History UsefulNotes / EastGermany

18th Oct '17 1:58:38 PM SilentHunterUK
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* ''Series/{{Deutschland 83}}'' is a heavily acclaimed German series involving both this and UsefulNotes/TheBonnRepublic.
* ''Der gleiche Himmel'' ("The Same Sky") is a 2016 ZDF series set in 1974 involving a Stasi Romeo agent sent to seduce a woman working at the NSA listening site in West Berlin, a family looking to get their daughter into the GDR Olympic team and a gay teacher.
11th Oct '17 5:47:45 AM GMantis
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-->-- '''Creator/BertoltBrecht''', "Die Lösung", written after the East German government and [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet forces]] massacred 513 workers demonstrating for better conditions.

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-->-- '''Creator/BertoltBrecht''', "Die Lösung", written after the East German government and [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet forces]] massacred 513 48 workers demonstrating for better conditions.
28th Sep '17 4:48:40 AM DeepRed
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During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, relations[[note]] Both sides, but particularly West Germany [[InsistentTerminology insisted they were not]] "diplomatic relations" as that would have implied them to be two different states, which West Germany fervently denied right up to reunification. Hence the "embassy" was not called "Botschaft" but "ständige Vertretung" (permanent Representation) [[/note]] between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.

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During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, in 1971, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, relations[[note]] Both sides, but particularly West Germany [[InsistentTerminology insisted they were not]] "diplomatic relations" as that would have implied them to be two different states, which West Germany fervently denied right up to reunification. Hence the "embassy" was not called "Botschaft" but "ständige Vertretung" (permanent Representation) [[/note]] between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.
24th Aug '17 7:44:54 AM Jhonny
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During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, relations[[note]] Both sides, but particularly West Germany [[InsitentTerminology insisted they were not]] "diplomatic relations" as that would have implied them to be two different states, which West Germany fervently denied right up to reunification. Hence the "embassy" was not called "Botschaft" but "ständige Vertretung" (permanent Representation) [[/note]] between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.

to:

During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, relations[[note]] Both sides, but particularly West Germany [[InsitentTerminology [[InsistentTerminology insisted they were not]] "diplomatic relations" as that would have implied them to be two different states, which West Germany fervently denied right up to reunification. Hence the "embassy" was not called "Botschaft" but "ständige Vertretung" (permanent Representation) [[/note]] between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.
24th Aug '17 7:44:10 AM Jhonny
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During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, diplomatic relations between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.

to:

During its early years, the conservative government of UsefulNotes/WestGermany did everything they could to not acknowledge East Germany's existence; breaking off diplomatic relations with every state (other than the USSR, which was too big to ignore) that acknowledged the GDR, calling it derogatory names like "[[Series/EinHerzUndEineSeele Ostzone]]" (east zone), "Sowjetische Besatzungszone" (Soviet-occupied Zone), "so-called GDR" and "Undeutsche Undemokratische Diktatur" ([[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny Un-German Undemocratic Dictatorship]]), and generally claiming that western Germany was the only legitimate German state. The GDR rulers did the same, just the other way round. Later, under Social Democrat Willy Brandt, diplomatic relations relations[[note]] Both sides, but particularly West Germany [[InsitentTerminology insisted they were not]] "diplomatic relations" as that would have implied them to be two different states, which West Germany fervently denied right up to reunification. Hence the "embassy" was not called "Botschaft" but "ständige Vertretung" (permanent Representation) [[/note]] between the Germanies improved (the so-called ''Neue Ostpolitik'', "New Eastern Policy") and relations with the Eastern Bloc were established. However, all the way until 1990 there was a lot of InsistentTerminology on the part of West Germany when it came to the East. For instance, the "embassy" in East Berlin was not called a ''Botschaft'' ("Embassy") but a "''ständige Vertretung''" (idiomatically, "Permanent Mission") and maps went to absurd lengths when describing the ''de facto'' borders of Europe with terms like "administered by Poland" for the former German territories east of Oder and Neiße.
23rd Aug '17 10:37:53 AM GrammarNavi
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East Germany was one of the economic success stories of CommieLand, with a decent agricultural system and enough manufacturing to put consumer goods within reach of many; their flag reflects this with its hammer and pair of compasses surrounded by wheat instead of the ubiquitous sickle. They achieved this despite the fact that, like the rest of CommieLand, the government invested far more than was necessary into the military and heavy industry. In fact, while the 1989 protesters had popular support for doing away with the oppressive regime, many East Germans were proud of their state and were not happy with the way that East Germany "[[InsistentTerminology became part of the effective area of the Basic Law of Germany]]" quite so summarily. [[note]]The term ''annexation'' is frequently used. This is incorrect. There was (in theory) only one German state, divided into UsefulNotes/WestGermany, East Germany and the lands occupied by UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} and the UsefulNotes/SovietUnion. East Germany adopted the laws of UsefulNotes/WestGermany and the lands east of the Oder-Neiße border were indeed annexed (or ceded to) the respective countries. Berlin was a special case.[[/note]] At least not after realising that reunification did not bring them an instant paradise, and that the now-ruling Western leaders weren't shy about handing out pink slips.[[note]] Neither were they particularly interested in keeping potential economic rivals of Western companies alive until they found their footing. A lot of previously state-owned factories were sold for next-to-nothing by the new government and then closed down by the "investors".[[/note]]

