History UsefulNotes / GermanEducationSystem

3rd Sep '16 7:46:23 AM Morgenthaler
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The first German universities in the HolyRomanEmpire were those of Prague and Vienna. The first ones within Germany's present borders however were Erfurt (1379) and Heidelberg (1385). Now most bigger cities have at least one, along with Fachhochschulen (lit. "subject highschools" but much closer to a college) which describe themselves as "Universities of Applied Sciences". In practice, a Fachhochschule is a place where pure theoretical learning takes a backseat and the focus is split evenly between classical learning from a teacher in a heavily practice-oriented style in a classroom or similar, and school-supported apprenticeships in the industry to gain real experience. Most Fachhochschulen offer a wide range of subjects, including medical science, engineering, programming, multimedia, tourism or even things like theology or Assyrian philology.

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The first German universities in the HolyRomanEmpire UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire were those of Prague and Vienna. The first ones within Germany's present borders however were Erfurt (1379) and Heidelberg (1385). Now most bigger cities have at least one, along with Fachhochschulen (lit. "subject highschools" but much closer to a college) which describe themselves as "Universities of Applied Sciences". In practice, a Fachhochschule is a place where pure theoretical learning takes a backseat and the focus is split evenly between classical learning from a teacher in a heavily practice-oriented style in a classroom or similar, and school-supported apprenticeships in the industry to gain real experience. Most Fachhochschulen offer a wide range of subjects, including medical science, engineering, programming, multimedia, tourism or even things like theology or Assyrian philology.
9th Jul '16 7:09:08 AM TheKaizerreich
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The first German universities in the HolyRomanEmpire were those of Prague and Vienna. The first ones within Germany's present borders however were Erfurt (1379) and Heidelberg (1385). Now most bigger cities have at least one, along with Fachhochschulen (which have recently begun to style themselves "Universities of Applied Sciences"), and most offer a wide range of subjects from medical science to theology to Assyrian philology.

to:

The first German universities in the HolyRomanEmpire were those of Prague and Vienna. The first ones within Germany's present borders however were Erfurt (1379) and Heidelberg (1385). Now most bigger cities have at least one, along with Fachhochschulen (which have recently begun (lit. "subject highschools" but much closer to style a college) which describe themselves as "Universities of Applied Sciences"), Sciences". In practice, a Fachhochschule is a place where pure theoretical learning takes a backseat and most the focus is split evenly between classical learning from a teacher in a heavily practice-oriented style in a classroom or similar, and school-supported apprenticeships in the industry to gain real experience. Most Fachhochschulen offer a wide range of subjects from subjects, including medical science to science, engineering, programming, multimedia, tourism or even things like theology to or Assyrian philology.



Another hotly debated university-related issue in recent years, apart from the bachelor/master stuff, has been the introduction of tuition payments which also didn't exist before. Each German state deals with this in its own way. Now most states who originally adopted the tuition fees are stopping them again. All of this is still in a bit of flux.


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Another hotly debated university-related issue in recent years, apart from the bachelor/master stuff, has been the introduction of tuition payments which also didn't exist before. Each German state deals with this in its own way.way, and some states never introduced them, while some others ask for a (comparatively) small payment at the beginning of a semester. Yet other states introduced fairly high monthly payments. Now most states who originally adopted the tuition fees are stopping them again. All of this is still in a bit of flux.

1st Aug '13 3:03:07 AM SeptimusHeap
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There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion. However, others are a little iffy about putting children into uniforms [[hottip:*:And we'll leave it there, thank-you-very-much.]]

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There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion. However, others are a little iffy about putting children into uniforms [[hottip:*:And [[note]]And we'll leave it there, thank-you-very-much.]]
[[/note]]



Even though there're so few private schools around, in fiction they're over-represented. There are some series of kids' books set in boarding schools, like ''Burg Schreckenstein'' (set on a castle - now that's a pretty cool school...), ''Literature/{{TKKG}}'', and the classic book ''Das fliegende Klassenzimmer'' (''The Flying Classroom'') by Erich Kästner.[[hottip:*:Actually, the school shown here is a Gymnasium with dormitories etc. of its own. The story is set at a time when only bigger towns had a Gymnasium and/or Lyzeum and boarding was the usual way for children from small towns, villages or the landed gentry to attend such schools.]] Serious literature also has some examples, like ''Young Törless'' or the recent OneHitWonder ''Crazy''.

