History UsefulNotes / Funerals

24th Jan '16 8:43:23 AM pittsburghmuggle
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Added DiffLines:

If you're interested in finding the graves of people in RealLife, check out the website Website/FindAGrave.
2nd Apr '15 3:19:16 AM DarkSoldier
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A Jewish burial is similar to its Christian counterpart. Jewish teachings state that one of the greatest ''mitzvah'' a person can perform for another is to bury their corpse, as it is the one act that cannot be repaid. Therefore, the attending mourners will all place at least two shovelfuls of dirt into the grave, the first with the back side of the shovel, and then plant the shovel into the exhumed dirt for another to take. The rending of garments is traditional, but it may be replaced with a symbolically-torn black ribbon worn by the immediate family.

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''Kevura'' (burial) is to take place as soon as possible after death according to the Torah, even for executed criminals. It can be delayed to allow distant relatives to travel, but is rarely postponed beyond seventy-two hours. A Jewish ''chevra kadisha'' (burial society) will prepare the deceased for burial in a process called ''taharah'': the body is similar washed, symbolically purified, dried, dressed, wrapped in a prayer shawl with a fringe removed, and placed in an unembellished casket (unless the deceased is a civilian who lived in Israel, whose body shall be placed into the grave without a casket). From then until burial, watchers will sit with the casket and recite prayers.

When the pallbearers bring the casket
to its Christian counterpart.the grave, they stop seven times for the rabbi to recite Psalm 91. Jewish teachings state that one of the greatest ''mitzvah'' a person can perform for another is to bury their corpse, as it is the one act that cannot be repaid. Therefore, the attending mourners will all place at least two three shovelfuls of dirt into the grave, the first with the back side of the shovel, and then plant the shovel into the exhumed dirt for another to take. take.

Following burial is the shiva (from the Hebrew ''shiv'ah'' lit. "seven"), wherein first-degree family members spend seven days mourning the deceased, but shiva will end prematurely for the first day of a holiday, even if that holiday begins the night of the burial. During shiva, the mourners will not perform many activities, including the conducting of business (unless one is, for example, a medical professional or holder of public office). Prayer services will be conducted in the facility where shiva is held (traditionally the family home).
The rending of garments worn over the heart (''keriah'') is traditional, but it Conservative and Reform Jews may be replaced with substitute a symbolically-torn black ribbon worn by the immediate family.ribbon.
30th Mar '15 7:07:46 PM DarkSoldier
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* The setting aside of cemetaries and locations for dealing with funerals. Mixing this with the affairs of the living means bringing in unchancy and unearthly elements to ordinary life.

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* The setting aside of cemetaries cemeteries and locations for dealing with funerals. Mixing this with the affairs of the living means bringing in unchancy and unearthly elements to ordinary life.



In Soviet Russia and certain other countries of the Soviet bloc, special burial rites were created to replace those of the displaced religions. The most common was cremation; the Communists stimulated its use due to the fact that it's un-Christian, to express disbelief in the "priests' myths". An upgraded version of cremation was burying the urn in some special place of honor, like the Kremlin Wall Necropolis in the USSR. It was reserved for important dignitaries. Finally, the most glorious leaders were interred in mausoleums, after undergoing a special mummification process that preserved their life-like appearance.

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In Soviet Russia and certain other countries of the Soviet bloc, special burial rites were created to replace those of the displaced religions. The most common was cremation; the Communists stimulated its use due to the fact that it's un-Christian, to express disbelief in the "priests' myths". An upgraded version of cremation was burying the urn in some special place of honor, like the Kremlin Wall Necropolis in the USSR. It was reserved for important dignitaries. Finally, the most glorious leaders were interred in mausoleums, after undergoing a special mummification process that preserved their life-like appearance.appearance.

!!Judaism
A Jewish burial is similar to its Christian counterpart. Jewish teachings state that one of the greatest ''mitzvah'' a person can perform for another is to bury their corpse, as it is the one act that cannot be repaid. Therefore, the attending mourners will all place at least two shovelfuls of dirt into the grave, the first with the back side of the shovel, and then plant the shovel into the exhumed dirt for another to take. The rending of garments is traditional, but it may be replaced with a symbolically-torn black ribbon worn by the immediate family.
4th Oct '14 9:27:51 AM m8e
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In the Japanese VisualKei and Music/HeavyMetal subcultures, those who attend wakes and burials of other artists are expected to tone down their appearance and dress as formally as possible (even if said appearance is a lifestyle appearance - someone who always has blonde or red or white or blue hair even offstage is expected to cut it as conservatively as possible and dye it black, or if this isn't possible due to upcoming work or events, to at least dye it a darker color or cover it). Anyone who knew the artist even as an acquaintance (and if the artist was famous enough, this includes fans as well) is usually expected to attend if at all possible, and if attendance is not possible, to send flowers and a card in their absence. Overly dramatic emotional displays are neither frowned upon ''nor'' demanded - it is very much "express how you truly feel" as a contrast to mainstream culture.

