History UsefulNotes / Basketball

13th Oct '17 1:44:10 AM kouta
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** Puerto Rico is a US Territory and people born there are automatically US Citizens. It came as no surprise to astute observers that a Puerto Rican basketball team could go toe-to-toe with one from the rest of the US.
4th Oct '17 7:27:26 PM Daylight
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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that has paid dividends since 2011. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015, officially becoming a dynasty.

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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that has paid dividends since 2011. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015, officially becoming a dynasty. Won their 4th title in 2017, after getting revenge against the team that beat them in 2016, The Los Angeles Sparks.




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* ''2017'': The ''Minnesota Lynx'' beat the Los Angeles Sparks 3-2.
27th Sep '17 12:29:31 AM KYCubbie
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''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including three separate Division I-record winning streaks—first 70, then 90, and finally ''[[UpToEleven 111]]'' games. Each of the last two streaks encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won 11 national titles, the most in the women's game, all under current head coach Geno Auriemma; the most recent title in 2016 took him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.

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''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including three separate Division I-record winning streaks—first streaks of (in chronological order) 70, then 90, and finally ''[[UpToEleven 111]]'' games. Each of the last two streaks encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won 11 national titles, the most in the women's game, all under current head coach Geno Auriemma; the most recent title in 2016 took him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.



''Notre Dame'': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years, though the Huskies have mostly had the upper hand. National champs in 2001 and runners-up in four NCAA tournaments in TheNewTens (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins and Jewell Loyd.

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''Notre Dame'': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years, though the Huskies have mostly had the upper hand. National champs in 2001 and runners-up in four NCAA tournaments in TheNewTens (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins Diggins-Smith and Jewell Loyd.
26th Sep '17 12:41:57 PM KYCubbie
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* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship and the last two European Championships -in which they have made it at least into the semifinals for the last 8 tournaments- and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who showed signs of being the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves before being traded to the Utah Jazz in 2017; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.

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* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship (now World Cup) and the last two 2009 and 2013 European Championships -in which they have made it Championships. Have reached at least into the semifinals for in the last 8 tournaments- nine [=EuroBasket=] editions, and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals.finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who showed signs of being the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves before being traded to the Utah Jazz in 2017; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.



* Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia: Formerly known altogether as Yugoslavia, they are, along with Team USA, the most successful team in Basketball World Cups, each with 5 golds. Always have a tough national team, and they are able to beat almost anybody, even after the collapse of the original country. Home to players like Darko Miličić, Peja Stojaković, and Goran Dragić, known for their tenacity and accuracy beyond the three point line. Slovenia are the reigning European champions, winning the 2017 {=EuroBasket=] behind Dragić (who had previously announced this would be his international finale) and teenage sensation Luka Dončić.

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* Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia: Formerly known altogether as Yugoslavia, they are, along with Team USA, the most successful team in Basketball World Cups, each with 5 golds. Always have a tough national team, and they are able to beat almost anybody, even after the collapse of the original country. Home to players like Darko Miličić, Peja Stojaković, and Goran Dragić, known for their tenacity and accuracy beyond the three point line. Slovenia are the reigning European champions, winning the 2017 {=EuroBasket=] [=EuroBasket=] behind Dragić (who had previously announced this would be his international finale) and teenage sensation Luka Dončić.
26th Sep '17 12:39:52 PM KYCubbie
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* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship and the last two European Championships -in which they have made it at least into the semifinals for the last 8 tournaments- and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who may very well be the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.
* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos) fight every year for the conquest of the local title. Greek supporters really are {{hot|Blooded}}. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[AGodIAm as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player, at least in North America, is the Milwaukee Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAN-ees AH-det-oh-KOON-boh[[/note]]
* Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia: Formerly known altogether as Yugoslavia, they are, along with Team USA, the most successful team in Basketball World Cups, each with 5 golds. Always have a tough national team, and they are able to beat almost anybody, even after the collapse of the original country. Home to players like Darko Miličić, Peja Stojaković, and Goran Dragić, known for their tenacity and accuracy beyond the three point line.

to:

