History UsefulNotes / Croatia

28th Feb '17 11:20:44 AM nebodija
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With state integrity preserved and the war over, Croatia found itself truly free and independent. Unfortunately, Croatian leadership and the people themselves found it hard to adjust to the new capitalist/free market system. Many firms and companies were given away or bought for next to nothing by tycoons or political cronies[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privatization_in_Croatia]]. Many people were also left impoverished of unable to work as a result of war.

to:

With state integrity preserved and the war over, Croatia found itself truly free and independent. Unfortunately, Croatian leadership and the people themselves found it hard to adjust to the new capitalist/free market system. Many firms and companies were given away or bought for next to nothing by tycoons or political cronies[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privatization_in_Croatia]]. Many people were also left impoverished of or unable to work as a result of war.



Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'' (lit. ''Cock-a-doodle-doo'' coalition), an association of center-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

to:

Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'' (lit. ''Cock-a-doodle-doo'' coalition), ''Cock-a-doodle-doo Coalition'', an association of center-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.
28th Feb '17 11:13:35 AM nebodija
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The early to mid 19th century saw the rise of the Croatian National Revival, with national awareness being awoken among the people and spreading into writing and politics. When the Hungarians rose up and tried to assert their rule over Croatia in 1848, the Croats sided with the Hapsburgs, but after Vienna restored control, they got nothing to show for it. Dalmatia was returned to Austria after the fall of Venice during the Napoleonic Wars, but the Austrian government refused to reunite it with the inland regions of Croatia right until the very end of the 19th century.

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The early to mid 19th century saw the rise of the Croatian National Revival, with national awareness being awoken among the people and spreading into writing and politics. When the Hungarians rose up and tried to assert their rule over Croatia in 1848, the Croats sided with the Hapsburgs, Habsburgs, but after Vienna restored control, they got nothing to show for it. Dalmatia was returned to Austria after the fall of Venice during the Napoleonic Wars, but the Austrian government refused to reunite it with the inland regions of Croatia right until the very end of the 19th century.
26th Feb '17 5:19:37 AM nebodija
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But in the 19th century another important change began to gain momentum: the long-dormant national spirit of the Croats re-asserted itself in literature and learning. When the Hungarians rose up and tried to assert their rule over Croatia, the Croats sided with the Hapsburgs, but after Vienna restored control, they got nothing to show for it. Dalmatia was returned to Austria after the fall of Venice during the Napoleonic Wars, but the Austrian government refused to reunite it with the inland regions of Croatia right until the very end of the 19th century.

A second shock to the Austrian system in 1867 ended up created a Croatia that was divided between Austria and Hungary within their joint empire but also autonomous in culture and politics.

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But in the The early to mid 19th century another important change began to gain momentum: saw the long-dormant rise of the Croatian National Revival, with national spirit of awareness being awoken among the Croats re-asserted itself in literature people and learning. spreading into writing and politics. When the Hungarians rose up and tried to assert their rule over Croatia, Croatia in 1848, the Croats sided with the Hapsburgs, but after Vienna restored control, they got nothing to show for it. Dalmatia was returned to Austria after the fall of Venice during the Napoleonic Wars, but the Austrian government refused to reunite it with the inland regions of Croatia right until the very end of the 19th century.

A second shock to When the Austrian system Habsburg Monarchy became the dual Austro-Hungary in 1867 ended up created a 1867, Croatia that was divided between Austria and Hungary within their joint empire empire, but also was to a certain extent autonomous in culture and politics.
26th Feb '17 4:56:35 AM nebodija
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The political situation began to stir up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of center right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with surprise third party MOST (lit. ''BRIDGE'') which acquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needless to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and new elections ere held in September 2016.

to:

The political situation began to stir up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of center right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with surprise third party MOST (lit. ''BRIDGE'') which acquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needless to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and new elections ere were held in September 2016.
2016, with the HDZ-MOST coalition ending up in power again.
26th Feb '17 4:49:39 AM nebodija
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There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_I_of_Yugoslavia Alexander I]] put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated in Marseille (France) by a violent terrorist outfit supported by a Croatian Nazi organization named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"), led by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ante_Pavelic Ante Pavelic]]. Alexander's successor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_II_of_Yugoslavia Peter II]] was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...

