History UsefulNotes / GermanPeculiarities

18th May '18 4:45:20 PM costanton11
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The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a [[HeatWave hard game at 40°C]] against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.

to:

The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard But trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], reserves, losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a [[HeatWave hard game at 40°C]] against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.



Most of the TV recording is unfortunately [[MissingEpisode lost]], including the whole soundtrack. Fortunately, the {{radio}} comment by Herbert Zimmermann has survived (and always was better known anyway, since few Germans had TV then). His [[LargeHam emotional reporting style]] stands out even today ("Deutschland im Endspiel der Fußballweltmeisterschaft das ist eine Riesen-Sensation das ist ein echtes Fußball-Wunder" - "Germany in the football finals - that's a huge sensation - that's a real football miracle"; "Gott sei Dank! Es steht nur noch 2:1." - "Thank {{God}}! It's only 2-1 now."; "Halten Sie mich für verrückt, halten Sie mich für übergeschnappt" - "Call me crazy, call me nuts"; ) and especially his comments when Germany scored the winning goal ("Aus dem Hintergrund müsste Rahn schießen, Rahn schießt - TOR, TOR, TOR!" - "Rahn has to shoot from the background, Rahn shoots - goal, goal, goal!"), when Turek saved one last time ("Turek, du bist ein Teufelskerl, Turek, du bist ein Fußballgott" - "Turek, you're a MagnificentBastard; Turek, you're a football god") and after the final whistle ("AUS! AUS! AUS! Das Spiel ist aus. Deutschland ist Weltmeister, schlägt Ungarn 3 zu 2!" - "Over! Over! Over! The game is over! Germany are World Champions, beat Hungary 32!") In 2003, a movie about the match was made in Germany, with the very same title: ''Das Wunder von Bern''.

to:

Most of the TV recording is unfortunately [[MissingEpisode lost]], including the whole soundtrack. Fortunately, the {{radio}} comment by Herbert Zimmermann has survived (and always was better known anyway, since few Germans had TV then). His [[LargeHam emotional reporting style]] stands out even today ("Deutschland im Endspiel der Fußballweltmeisterschaft das ist eine Riesen-Sensation das ist ein echtes Fußball-Wunder" - "Germany in the football finals - that's a huge sensation - that's a real football miracle"; "Gott sei Dank! Es steht nur noch 2:1." - "Thank {{God}}! It's only 2-1 now."; "Halten Sie mich für verrückt, halten Sie mich für übergeschnappt" - "Call me crazy, call me nuts"; ) and especially his comments when Germany scored the winning goal ("Aus dem Hintergrund müsste Rahn schießen, Rahn schießt - TOR, TOR, TOR!" - "Rahn has to shoot from the background, Rahn shoots - goal, goal, goal!"), when Turek saved one last time ("Turek, du bist ein Teufelskerl, Turek, du bist ein Fußballgott" - "Turek, you're a MagnificentBastard; Magnificent Bastard; Turek, you're a football god") and after the final whistle ("AUS! AUS! AUS! Das Spiel ist aus. Deutschland ist Weltmeister, schlägt Ungarn 3 zu 2!" - "Over! Over! Over! The game is over! Germany are World Champions, beat Hungary 32!") In 2003, a movie about the match was made in Germany, with the very same title: ''Das Wunder von Bern''.
8th Mar '18 9:49:14 PM nombretomado
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In 1887, the UnitedKingdom passed the ''Merchandise Marks Act 1887'', which states that imported products must be labeled with their country of origin. The purpose was of course for British consumers to be able to distinguish British-made products from the "inferior" stuff produced on the continent, and buy accordingly patriotic, for the benefit of Britain's own economy, because originally, British factories did put out the best stuff and the German ones were pumping out cheap crap (they had a reputation rather like China today). [[HoistByHisOwnPetard This backfired]], though, as German products were getting steadily better, and by 1900, said consumers began to associate the label ''Made in Germany'' with ''good'' quality. It helped too that "Made in Germany" had always been a selling point for a particular class of product--artificial dyes and pigments, which although a British invention (the first synthetic colour was mauveine, extracted from coal tar by William Henry Perkin in 1856) were perfected by the Germans.