* Spain: Won the 2006 World Championship and the last two European Championships -in which they have made it at least into the semifinals for the last 8 tournaments- and lost against the U.S.A. in the last two Olympic Games Finals. Country of Pau Gasol, ex-forward of the Memphis Grizzlies, Los Angeles Lakers and Chicago Bulls and current power forward with the San Antonio Spurs; his brother Marc Gasol, ex-forward of the Lakers and current forward-center of the Grizzlies; Ricky Rubio, who may very well be showed signs of being the star of the future for the Minnesota Timberwolves; Timberwolves before being traded to the Utah Jazz in 2017; and Serge Ibaka (born in the Republic of the Congo but naturalized in Spain), shot-blocking wizard who made his name with the Oklahoma City Thunder before being traded to the Orlando Magic in 2016.
* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos) fight every year for the conquest of the local title. Greek supporters really are {{hot|Blooded}}. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[AGodIAm as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player, at least in North America, is the Milwaukee Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAN-ees YAHN-ees AH-det-oh-KOON-boh[[/note]]
* Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia: Formerly known altogether as Yugoslavia, they are, along with Team USA, the most successful team in Basketball World Cups, each with 5 golds. Always have a tough national team, and they are able to beat almost anybody, even after the collapse of the original country. Home to players like Darko Miličić, Peja Stojaković, and Goran Dragić, known for their tenacity and accuracy beyond the three point line. Slovenia are the reigning European champions, winning the 2017 {=EuroBasket=] behind Dragić (who had previously announced this would be his international finale) and teenage sensation Luka Dončić.
26th Sep '17 12:32:49 PM KYCubbie
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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also two other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field) and the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field). In the 2015–16 season, there was yet another tournament called the Vegas 16 (it had an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but was aiming for 16), but that event folded after only one edition. Collectively, all of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the best of these tournaments, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted their two NIT wins as being part of their "championship tradition").

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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also two other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field) and the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field).(normally a 32-team field, though the 2017 edition had only 26). In the 2015–16 season, there was yet another tournament called the Vegas 16 (it had an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but was aiming for 16), but that event folded after only one edition. Collectively, all of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the best of these tournaments, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted their two NIT wins as being part of their "championship tradition").



''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including winning streaks of 90 and ''111'' games that each encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won 11 national titles, the most in the women's game, all under current head coach Geno Auriemma; the most recent title in 2016 took him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.

''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=], who became the second D-I women's head coach with 1,000 wins in 2017. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's first record winning streak.[[note]]Stanford was also the last team to defeat [=UConn=] before the Huskies started their second record winning streak.[[/note]] You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]

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''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of six, including three separate Division I-record winning streaks—first 70, then 90, and finally ''[[UpToEleven 111]]'' games. Each of the last two streaks of 90 and ''111'' games that each encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won 11 national titles, the most in the women's game, all under current head coach Geno Auriemma; the most recent title in 2016 took him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.

''Stanford'': The Cardinal (yes, Cardinal, the color, not the bird) has been the lone representative of high-quality women's basketball on the West Coast for a loooong time. Two-time national champions and several more times bridesmaid, they're coached by Tara [=VanDerveer=], who became the second D-I women's head coach with 1,000 wins in 2017. Their current CrowningMomentOfAwesome is ending Connecticut's first record 90-game winning streak.[[note]]Stanford was also the last team to defeat [=UConn=] before the Huskies started their second record winning 111-game streak.[[/note]] You might not want to mention [[BerserkButton Harvard]] around them. [[note]]In 1998, Harvard upset Stanford in the first round of the NCAA Women's Tournament, making the Crimson the only No. 16 seed (women or men) to ever win a tournament game. And to boot, first-round games were played on the home court of the higher seed at the time.[[/note]]
26th Sep '17 12:28:07 PM KYCubbie
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''Tennessee'': The Lady Vols have been a consistent powerhouse in women's basketball for thirty years and counting. Legendary head coach Pat Summitt[[note]]yes, Tyler's mom[[/note]] racked up over a thousand wins, including eight titles, since taking over as a grad student in 1972 and is the first coach in the Division I college game, men's or women's, to have over 1,000 wins (since joined by Coach K and Tara [=VanDerveer=]). Known for her DeathGlare. The 'Lady' is a bit of a requirement,[[note]]enough so that the women's basketball team remains "Lady Volunteers" after all other Tennessee women's teams dropped "Lady" starting in 2015–16[[/note]] or Summitt will glare at you from beyond the grave. After Summitt was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011 (which would ultimately claim her life in 2016), she coached one final season before retiring in 2012 and being succeeded by longtime assistant Holly Warlick.