The Yugoslav government stayed neutral at first, then joined the Axis under German pressure in 1941, but almost immediately there was an anti-fascist military coup in Serbia. Hitler would have nothing of it, and Germany, Italy, Hungary, Albania and Bulgaria invaded Yugoslavia and conquered it in 2 weeks.

to:

There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_I_of_Yugoslavia Alexander I]] (of the Serbian royal dynasty) put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated in Marseille (France) by a violent terrorist outfit supported by a Croatian Nazi organization named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"), led by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ante_Pavelic org/wiki/Ante_Pavelić Ante Pavelic]].Pavelić]]. Alexander's successor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_II_of_Yugoslavia Peter II]] was 11 at the time, so the Council of Regents was set up, led by the late king's cousin, Prince-Regent Paul. He was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created within Yugoslavia in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...

The Yugoslav government stayed neutral at first, then joined the Axis under German pressure in 1941, but almost immediately two days later there was an anti-fascist military coup in Serbia. Hitler would have nothing of it, and Germany, Italy, Hungary, Albania and Bulgaria invaded Yugoslavia and conquered it in 2 weeks.



[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_in_Yugoslavia The war was extremely bloody and brutal]], with more than 1.1 million dead in the whole of Yugoslavia, out of a total population of around 16.5 million. The remnants of the Ustašhe and Četnik forces tried to surrender to the British troops in Austria and Italy, but were turned back, which led to many of them being summarily executed or left to die in prison camps. In addition, most German and some Italian and Hungarian residents were driven out of the country almost immediately after the war. Sadly, this was another episode in the long Balkan history of massacre and counter-massacre. And it was not the last.

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[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_in_Yugoslavia The war was extremely bloody and brutal]], with more than 1.1 million dead in the whole of Yugoslavia, out of a total population of around 16.5 million. The remnants of the Ustašhe Ustaše and Četnik forces tried to surrender to the British troops in Austria and Italy, but were turned back, which led to many of them being summarily executed or left to die in prison camps. In addition, most German and some Italian and Hungarian residents were driven out of the country almost immediately after the war. Sadly, this was another episode in the long Balkan history of massacre and counter-massacre. And it was not the last.



With state integrity preserved and the war over, Croatia found itself truly free and independent, a goal that was pursued by Croats for nearly 900 years. Unfortunately, Croatian leadership and the people themselves found it hard to adjust to the new capitalist/free market system. Many firms and companies were given away or bought for next to nothing by tycoons or political cronies[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privatization_in_Croatia]]. Many people were also left impoverished of unable to work as a result of war.

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%%The line "a goal that was pursued by Croats for nearly 900 years" implicates that the Croats existed as a nation back in the 1100s, which predates the modern idea of nations by about 600-700 years, so it falls into the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies primordialist school of nationalism]]. The line ''is'' found very often in Croatian history textbooks, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgment and let's leave it at that]].

With state integrity preserved and the war over, Croatia found itself truly free and independent, a goal that was pursued by Croats for nearly 900 years.independent. Unfortunately, Croatian leadership and the people themselves found it hard to adjust to the new capitalist/free market system. Many firms and companies were given away or bought for next to nothing by tycoons or political cronies[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privatization_in_Croatia]]. Many people were also left impoverished of unable to work as a result of war.



Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'', an association of center-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

After it's accession into the European Union, Croatian politics were largely focused on combating the deficit in state finances. Notable events include the '2013 Gay marriage Referendum' which defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman" (it is important to note that gay couples have the right to form civil unions which grant ''de facto'' grant the same rights as traditional marriage). The ongoing European immigration crisis impacted Croatia which, along with a number of other countries, erected barricades and wire fences on critical border spots, though the overall handling of refugees was mostly decent. Croatia also received its first female president, Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic, in 2015.