to:

East Germany was one of the economic success stories of CommieLand, with a decent agricultural system and enough manufacturing to put consumer goods within reach of many; their flag reflects this with its hammer and pair of compasses surrounded by wheat instead of the ubiquitous sickle. They achieved this despite the fact that, like the rest of CommieLand, the government invested far more than was necessary into the military and heavy industry. In fact, while the 1989 protesters had popular support for doing away with the oppressive regime, many East Germans were proud of their state and were not happy with the way that East Germany "[[InsistentTerminology became part of the effective area of the Basic Law of Germany]]" quite so summarily. [[note]]The term ''annexation'' is frequently used. This is incorrect. There was (in theory) only one German state, divided into UsefulNotes/WestGermany, East Germany and the lands occupied by UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} and the UsefulNotes/SovietUnion.[[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]]. East Germany adopted the laws of UsefulNotes/WestGermany and the lands east of the Oder-Neiße border were indeed annexed (or ceded to) the respective countries. Berlin was a special case.[[/note]] At least not after realising that reunification did not bring them an instant paradise, and that the now-ruling Western leaders weren't shy about handing out pink slips.[[note]] Neither were they particularly interested in keeping potential economic rivals of Western companies alive until they found their footing. A lot of previously state-owned factories were sold for next-to-nothing by the new government and then closed down by the "investors".[[/note]]
7th Aug '17 8:19:52 AM DeepRed
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* The Anime/LupinIIIRedJacket episode "To Be Or Nazi Be" depicted an airborne escape over the BerlinWall.
1st Jul '17 3:07:22 PM eroock
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->''After the uprising of the 17th of June\\

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->''After ->''"After the uprising of the 17th of June\\



And elect another?''
-->--'''Creator/BertoltBrecht''', ''Die Lösung'', written after the East German government and [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet forces]] massacred 513 workers demonstrating for better conditions.

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And elect another?''
-->--'''Creator/BertoltBrecht''', ''Die Lösung'',
another?"''
-->-- '''Creator/BertoltBrecht''', "Die Lösung",
written after the East German government and [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet forces]] massacred 513 workers demonstrating for better conditions.
30th Apr '17 5:29:44 PM karstovich2
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* ''Polizeiruf 110'' ("Police call 110"): A PoliceProcedural, originally the [[AlternateCompanyEquivalent Alternate Germany Equivalent]] of ARD's ''Series/{{Tatort}}'' (albeit one that averted AlwaysMurder in an attempt to "educate" the people), this series moved to Das Erste after reunification and basically became indistinguishable from its new inspiration (and stablemate).
30th Apr '17 12:46:03 PM JulianLapostat
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It allowed churches to operate freely, provided they didn't get political.

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It allowed churches to operate freely, provided they didn't get political.
political. It was also the most progressive of the East Bloc nations in matters of LGBT Rights. This dates back to the German Communist Party's support of Magnus Hirschfield's policies in UsefulNotes/TheWeimarRepublic (which preceded Stalin's homophobic reversal). The Paragraph 175 homophobic legislation from UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany remained on the books in both West and East Germany, but East Germany stopped enforcing it in TheFifties and took a far more moderate approach albeit it absolutely forbade the creation of any public {{Gayborhood}} and kept the closet in force. In sharp contrast to West Germany, where pro-LGBT rights were opposed by the Churches, in East Germany, Protestant Churches actually helped nurture the underground gay community. In TheEighties, East Germany reversed homophobia, and opened the first state-owned gay disco while a Supreme Court in East Germany affirmed, that "homosexuality, just like heterosexuality, represents a variant of sexual behavior. Homosexual people do therefore not stand outside socialist society, and the civil rights are warranted to them exactly as to all other citizens." In some respects, East Germany was a lot more progressive than West Germany on this issue, albeit the latter's development of free society and free speech allowed for openly gay artists and gay communities to develop, which did not quite happen behind the Wall.
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