History UsefulNotes / ChristmasIsBourgeois

22nd Dec '15 6:22:32 PM Hadjorim
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Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Uncle Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on Myth/RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
to:
Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Uncle (Grandfather Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on Myth/RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
22nd Dec '15 6:21:22 PM Hadjorim
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Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Father Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on Myth/RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
to:
Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Father (Uncle Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on Myth/RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
22nd Dec '15 6:21:05 PM Hadjorim
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However, everything changed with the Revolution. At first, the Bolsheviks tried to suppress the winter holiday traditions entirely. Christmas was banned as part of general antireligious propaganda as a "bourgeois clerical tradition", and for the New Year the Bolsheviks simply didn't care. Things changed in 1935, when the Soviet authorities decided to strip the Cristmas imagery from everything religious and reattach it to the New Year. Thus the current tradition was born.
to:
However, everything changed with the Revolution. At first, the Bolsheviks tried to suppress the winter holiday traditions entirely. Christmas was banned as part of general antireligious propaganda as a "bourgeois clerical tradition", and for the New Year the Bolsheviks simply didn't care. Things changed in 1935, when the Soviet authorities decided to strip the Cristmas Christmas imagery from everything religious and reattach it to the New Year. Thus the current tradition was born.
23rd Nov '15 8:31:55 PM karstovich2
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Before the October Revolution, Russia was not much different from other countries regarding Christmas traditions. The only important bit of local color was the day of Christmas: the Russian Orthodox Church still observes the Julian Calendar, so their Christmas falls on January 7 for Gregorians. The rest was mostly the same: Christmas trees with garlands and decorations, the old grandfatherly gift-giver who was identified as St.Nicholas (Santa Claus). The New Year was a separate secular holiday estabilished by Peter the Great, and it was not yet intertwined with Christmas.
to:
Before the October Revolution, Russia was not much different from other countries regarding Christmas traditions. The only important bit of local color was the day of Christmas: the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church Church]] still observes the Julian Calendar, so their Christmas falls on January 7 for Gregorians. The rest was mostly the same: Christmas trees with garlands and decorations, the old grandfatherly gift-giver who was identified as St.Nicholas (Santa Claus). The New Year was a separate secular holiday estabilished by Peter the Great, and it was not yet intertwined with Christmas.
21st Nov '15 12:20:35 PM nombretomado
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Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Father Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
to:
Instead of Santa, a new SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was created, named Ded Moroz (Father Frost). He was loosely based on an old Slavic nature spirit Morozko (or Jack Frost), who didn't have any association with holidays and was "responsible" for cold and frost; the new Ded Moroz, however, was explicitly a Santa-like figure. A sidekick was also invented for Ded Moroz, his supposed grand-daughter named Snegurochka (Snow Maiden); likewise, she was loosely based on RussianMythologyAndTales Myth/RussianMythologyAndTales but previously didn't have any connection with either Christmas or New Year.
15th Nov '15 11:43:24 PM C2
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* '''Presidential Address''': just before 0:00, it is customary for families to gather in front of their TV sets and listen to the president's public speech congratulating citizens with New Year, and listen to the national anthem. So far, there were two seriously abnormal speeches first on December 31, 1991, read by the famous standup comedian Mikhail Zadornov: in the chaos of Soviet Union dissolution few days before no one up there thought about the traditional speech, and Zadornov just happened to be the most universally recognized figure that's been in studio at the time, and the second was on December 31, 1999, when Yeltsin repeated his surprise resignation announcement from earlier that day, followed immediately by a more typical New Year speech by Putin, then acting president.
to:
* '''Presidential Address''': just before 0:00, it is customary for families to gather in front of their TV sets and listen to the president's public speech congratulating citizens with New Year, and listen to the national anthem. So far, there were two seriously abnormal speeches first on December 31, 1991, read by the famous standup comedian Mikhail Zadornov: in the chaos of Soviet Union dissolution few days before no one up there thought about the traditional speech, and Zadornov just happened to be the most universally recognized figure that's been in studio at the time, and the second was on December 31, 1999, when Boris Yeltsin repeated his surprise resignation announcement from earlier that day, followed immediately by a more typical New Year speech by Vladimir Putin, then acting president.
