History UsefulNotes / Basketball

26th Mar '17 4:43:03 PM KYCubbie
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''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=], who became the second D-I women's head coach with 1,000 wins in 2017. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's record winning streak. You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]

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''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=], who became the second D-I women's head coach with 1,000 wins in 2017. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's first record winning streak. streak.[[note]]Stanford was also the last team to defeat [=UConn=] before the Huskies started their current record winning streak.[[/note]] You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]
25th Mar '17 10:09:28 PM KYCubbie
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''Tennessee'': The Lady Vols have been a consistent powerhouse in women's basketball for thirty years and counting. Legendary head coach Pat Summitt[[note]]yes, Tyler's mom[[/note]] racked up over a thousand wins, including eight titles, since taking over as a grad student in 1972 and is the first coach in the Division I college game, men's or women's, to have over 1,000 wins (since joined by Coach K). Known for her DeathGlare. The 'Lady' is a bit of a requirement,[[note]]enough so that the women's basketball team remains "Lady Volunteers" after all other Tennessee women's teams dropped "Lady" starting in 2015–16[[/note]] or Summitt will glare at you from beyond the grave. After Summitt was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011 (which would ultimately claim her life in 2016), she coached one final season before retiring in 2012 and being succeeded by longtime assistant Holly Warlick.

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''Tennessee'': The Lady Vols have been a consistent powerhouse in women's basketball for thirty years and counting. Legendary head coach Pat Summitt[[note]]yes, Tyler's mom[[/note]] racked up over a thousand wins, including eight titles, since taking over as a grad student in 1972 and is the first coach in the Division I college game, men's or women's, to have over 1,000 wins (since joined by Coach K).K and Tara [=VanDerveer=]). Known for her DeathGlare. The 'Lady' is a bit of a requirement,[[note]]enough so that the women's basketball team remains "Lady Volunteers" after all other Tennessee women's teams dropped "Lady" starting in 2015–16[[/note]] or Summitt will glare at you from beyond the grave. After Summitt was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011 (which would ultimately claim her life in 2016), she coached one final season before retiring in 2012 and being succeeded by longtime assistant Holly Warlick.



''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=]. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's record winning streak. You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]

to:

''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=].[=VanDerveer=], who became the second D-I women's head coach with 1,000 wins in 2017. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's record winning streak. You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]
25th Mar '17 10:02:01 PM KYCubbie
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Honorable mention goes to the '''Kansas Jayhawks''', '''UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} State Spartans''', '''Gonzaga Bulldogs'''[[note]]unofficially known as "Zags"[[/note]], and '''Wisconsin Badgers''', which, with the aforementioned Blue Devils, are in the midst of the five longest current March Madness (for which see below) appearance streaks (at 28 years for the Jayhawks, 22 for the Blue Devils, 20 for the Spartans, and 19 for both the Bulldogs and Badgers). Two teams in this group deserve special honorable mentions. The first goes to Kansas for setting a new record streak of NCAA appearances, and also winning at least a share of the Big 12 Conference regular-season title for 13 straight seasons and counting, tying the record set by UCLA in the post-Wooden years.[[note]]Wooden ended his career with nine straight conference titles; his two successors extended the streak to 13.[[/note]] The other goes to Gonzaga, even though it's the only team in the group that hasn't won a national title[[note]](and not even making the Final Four until 2017)[[/note]], for two reasons—first, it plays in the decidedly mid-major West Coast Conference,[[note]]meaning that in some of those years, they wouldn't have made it to the NCAA tournament without winning the conference tournament[[/note]] and second, it's done it without the benefit of any revenue from football (Gonzaga hasn't had a football team since 1941).[[note]]Significant because football programs often subsidize other sports at a school. Although men's basketball makes money at many schools, it very often benefits from the money and exposure that the football team gets.[[/note]] Another special honorable mention goes to the 1965-66 Texas Western College team, for being the only college men's team to ''ever'' get into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (mainly due to the fact they were the first all-black starting team to ever win the NCAA Tournament).[[note]]For several years, they were the only college team in the Hall, but the Immaculata women of 1972–1974 joined them in 2014.[[/note]]

