History UsefulNotes / CivilRightsMovement

9th Apr '16 11:04:49 AM CassandraLeo
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* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] Sweet Black Angel", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.

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* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt Sweet Black Angel", Angel]]", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.
9th Apr '16 11:04:27 AM CassandraLeo
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!!Depictions in fiction:

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!!Depictions in fiction:
fiction and the arts:


Added DiffLines:

[[AC:{{Music}}]]
* "Strange Fruit", written by schoolteacher Abel Meeropol and most famous in Music/BillieHoliday's version, is one of the most famous civil rights anthems, explicitly protesting the practice of lynching. It was named as the song of the century by Time'' magazine.
* Music/NinaSimone's "Mississippi Goddam" is regarded as a central song of the civil rights movement, explicitly responding to the murder of Medgar Evers and the September 1963 bombing of a black Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama. Several other songs of hers also have pro-civil rights themes.
* Music/BobDylan wrote several songs explicitly in support of the civil rights movement. "Blowin' in the Wind" is probably the most famous of them (Civil rights activist Mavis Staples expressed astonishment that a young white man could write a song that so eloquently captured the frustrations and aspirations of black people), although other songs such as "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" address the subject even more explicitly.
* Music/SamCooke's "A Change Is Gonna Come", which he wrote after hearing "Blowin' in the Wind" and being ashamed that he hadn't yet written anything addressing the subject, also became a civil rights anthem.
* "We Shall Overcome", though it has a long history that predates the civil rights movement, was adopted by the movement as an anthem. It has perhaps become most associated with the folk singer Music/PeteSeeger.
* Music/TheBeatles' "[[Music/TheWhiteAlbum Blackbird]]" has been interpreted as a pro-civil rights song, and its author Music/PaulMcCartney has confirmed that this is one intended interpretation.
* Music/TheRollingStones' "[[Music/ExileOnMainSt]] Sweet Black Angel", one of the band's few overtly political songs, was written in support of civil rights leader Angela Davis.
5th Mar '16 10:34:40 AM Jhonny
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In the months leading up to the 2008 presidential election, many looked at the election as the ultimate litmus test towards whether or not the civil rights movement had succeeded, as the idea of Americans having the chance to elect an African-American to the Presidency would be the ultimate way to see if the movement's successes had any impact upon the generations who came afterwards. Needless to say, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's election not only proved that the movement did indeed bring progress -- in a scant 53 years, America had gone from needing a law to let black people vote at all to a majority of all Americans freely casting their votes for a black man as the President of United States, and even re-elected him with a greater margin -- but also proved that there was still more work to be done.

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In the months leading up to the 2008 presidential election, many looked at the election as the ultimate litmus test towards whether or not the civil rights movement had succeeded, as the idea of Americans having the chance to elect an African-American to the Presidency would be the ultimate way to see if the movement's successes had any impact upon the generations who came afterwards. Needless to say, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's election not only proved that the movement did indeed bring progress -- in a scant 53 years, America had gone from needing a law to let black people vote at all to a majority of all Americans freely casting their votes for a black man - a man whose parents could not have legally married in several states at the time of his birth - as the President of United States, and even re-elected him with a greater margin him -- but also proved that there was still more work to be done.
18th Dec '15 8:03:05 AM JamesAustin
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->''"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"''\\
--'''Martin Luther King, Jr.''' (1929-1968)

to:

->''"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"''\\
--'''Martin
'"''
-->--'''Martin
Luther King, Jr.''' (1929-1968)
3rd Dec '15 3:31:07 PM SoapheadChurch
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* Robert (Granddad) Freeman of ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the hoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat.

to:

* Robert (Granddad) Freeman of ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' had an involvement in the movement. He still held a grudge against Rosa Parks for "stealing his thunder" (he was sitting next to her on that bus and likewise refused to give up his seat, but the bus driver was only offended by Rosa's unwillingness to move, not his), and once showed up late to a march because he knew they would bring out the hoses and figured he'd bring a raincoat.
raincoat. A WholeEpisodeFlashback in Season 4 shows that he was one of the Freedom Riders, but his participation was completely involuntary.
17th Nov '15 9:30:25 PM kchishol
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Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during The ColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.

to:

Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to the point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during The ColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.
7th Nov '15 12:50:58 PM kchishol
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So, those President managed to massage the issue in Congress with not just intense lobbying, of which Johnson, a proud Southerner himself, was a master, but also helping King and Company organize major events like the 1963 March on Washington. This culminated in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.

to:

So, those President Presidents managed to massage the issue in Congress with not just intense lobbying, of which Johnson, a proud Southerner himself, was a master, but also helping King and Company organize major events like the 1963 March on Washington. This culminated in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.
7th Nov '15 5:05:16 AM kchishol
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Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.

to:

Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson were initially apprehensive about the movement, much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar The ColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.
7th Nov '15 5:04:00 AM kchishol
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Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson supported the movement, culminating in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.

to:

Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson supported were initially apprehensive about the movement, culminating much of the Democratic Party's power base was in the South and neither wanted to alienate those supporters. However, King and company, using the tactics described above, were able to force the issue to point where the White House had to act. Furthermore, remember that all this happened during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar and the USA became painfully aware that they were hardly going to be able to claim to be morally superior to the Communist Bloc when this racist brutality was being exposed around the world.

So, those President managed to massage the issue in Congress with not just intense lobbying, of which Johnson, a proud Southerner himself, was a master, but also helping King and Company organize major events like the 1963 March on Washington. This culminated
in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.
4th Nov '15 2:08:41 AM Fireblood
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One of the most important events in American history, the Civil Rights Movement brought about progress towards racial equality under the law, after America largely spent the hundred years after the Civil War ignoring the fact that blacks and other minorities were still being treated like second class citizens with little to no rights in many parts of the country. The [[TheDeepSouth Southern states]], despite losing the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar and the abolition of slavery, had found numerous loopholes to keep blacks down: "Jim Crow" laws were drafted following the end of reconstruction in many Southern states, while the hypocritical and inherently flawed concept of "Separate but Equal" segregation denied minorities in the South basic rights. Black people even found it difficult to vote, despite having the right to, since states could (and did) impose literacy tests, which were often rigged by having questions that were either impossible to answer or deliberately ambiguous, poll taxes, or even making people ''guess the jellybeans inside a jar.''[[note]]If you're wondering why these didn't apply to whites, it's because the laws had exemptions for people whose fathers or grandfathers could vote at the time of the law's passage. This is where we get the term "GrandfatherClause."[[/note]] Note that discrimination was not exclusive to African Americans; Hispanics, Natives, Asians, Jews, Irish, and others were oppressed in varying ways as well, to say nothing about the LGBT community who had to had to hide their true natures hidden for fear of their well being and often their lives.

The date when the civil rights movement started is not definitive and is still debated among historians; some credit the formation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909, a few point to UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt ending racial discrimination in the federal government, others say when UsefulNotes/HarryTruman forcibly integrated the [[YanksWithTanks US Army]] during his presidency, and others point to the role of [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar Soviet and Maoist funding, cultural contacts, moral support]] (even after the Sino-Soviet Split and border wars in 1960 it remained an issue they could agree on) and agitation on the behalf of African-Americans and Africans in general in the U.N. and off-the-books. Most often though, two moments in the 1950s stand out as the turning points which brought the movement together as far as catalysts go. The first one was ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'', a 1954 Supreme Court ruling that struck down the controversial 1896 ''Plessy v. Fergeson'' Supreme Court ruling which legalized segregation. "Brown" was a 9-0 ruling that basically called out the utter hypocrisy of segregation by way of pointing out that "separate but equal" was essentially code for "white people get nice things, but black people get barely functioning, barely usable versions of what white people take for granted." Famously, Chief Justice Earl Warren's ruling stated "Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal."

The second catalyst was a moment towards the end of 1955, when a woman by the name of Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white person, as was demanded by standard bus policy at the time in the city of Montgomery, Alabama and was arrested, gaining national attention and giving civil rights groups a chance to unify behind a symbol. Contrary to popular belief, the act was not an accidental act of protest[[note]]The only tired she was that day was of being pushed around[[/note]]; Parks was an activist affiliated with the NAACP and was selected to test the segregation laws in court. Additionally, she was not the first person to resist the segregated bus polices either but was the one the NAACP decide to use to draw attention to the issue.

to:

One of the most important events in American history, the Civil Rights Movement brought about progress towards racial equality under the law, after America largely spent the hundred years after the Civil War ignoring the fact that blacks and other minorities were still being treated like second class citizens with little to no rights in many parts of the country. The [[TheDeepSouth Southern states]], despite losing the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar and the abolition of slavery, had found numerous loopholes to keep blacks down: "Jim Crow" laws were drafted following the end of reconstruction in many Southern states, while the hypocritical and inherently flawed concept of "Separate but Equal" segregation denied minorities in the South basic rights. Black people even found it difficult to vote, despite having the right to, since states could (and did) impose literacy tests, which were often rigged by having questions that were either impossible to answer or deliberately ambiguous, poll taxes, or even making people ''guess the number of jellybeans inside a jar.''[[note]]If you're wondering why these didn't apply to whites, it's because the laws had exemptions for people whose fathers or grandfathers could vote at the time of the law's passage. This is where we get the term "GrandfatherClause."[[/note]] Note that discrimination was not exclusive to African Americans; Hispanics, Natives, Asians, Jews, Irish, and others were oppressed in varying ways as well, to say nothing about the LGBT community who had to had to hide their true natures hidden for fear of their well being and often their lives.