The political situation began to stir up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of center right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with surprise third party MOST which acquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needless to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and now the new elections are scheduled for September 2016.

to:

Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'', coalition'' (lit. ''Cock-a-doodle-doo'' coalition), an association of center-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

After it's accession into the European Union, Croatian politics were largely focused on combating the deficit in state finances. Notable events include the '2013 Gay marriage Marriage Referendum' which defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman" (it is important to note that gay couples have the right to form civil unions which grant ''de facto'' grant the same rights as traditional marriage). The ongoing European immigration crisis impacted Croatia which, along with a number of other countries, erected barricades and wire fences on critical border spots, though the overall handling of refugees was mostly decent. Croatia also received its first female president, Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic, Grabar-Kitarović, in 2015.

The political situation began to stir up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of center right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with surprise third party MOST (lit. ''BRIDGE'') which acquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needless to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and now the and new elections are scheduled for ere held in September 2016.



Croatia rarely appears in Western media, and when it does it often includes elements of {{Ruritania}} (typical pre-World War II portrayal, but is also present in UsefulNotes/ColdWar era and UsefulNotes/YugoslavWars portrayals), CommieLand (less sympathetic Cold War-era portrayals) or an {{Expy}} of UsefulNotes/RepublicanItaly (when its summer tourism appeal is emphasized - this portrayal was almost as common during Tito's time as it is today). Sometimes it is even presented as a bizarre mix of the above settings. However ''Croatians'', when seen in contemporary works of fiction, have usually been touched by the Civil War in some fashion.

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Croatia rarely appears in Western media, and when it does it often includes elements of {{Ruritania}} (typical pre-World War II portrayal, but is also present in UsefulNotes/ColdWar era and UsefulNotes/YugoslavWars UsefulNotes/TheYugoslavWars portrayals), CommieLand (less sympathetic Cold War-era portrayals) or an {{Expy}} of UsefulNotes/RepublicanItaly (when its summer tourism appeal is emphasized - this portrayal was almost as common during Tito's time as it is today). Sometimes it is even presented as a bizarre mix of the above settings. However ''Croatians'', when seen in contemporary works of fiction, have usually been touched by the Civil War in some fashion.



* The chequerboard design on the coat-of-arms (and flag) is echoed on most of their sports uniforms, and Croatia are the only national team to play in checks. Their football team has been very successful since independence - they came third in the World Cup in 1998, their first appearance.

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* The chequerboard design on the coat-of-arms (and flag) is echoed on most of their sports uniforms, and Croatia are the only national team to play in checks. Their football team has been very successful since independence - they came third in the World Cup in 1998, their first appearance. They have never been that successful again.



* Other famous Croats in modern times include actor Goran Višnjić (Luka Kovač in ''{{Series/ER}}''), basketball players Dražen Petrović and Toni Kukoč, and tennis players Goran Ivanišević and Marin Čilić.[[note]]If we go technical, however, Cilic's birthplace of [[http://wikitravel.org/en/Medugorje Medugorje]] now belongs to Bosnia-Herzegovina.[[/note]]
* Many Austro-Hungarian naval bases were located in Croatia. The prototype of the world's first self-propelled torpedo was built in one of them.

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* Other famous Croats in modern times include actor Goran Višnjić (Luka Kovač in ''{{Series/ER}}''), basketball players Dražen Petrović and Toni Kukoč, and tennis players Goran Ivanišević and Marin Čilić.[[note]]If we go technical, however, Cilic's Čilić's birthplace of [[http://wikitravel.org/en/Medugorje Medugorje]] org/en/Međugorje Međugorje]] now belongs to Bosnia-Herzegovina.[[/note]]
* Many Austro-Hungarian naval bases were located in Croatia. The prototype of the world's first self-propelled torpedo was built in one of them.them (in Rijeka).
6th Feb '17 9:17:57 PM Fireblood
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The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then [=POWs=] started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about UsefulNotes/RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.

to:

The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then when [=POWs=] started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about UsefulNotes/RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.



