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History UsefulNotes / HeresiesAndHeretics

16th Dec '15 10:04:23 PM h27kim
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** Having publicly mocked the Pope, alienating the Jesuits to boot with attacks on two of their astronomers, Galileo's actions resulted in the famous trial. While he eventually recanted his teachings, he was not tortured (he was only threatened); he was actually merely placed under house arrest, at a fine mansion in the countryside belonging to a friend... and given a manservant. Galileo was not explicitly declared a heretic, though he was found to be "''vehemently suspect''" of it; the testimony from his trial (Galileo was tried before an ordinary tribunal) was brought before a group of ten cardinals. Three of them refused to sign his verdict, but his works were eventually condemned.

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** Having publicly mocked the Pope, alienating the Jesuits to boot with attacks on two of their astronomers, Galileo's actions resulted in the famous trial. In course of the trial, Galileo stayed in fine quarters at the Apostolic Palace while his meals were prepared by the best chef in town. While he eventually recanted his teachings, he was not tortured (he was only threatened); he was actually merely placed under house arrest, at a fine mansion in the countryside belonging to a friend... and given a manservant. Galileo was not explicitly declared a heretic, though he was found to be "''vehemently suspect''" of it; the testimony from his trial (Galileo was tried before an ordinary tribunal) was brought before a group of ten cardinals. Three of them refused to sign his verdict, but his works were eventually condemned.
16th Dec '15 9:54:31 PM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to disavow the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to disavow renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 9:52:58 PM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce disavow the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 9:52:03 PM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full in communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full in communion with Rome, to use Catholic lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 9:09:30 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic--or, in full in communion with Rome, to use Catholic even lingo--even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 8:57:12 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. In other words, most bishops in mainland China today are formally appointed by the Chinese state, but are unofficially recognized by the Vatican. By the same token, the only overt persecution of Catholics in China today are directed at the bishops who openly recognize the Pope while disavowing the religious authority of the Chinese government. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 8:51:09 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. [[/note]]

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 8:46:08 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.[[note]]This makes the life of non-Chinese Catholics in China much easier--every sacrament at a Chinese Catholic church is accepted as valid by the Vatican. The only problems arise when bishops are consecrated at the order of the Chinese government without Vatican recognition, but even then, informal arrangements are usually made nowadays so that they are not truly schismatic except in rare cases. [[/note]]
16th Dec '15 8:35:49 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). The Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). The Some Catholics consider the Patriotic Catholic Church schismatic, but the Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.
16th Dec '15 8:31:30 AM h27kim
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*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government.). The Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.

to:

*** Someone who believes in Church doctrine but does not recognize the authority of the Pope is ''schismatic''. The clearest example of this is the Eastern Orthodox church, who agree with Rome on virtually every doctrinal point but disagree on whether Papal authority is legitimate. The status of the "Patriotic" Catholic Church in China is murkier. The communist government of the People's Republic has required Chinese Catholics to renounce the authority of the Pope even as they are allowed to practice their religion while subscribing to more or less the same doctrine as Catholics elsewhere (subject to change under demands by the Chinese government, e.g. on abortion and contraception--that's what the whole "Patriotic" business is about, being willing to bend the tenets of their religion to requirements of the government.government, regardless of what foreigners like the Pope have to say.). The Vatican refuses to acknowledge the renunciation and maintains that the Catholic Church in China remains fully Catholic even if under complicated political circumstances that make formal ties with Vatican difficult and dangerous.
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