The date when the civil rights movement started is not definitive and is still debated among historians; some credit the formation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909, a few point to UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt ending racial discrimination in the federal government, others say when UsefulNotes/HarryTruman forcibly integrated the [[YanksWithTanks US Army]] during his presidency, and others point to the role of [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheColdWar Soviet and Maoist funding, cultural contacts, moral support]] (even after the Sino-Soviet Split and border wars in 1960 it remained an issue they could agree on) and agitation on the behalf of African-Americans and Africans in general in the U.N. and off-the-books. Most often though, two moments in the 1950s stand out as the turning points which brought the movement together as far as catalysts go. The first one was ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'', a 1954 Supreme Court ruling that struck down the controversial 1896 ''Plessy v. Fergeson'' Supreme Court ruling which legalized segregation. "Brown" ''Brown'' was a 9-0 ruling that basically called out the utter hypocrisy of segregation by way of pointing out that "separate but equal" was essentially code for "white people get nice things, but black people get barely functioning, barely usable versions of what white people take for granted." Famously, Chief Justice Earl Warren's ruling stated "Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal."

The second catalyst was a moment towards the end of 1955, when a woman by the name of Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white person, as was demanded by standard bus policy at the time in the city of Montgomery, Alabama and was arrested, gaining national attention and giving civil rights groups a chance to unify behind a symbol. Contrary to popular belief, the act was not an accidental act of protest[[note]]The protest;[[note]]The only tired she was that day was of being pushed around[[/note]]; around[[/note]] Parks was an activist affiliated with the NAACP and was selected to test the segregation laws in court. Additionally, she was not the first person to resist the segregated bus polices either either, but was the one the NAACP decide to use to draw attention to the issue.
issue.[[note]]Parks, a respectable housewife, held a better image than another woman arrested for the same thing, who'd had a child out of wedlock.[[/note]]



Despite the gravitas of this movement, evidence of it was hardly seen in popular culture until later on in UsefulNotes/TheSixties. The mainstream media largely ignored the movements until the late 1950s, when the struggle and police violence against members of the movement began to be filmed, serving as ready-made fodder for the growing television news genre. In this case, this interest was sparked in part by FCC head Newton Minow's embarassing "Vast Wasteland" speech, excoriating TV's vapidity, which the TV networks were determined to prove wrong. To the networks, the civil rights movement was perfect material to present quickly: it was dramatic with the violence protesters were enduring, the sides were easy to distinguish with the good guys being predominately black and peaceful and the villains being all white who were acting like crazed brutes and the stories' theme of the state of human rights in America was a national issue no one was going to dispute as important to discuss.

For their part, Martin Luther King Jr. and company realized this media situation themselves and proved quick studies in media savvy to work the reporters well, taking advantage of the fact that their enemies were all but threatening them. In fact, King would select certain southern cities gambling that the authorities there were such bullying racist knuckleheads that it would create dramatic footage of them going berserk at peaceful protesters that no one could ignore. As it happened, most municipal figures like Commissioner of Public Safety "Bull" Connor in Birmingham, Alabama got suckered into that trap with bloody crackdowns that were condemned around the world.

Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson supported the movement, culminating in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals.

to:

Despite the gravitas of this movement, evidence of it was hardly seen in popular culture until later on in UsefulNotes/TheSixties. The mainstream media largely ignored the movements until the late 1950s, when the struggle and police violence against members of the movement began to be filmed, serving as ready-made fodder for the growing television news genre. In this case, this interest was sparked in part by FCC head Newton Minow's embarassing embarrassing "Vast Wasteland" speech, excoriating TV's vapidity, which the TV networks were determined to prove wrong. To the networks, the civil rights movement was perfect material to present quickly: it was dramatic with the violence protesters were enduring, the sides were easy to distinguish with the good guys being predominately black and peaceful and the villains being all white who were acting like crazed brutes and the stories' theme of the state of human rights in America was a national issue no one was going to dispute as important to discuss.