There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_I_of_Yugoslavia Alexander I]] put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated in Marseille (France) by a violent terrorist outfit backed by Croatian nazi organization called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"), led by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ante_Pavelic Ante Pavelic]]. Alexander's successor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_II_of_Yugoslavia Peter II]] was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...

to:

There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_I_of_Yugoslavia Alexander I]] put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated in Marseille (France) by a violent terrorist outfit backed supported by a Croatian nazi Nazi organization called named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"), led by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ante_Pavelic Ante Pavelic]]. Alexander's successor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_II_of_Yugoslavia Peter II]] was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...



The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specifically for (Serbian) children ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisak_children%27s_concentration_camp Sisak]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jastrebarsko_concentration_camp Jastrebarsko]]). [[TheDogBitesBack Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.]]

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The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia Bosnia, creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland coast land under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First (first at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specifically for (Serbian) children ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisak_children%27s_concentration_camp Sisak]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jastrebarsko_concentration_camp Jastrebarsko]]). [[TheDogBitesBack Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.]]



Under Yugoslavia and its GloriousLeader Tito, Croatia enjoyed autonomy within boundaries fairly similar to those of 1938. This left many Serbs still in the country, and many Croats still in Bosnia, as the different peoples were all mingled together. In the 70s, Croatia gained more power under a decentralised constitution. Living standards in communist Yugoslavia were much better than in the Eastern Block, and the country was more open towards the West. That said, Yugoslavia was a prominent member of the [[TakeAThirdOption Non-aligned movement]] and firmly refused to join either NATO or the Warsaw Pact. It did, however, reestablish relations with both German republics.

After the fall of many communist regimes in the early 90s, Croatia tried to follow the lead of Slovenia and leave crumbling Yugoslavia, but most areas where the Serbs were in the majority decided to secede from Croatia in the same way Croatia did from Yugoslavia, forming with Serbia's support the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republika_Srpska_Krajina Serb Krajina]] ("Krayeena"). The desertion-plagued and badly motivated Serb-dominated Yugoslav People's Army intervened to officially stop the Croatian attempt to secede while in reality giving military assistance to the Krajina Serbs, but proved ineffective against the Croatian militias and volunteers due to low morale, sloppy to nonexistent strategies and outdated military doctrines - though brutal Serb paramilitaries did their best to make up for this by terrorizing the population. After a few initial successes, the Yugoslav People's Army got bogged down in brutal urban fighting, where it took heavy losses (high desertion rates were a big factor in this - tanks were often left without infantry support, for example). A ceasefire was agreed upon at the end of 1991, and the war in Croatia died down to a series of skirmishes, until the Croats eventually toppled the Serb Krajina in a series of offensives in 1995, killing 700 and expelling around 120,000 Serbs from the area.

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Under Yugoslavia and its GloriousLeader Tito, Croatia enjoyed autonomy within boundaries fairly similar to those of 1938. This left many Serbs still in the country, and many Croats still in Bosnia, as the different peoples were all mingled together. In the 70s, Croatia gained more power under a decentralised decentralized constitution. Living standards in communist Yugoslavia were much better than in the Eastern Block, Bloc, and the country was more open towards the West. That said, Yugoslavia was a prominent member of the [[TakeAThirdOption Non-aligned movement]] and firmly refused to join either NATO or the Warsaw Pact. It did, however, reestablish relations with both German republics.

After the fall of many communist regimes in the early 90s, Croatia tried to follow the lead of Slovenia and leave crumbling Yugoslavia, but most areas where the Serbs were in the majority decided to secede from Croatia in the same way Croatia did from Yugoslavia, forming with Serbia's support the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republika_Srpska_Krajina Serb Krajina]] ("Krayeena"). The desertion-plagued and badly motivated Serb-dominated Yugoslav People's Army intervened to officially stop the Croatian attempt to secede while in reality giving military assistance to the Krajina Serbs, but proved ineffective against the Croatian militias and volunteers due to low morale, sloppy to nonexistent strategies and outdated military doctrines - though although brutal Serb paramilitaries did their best to make up for this by terrorizing the population. After a few initial successes, the Yugoslav People's Army got bogged down in brutal urban fighting, where it took heavy losses (high desertion rates were a big factor in this - tanks were often left without infantry support, for example). A ceasefire was agreed upon at the end of 1991, and the war in Croatia died down to a series of skirmishes, until the Croats eventually toppled the Serb Krajina in a series of offensives in 1995, killing 700 and expelling around 120,000 Serbs from the area.