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Honorable mention goes to the '''Kansas Jayhawks''', '''UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} State Spartans''', '''Gonzaga Bulldogs'''[[note]]unofficially known as "Zags"[[/note]], and '''Wisconsin Badgers''', which, with the aforementioned Blue Devils, are in the midst of the five longest current March Madness (for which see below) appearance streaks (at 28 years for the Jayhawks, 22 for the Blue Devils, 20 for the Spartans, and 19 for both the Bulldogs and Badgers). Two teams in this group deserve special honorable mentions. The first goes to Kansas for setting a new record streak of NCAA appearances, and also winning at least a share of the Big 12 Conference regular-season title for 13 straight seasons and counting, tying the record set by UCLA in the post-Wooden years.[[note]]Wooden ended his career with nine straight conference titles; his two successors extended the streak to 13.[[/note]] The other goes to Gonzaga, even though it's the only team in the group that hasn't won a national title[[note]](and not title[[note]](the Zags also didn't even making make the Final Four until 2017)[[/note]], for two reasons—first, it plays in the decidedly mid-major West Coast Conference,[[note]]meaning that in some of those years, they wouldn't have made it to the NCAA tournament without winning the conference tournament[[/note]] and second, it's done it without the benefit of any revenue from football (Gonzaga hasn't had a football team since 1941).[[note]]Significant because football programs often subsidize other sports at a school. Although men's basketball makes money at many schools, it very often benefits from the money and exposure that the football team gets.[[/note]] Another special honorable mention goes to the 1965-66 Texas Western College team, for being the only college men's team to ''ever'' get into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (mainly due to the fact they were the first all-black starting team to ever win the NCAA Tournament).[[note]]For several years, they were the only college team in the Hall, but the Immaculata women of 1972–1974 joined them in 2014.[[/note]]
25th Mar '17 9:59:44 PM KYCubbie
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Honorable mention goes to the '''Kansas Jayhawks''', '''UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} State Spartans''', '''Gonzaga Bulldogs'''[[note]]unofficially known as "Zags"[[/note]], and '''Wisconsin Badgers''', which, with the aforementioned Blue Devils, are in the midst of the five longest current March Madness (for which see below) appearance streaks (at 28 years for the Jayhawks, 22 for the Blue Devils, 20 for the Spartans, and 19 for both the Bulldogs and Badgers). Two teams in this group deserve special honorable mentions. The first goes to Kansas for setting a new record streak of NCAA appearances, and also winning at least a share of the Big 12 Conference regular-season title for 13 straight seasons and counting, tying the record set by UCLA in the post-Wooden years.[[note]]Wooden ended his career with nine straight conference titles; his two successors extended the streak to 13.[[/note]] The other goes to Gonzaga, even though it's the only team in the group that hasn't won a national title[[note]]or, for that matter, made the Final Four[[/note]], for two reasons—first, it plays in the decidedly mid-major West Coast Conference,[[note]]meaning that in some of those years, they wouldn't have made it to the NCAA tournament without winning the conference tournament[[/note]] and second, it's done it without the benefit of any revenue from football (Gonzaga hasn't had a football team since 1941).[[note]]Significant because football programs often subsidize other sports at a school. Although men's basketball makes money at many schools, it very often benefits from the money and exposure that the football team gets.[[/note]] Another special honorable mention goes to the 1965-66 Texas Western College team, for being the only college men's team to ''ever'' get into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (mainly due to the fact they were the first all-black starting team to ever win the NCAA Tournament).[[note]]For several years, they were the only college team in the Hall, but the Immaculata women of 1972–1974 joined them in 2014.[[/note]]