For their part, Martin Luther King Jr. and company realized this media situation themselves and proved quick studies in media savvy to work the reporters well, taking advantage of the fact that their enemies were all but threatening them. In fact, King would select certain southern cities cities, gambling that the authorities there were such bullying racist knuckleheads that it would create dramatic footage of them going berserk at peaceful protesters that no one could ignore. As it happened, most municipal figures like Commissioner of Public Safety "Bull" Connor in Birmingham, Alabama got suckered into that trap with bloody crackdowns that were condemned around the world.

Politically, President UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower was infamously silent on the matter in public, though in private he supported desegregation and even authorized the use of the 101st Airborne to enforce desegregation in Arkansas, a state whose governor (Orval Faubus, not George Wallace as most people think) tried to use the National Guard to prevent black students from attending white schools. Both UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy and UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson supported the movement, culminating in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which made illegal the "Jim Crow" trickery that kept minorities from being able to vote. UsefulNotes/HarryTruman also publicly supported equal rights for African Americans (famously saying "My forebears were Confederates... but my very stomach turned over when I had learned that Negro soldiers, just back from overseas, were being dumped out of Army trucks in Mississippi and beaten."), but Congress practically ignored his proposals.
proposals. Nonetheless, he desegregated the armed forces, as that was in his control.



As of this writing, the Civil Rights Movement is still within living memory, and many of the participants on both sides are still alive, with the [[DeadArtistsAreBetter deceased ones]] like Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks as great leaders and heroes of American history. Those who were on the racist side are often, today, deeply ashamed of their former attitudes ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazel_Massery Hazel Massery]] is one example). Others are finally being prosecuted for their crimes ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Ray_Killen Edgar Ray Killen]], one of the men who organized the mob that killed three civil rights workers in Mississippi in the Freedom Summer of 1964, was one of them). And racism still exists in many forms (beyond the overt cross-burning and men in white hoods), but these days the civil rights movement is fractured and has no clear leader.

However, to the further consternation of the forces of social privilege and unjust dominance, the African-Americans' crusade proved to be just the beginning. Other oppressed communities in North America were inspired by the Civil Rights Movement to rise up and demand their own equal rights and a fair shake in their society as well such as Women, Native Americans, the Gay community, Asians, religious minorities and the Physically Challenged. With these communities striving with their own eyes on the prize, they all contributed to a great combined social phenomenon that would be called The Rights Revolution that would challenge and redefine the definition of justice around the world.

to:

As of this writing, the Civil Rights Movement is still within living memory, and many of the participants on both sides are still alive, with the [[DeadArtistsAreBetter deceased ones]] like Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks viewed as great leaders and heroes of American history. Those who were on the racist side are often, today, deeply ashamed of their former attitudes ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazel_Massery Hazel Massery]] is one example). Others are finally being prosecuted for their crimes ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Ray_Killen Edgar Ray Killen]], one of the men who organized the mob that killed three civil rights workers in Mississippi in the Freedom Summer of 1964, was one of them). And racism still exists in many forms (beyond the overt cross-burning and men in white hoods), but these days the civil rights movement is fractured and has no clear leader.

However, to the further consternation of the forces of social privilege and unjust dominance, the African-Americans' crusade proved to be just the beginning. Other oppressed communities in North America were inspired by the Civil Rights Movement to rise up and demand their own equal rights and a fair shake in their society as well such as Women, women, Native Americans, the Gay LGBT community, Asians, religious minorities and the Physically Challenged.disabled. With these communities striving with their own eyes on the prize, they all contributed to a great combined social phenomenon that would be called The Rights Revolution that would challenge and redefine the definition of justice around the world.



The Civil Rights Movement itself is also being introduced to the modern generation through the current debates on whether marriage between UsefulNotes/{{homosexual}}s ought to be legal. In addition to the debate being, essentially, a civil-rights issue to begin with (that label is historically associated with anti-racism measures, and it's too late to change the name now), many commentators are drawing the easily-made comparisons between the arguments against giving gay and non-European people rights under the law --[[ThisIsUnforgivable many of them unflattering to boot]].

to:

The Civil Rights Movement itself is also being introduced to the modern generation through the current recent debates on whether marriage between UsefulNotes/{{homosexual}}s ought to be legal. In addition to the debate being, essentially, a civil-rights issue to begin with (that label is historically associated with anti-racism measures, and it's too late to change the name now), many commentators are drawing the easily-made comparisons between the arguments against giving gay and non-European people rights under the law --[[ThisIsUnforgivable many of them unflattering to boot]].
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