History UsefulNotes / BritishWeather

13th Aug '16 5:04:06 PM DarkPhoenix94
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In fiction, London, of course, will always have fog at some point of the story. In addition to natural fog, the burning of coal creates a lot of problems. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smog In 1952 it is estimated that over 12,000 people died from four days of bad smog]]. Actual London, and indeed Britain in general, are today ''far'' less burdened with fog than some fictional works would have you believe, but their depictions can be given a bit more credence if set after industrialisation but before the passing of the clean air acts. Narrow river valleys OopNorth are prone to mist and fog in winter, but it's rarely a London phenomenon nowadays. It's also not uncommon to see thick haar or 'sea fog' in coastal cities such as Edinburgh, but it isn't an everyday occurrence. See also AFoggyDayInLondonTown.

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In fiction, London, of course, will always have fog at some point of the story. In addition to natural fog, the burning of coal creates a lot of problems. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smog In 1952 it is estimated that over 12,000 people died from four days of bad smog]]. Actual London, and indeed Britain in general, are today ''far'' less burdened with fog than some fictional works would have you believe, but their depictions can be given a bit more credence if set after industrialisation but before the passing of the clean air acts.acts - though London today is still reliably a couple of degrees Celsius warmer than the rest of the country thanks to pollution. Narrow river valleys OopNorth are prone to mist and fog in winter, but it's rarely a London phenomenon nowadays. It's also not uncommon to see thick haar or 'sea fog' in coastal cities such as Edinburgh, but it isn't an everyday occurrence. See also AFoggyDayInLondonTown.



One aspect of British and Irish weather that's often overlooked by writers used to lower latitudes is that the days are very long in the summer and very short in the winter. This is especially the case in northern Scotland, but is true of the UK and Ireland in general. There's no "midnight sun" like in the polar regions, but 10 pm sun can be expected in midsummer, while it can start getting dim at something like 3PM in deep winter. This has led to some degree of FantasticReligiousWeirdness here on Earth: Britain's [[UsefulNotes/ATouchOfClassEthnicityAndReligion substantial]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Muslim]] community, and particularly those living in Scotland,[[note]]Which is, again, substantial; the first Muslim MP represented Glasgow, and a Muslim has represented some part of Glasgow or other since 1997[[/note]]have received numerous ''fatwas'' saying "No, you ''don't'' have to fast from literal sunrise to sunset, seeing as that's a 15 or even 20-hour fast for 30 days when Ramadan falls in the summertime. 6 in the morning to 6 at night is just fine."

to:

One aspect of British and Irish weather that's often overlooked by writers used to lower latitudes is that the days are very long in the summer and very short in the winter.winter - and sometimes, the Northern Lights can be seen in Scotland and its northern islands. This is especially the case in northern Scotland, but is true of the UK and Ireland in general. There's no "midnight sun" like in the polar regions, but 10 pm sun can be expected in midsummer, while it can start getting dim at something like 3PM in deep winter. This has led to some degree of FantasticReligiousWeirdness here on Earth: Britain's [[UsefulNotes/ATouchOfClassEthnicityAndReligion substantial]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Muslim]] community, and particularly those living in Scotland,[[note]]Which is, again, substantial; the first Muslim MP represented Glasgow, and a Muslim has represented some part of Glasgow or other since 1997[[/note]]have received numerous ''fatwas'' saying "No, you ''don't'' have to fast from literal sunrise to sunset, seeing as that's a 15 or even 20-hour fast for 30 days when Ramadan falls in the summertime. 6 in the morning to 6 at night is just fine."
13th Aug '16 5:01:12 PM DarkPhoenix94
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Britain tends to have three seasons - [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs a cold season, a wet season, and a cold and wet season]]. If you're lucky, there may be a week or so of sunshine between the latter two. Creator/BillBryson noted seeing a forecast of 'Warm and dry, with cooler and rainy spells' and commentated that it could be printed every day, and in fact might be for all he knew, and hardly ever be wrong, and that unless you decide to go hiking up Ben Nevis in your dressing gown, you can probably get away with wearing the same thing all year round. Provided it comes with a hood or you're carrying your umbrella.

to:

Britain tends to have three seasons - [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs a cold season, a wet season, and a cold and wet season]]. If you're lucky, there may be a week or so of sunshine between the latter two. Creator/JohnCleese once said in a tv interview [[DeadpanSnarker "We have a national holiday in Britain. It's called Summer."]] Creator/BillBryson noted seeing a forecast of 'Warm and dry, with cooler and rainy spells' and commentated that it could be printed every day, and in fact might be for all he knew, and hardly ever be wrong, and that unless you decide to go hiking up Ben Nevis in your dressing gown, you can probably get away with wearing the same thing all year round. Provided it comes with a hood or you're carrying your umbrella.