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Even though there're so few private schools around, in fiction they're over-represented. There are some series of kids' books set in boarding schools, like ''Burg Schreckenstein'' (set on a castle - now that's a pretty cool school...), ''Literature/{{TKKG}}'', and the classic book ''Das fliegende Klassenzimmer'' (''The Flying Classroom'') by Erich Kästner.[[hottip:*:Actually, [[note]]Actually, the school shown here is a Gymnasium with dormitories etc. of its own. The story is set at a time when only bigger towns had a Gymnasium and/or Lyzeum and boarding was the usual way for children from small towns, villages or the landed gentry to attend such schools.]] [[/note]] Serious literature also has some examples, like ''Young Törless'' or the recent OneHitWonder ''Crazy''.
10th Jun '13 10:26:03 AM SantosLHalper
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German youths occasionally find tests too hard, too. One possible solution: Prepare a piece of paper, the ''Spickzettel'' in German, write the important stuff in very small letters on it, and use it during the test [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught without being caught by the teacher]]. The attitude of people to this seems to be somewhat different than in English-speaking countries: It's forbidden of course, and you'll fail the test if caught as you might expect, but other students who know about it won't tell you off. English doesn't even have a word for this [[hottip:* : Actually, we do. It's called "cribbing", and those are cribs or crib sheets, in Japan they're "cunning paper" (this is pretty universal).]] and "cheating" definitely sounds harsher.

to:

German youths occasionally find tests too hard, too. One possible solution: Prepare a piece of paper, the ''Spickzettel'' in German, write the important stuff in very small letters on it, and use it during the test [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught without being caught by the teacher]]. The attitude of people to this seems to be somewhat different than in English-speaking countries: It's forbidden of course, and you'll fail the test if caught as you might expect, but other students who know about it won't tell you off. The English doesn't even have equivalent is a word for this [[hottip:* : Actually, we do. It's called "cribbing", and those are cribs or crib sheets, in Japan they're "cunning paper" (this is pretty universal).]] and "cheating" definitely sounds harsher.
sheet.
19th Oct '12 4:20:07 PM nlpnt
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Not everyone liked the three-parted school system. Critics stated that this system was too classist and [[AmbitionIsEvil may encourage elitism]]. So, starting in TheSixties (but it only really took off in TheSeventies), politicians of the Social Democrats and Liberals created a new school, the ''Gesamtschule'' (roughly: comprehensive school) - one school after ''Grundschule'', for all kids, from all classes and backgrounds. Other than in Britain however, the new school didn't replace all other school types, but instead co-exists with them. Thus, parents who didn't like this new-fangled concept, still sent their kids to the schools they knew. And inside the new schools, kids were divided into courses or classes which would teach at the level of Hauptschule, Realschule or Gymnasium respectively - the old divisions lived on. And of course, different ''Länder'' (with governments from different parties) implemented the new schools differently - leftist Berlin has many ''Gesamtschulen'', conservative Bavaria almost none. Critics pointed out that the students from new schools would score lower in tests.

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Not everyone liked the three-parted school system. Critics stated that this system was too classist and [[AmbitionIsEvil may encourage elitism]]. (Also, in a country famed for engineering, it might be a plus if it were possible to teach both calculus/trigonometry and sheetmetal fabrication/welding in the same building so one kid can learn both.) So, starting in TheSixties (but it only really took off in TheSeventies), politicians of the Social Democrats and Liberals created a new school, the ''Gesamtschule'' (roughly: comprehensive school) - one school after ''Grundschule'', for all kids, from all classes and backgrounds. Other than in Britain however, the new school didn't replace all other school types, but instead co-exists with them. Thus, parents who didn't like this new-fangled concept, still sent their kids to the schools they knew. And inside the new schools, kids were divided into courses or classes which would teach at the level of Hauptschule, Realschule or Gymnasium respectively - the old divisions lived on. And of course, different ''Länder'' (with governments from different parties) implemented the new schools differently - leftist Berlin has many ''Gesamtschulen'', conservative Bavaria almost none. Critics pointed out that the students from new schools would score lower in tests.
14th May '12 1:54:30 AM Nithael
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At the beginning, things are relatively easy: All six year-old kids (well, almost all) start at the ''Grundschule'' (lit. "basic school"; primary / elementary school), which is four years long (except in some states, where it's six years - thanks to [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland the German federalism]]). Towards the end of it, kids are tested for which type of secondary school they're fit. (This is a [[UnderStatement ''very'' controversial topic]].) Because yes, there isn't just one type of secondary school in Germany. That'd be too simple.