12th Dec '14 8:42:02 AM ZemplinTemplar
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* Fall semester exams in higher education. Traditionally, they start somewhere close to end of December with series of 'зачет's, before New Year and continues with proper exams (usually, but not always, after New Year holyday season). The problem is, that students of higher education are prone to long alco-maraphones and it so happens that the greatest holyday falls just in between exams.
to:
* Fall semester exams in higher education. Traditionally, they start somewhere close to end of December with series of 'зачет's, before New Year and continues with proper exams (usually, but not always, after New Year holyday season). The problem is, that students of higher education are prone to long alco-maraphones and it so happens that the greatest holyday falls just in between exams.exams. ----
8th Oct '14 8:06:50 AM Grasshopper
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Before the October Revolution, Russia was not much different from other countries regarding Christmas traditions. The only important bit of local color was the day of Christmas: the Russian Orthodox Church celebrates that holiday on January 7. The rest was mostly the same: Christmas trees with garlands and decorations, the old grandfatherly gift-giver who was identified as St.Nicholas (Santa Claus). The New Year was a separate secular holiday estabilished by Peter the Great, and it was not yet intertwined with Christmas.
to:
Before the October Revolution, Russia was not much different from other countries regarding Christmas traditions. The only important bit of local color was the day of Christmas: the Russian Orthodox Church celebrates that holiday still observes the Julian Calendar, so their Christmas falls on January 7.7 for Gregorians. The rest was mostly the same: Christmas trees with garlands and decorations, the old grandfatherly gift-giver who was identified as St.Nicholas (Santa Claus). The New Year was a separate secular holiday estabilished by Peter the Great, and it was not yet intertwined with Christmas.
22nd Sep '14 3:27:59 PM permeakra
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* '''Old New Year''': celebrated by those who haven't had enough of New Year and Christmas on January 14, which corresponds to New Year's Day in the Julian calendar. Unlike New Year and Christmas, Old New Year is not an official holiday. The wildest party animals and the biggest alcoholics will start "celebrating" on the Gregorian Christmas and continue all the way until the Julian New Year.
to:
* '''Old New Year''': celebrated by those who haven't had enough of New Year and Christmas on January 14, which corresponds to New Year's Day in the Julian calendar. Unlike New Year and Christmas, Old New Year is not an official holiday. The wildest party animals and the biggest alcoholics will start "celebrating" on the Gregorian Christmas and continue all the way until the Julian New Year.Year. * Fall semester exams in higher education. Traditionally, they start somewhere close to end of December with series of 'зачет's, before New Year and continues with proper exams (usually, but not always, after New Year holyday season). The problem is, that students of higher education are prone to long alco-maraphones and it so happens that the greatest holyday falls just in between exams.
7th Jun '13 1:23:42 PM aurora369
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Some parents hire Ded Moroz impersonators to deliver gifts to their children personally, in exchange for a small poem recited by heart, usually New Year themed. Every children's New Year festival, usually carried out in schools and kindergartens, also has a Ded Moroz and Snegurochka. There's also a single official Ded Moroz impersonator who anonymously lives in Veliky Ustyug, Archangelsk Oblast and is supposed to represent the real Ded Moroz.
to:
Some parents hire Ded Moroz impersonators to deliver gifts to their children personally, in exchange for a small poem recited by heart, usually New Year themed. Every children's New Year festival, usually carried out in schools and kindergartens, also has a Ded Moroz and Snegurochka. There's also a single official Ded Moroz impersonator who anonymously lives in Veliky Ustyug, Archangelsk Vologda Oblast and is supposed to represent the real Ded Moroz.
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