History UsefulNotes / Croatia

6th Aug '16 2:36:09 PM Khazzadumm
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Today Croatia is still struggling with high unemployment rates and recession brought about due to the world economic crisis of 2008/2009. Though the membership in the European Union has enabled Croatia access to numerous funds for structural and societal development, the government and the people are still struggling to make use of them. On the lighter note as of beginning of 2015, the Croatian economy has shown slight signs of recovery as exports and industrial production have been on the rise( mostly in the private sector), as well as income generated by tourism.


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Afther it's accesion into the European Union, croatian politics were largely focused on combating the deficit in state finances. Notable events include the '2013 Gay marriage Referendum' which defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman" (it is important to note that gay couples have the right to form civil unions which grant ''de facto'' grant the same rights as traditional marriage). The ongoing European immigration crisis impacted Croatia which, along with a number of other countries, erected barricades and wire fence on critical border spots, though the overall handling of refugees was mostly decent. Croatia also recieved it's first female president - Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic in 2015.

The political situation began to stirr up significantly following the 2015 elections. The elections were won by a coalition of right-wing parties called the ''Patriotic Coalition''. The coalition was also something of a novelty as the usually solitary leader of centre right/right-wing coalitions HDZ was sharing power with an suprise third party MOST which aquired a stunning 21% of votes, making it a legitimate "third party" in a usually staunch bipartisan electoral system. The new coalition was marred by power struggles and various quirks from the get-go. The HDZ "lobe" of the coalition went on to enforce a distinctively right oriented policies which disturbed a number of citizens whilst the MOST part was generally bickering with HDZ over how to best implement their own policies. Needles to say, the coalition collapsed in less than a year and now the new elections are scheduled for September 2016.

Today Croatia is still struggling with high unemployment rates and recession brought about due to the world economic crisis of 2008/2009. Though the membership in the European Union has enabled Croatia access to numerous funds for structural and societal development, the government and the people are still struggling to make use of them. On the lighter note as of beginning of 2015, 2016, the Croatian economy has shown slight is showing signs of recovery as exports and industrial production have been are continually on the rise( mostly rise (mostly in the private sector), as well as income generated by tourism.

tourism which is consistently breaking last-year records.





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* The city of Dubrovnik has become famous as a location of filming of mega-popular Game of Thrones and Star Wars - episode VII (with a number of other high budget films either planned or being filmed there allready)
6th Jun '16 11:29:41 AM Doug86
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* Renowned TV chef Lidia Bastianich (and mother of ''Series/{{Masterchef}}'''s Joe Bastianich) was born in what is now the Croatian realm of Istria. At the time of her birth, Istria was a part of Italy, but was annexed by the former Yugoslavia after WorldWarII.

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* Renowned TV chef Lidia Bastianich (and mother of ''Series/{{Masterchef}}'''s Joe Bastianich) was born in what is now the Croatian realm of Istria. At the time of her birth, Istria was a part of Italy, but was annexed by the former Yugoslavia after WorldWarII.
UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
23rd Mar '16 7:40:09 AM GlitteringFlowers
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There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated by a violent terrorist outfit backed by Croatian nazi organization called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"). His successor was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...

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There were problems from the start, however. Croats wanted autonomy, but there was no clean dividing line between Serbs and Croats. As an answer to this and other pro-national movements, the Serb king put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated by a violent terrorist outfit backed by Croatian nazi organization called [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_I_of_Yugoslavia Alexander I]] put up a dictatorial regime, which lasted until he was assassinated in Marseille (France) by a violent terrorist outfit backed by Croatian nazi organization called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustasha the Ustaše]] ("Oostahshee"). His ("Oostahshee"), led by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ante_Pavelic Ante Pavelic]]. Alexander's successor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_II_of_Yugoslavia Peter II]] was more even-handed and, after long and tricky negotiations, a large autonomous Croatia was created in 1939. But soon after that UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler began his campaign to conquer Europe...



The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specificaly for (Serbian ) children. Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.