to:

At the beginning, things are relatively easy: All six year-old kids (well, almost all) start at the ''Grundschule'' (lit. "basic school"; primary / elementary school), which is four years long (except in some states, where it's six years - thanks to [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland the German federalism]]). Towards the end of it, kids are tested for which type of secondary school they're fit. (This is a [[UnderStatement ''very'' controversial topic]].topic.) Because yes, there isn't just one type of secondary school in Germany. That'd be too simple.
17th Apr '12 3:13:03 AM EpitomeORandom
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Added DiffLines:

17th Apr '12 3:12:49 AM EpitomeORandom
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There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion. However, others are a little iffy about putting children into uniforms hottip*And we'll leave it there, thank-you-very-much.*

to:

There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion. However, others are a little iffy about putting children into uniforms hottip*And [[hottip:*:And we'll leave it there, thank-you-very-much.*
]]
17th Apr '12 3:09:52 AM EpitomeORandom
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There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion.

to:

There are no school uniforms, although some people are toying with the thought since in recent years, more kids have been bullied because they can't afford the latest brand fashion.
fashion. However, others are a little iffy about putting children into uniforms hottip*And we'll leave it there, thank-you-very-much.*
9th Feb '12 7:32:51 AM DanglyLeggedOwl
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School in Germany starts when kids are six years old. Germany has compulsory education - thus, no chance for homeschooling. Theoretically, the police may even force kids to go to school. (It actually has happened, albeit in few cases, with kids of members of radical sects who objected to sexual education in schools.)

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School in Germany starts when kids are six years old. Germany has compulsory education - thus, thus there's no chance for homeschooling. Theoretically, the police may even force kids to go to school. (It actually has happened, albeit in few cases, with kids of members of radical sects who objected to sexual education in schools.)



One important thing: Unlike most countries in the world, school in Germany only happens on half of the day, pre-noon - at least until the students reach seventh grade; after that, school usually finishes around four in the afternoon. In order to cram all the necessary lessons into these few hours, school also starts earlier (around 8 o'clock, mostly, though students in higher classes may also start school at 7 AM on some days). ''Ganztagsschulen'' (all-day schools) are demanded by some people, but are still a minority. Thus, school lunch / dinner is a thing mostly unknown in Germany and German students generally don't have the same level of attachment to their school that Japanese students (for example) have.

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One important thing: Unlike most countries in the world, school in Germany only happens on half of the day, pre-noon - at least until the students reach seventh the 7th grade; after that, from then on, school usually finishes around four in the afternoon. In order to cram all the necessary lessons into these few hours, school also starts earlier (around 8 o'clock, mostly, though students in higher classes may also start school at 7 AM a.m. on some days). ''Ganztagsschulen'' (all-day schools) are demanded by some people, but are still a minority. Thus, school lunch / dinner is a thing mostly unknown in Germany and German students generally don't have the same level of attachment to their school that Japanese students (for example) have.



Precursors to the kindergarten have been around since the late 18th century, but it became a pressing issue during industrialization, when many mothers had a) to work all day and b) no other relatives who could care for the kids. The word kindergarten (a garden for kids) was coined in 1840 by a Friedrich Fröbel, who also founded the first kindergarten. In 1851, the Prussian government forbade it, fearing atheistic tendencies. This didn't stay for long though, and from then on, the number of kindergartens started to grow continually - under all governments, whether monarchist, democrat (left or right), national socialist or communist.