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''Tennessee'': The Lady Vols have been a consistent powerhouse in women's basketball for thirty years and counting. Legendary head coach Pat Summitt[[note]]yes, Tyler's mom[[/note]] racked up over a thousand wins, including eight titles, since taking over as a grad student in 1972 and is the first coach in the Division I college game, men's or women's, to have over 1,000 wins (since joined by Coach K and Tara [=VanDerveer=]). Known for her DeathGlare. The 'Lady' is a bit of a requirement,[[note]]enough so that the women's basketball team remains remained "Lady Volunteers" after all other Tennessee women's teams dropped "Lady" starting in 2015–16[[/note]] 2015–16...
though in 2017–18, UT [[HesBack brought back "Lady Volunteers"]], giving the rest of its women's teams the option to restore "Lady"[[/note]]
or Summitt will glare at you from beyond the grave. After Summitt was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011 (which would ultimately claim her life in 2016), she coached one final season before retiring in 2012 and being succeeded by longtime assistant Holly Warlick.
26th Jun '17 3:30:54 PM Statzkeen
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* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and the league, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star, the league's all-time leading rebounder until Catchings passed her in her final season, and member of the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.

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* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and the league, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star, the league's all-time leading rebounder until Catchings passed her in her final season, and member of the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. Also notable for recording the first-ever dunk in a WNBA game. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those...those who... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.
16th Apr '17 6:35:01 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Diana Taurasi''': Guard for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted #1 overall in 2004 out of [[OverusedRunningGag UConn]]. [[ArsonMurderAndLifesaving Hot-headed, foul-mouthed, charismatic, and exceedingly talented]]. Has gotten in a little bit of trouble, caught DUI in 2009 and implicated in steroid use (turned out to be a false positive from a sketchy lab). Sat out the 2015 WNBA season at the request of the Russian team she plays for during the traditional basketball season, which offered her [[MoneyDearBoy a bonus well in excess of her WNBA salary]] to sit out.[[note]]To put the financial decision in perspective, she was making slightly under the WNBA maximum salary of $107,000. Her Russian team was paying her $1.5 million a season, not including the aforementioned bonus.[[/note]][[note]]In Taurasi's defense, she turned 33 during the 2015 WNBA season, and hadn't had an offseason since she was at [=UConn=]. This wasn't the first time that Taurasi had been offered a bonus to sit out a WNBA season, and several other WNBA players have reportedly been offered similar bonuses; she's just the first player who's accepted such an offer.[[/note]]

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* '''Diana Taurasi''': Guard for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted #1 overall in 2004 out of [[OverusedRunningGag UConn]]. [[ArsonMurderAndLifesaving Hot-headed, foul-mouthed, charismatic, and exceedingly talented]]. Barring injury or other misfortune, will become the league's career scoring leader during the 2017 season. Has gotten in a little bit of trouble, caught DUI in 2009 and implicated in steroid use (turned out to be a false positive from a sketchy lab). Sat out the 2015 WNBA season at the request of the Russian team she plays for during the traditional basketball season, which offered her [[MoneyDearBoy a bonus well in excess of her WNBA salary]] to sit out.[[note]]To put the financial decision in perspective, she was making slightly under the WNBA maximum salary of $107,000. Her Russian team was paying her $1.5 million a season, not including the aforementioned bonus.[[/note]][[note]]In Taurasi's defense, she turned 33 during the 2015 WNBA season, and hadn't had an offseason since she was at [=UConn=]. This wasn't the first time that Taurasi had been offered a bonus to sit out a WNBA season, and several other WNBA players have reportedly been offered similar bonuses; she's just the first player who's accepted such an offer.[[/note]]
7th Apr '17 5:24:46 PM KYCubbie
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'''North Carolina Tar Heels''' - First and foremost, famous for being UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan's alma mater. The Tar Heels are six-time and currently reigning NCAA champions, and Dean Smith, their coach from 1962 to 1997, coached them to two of those. The Heels had the longest streak ever of consecutive NCAA tournament appearances at 27, making every tournament from 1975 to 2001, before Kansas (see below) passed them in 2017. The Carolina women have one national title to their credit (1994).

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'''North Carolina Tar Heels''' - First and foremost, famous for being UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan's alma mater. The Tar Heels are six-time and currently reigning NCAA champions, and champions; Dean Smith, their coach from 1962 to 1997, coached them to two of those.those, and Roy Williams, their coach since 2003, has led them to three. The Heels had the longest streak ever of consecutive NCAA tournament appearances at 27, making every tournament from 1975 to 2001, before Kansas (see below) passed them in 2017. The Carolina women have one national title to their credit (1994).
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