History UsefulNotes / Britain

9th Jun '16 6:39:08 PM Awsamazing
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Once ruled the [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire largest empire in world history]] but by the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, its ability to rule those colonies was challenged and independence movements in Ireland, India, Egypt, Africa and Israel broke out. Public opinion was no longer as buoyed by the optimism of empire world-building as it was in the Victorian era, the young generation of Tommies killed in the Great War put a damper on that. The vast mobilization and defense of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII as well as UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt's insistence that the Empire not survive the war made it next to impossible for the UK to maintain its holdings and several former colonies gained its independence between 1945 to 1954. A permanent member of the UN Security Council, and with [[UltimateDefenceOfTheRealm its own nuclear weapons]] and one of the few remaining blue-water navies, Britain's status as a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships credible military power]] on its own is well cemented, mostly because of [[UsefulNotes/TheFalklandsWar the war in the Falkland Islands]]: waging war with an advanced military force sited ''next door'' to the contested scrap of land in open conflict 8000 miles away ''and then winning'' is no mean feat. Once an industrial powerhouse, Britain now has a mainly service-based economy but is still [[http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15772127 the world's sixth largest]] manufacturer.

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Once ruled the [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire largest empire in world history]] but by the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, its ability to rule those colonies was challenged and independence movements in Ireland, India, Egypt, Africa and Israel broke out. Public opinion was no longer as buoyed by the optimism of empire world-building as it was in the Victorian era, the young generation of Tommies killed in the Great War put a damper on that. The vast mobilization and defense of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII as well as UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt's insistence that the Empire not survive the war made it next to impossible for the UK to maintain its holdings and several former colonies gained its independence between 1945 to 1954. A permanent member of the UN Security Council, and with [[UltimateDefenceOfTheRealm its own nuclear weapons]] and one of the few remaining blue-water navies, Britain's status as a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships credible military power]] on its own is well cemented, mostly because of [[UsefulNotes/TheFalklandsWar the war in the Falkland Islands]]: waging war with an advanced military force sited ''next door'' to the contested scrap of land in open conflict 8000 miles away ''and then winning'' is no mean feat. Once an industrial powerhouse, Britain now has a mainly service-based economy but is still [[http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15772127 the world's sixth largest]] manufacturer.
9th Jun '16 2:50:22 PM moloch
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The King of England (and subsequently Great Britain) was also Lord of Ireland from 1171, and King of Ireland from 1541. Ireland joined the UK in 1801, theoretically by the same means as Scotland--i.e. a free vote of its Parliament--but since that Parliament was dominated by the Protestant Anglo-Irish minority, the union was [[TheIrishQuestion a bit controversial]]. After the Civil War bogged down, most of Ireland was granted formal independence again in 1921 to form the Irish Free State, which later became the Republic Of Ireland. Since 1999, Scotland and Wales have been partially self-governing through a new Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly respectively, though these bodies only have powers to deal with certain areas of government - education policy, for example. Scotland & Wales still elect [=MPs=] to the main London Parliament too, which retains control over national issues like defense. Northern Ireland is a portion of Ireland that remained part of the United Kingdom after the rest of Ireland decided to become independent (and, later, a republic) in the 20th century. Unlike the other home nations, which only achieved this fairly recently, Northern Ireland has been partially self-governing since its creation in 1921, though this was suspended between 1972 and 2002 due to [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles a small spot of bother]].

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The King of England (and subsequently Great Britain) was also Lord of Ireland from 1171, and King of Ireland from 1541. Ireland joined the UK in 1801, theoretically by the same means as Scotland--i.e. a free vote of its Parliament--but since that Parliament was dominated by the Protestant Anglo-Irish minority, the union was [[TheIrishQuestion a bit controversial]]. After the Civil War bogged down, most of Ireland was granted gained formal independence again in 1921 to form after its 1919-21 War of Independence, forming the Irish Free State, which later became the Republic Of Ireland. Since 1999, Scotland and Wales have been partially self-governing through a new Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly respectively, though these bodies only have powers to deal with certain areas of government - education policy, for example. Scotland & Wales still elect [=MPs=] to the main London Parliament too, which retains control over national issues like defense.defence. Northern Ireland is a portion of Ireland that remained part of the United Kingdom after the rest of Ireland decided to become independent (and, later, a republic) in the 20th century. Unlike the other home nations, which only achieved this fairly recently, Northern Ireland has been partially self-governing since its creation in 1921, though this was suspended between 1972 and 2002 due to [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles a small spot of bother]].
30th Mar '16 5:05:22 PM MarkLungo
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* KnightFever