Soon after the German invasion of the USSR in 1941, two movements sprang up in Croatia (and most of the former Yugoslavia): the multinational and predominantly communist Partisans and the royalist and Serb-nationalist Četniks ("Chetniks"). The two movements soon realized their goals were incompatible and fought each other as well as the Axis forces. The Četniks soon made a non-attack agreement with the Axis forces (thinking the partisans were a greater threat), but despite all this the Partisans gained the upper hand by 1943. After Italy surrendered later in the same year, the partisans gained a lot of captured equipment, as well as aid from the British air force based in Italy and the Croatian islands.

The war was extremely bloody and brutal, with more than 1.1 million dead in the whole of Yugoslavia, out of a total population of around 16.5 million. The remnants of the Ustašhe and Četnik forces tried to surrender to the British troops in Austria and Italy, but were turned back, which led to many of them being summarily executed or left to die in prison camps. In addition, most German and some Italian and Hungarian residents were driven out of the country almost immediately after the war. Sadly, this was another episode in the long Balkan history of massacre and counter-massacre. And it was not the last.

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The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specificaly specifically for (Serbian ) children. (Serbian) children ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisak_children%27s_concentration_camp Sisak]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jastrebarsko_concentration_camp Jastrebarsko]]). [[TheDogBitesBack Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.

movements.]]

Soon after the German invasion of the USSR in 1941, two movements sprang up in Croatia (and most of the former Yugoslavia): the multinational and predominantly communist Partisans and the royalist and Serb-nationalist Četniks ("Chetniks").([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chetniks "Chetniks"]]). The two movements soon realized their goals were incompatible and fought each other as well as the Axis forces. The Četniks soon made a non-attack agreement with the Axis forces (thinking the partisans were a greater threat), but despite all this the Partisans gained the upper hand by 1943. After Italy surrendered later in the same year, the partisans gained a lot of captured equipment, as well as aid from the British air force based in Italy and the Croatian islands.

[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_in_Yugoslavia The war was extremely bloody and brutal, brutal]], with more than 1.1 million dead in the whole of Yugoslavia, out of a total population of around 16.5 million. The remnants of the Ustašhe and Četnik forces tried to surrender to the British troops in Austria and Italy, but were turned back, which led to many of them being summarily executed or left to die in prison camps. In addition, most German and some Italian and Hungarian residents were driven out of the country almost immediately after the war. Sadly, this was another episode in the long Balkan history of massacre and counter-massacre. And it was not the last.
31st Jan '16 2:38:09 PM iilija64
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After the fall of many communist regimes in the early 90s, Croatia tried to follow the lead of Slovenia and leave crumbling Yugoslavia, but most areas where the Serbs were in the majority decided to secede from Croatia in the same way Croatia did from Yugoslavia, forming with Serbia's support the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republika_Srpska_Krajina Serb Krajina]] ("Krayeena"). The desertion-plagued and badly motivated Serb-dominated Yugoslav People's Army intervened to officially stop the Croatian attempt to secede while in reality giving military assistance to the Krajina Serbs, but proved ineffective against the Croatian militias and volunteers due to low morale, sloppy to nonexistent strategies and outdated military doctrines - though brutal Serb paramilitaries did their best to make up for this by terrorizing the population. After a few initial successes, the Yugoslav People's Army got bogged down in brutal urban fighting, where it took heavy losses (high desertion rates were a big factor in this - tanks were often left without infantry support, for example). A ceasefire was agreed upon at the end of 1991, and the war in Croatia died down to a series of skirmishes, until the Croats eventually toppled the Serb Krajina in a series of offensives in 1995, killing and expelling around 60,000 Serbs from the area.