The war ended with Croatia independent and much of its non-Croatian population either fled or were forcefully expelled, and Bosnia divided into a Serb zone and a joint Croat-Bosniak zone. The national borders almost exactly the same as they were in Yugoslavia.

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The war ended with Croatia independent and much of its non-Croatian population either having fled or were forcefully been expelled, and Bosnia divided into a Serb zone and a joint Croat-Bosniak zone. The zone, the national borders almost exactly the same as they were in Yugoslavia.



This lasted until the HDZ (Croatian Democratic Community) lost the 2000 elections to the center-left coalition led by SDP (Social Democratic Party). The new government instituted a number of reforms intended to limit the presidental power and transform the country's semi-presidential system into a parliamentary one. The country enjoyed a relative period of prosperity from 2000-2003 as the economy started to grow again, unemployment was on the decline, and numerous construction projects were started (most notably the construction of the A1 highway). The country was also accepted into the WTO and started the process of accession into the European Union.

However, in 2003 parliamentary elections, the ''reformed'' HDZ was once again elected. The government, headed by prime minister Ivo Sanader resumed negotiations with the EU which were delayed due to controversies surrounding the extradiction of it's generals to the ICTY, and because of the Slovenia's blockade of the negotiations due to some border disputes.

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This lasted until the HDZ (Croatian Democratic Community) lost the 2000 elections to the center-left coalition led by the SDP (Social Democratic Party). The new government instituted a number of reforms intended to limit the presidental presidential power and transform the country's semi-presidential system into a parliamentary one. The country enjoyed a relative period of prosperity from 2000-2003 as the economy started to grow again, unemployment was on the decline, and numerous construction projects were started (most notably the construction of the A1 highway). The country was also accepted into the WTO and started the process of accession into the European Union.

However, in the 2003 parliamentary elections, the ''reformed'' HDZ was once again elected. The government, headed by prime minister Ivo Sanader Sanader, resumed negotiations with the EU which were delayed due to controversies surrounding the extradiction extradition of it's its generals to the ICTY, and because of the Slovenia's Slovenians blockade of the negotiations due to some border disputes.



Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'', a association of centre-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

Afther it's accesion into the European Union, croatian politics were largely focused on combating the deficit in state finances. Notable events include the '2013 Gay marriage Referendum' which defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman" (it is important to note that gay couples have the right to form civil unions which grant ''de facto'' grant the same rights as traditional marriage). The ongoing European immigration crisis impacted Croatia which, along with a number of other countries, erected barricades and wire fence on critical border spots, though the overall handling of refugees was mostly decent. Croatia also recieved it's first female president - Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic in 2015.

The political situation began to stirr up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of centre right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with an suprise third party MOST which aquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needles to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and now the new elections are scheduled for September 2016.

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Croatia finished it's accession agreement in 2011 and was given an all-clear to join the EU. The HDZ party lost the parliamentary elections and was superseded by the so-called ''Kukuriku coalition'', a an association of centre-left center-left and centrist parties headed by SDP. This period was marked by downfall of major government owned enterprises as well as major corruption and theft scandals associated with the HDZ government. On 1 July 2013, after ten years of negotiations, Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

Afther After it's accesion accession into the European Union, croatian Croatian politics were largely focused on combating the deficit in state finances. Notable events include the '2013 Gay marriage Referendum' which defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman" (it is important to note that gay couples have the right to form civil unions which grant ''de facto'' grant the same rights as traditional marriage). The ongoing European immigration crisis impacted Croatia which, along with a number of other countries, erected barricades and wire fence fences on critical border spots, though the overall handling of refugees was mostly decent. Croatia also recieved it's received its first female president - president, Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic Kitarovic, in 2015.

The political situation began to stirr stir up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of centre center right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with an suprise surprise third party MOST which aquired acquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needles Needless to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and now the new elections are scheduled for September 2016.