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Honorable mention goes to the '''Kansas Jayhawks''', '''UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} State Spartans''', '''Gonzaga Bulldogs'''[[note]]unofficially known as "Zags"[[/note]], and '''Wisconsin Badgers''', which, with the aforementioned Blue Devils, are in the midst of the five longest current March Madness (for which see below) appearance streaks (at 28 years for the Jayhawks, 22 for the Blue Devils, 20 for the Spartans, and 19 for both the Bulldogs and Badgers). Two teams in this group deserve special honorable mentions. The first goes to Kansas for setting a new record streak of NCAA appearances, and also winning at least a share of the Big 12 Conference regular-season title for 13 straight seasons and counting, tying the record set by UCLA in the post-Wooden years.[[note]]Wooden ended his career with nine straight conference titles; his two successors extended the streak to 13.[[/note]] The other goes to Gonzaga, even though it's the only team in the group that hasn't won a national title[[note]]or, for that matter, made title[[note]](and not even making the Final Four[[/note]], Four until 2017)[[/note]], for two reasons—first, it plays in the decidedly mid-major West Coast Conference,[[note]]meaning that in some of those years, they wouldn't have made it to the NCAA tournament without winning the conference tournament[[/note]] and second, it's done it without the benefit of any revenue from football (Gonzaga hasn't had a football team since 1941).[[note]]Significant because football programs often subsidize other sports at a school. Although men's basketball makes money at many schools, it very often benefits from the money and exposure that the football team gets.[[/note]] Another special honorable mention goes to the 1965-66 Texas Western College team, for being the only college men's team to ''ever'' get into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (mainly due to the fact they were the first all-black starting team to ever win the NCAA Tournament).[[note]]For several years, they were the only college team in the Hall, but the Immaculata women of 1972–1974 joined them in 2014.[[/note]]
25th Mar '17 2:33:23 PM KYCubbie
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Basketball is played with five people on each team. Canonically, the positions are Point Guard, Shooting Guard, the Center, the Small Forward, and the Power Forward. In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to play three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) considered simply "frontcourt" players. The most common positional "blurs" are:

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Basketball is played with five people on each team. Canonically, the positions are Point Guard, Shooting Guard, the Center, the Small Forward, and the Power Forward. In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to play three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) considered simply "frontcourt" players. The most common Common positional "blurs" are:



* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship and the last two European Championships -in which they have made it at least into the semifinals for the last 8 tournaments- and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs˜; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who may very well be the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.
* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos) fight every year for the conquest of the local title. Greek supporters really are [[HotBlooded hot]]. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[AGodIAm as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player, at least in North America, is the Milwaukee Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAN-ees AH-det-oh-KOON-boh[[/note]]

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* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship and the last two European Championships -in which they have made it at least into the semifinals for the last 8 tournaments- and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs˜; Spurs; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who may very well be the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.
* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos) fight every year for the conquest of the local title. Greek supporters really are [[HotBlooded hot]].{{hot|Blooded}}. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[AGodIAm as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player, at least in North America, is the Milwaukee Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAN-ees AH-det-oh-KOON-boh[[/note]]



'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph Rupp from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 school year saw huge upheaval in the program—seven players left the program with eligibility remaining, five recruits rescinded their commitments to play for UK, and all three assistant coaches departed.

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'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph Rupp from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 school year saw huge upheaval in the program—seven players left the program major turmoil, with eligibility remaining, five multiple transfers out of the program, many recruits rescinded rescinding their commitments to play for UK, commitments, and all three of the assistant coaches departed.leaving.



''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including winning streaks of 90 and ''over 100'' games that each encompassed parts of three seasons (the second of these is still going). They've won the last four titles; the second of the streak in 2014 took them past rival Tennessee for the most in women's college basketball, and the fourth in 2016 gave coach Geno Auriemma his 11th national title, taking him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.

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''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including winning streaks of 90 and ''over 100'' ''110'' games that each encompassed parts of three seasons (the second of these is still going). They've won the last four titles; the second of the streak in 2014 took them past rival Tennessee for the most in women's college basketball, and the fourth in 2016 gave coach Geno Auriemma his 11th national title, taking him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.
23rd Mar '17 11:32:46 PM KYCubbie
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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the better of these four, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted their two NIT wins as being part of their "championship tradition").

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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three two other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), field) and the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and field). In the 2015–16 season, there was yet another tournament called the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has (it had an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were was aiming for 16); collectively, 16), but that event folded after only one edition. Collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the better best of these four, tournaments, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted their two NIT wins as being part of their "championship tradition").
19th Mar '17 10:58:07 PM KYCubbie
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[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference except the UsefulNotes/IvyLeague has its own tournament, and the champion of each conference tournament is assured a place in the NCAA tournament. Through the 2015–16 season, the Ivies granted their automatic bid to the team with the best record,[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs were needed when there was a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]] but the Ivy League started holding its own conference tournament in 2016–17.