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In 1887, the UnitedKingdom UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom passed the ''Merchandise Marks Act 1887'', which states that imported products must be labeled with their country of origin. The purpose was of course for British consumers to be able to distinguish British-made products from the "inferior" stuff produced on the continent, and buy accordingly patriotic, for the benefit of Britain's own economy, because originally, British factories did put out the best stuff and the German ones were pumping out cheap crap (they had a reputation rather like China today). [[HoistByHisOwnPetard This backfired]], though, as German products were getting steadily better, and by 1900, said consumers began to associate the label ''Made in Germany'' with ''good'' quality. It helped too that "Made in Germany" had always been a selling point for a particular class of product--artificial dyes and pigments, which although a British invention (the first synthetic colour was mauveine, extracted from coal tar by William Henry Perkin in 1856) were perfected by the Germans.
23rd Feb '18 2:50:30 AM DeepRed
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The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a hard game at 40°C against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.

to:

The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a [[HeatWave hard game at 40°C 40°C]] against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.
21st Dec '17 2:48:39 AM Quanyails
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Germany was held responsible for UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in the Treaty of Versailles, which fueled nationalist feelings, but after [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]] started and lost another World War, nationalism lost a lot of its appeal and became a touchy subject. Which of course did not happen overnight, as it would take years for the full extent of German war crimes, the Holocaust etc. to become public knowledge and for people to face up to what had happened. In West Germany you might say that even though people became more reticent about using national symbols in private, the negative side of nationalism was not completely dead as some prominent people who had fled from the Nazis or contributed to the victory over them, like Marlene Dietrich and Willy Brandt, were still attacked as "disloyal" or "traitors" from some quarters as late as the 1960s. Another part of the West German public took it to the other extreme and tried to create a "post-national" German and European identity. Which some people have seen as typically German: swinging from being among the leading nationalists in Europe to the leading internationalists. To what extent it worked is debatable (countries outside of Germany certainly were not eager to pick up such ideas). In any case, expect that GodwinsLaw may - no, will - be involved in discussions about German patriotism/nationalism, but also don't be surprised about other people bemoaning that in their view Germans are being insufficiently patriotic and suffering from a national inferiority complex to the point of German flags being almost entirely owned by state buildings and german citizens ignoring flag code by throwing away their flags after sport events.

to:

Germany was held responsible for UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in the Treaty of Versailles, which fueled nationalist feelings, but after [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]] started and lost another World War, nationalism lost a lot of its appeal and became a touchy subject. Which of course did not happen overnight, as it would take years for the full extent of German war crimes, the Holocaust etc. to become public knowledge and for people to face up to what had happened. In West Germany you might say that even though people became more reticent about using national symbols in private, the negative side of nationalism was not completely dead as some prominent people who had fled from the Nazis or contributed to the victory over them, like Marlene Dietrich and Willy Brandt, were still attacked as "disloyal" or "traitors" from some quarters as late as the 1960s. Another part of the West German public took it to the other extreme and tried to create a "post-national" German and European identity. Which some people have seen as typically German: swinging from being among the leading nationalists in Europe to the leading internationalists. To what extent it worked is debatable (countries outside of Germany certainly were not eager to pick up such ideas). In any case, expect that GodwinsLaw may - no, will - be involved in discussions about German patriotism/nationalism, but also don't be surprised about other people bemoaning that in their view Germans are being insufficiently patriotic and suffering from a national inferiority complex to the point of German flags being almost entirely owned by state buildings and german German citizens ignoring flag code by throwing away their flags after sport events.



[[OverusedRunningGag Believe it or not, Germany has more than 16,000 Döner shops, which might be some kind of record.]] Donner or shawarma or gyros in other countries was invented in its modern form (thinly sliced, spit-roasted meat and veggies with sauce and spices in one or the other kind of bread) in Berlin by Turkish immigrants, and quickly conquered the German fast food landscape. Today it keeps its dominating position, having a higher sales volume than all UsefulNotes/McDonalds in Germany (which takes second place), and Döner shops even in many villages. Germans in other countries cite Döner as one of the things they miss the most [[note]]along with, and often surpassed by, beer, bread, cheeses, fish dishes and sausages[[/note]]. A few Döner shops exist in places such as the UK, Japan or the US, usually led by turkish-german immigrants.