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* KnightFeverUsefulNotes/KnightFever
26th Mar '16 12:07:19 PM MarkLungo
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** CricketRules

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** CricketRulesUsefulNotes/CricketRules
25th Mar '16 2:09:33 PM MarkLungo
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* {{Cricket}}

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* {{Cricket}}UsefulNotes/{{Cricket}}
24th Mar '16 6:38:40 PM dmcreif
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Britain is made up of four "home nations": England, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} and UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland. Wales was annexed by England in the middle ages (and the title of Wales' old ruler - Prince of Wales (''Tywysog Cymru'') - has been passed to the reigning English monarch's eldest son ever since) but Scotland's entry into this Union was via vote of the Scottish Parliament in the early 18th century which means, theoretically, Scotland entered as an equal. Because England and Scotland merged to form the Kingdom of Great Britain, this means that talking about the "Kingdom of England" (or of Scotland) after 1707 is incorrect as those entities had legally ceased to exist. (Which makes the common foreign--and frequently domestic--reference to Her Majesty as 'the Queen of England' a mistake). The title "United Kingdom" only came about when another Act of Union combined the Kingdom of Great Britain with the Kingdom of Ireland, though paragraph III of the 1707 Act of Union states "THAT the united Kingdom of Great Britain be Represented by one and the same Parliament..." (note the capitalisation) and the description "United Kingdom" was in common parlance in the 18th century.

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Britain is made up of four "home nations": nations" wedged into a space slightly smaller than the state of Wyoming: England, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}}, UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} and UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland. Wales was annexed by England in the middle ages (and the title of Wales' old ruler - Prince of Wales (''Tywysog Cymru'') - has been passed to the reigning English monarch's eldest son ever since) but Scotland's entry into this Union was via vote of the Scottish Parliament in the early 18th century which means, theoretically, Scotland entered as an equal. Because England and Scotland merged to form the Kingdom of Great Britain, this means that talking about the "Kingdom of England" (or of Scotland) after 1707 is incorrect as those entities had legally ceased to exist. (Which makes the common foreign--and frequently domestic--reference to Her Majesty as 'the Queen of England' a mistake). The title "United Kingdom" only came about when another Act of Union combined the Kingdom of Great Britain with the Kingdom of Ireland, though paragraph III of the 1707 Act of Union states "THAT the united Kingdom of Great Britain be Represented by one and the same Parliament..." (note the capitalisation) and the description "United Kingdom" was in common parlance in the 18th century.



The UK produces a large number of English-language films and TV programmes of international fame, from places like Pinewood Studios and Creator/TheBBC.

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The UK produces a large number of English-language films and TV programmes of international fame, from places well known establishments like Pinewood Studios and Creator/TheBBC.
5th Mar '16 1:39:25 PM MarkLungo
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*** ScottishPremierLeague

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*** ScottishPremierLeagueUsefulNotes/ScottishPremierLeague



* {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}}

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* {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}}UsefulNotes/{{Wimbledon}}
20th Feb '16 2:17:07 PM MarkLungo
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*** EnglishPremierLeague

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*** EnglishPremierLeagueUsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague
7th Feb '16 10:10:22 AM nombretomado
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->The red cross on a white field goes back to TheCrusades, when English and French crusaders exchanged colors assigned to them by UsefulNotes/ThePope with each other (originally England got a standard of a white cross on a red field), which was identified with Saint George, a late 3rd-century Roman soldier.

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->The red cross on a white field goes back to TheCrusades, UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, when English and French crusaders exchanged colors assigned to them by UsefulNotes/ThePope with each other (originally England got a standard of a white cross on a red field), which was identified with Saint George, a late 3rd-century Roman soldier.
31st Jan '16 1:41:08 PM Lymantria
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* BritishPubs

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* BritishPubsUsefulNotes/BritishPubs
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Britain