Croatia rarely appears in Western media, and when it does it often includes elements of {{Ruritania}} (typical pre-World War II portrayal, but is also present in UsefulNotes/ColdWar era and UsefulNotes/YugoslavWars portrayals), CommieLand (less sympathetic Cold War-era portrayals) or an {{Expy}} of UsefulNotes/RepublicanItaly (when its summer tourism appeal is emphasized - this portrayal was almost as common during Tito's time as it is today). Sometimes it is even presented as a bizarre mix of the above settings. However, ''Croatians'', when seen in contemporary works of fiction, have usually been touched by the Civil War in some fashion.

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Croatia rarely appears in Western media, and when it does it often includes elements of {{Ruritania}} (typical pre-World War II portrayal, but is also present in UsefulNotes/ColdWar era and UsefulNotes/YugoslavWars portrayals), CommieLand (less sympathetic Cold War-era portrayals) or an {{Expy}} of UsefulNotes/RepublicanItaly (when its summer tourism appeal is emphasized - this portrayal was almost as common during Tito's time as it is today). Sometimes it is even presented as a bizarre mix of the above settings. However, However ''Croatians'', when seen in contemporary works of fiction, have usually been touched by the Civil War in some fashion.
8th Dec '16 1:58:31 PM Lloigor
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* The city of Dubrovnik has become famous as a location for the filming of the mega-popular ''GameOfThrones'' and the seventh ''{{StarWars}}'' film (with a number of other high budget films either planned or being filmed there already).

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* The city of Dubrovnik has become famous as a location for the filming of the mega-popular ''GameOfThrones'' and the seventh ''{{StarWars}}'' ''StarWars'' film (with a number of other high budget films either planned or being filmed there already).
8th Dec '16 1:58:12 PM Lloigor
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* Captain von Trapp from Movie/TheSoundOfMusic, was born in the Croatian city of Zadar.

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* Captain von Trapp from Movie/TheSoundOfMusic, ''Movie/TheSoundOfMusic'' was born in the Croatian city of Zadar.



* The city of Dubrovnik has become famous as a location of filming of mega-popular Game of Thrones and Star Wars - episode VII (with a number of other high budget films either planned or being filmed there allready)

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* The city of Dubrovnik has become famous as a location of for the filming of the mega-popular Game of Thrones ''GameOfThrones'' and Star Wars - episode VII the seventh ''{{StarWars}}'' film (with a number of other high budget films either planned or being filmed there allready)
already).
25th Nov '16 2:32:45 PM Bat178
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Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Hrvatska''), officially known as the Republic of Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Republika Hrvatska''[[note]]in the Yugoslavian languages, "r" is occasionally a vowel[[/note]]), is a Southern European country and a former Yugoslav State. The Croats were a Slavic tribe who probably came from somewhere in modern Poland and Ukraine before crossing over the Carpathian basin to settle in modern Croatia during the 600s, when that region had been devastated by nomadic raiders.

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Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Hrvatska''), officially known as the Republic of Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Republika Hrvatska''[[note]]in the Yugoslavian languages, "r" is occasionally a vowel[[/note]]), is a Southern European country and a former Yugoslav State.state. The Croats were a Slavic tribe who probably came from somewhere in modern Poland and Ukraine before crossing over the Carpathian basin to settle in modern Croatia during the 600s, when that region had been devastated by nomadic raiders.
25th Nov '16 12:05:00 PM Bat178
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Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Hrvatska''), officially known as the Republic of Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Republika Hrvatska''[[note]]in the Yugoslavian languages, "r" is occasionally a vowel[[/note]]). The Croats were a Slavic tribe who probably came from somewhere in modern Poland and Ukraine before crossing over the Carpathian basin to settle in modern Croatia during the 600s, when that region had been devastated by nomadic raiders.

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Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Hrvatska''), officially known as the Republic of Croatia ('''Croatian:''' ''Republika Hrvatska''[[note]]in the Yugoslavian languages, "r" is occasionally a vowel[[/note]]).vowel[[/note]]), is a Southern European country and a former Yugoslav State. The Croats were a Slavic tribe who probably came from somewhere in modern Poland and Ukraine before crossing over the Carpathian basin to settle in modern Croatia during the 600s, when that region had been devastated by nomadic raiders.
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