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[[OverusedRunningGag Believe it or not, Germany has more than 16,000 Döner shops, which might be some kind of record.]] Donner or shawarma or gyros in other countries was invented in its modern form (thinly sliced, spit-roasted meat and veggies with sauce and spices in one or the other kind of bread) in Berlin by Turkish immigrants, and quickly conquered the German fast food landscape. Today it keeps its dominating position, having a higher sales volume than all UsefulNotes/McDonalds in Germany (which takes second place), and Döner shops even in many villages. Germans in other countries cite Döner as one of the things they miss the most [[note]]along with, and often surpassed by, beer, bread, cheeses, fish dishes and sausages[[/note]]. A few Döner shops exist in places such as the UK, Japan or the US, usually led by turkish-german Turkish-German immigrants.



Now, Ikea is of course a Swedish furniture shop, so what could it possibly do on a page about Germany? Well, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Germans ''love'' IKEA]]. It is one of the countries with the most IKEA shops (as of October 2016 there are 51 stores and five more planned until 2019, in comparison: the entire US has 44) and the highest revenue (15% of IKEA's total turnover comes from Germany). The IKEA restaurant is in the Top 5 fastfood restaurants of Germany, Germany created a ''law'' called IKEA-Klausel [[note]]which allows the use of warranty when the client damaged his furniture by building it wrong ''if'' the building description is faulty itself[[/note]], a museum in Hamburg showed an exhibition about IKEA furniture and research about the "IKEA effect" [[note]]which describes that a person cares more about an object if they build it themselves[[/note]] is currently done on german citizens. It also seems like products sold in Germany are higher quality than those sold in America. While America IKEA seems to be almost-scrap wood from the moment it leaves the package, the legions of BILLY shelves making up the basis for storage of things in cellars or in attics for long amounts of time can attest themselves. The relationship between Germany and IKEA could, however, be compared to the relationship between the world and Microsoft - in both cases, many people use the company's products, but many of the people who use the company's products complain about them a lot.

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Now, Ikea is of course a Swedish furniture shop, so what could it possibly do on a page about Germany? Well, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Germans ''love'' IKEA]]. It is one of the countries with the most IKEA shops (as of October 2016 there are 51 stores and five more planned until 2019, in comparison: the entire US has 44) and the highest revenue (15% of IKEA's total turnover comes from Germany). The IKEA restaurant is in the Top 5 fastfood restaurants of Germany, Germany created a ''law'' called IKEA-Klausel [[note]]which allows the use of warranty when the client damaged his furniture by building it wrong ''if'' the building description is faulty itself[[/note]], a museum in Hamburg showed an exhibition about IKEA furniture and research about the "IKEA effect" [[note]]which describes that a person cares more about an object if they build it themselves[[/note]] is currently done on german German citizens. It also seems like products sold in Germany are higher quality than those sold in America. While America IKEA seems to be almost-scrap wood from the moment it leaves the package, the legions of BILLY shelves making up the basis for storage of things in cellars or in attics for long amounts of time can attest themselves. The relationship between Germany and IKEA could, however, be compared to the relationship between the world and Microsoft - in both cases, many people use the company's products, but many of the people who use the company's products complain about them a lot.
12th Dec '17 4:04:51 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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Added DiffLines:

However, it has been gaining traction again in certain populist sectors of the German political discourse in the wake of the EU's troubles, the European migrant crisis of 2015 and the general gradual shift towards right-wing sentiments in continental Europe ([[{{RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement}} which we will refrain from commenting upon, let alone taking sides, here]]), as a symbol for the German nation's alleged lethargy in the face of the (alleged?) problems at hand. As a companion word, the term ''Schlafschaf'' (meaning "sleeping sheep", roughly equivalent in meaning and derisive character to the US alt-right's ''sheeple'') has become wildly popular among members of the right-wing ''Alternative für Deutschland'' party as well as among grassroots Euro-alt-right movements like Pegida.
24th Nov '17 6:46:00 AM MarqFJA
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Meanwhile in East Germany the government encouraged patriotism on its terms, and facilitated it by treating the Nazis as something alien to the Victorious German Working Class. This led to the odd situation that the uniforms of the East German armed forces resembled those of the Nazi Wehrmacht more than those of the West German ones. For a long time East Germany defined itself was the "better Germany" and still paid lip service to the stated goal of reunification. It was only some time after the building of the Wall that the government tried to foster a GDR identity completely separate from the rest of Germany, but as the events of 1989-1990 showed, that did not quite work. Since 1989 attitudes have relaxed somewhat. It helped that many people abroad actually turned out to be happy for the reunited Germans, and that the 2006 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]] in Germany showed that even German association football fans could be happy for their team and proud of their nation while still being welcoming hosts for the international teams and their fans. However, things started taking a turn towards the other direction again with the rise of a right wing populist party in the mid 2010s and ''Pegida'' demonstrations that are chock full of black red yellow flags (albeit some of them in a weird "Scandinavian cross" design that was invented by the 1944 coup attempt against Hitler and is now popular with the political right, just like black white red flags were in the past). In general, a German waving around a flag unrelated to a sports event is almost universally presumed to be politically on the right.