The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native Hawaiian posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} was an underperforming amateur.

to:

The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, flooded [[note]] or at least, there are puddles large enough that the ball actually floats across them - and this only applies to the professional game. At amateur level, such occurrences merely lead to people playing around the puddle and raucous laughter when the ball lands in the puddle and some poor sod gets drenched. [[/note]], is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native Hawaiian posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} was an underperforming amateur.
29th Jul '16 11:14:36 AM AgProv
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The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[{{Hawaii}}]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.

to:

The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[{{Hawaii}}]]an Hawaiian posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} was an underperforming amateur.
29th Jul '16 11:10:13 AM AgProv
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The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}}]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.

to:

The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}}]]an [[{{Hawaii}}]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.
29th Jul '16 11:08:11 AM AgProv
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The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[Hawaii]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.

to:

The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[Hawaii]]an [[UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}}]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.
29th Jul '16 11:06:18 AM AgProv
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The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there.

to:

The most obvious thing anyone notices is the rain. Virtually every day, somewhere will have a downpour. If you look at the weather forecast for UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} on any given day, it predicts rain. The East Coast is supposed to be drier, but even there it's not exactly dry. Get two or three days of hot weather and a thunderstorm will generally finish it off. {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} is a case in point, and rain (or bad light) is a frequent play-stopper in cricket. [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Football]], on the other hand... only if the pitch is too frozen to play on, or actually flooded, is a match called off. [[RugbyIsSlaughter Rugby won't be called off]] for anything less than a direct meteor strike -- and then, only for long enough to prop the posts back up and remove the meteorite. Glasgow is the rainiest city in the UK by average rainfall. This is not news to anyone who lives there.
there. British people are perversely ''proud'' of their rain. A vigorous debate arose on Facebook when a native [[Hawaii]]an posted that they lived in the rainiest place on Earth - a Hawaiian island that had had rain for 247 straight days. Readers were invited to top that. British readers obliged in droves. One correspondent from North Wales said "247 days? that's a drought!" Others pointed to their own native areas with pride and provided similar anecdotes suggesting Hawaii was an underperforming amateur.
12th Jul '16 2:09:47 AM MorganWick
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Britain tends to have three seasons - a cold season, a wet season, and a cold and wet season. If you're lucky, there may be a week or so of sunshine between the latter two. Creator/BillBryson noted seeing a forecast of 'Warm and dry, with cooler and rainy spells' and commentated that it could be printed every day, and in fact might be for all he knew, and hardly ever be wrong, and that unless you decide to go hiking up Ben Nevis in your dressing gown, you can probably get away with wearing the same thing all year round. Provided it comes with a hood or you're carrying your umbrella.

to:

Britain tends to have three seasons - [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs a cold season, a wet season, and a cold and wet season.season]]. If you're lucky, there may be a week or so of sunshine between the latter two. Creator/BillBryson noted seeing a forecast of 'Warm and dry, with cooler and rainy spells' and commentated that it could be printed every day, and in fact might be for all he knew, and hardly ever be wrong, and that unless you decide to go hiking up Ben Nevis in your dressing gown, you can probably get away with wearing the same thing all year round. Provided it comes with a hood or you're carrying your umbrella.
7th Jul '16 5:42:31 PM Wyldchyld
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One aspect of British and Irish weather that's often overlooked by writers used to lower latitudes is that the days are very long in the summer and very short in the winter. This is especially the case in northern Scotland, but is true of the UK and Ireland in general. There's no "midnight sun" like in the polar regions, but 10 pm sun can be expected in midsummer, while it can start getting dim at something like 4PM in deep winter. This has led to some degree of FantasticReligiousWeirdness here on Earth: Britain's [[UsefulNotes/ATouchOfClassEthnicityAndReligion substantial]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Muslim]] community, and particularly those living in Scotland,[[note]]Which is, again, substantial; the first Muslim MP represented Glasgow, and a Muslim has represented some part of Glasgow or other since 1997[[/note]]have received numerous ''fatwas'' saying "No, you ''don't'' have to fast from literal sunrise to sunset, seeing as that's a 15 or even 20-hour fast for 30 days when Ramadan falls in the summertime. 6 in the morning to 6 at night is just fine."