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In the Japanese VisualKei and Music/HeavyMetal HeavyMetal subcultures, those who attend wakes and burials of other artists are expected to tone down their appearance and dress as formally as possible (even if said appearance is a lifestyle appearance - someone who always has blonde or red or white or blue hair even offstage is expected to cut it as conservatively as possible and dye it black, or if this isn't possible due to upcoming work or events, to at least dye it a darker color or cover it). Anyone who knew the artist even as an acquaintance (and if the artist was famous enough, this includes fans as well) is usually expected to attend if at all possible, and if attendance is not possible, to send flowers and a card in their absence. Overly dramatic emotional displays are neither frowned upon ''nor'' demanded - it is very much "express how you truly feel" as a contrast to mainstream culture.
6th Jul '14 10:55:02 PM RevolutionStone
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In Shinto, an oracle decreed that the appropriate funeral rites are performed by a Buddhist priest, which is normal nowadays. Cremation and the burial of the ashes in a family plot are the common form, though some people will choose to have their ashes scattered in one place and their family grave in another. Grave goods are generally flowers, pinwheels, or items that the deceased enjoyed in life left as offering and decoration at the grave both - alcohol and tobacco are common for this reason, and occasionally food items such as candy as well.

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In Shinto, an oracle decreed that the appropriate funeral rites are performed by a Buddhist priest, which is normal nowadays. Cremation and the burial of the ashes in a family plot are the common form, though some people will choose to have their ashes scattered in one place and their family grave in another. Grave goods are generally flowers, pinwheels, or items that the deceased enjoyed in life left as offering and decoration at the grave both - alcohol and tobacco are common for this reason, and occasionally food items such as candy as well.
well. (Stealing these from a grave or defacing a grave is generally considered a very taboo act and can result in ''everyone'' being barred from visiting the grave, or in criminal penalties as any other kind of theft/vandalism.)
31st Jan '14 6:39:12 PM DracMonster
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->''The meeting between ignorance and knowledge, between brutality and culture - it begins in the dignity with which we treat our dead.''
-->--Frank Herbert, ''Literature/{{Dune}}''
23rd Jan '14 12:10:27 PM JoieDeCombat
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DueToTheDead is an old trope. Very old. Based on archeological evidence, we have reason to believe that [[OlderThanDirt they occurred as long as 300,000 years ago]], as a practice among the Neanderthals. [[note]]Elephants have what looks a lot like some kind of funerary rite too, but it's a kind that doesn't show up well on the fossil record, so who knows how long the dead have been ritually mourned?[[/note]]

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DueToTheDead is an old trope. Very old. Based on archeological evidence, we have reason to believe that [[OlderThanDirt they some form of it occurred as long as 300,000 years ago]], as a practice among the Neanderthals. [[note]]Elephants have what looks a lot like some kind of funerary rite too, but it's a kind that doesn't show up well on the fossil record, so who knows how long the dead have been ritually mourned?[[/note]]
23rd Jan '14 12:01:38 PM Pszczola
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Although the [[VikingFuneral stereotypical Viking funeral]] is pushing a burning boat out to see with the dead man, plenty of archeological evidence points to burial. Large mounds were built to hold the dead man and his grave goods, which could include [[HumanSacrifice slaves]], and a ship. These, however, were often burned on a pyre before burial.

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Although the [[VikingFuneral stereotypical Viking funeral]] is pushing a burning boat out to see sea with the dead man, plenty of archeological evidence points to burial. Large mounds were built to hold the dead man and his grave goods, which could include [[HumanSacrifice slaves]], and a ship. These, however, were often burned on a pyre before burial.
10th Jan '14 8:00:33 PM Goldfritha
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Christian practice is generally burial, normally facing east, because of belief in the resurrection of the body. Because cremation has been used historically to express disbelief in resurrection, it has been discouraged and even banned, though in modern days cremation is no longer taboo to most Christians. Grave goods are also not used. This is so prevalent that archeologists use burial ''ad orientum'' and lack of grave goods to determine whether a grave is Christian or pagan in times where either was possible (and observe that their findings grow much sparser as regions are Christianized and no grave goods are found).

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Christian practice is generally burial, normally facing east, because of belief in the resurrection of the body. Because cremation has been used historically to express disbelief in resurrection, it has been discouraged and even banned, though in modern days cremation is no longer taboo to banned; nowadays most Christians.sects do not ban it because the use is not generally to express the disbelief. Grave goods are also not used. This is so prevalent that archeologists use burial ''ad orientum'' and lack of grave goods to determine whether a grave is Christian or pagan in times where either was possible (and observe that their findings grow much sparser as regions are Christianized and no grave goods are found).
6th Nov '13 8:20:54 PM DracMonster
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Proper funerary rites are often deemed necessary to prevent wandering ghosts and other evils, but what qualifies as proper varies widely. Cremation and burial are the most common, but such practices as exposing to the dead to vultures and other unusual methods are not unknown. Even slicing up the body has been done -- as a means to free the soul from the body. This is often a time of danger, with the body being regarded as polluting.

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Proper funerary rites are often deemed necessary to prevent wandering ghosts the deceased from being BarredFromTheAfterlife and other evils, but what qualifies as proper varies widely. Cremation and burial are the most common, but such practices as exposing to the dead to vultures and other unusual methods are not unknown. Even slicing up the body has been done -- as a means to free the soul from the body. This is often a time of danger, with the body being regarded as polluting.
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