to:

Meanwhile in East Germany the government encouraged patriotism on its terms, and facilitated it by treating the Nazis as something alien to the Victorious German Working Class. This led to the odd situation that the uniforms of the East German armed forces resembled those of the Nazi Wehrmacht more than those of the West German ones. For a long time East Germany defined itself was as the "better Germany" and still paid lip service to the stated goal of reunification. It was only some time after the building of the Wall that the government tried to foster a GDR identity completely separate from the rest of Germany, but as the events of 1989-1990 showed, that did not quite work. Since 1989 attitudes have relaxed somewhat. It helped that many people abroad actually turned out to be happy for the reunited Germans, and that the 2006 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]] in Germany showed that even German association football fans could be happy for their team and proud of their nation while still being welcoming hosts for the international teams and their fans. However, things started taking a turn towards the other direction again with the rise of a right wing populist party in the mid 2010s and ''Pegida'' demonstrations that are chock full of black red yellow flags (albeit some of them in a weird "Scandinavian cross" design that was invented by the 1944 coup attempt against Hitler and is now popular with the political right, just like black white red flags were in the past). In general, a German waving around a flag unrelated to a sports event is almost universally presumed to be politically on the right.
24th Nov '17 6:44:35 AM MarqFJA
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Germany was held responsible for UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in the Treaty of Versailles, which fueled nationalist feelings, but after [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]] started and lost another World War, nationalism lost a lot of its appeal and became a touchy subject. Which of course did not happen overnight, as it would take years for the full extent of German war crimes, the Holocaust etc. to become public knowledge and for people to face up to what had happened. In West Germany you might say that even though people became more reticent about using national symbols in private, the negative side of nationalism was not completely dead as some prominent people who had fled from the Nazis or contributed to the victory over them, like Marlene Dietrich and Willy Brandt, were still attacked as "disloyal" or "traitors" from some quarters as late as the 1960s. Another part of the West German public took it to the other extreme and tried to create a "post-national" German and European identity. Which some people have seen as typically German: swinging from being among the leading nationalists in Europe to the leading internationalists. To what extent it worked is debatable (countries outside of Germany certainly were not eager to pick up such ideas). In any case, expect that GodwinsLaw may - no, will - be involved in discussions about German patriotism/nationalism, but also don't be surprised about other people bemoaning that in their view Germans are being insufficiently patriotic and suffering from a national inferiority complex to the point of german flags being almost entirely owned by state buildings and german citizens ignoring flag code by throwing away their flags after sport events.

to:

Germany was held responsible for UsefulNotes/WorldWarI in the Treaty of Versailles, which fueled nationalist feelings, but after [[ThoseWackyNazis the Nazis]] started and lost another World War, nationalism lost a lot of its appeal and became a touchy subject. Which of course did not happen overnight, as it would take years for the full extent of German war crimes, the Holocaust etc. to become public knowledge and for people to face up to what had happened. In West Germany you might say that even though people became more reticent about using national symbols in private, the negative side of nationalism was not completely dead as some prominent people who had fled from the Nazis or contributed to the victory over them, like Marlene Dietrich and Willy Brandt, were still attacked as "disloyal" or "traitors" from some quarters as late as the 1960s. Another part of the West German public took it to the other extreme and tried to create a "post-national" German and European identity. Which some people have seen as typically German: swinging from being among the leading nationalists in Europe to the leading internationalists. To what extent it worked is debatable (countries outside of Germany certainly were not eager to pick up such ideas). In any case, expect that GodwinsLaw may - no, will - be involved in discussions about German patriotism/nationalism, but also don't be surprised about other people bemoaning that in their view Germans are being insufficiently patriotic and suffering from a national inferiority complex to the point of german German flags being almost entirely owned by state buildings and german citizens ignoring flag code by throwing away their flags after sport events.
22nd Nov '17 7:19:48 PM nombretomado
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The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a hard game at 40°C against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.