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[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference except the UsefulNotes/IvyLeague has its own tournament, and the champion of each conference tournament is assured a place in the NCAA tournament. Through the 2015–16 season, the Ivies UsefulNotes/IvyLeague granted their its automatic bid to the team with the best record,[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs were needed when there was a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]] but the Ivy League Ivies started holding its their own conference tournament in 2016–17.
19th Mar '17 10:47:40 PM KYCubbie
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[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference except the UsefulNotes/IvyLeague has its own tournament, and the champion of each conference tournament is assured a place in the NCAA tournament. Through the 2015–16 season, the Ivies granted their automatic bid to the team with the best record,[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs were needed when there was a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]] but starting with the 2016–17 season, the Ivy League will begin holding its own conference tournament.

to:

[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference except the UsefulNotes/IvyLeague has its own tournament, and the champion of each conference tournament is assured a place in the NCAA tournament. Through the 2015–16 season, the Ivies granted their automatic bid to the team with the best record,[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs were needed when there was a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]] but starting with the 2016–17 season, the Ivy League will begin started holding its own conference tournament.
tournament in 2016–17.
15th Mar '17 10:17:46 AM nightkiller
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After 68 teams are chosen to play and the announcement of the field is made one Sunday in mid-March on CBS, it's time for people from across America from all walks of life--up to and including [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama our current president]][[note]]Not terribly surprising, given that he's known to play basketball himself to blow off steam--often against his Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who led the Harvard Crimson in the late '80s and played pro ball in Australia for four years[[/note]]--to pick the teams they think will win each game by "filling out the bracket." This is done for fun, but some play betting games and hold office pools, which the NCAA looks down on. The study of the bracket is often referred to as "bracketology."

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After 68 teams are chosen to play and the announcement of the field is made one Sunday in mid-March on CBS, it's time for people from across America from all walks of life--up to and including a certain [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama our current former president]][[note]]Not terribly surprising, given that he's known to play basketball himself to blow off steam--often against his Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who led the Harvard Crimson in the late '80s and played pro ball in Australia for four years[[/note]]--to pick the teams they think will win each game by "filling out the bracket." This is done for fun, but some play betting games and hold office pools, which the NCAA looks down on. The study of the bracket is often referred to as "bracketology."
12th Mar '17 3:40:32 PM KYCubbie
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** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product, who spent her first four WNBA seasons with the Chicago Sky before being dealt to the Washington Mystics in the 2017 offseason, is listed as a guard and forward—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman[[note]]frequently used term for her listed positional combination[[/note]], stretch four, point forward[[note]]a forward who can handle the ball well enough to run a team's offense[[/note]], combo guard[[note]]combination of point guard and shooting guard[[/note]]... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. While she's been named to three All-Star teams so far, also being the top vote-getter in 2015, the 2015 game was the first she actually got to play in.[[note]]She missed the 2013 game to a concussion and the 2014 game to the aftereffects of Lyme disease.[[/note]] In 2015, she also set an all-time league record for free-throw percentage (unheard of for center-sized players),[[note]]EDD shot 94.95% that season. Only five ''NBA'' players have shot for a better percentage in a season. All five were guards, and the tallest of these, Ray Allen, is listed at the same height as EDD.[[/note]] led the league in scoring, and earned MVP honors.

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** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product, who spent her first four WNBA seasons with the Chicago Sky before being dealt to the Washington Mystics in the 2017 offseason, is listed as a guard and forward—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman[[note]]frequently used term for her listed positional combination[[/note]], swingman, stretch four, point forward[[note]]a forward who can handle the ball well enough to run a team's offense[[/note]], forward, combo guard[[note]]combination of point guard and shooting guard[[/note]]...guard... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. While she's been named to three All-Star teams so far, also being the top vote-getter in 2015, the 2015 game was the first she actually got to play in.[[note]]She missed the 2013 game to a concussion and the 2014 game to the aftereffects of Lyme disease.[[/note]] In 2015, she also set an all-time league record for free-throw percentage (unheard of for center-sized players),[[note]]EDD shot 94.95% that season. Only five ''NBA'' players have shot for a better percentage in a season. All five were guards, and the tallest of these, Ray Allen, is listed at the same height as EDD.[[/note]] led the league in scoring, and earned MVP honors.
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