History UsefulNotes / CivilRightsMovement

5th Jul '16 6:47:48 PM Meshakhad
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* ''Literature/TheSelmaMassacre'' begins with the titular march being gunned down, and the entire movement takes an extremely violent turn.
10th Jun '16 10:30:44 PM DoctorCooper
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Meanwhile, the north had similar incidents, such as in 1957 when the African American family of Bill and Daisy Meyers attempted to move into Levittown, Pennsylvania, one of the famed suburban projects created by William Levitt to be model communities--for whites only, that is. Although they and their supporters wanted no trouble, their very presences revealed that there was a lot of foul bigotry in them Little Boxes made out of Ticky-Tacky. Thus, their summer was a living hell, with angry mobs, destructive riots, and systematic racist harassment, aided and abetted by indifferent local police that finally prompted the State authorities to step in to stop it. Throughout it all, the Meyers and their friends stuck it out to become heroes who impressed Martin Luther King and JackieRobinson among others; Daisy was not called "The Rosa Parks of the North" for nothing.

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Meanwhile, the north had similar incidents, such as in 1957 when the African American family of Bill and Daisy Meyers attempted to move into Levittown, Pennsylvania, one of the famed suburban projects created by William Levitt to be model communities--for whites only, that is. Although they and their supporters wanted no trouble, their very presences revealed that there was a lot of foul bigotry in them Little Boxes made out of Ticky-Tacky. Thus, their summer was a living hell, with angry mobs, destructive riots, and systematic racist harassment, aided and abetted by indifferent local police that finally prompted the State authorities to step in to stop it. Throughout it all, the Meyers and their friends stuck it out to become heroes who impressed Martin Luther King and JackieRobinson UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson among others; Daisy was not called "The Rosa Parks of the North" for nothing.
31st May '16 10:41:08 AM AHI-3000
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[[AC:NewspaperComics]]
* Robert (Granddad) Freeman of ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the hoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat. A WholeEpisodeFlashback in Season 4 shows that he was one of the Freedom Riders, but his participation was completely involuntary.


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[[AC:WesternAnimation]]
* Robert "Granddad" Freeman of ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the firehoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat. A WholeEpisodeFlashback in Season 4 shows that he was one of the Freedom Riders, but his participation was completely involuntary.
9th Apr '16 11:04:49 AM CassandraLeo
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* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] Sweet Black Angel", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.

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* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt Sweet Black Angel", Angel]]", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.
9th Apr '16 11:04:27 AM CassandraLeo
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!!Depictions in fiction:

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!!Depictions in fiction:
fiction and the arts:


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[[AC:{{Music}}]]
* "Strange Fruit", written by schoolteacher Abel Meeropol and most famous in Music/BillieHoliday's version, is one of the most famous civil rights anthems, explicitly protesting the practice of lynching. It was named as the song of the century by Time'' magazine.
* Music/NinaSimone's "Mississippi Goddam" is regarded as a central song of the civil rights movement, explicitly responding to the murder of Medgar Evers and the September 1963 bombing of a black Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama. Several other songs of hers also have pro-civil rights themes.
* Music/BobDylan wrote several songs explicitly in support of the civil rights movement. "Blowin' in the Wind" is probably the most famous of them (Civil rights activist Mavis Staples expressed astonishment that a young white man could write a song that so eloquently captured the frustrations and aspirations of black people), although other songs such as "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" address the subject even more explicitly.
* Music/SamCooke's "A Change Is Gonna Come", which he wrote after hearing "Blowin' in the Wind" and being ashamed that he hadn't yet written anything addressing the subject, also became a civil rights anthem.
* "We Shall Overcome", though it has a long history that predates the civil rights movement, was adopted by the movement as an anthem. It has perhaps become most associated with the folk singer Music/PeteSeeger.
* Music/TheBeatles' "[[Music/TheWhiteAlbum Blackbird]]" has been interpreted as a pro-civil rights song, and its author Music/PaulMcCartney has confirmed that this is one intended interpretation.
* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] Sweet Black Angel", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.
5th Mar '16 10:34:40 AM Jhonny
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In the months leading up to the 2008 presidential election, many looked at the election as the ultimate litmus test towards whether or not the civil rights movement had succeeded, as the idea of Americans having the chance to elect an African-American to the Presidency would be the ultimate way to see if the movement's successes had any impact upon the generations who came afterwards. Needless to say, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's election not only proved that the movement did indeed bring progress -- in a scant 53 years, America had gone from needing a law to let black people vote at all to a majority of all Americans freely casting their votes for a black man as the President of United States, and even re-elected him with a greater margin -- but also proved that there was still more work to be done.

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In the months leading up to the 2008 presidential election, many looked at the election as the ultimate litmus test towards whether or not the civil rights movement had succeeded, as the idea of Americans having the chance to elect an African-American to the Presidency would be the ultimate way to see if the movement's successes had any impact upon the generations who came afterwards. Needless to say, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's election not only proved that the movement did indeed bring progress -- in a scant 53 years, America had gone from needing a law to let black people vote at all to a majority of all Americans freely casting their votes for a black man - a man whose parents could not have legally married in several states at the time of his birth - as the President of United States, and even re-elected him with a greater margin him -- but also proved that there was still more work to be done.
18th Dec '15 8:03:05 AM JamesAustin
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->''"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"''\\
--'''Martin Luther King, Jr.''' (1929-1968)

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->''"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"''\\
--'''Martin
'"''
-->--'''Martin
Luther King, Jr.''' (1929-1968)
3rd Dec '15 3:31:07 PM SoapheadChurch
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* Robert (Granddad) Freeman of ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the hoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat.

to:

* Robert (Granddad) Freeman of ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the hoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat.
raincoat. A WholeEpisodeFlashback in Season 4 shows that he was one of the Freedom Riders, but his participation was completely involuntary.
17th Nov '15 9:30:25 PM kchishol
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Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during The ColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.

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Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to the point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during The ColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.
7th Nov '15 12:50:58 PM kchishol
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So, those President managed to massage the issue in Congress with not just intense lobbying, of which Johnson, a proud Southerner himself, was a master, but also helping King and Company organize major events like the 1963 March on Washington. This culminated in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.

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So, those President Presidents managed to massage the issue in Congress with not just intense lobbying, of which Johnson, a proud Southerner himself, was a master, but also helping King and Company organize major events like the 1963 March on Washington. This culminated in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.CivilRightsMovement