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After the fall of many communist regimes in the early 90s, Croatia tried to follow the lead of Slovenia and leave crumbling Yugoslavia, but most areas where the Serbs were in the majority decided to secede from Croatia in the same way Croatia did from Yugoslavia, forming with Serbia's support the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republika_Srpska_Krajina Serb Krajina]] ("Krayeena"). The desertion-plagued and badly motivated Serb-dominated Yugoslav People's Army intervened to officially stop the Croatian attempt to secede while in reality giving military assistance to the Krajina Serbs, but proved ineffective against the Croatian militias and volunteers due to low morale, sloppy to nonexistent strategies and outdated military doctrines - though brutal Serb paramilitaries did their best to make up for this by terrorizing the population. After a few initial successes, the Yugoslav People's Army got bogged down in brutal urban fighting, where it took heavy losses (high desertion rates were a big factor in this - tanks were often left without infantry support, for example). A ceasefire was agreed upon at the end of 1991, and the war in Croatia died down to a series of skirmishes, until the Croats eventually toppled the Serb Krajina in a series of offensives in 1995, killing 700 and expelling around 60,000 120,000 Serbs from the area.
31st Jan '16 12:54:41 PM iilija64
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The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specificaly for (Serbian and Jewish) children, which - while not all that large - were so incredibly brutal that even some Nazis were sickened at what they saw (though they did nothing substantial to stop it). Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.

to:

The Germans and Italians put the Ustaše in charge of Croatia and the whole of Bosnia creating the [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial "Independent State of Croatia,"]] while Italy placed a large part of the Croatian coastland under its direct rule (and Hungary took a small part of northern Croatia). Without any prompting from Germany, they set out of destroy Serbs, Jews, Roma (usually called "Gypsies"), and "antifascists". The last covered mostly enthusiastic supporters of the communist Partisans and other opponents of the Ustaša regime. The Ustaše also hold the "distinction" of being the only non-German nation who ran their own extermination camps (First at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadovno Jadovno]], then at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasenovac Jasenovac]]) and the only nation to ran extermination camps specificaly for (Serbian and Jewish) children, which - while not all that large - were so incredibly brutal that even some Nazis were sickened at what they saw (though they did nothing substantial to stop it).) children. Ustaše brutality was a major factor in driving people to join local resistance movements.
30th Dec '15 9:11:58 AM StFan
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The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then POWs started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about UsefulNotes/RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.

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The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then POWs [=POWs=] started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about UsefulNotes/RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.
5th Sep '15 7:14:44 PM nombretomado
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* Croatia became a member of {{NATO}} in 2008, and a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion in 2013.

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* Croatia became a member of {{NATO}} UsefulNotes/{{NATO}} in 2008, and a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion in 2013.
30th Jun '15 3:13:26 PM Khazzadumm
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* The Croatian language has three major dialects, identified by three different words for "what" ća, kaj and što.

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* The Croatian language has three major dialects, identified by three different words for "what" ća, ča, kaj and što.
31st Mar '15 5:55:54 AM Adept
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* Renowned TV chef Lidia Bastianich (and mother of ''{{Masterchef}}'''s Joe Bastianich) was born in what is now the Croatian realm of Istria. At the time of her birth, Istria was a part of Italy, but was annexed by the former Yugoslavia after WorldWarII.

to:

* Renowned TV chef Lidia Bastianich (and mother of ''{{Masterchef}}'''s ''Series/{{Masterchef}}'''s Joe Bastianich) was born in what is now the Croatian realm of Istria. At the time of her birth, Istria was a part of Italy, but was annexed by the former Yugoslavia after WorldWarII.
12th Mar '15 8:40:59 PM jormis29
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The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then POWs started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.

to:

The bitterness of the Croats would show during UsefulNotes/WW1. While most were originally content to serve in the army, a series of Austo-Hungarian defeats and the worsening economic situation led to many Croats refusing to take up arms against their "brother" Serbs and Russians. In late 1917 the situation became dire as armed bands of deserters (the so-called "Green Cadre") plagued the countryside. It became even worse then POWs started returning from Russia (which had withdrawn from the war), telling the locals about RedOctober UsefulNotes/RedOctober and the promise of a better future should they overthrow their semi-feudal overlords.
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