to:

The most favorite sports in Germany are: [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup football]], [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty football]][[note]]what Americans call "soccer" incidentally, American "gridiron" football has a minor following in Germany thanks in no small part to osmosis from US troops stationed there during [[HistoryOfTheColdWar [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar the Cold War]]. Germany also hosts [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative the best American Football league in Europe]] and has won the European championship - yes such a thing exists - three times, 2001, 2010 and 2014 and will host the upcoming 2018 edition[[/note]], tennis (preferably with Boris Becker and Steffi Graf), car racing (preferably with Michael Schumacher) and boxing (preferably with Henry Maske, or the Klitchko brothers) Handball, ice-hockey and basketball are somewhere down the line and only really ''en vogue'' when Germans are good at it. This love goes back to (at least) the 1954 FIFA World Cup, first time when Germany won UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup. Which, probably, no one expected, for good reasons: The [[GermanicEfficiency German]] football team had to play Hungary's Golden Team (which hadn't lost a game in 4 years!) in the group stage. But [[MagnificentBastard trainer Sepp Herberger decided to play Hungary with his reserves]], losing 8-3. However, this just meant that Germany had to play another game against Turkey (which they had defeated easily just before), but then got to the easier side in the knockout stage, defeating Yugoslavia and Austria (who had suffered from a hard game at 40°C against Switzerland) before the finals, a rematch with Hungary (who had to [[UnnecessaryRoughness literally fight]] Brazil and later confront reigning champions Uruguay). The match was played in heavy rain, which the Germans had christened "Fritz Walter-weather", as their team captain was known for playing his best football under those conditions. In addition, the Germans were equipped with footwear supplied by Adidas, which had produced a hitherto unheard of design of boot with exchangeable, screw-in studs that could be adapted to any weather. This enabled the German players to wear their regular boots despite the adverse weather.
16th Nov '17 11:40:37 AM AHI-3000
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[[NationsAsPeople The US have Uncle Sam, France has Marianne, Germany has (aside from the female Germania) Michel]]: A guy who's for some reason always wearing a night cap. The origin is not completely clear; some people claim it had to do with the archangel Michael (patron saint of Germany), but that's not proven. Be that as it may, as the cap hints at, this Michel guy is generally seen as pretty relaxed, laid-back, a BigEater and drinker, and especially, someone who likes to sleep[[note]]This latter trait was in the 19th century portrayed as a metaphor for the Germans' apparent docility towards their multitude of kings and princelings[[/note]]. ''Gemütlich'', as we say. And admittedly, very far from [[NationalStereotypingTropes German stereotypes]] (except maybe {{Oktoberfest}}) like the ruthlessly efficient UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}, let alone ThoseWackyNazis[[note]]Although one of ''their'' slogans was "Germany, awaken!"[[/note]]. Sometimes still used in caricatures, as stand-in for the German people, if nowhere else.

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[[NationsAsPeople The US have Uncle Sam, France has Marianne, Germany has (aside from the female Germania) Michel]]: A guy who's for some reason always wearing a night cap. The origin is not completely clear; some people claim it had to do with the archangel Michael (patron saint of Germany), but that's not proven. Be that as it may, as the cap hints at, this Michel guy is generally seen as pretty relaxed, laid-back, a BigEater and drinker, and especially, someone who likes to sleep[[note]]This latter trait was in the 19th century portrayed as a metaphor for the Germans' apparent docility towards their multitude of kings and princelings[[/note]]. ''Gemütlich'', as we say. And admittedly, very far from [[NationalStereotypingTropes [[NationalStereotypes German stereotypes]] (except maybe {{Oktoberfest}}) like the ruthlessly efficient UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}, let alone ThoseWackyNazis[[note]]Although one of ''their'' slogans was "Germany, awaken!"[[/note]]. Sometimes still used in caricatures, as stand-in for the German people, if nowhere else.
2nd Aug '17 10:04:30 AM Jhonny
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!!!Complaining

As you may have guessed by now, Germans ''love'' complaining, which has - naturally - resulted in Meta-complaining with many Germans annoyed about Germans who complain about Germans always complaining. If you bring up GermanicEfficiency in the company of Germans, they will most likely point out a dozen or so examples how you are wrong, the GloryDays are long past and Germany is basically a slightly less financially destitute third world country on the brink of collapse.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.GermanPeculiarities