Other countries (in fact, most developed countries) copied the concept, with some variations (most important, the age of the kids: In Germany, kids usually start going to the kindergarten at the age of three).

to:

Precursors to the kindergarten have been around since the late 18th century, but it became a pressing issue during industrialization, when many mothers had a) to work all day and b) no other relatives who could care for the kids. The word kindergarten (a garden for kids) was coined in 1840 by a Friedrich Fröbel, who also founded the first kindergarten. In 1851, the Prussian government forbade banned it, fearing atheistic tendencies. This The ban didn't stay for long though, and from then on, the number of kindergartens started to grow continually - under all governments, whether monarchist, democrat (left or right), national socialist or communist.

Other countries (in fact, most developed countries) copied the concept, with some variations (most important, importantly, the age of the kids: In Germany, kids usually start going to the kindergarten at the age of three).



At the beginning, things are relatively easy: All six year-old kids (well, almost all) start at the ''Grundschule'' (lit. "basic school"; primary / elementary school), which is four years long (except in some states, where it's six years - thanks to [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland the German federalism]]). Towards the end of it, kids are tested for which type of secondary school they're fit. (This is a [[UnderStatement very controversial topic]].) Because yes, there isn't just one type of secondary school in Germany. That'd be too simple.

to:

At the beginning, things are relatively easy: All six year-old kids (well, almost all) start at the ''Grundschule'' (lit. "basic school"; primary / elementary school), which is four years long (except in some states, where it's six years - thanks to [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland the German federalism]]). Towards the end of it, kids are tested for which type of secondary school they're fit. (This is a [[UnderStatement very ''very'' controversial topic]].) Because yes, there isn't just one type of secondary school in Germany. That'd be too simple.



After finishing high school, you generally have two options when choosing how to continue. You may embark on an apprenticeship ("Ausbildung") or you may attend a university.

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After finishing high school, you generally have two options when choosing how to continue. You may embark on an apprenticeship ("Ausbildung") or you may attend a university.
university (for which you need the Abitur).



First of all: In Germany there is no distinction between colleges and universities, and there used to be no distiction between undergraduate and graduate either. The degrees you could get were a Diplom (diploma), a Magister ("master" in Latin), or a Staatsexamen (state exam). Some university still retain these today, but most have changed toward bachelor and master degrees in an attempt to improve their graduates' chances in the international market. This has been a hotly debated issue for the past few years.

to:

First of all: In Germany there is no distinction between colleges and universities, and there used to be no distiction between undergraduate undergraduates and graduate graduates either. The degrees you could get were a Diplom (diploma), a Magister ("master" in Latin), or a Staatsexamen (state exam). Some university still retain these today, but most have changed toward bachelor and master degrees in an attempt to improve their graduates' chances in the international market. This has been a hotly debated issue for the past few years.



Also note that to obtain a Doctor's degree (PhD) you need to have a master's degree (or a Diplom, Magister, or Staatsexamen) first and have to publish a book-size doctoral thesis which has to contribute to the sum of human knowledge. In addition, in Germany there's no such thing as an MD - a physician who hasn't written a doctoral thesis may technically not call himself a doctor.

Another hotly debated university-related issue in recent years, apart from the bachelor/master stuff, has been the introduction of tuition payments which also didn't exist before. Each German state deals with this stuff in its own way. Now most states who originally adopted it are stopping it again. All this is still a bit in flux.


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Also note that to obtain a Doctor's degree (PhD) ([=PhD=]) you need to have a master's degree (or a Diplom, Magister, or Staatsexamen) first and have to publish a book-size [[DoorStopper book-size]] doctoral thesis which has to contribute to the sum of human knowledge. In addition, in Germany there's no such thing as an MD - a any physician who hasn't written a doctoral thesis may technically not call himself themselves a doctor.

Another hotly debated university-related issue in recent years, apart from the bachelor/master stuff, has been the introduction of tuition payments which also didn't exist before. Each German state deals with this stuff in its own way. Now most states who originally adopted it the tuition fees are stopping it them again. All of this is still in a bit in of flux.

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