to:

One aspect of British and Irish weather that's often overlooked by writers used to lower latitudes is that the days are very long in the summer and very short in the winter. This is especially the case in northern Scotland, but is true of the UK and Ireland in general. There's no "midnight sun" like in the polar regions, but 10 pm sun can be expected in midsummer, while it can start getting dim at something like 4PM 3PM in deep winter. This has led to some degree of FantasticReligiousWeirdness here on Earth: Britain's [[UsefulNotes/ATouchOfClassEthnicityAndReligion substantial]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Muslim]] community, and particularly those living in Scotland,[[note]]Which is, again, substantial; the first Muslim MP represented Glasgow, and a Muslim has represented some part of Glasgow or other since 1997[[/note]]have received numerous ''fatwas'' saying "No, you ''don't'' have to fast from literal sunrise to sunset, seeing as that's a 15 or even 20-hour fast for 30 days when Ramadan falls in the summertime. 6 in the morning to 6 at night is just fine."
29th Jun '16 5:59:31 PM LeedsKing
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Notably April, most notorious for "April showers", is often the month when the Sun is first seen each year, often causing hill fires (identical to Australian bush fires, but on hills) and burning people who keep their liquid fuel cans outside then pick them up (honestly).[[note]] OopNorth, this is the second most common reason the fire service is called. The most common is to rescue sheep from waterways. No joke.[[/note]] In 2012 there was a section of the North Midlands in drought and flood ''at the same time''. In the North of England one week of blizzards and -13 was followed by a week of heatwaves and +32. The Calder Valley flooded four times in three weeks later that year. In 2012 TheMidlands experienced hailstones in July.

to:

Notably April, most notorious for "April showers", is often the month when the Sun is first seen each year, often causing hill fires (identical to Australian bush fires, but on hills) and burning people who keep their liquid fuel cans outside then pick them up (honestly).[[note]] OopNorth, this is the second most common reason the fire service is called. The most common is to rescue sheep from waterways. No joke.[[/note]] In 2012 there was a section of the North Midlands in drought and flood ''at the same time''. In the North of England one week of blizzards and -13 -13°C was followed by a week of heatwaves and +32.+32°C. The Calder Valley flooded four times in three weeks later that year. In 2012 TheMidlands experienced hailstones in July.
21st Mar '16 7:05:27 PM karstovich2
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Wind can get pretty high, but the sea is too cold for hurricanes. We've had some close ones though. The Great Storm of 1987 is infamous, partly because of a weather forecaster named Michael Fish, who explained that there wasn't a hurricane on the way. He was technically correct - hurricanes occur by definition in the tropics - but there were definitely some hurricane-force winds. In the event of a storm, expect at least one picture of some brave/stupid (opinions may vary) souls braving crashing waves on a seashore. A favourite pastime of schoolchildren on a windy day is to lift their jacket up over their heads and walk into the wind. Way more fun than it sounds.

to:

Wind can get pretty high, but the sea is too cold for hurricanes. We've had some close ones though. The Great Storm of 1987 is infamous, partly because of a weather forecaster named Michael Fish, who explained that there wasn't a hurricane on the way. He was technically correct - hurricanes occur by definition in the tropics - but there were definitely some hurricane-force winds. Actual hurricanes originally from the tropics (or at least subtropics) actually do occasionally make their way to Britain; 1986's Hurricane Charley, which famously caused massive amounts of very expensive damage in North Carolina and Virginia, actually managed to cross the Atlantic to dump historic amounts of rain on Ireland, Wales, and England, costing millions of pounds and killing eleven people. In the event of a storm, expect at least one picture of some brave/stupid (opinions may vary) souls braving crashing waves on a seashore. A favourite pastime of schoolchildren on a windy day is to lift their jacket up over their heads and walk into the wind. Way more fun than it sounds.
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