History UsefulNotes / Basketball

3rd Jan '16 6:01:17 PM KYCubbie
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Games are divided into two 20-minute halves, the shot clock was shortened from 35 seconds to 30 for the 2015–16 season[[note]]not added until 1985, an originally 45 seconds[[/note]] (hence the relatively low scoring), each team has four timeouts in a game[[note]]down from five prior to 2015–16[[/note]], and the three-point line is different from the ones found in the NBA and in international games. The style of play and the overall feeling of watching a game are refreshingly different.
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Games are divided into two 20-minute halves, halves (for men only; the women's game was changed to 10-minute quarters in 2015–16), the shot clock was shortened from 35 seconds to 30 for the 2015–16 season[[note]]not added until 1985, an originally 45 seconds[[/note]] (hence the relatively low scoring), each team has four timeouts in a game[[note]]down from five prior to 2015–16[[/note]], and the three-point line is different from the ones found in the NBA and in international games. The style of play and the overall feeling of watching a game are refreshingly different.

Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, starting in 2015–16, the women's game will be played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]
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Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, starting in 2015–16, with the current 2015–16 season, the women's game will be is played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]

''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015 officially becoming a dynasty.
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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015 2015, officially becoming a dynasty.
10th Dec '15 8:27:52 AM HeraldAlberich
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namespace
[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference (with one exception - the IvyLeague grants its automatic bid to the team with the best record[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs are needed when there's a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]]) has its own tournament, and the champions of each conference tournament are assured a place in the NCAA tournament.[[note]] Most conferences officially recognize both regular-season and tournament champions. Besides the Ivy League, the exceptions are the ACC and (partially) SEC. The ACC abolished its regular-season championship in 1961 and recognizes only the tournament winner as its champion. The SEC, on the other hand, has awarded its official championship solely by regular-season records since 1951; even though the SEC had a tournament until the early 1950s and reinstated it in 1979, the tournament only awards the automatic NCAA bid and not the SEC championship.[[/note]]
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[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters About 350 schools' teams]] make up Division I, the top level of the NCAA.[[note]]351 on the men's side, and 349 women's teams: Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, being predominantly male [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]], don't have women's teams.[[/note]] All of them[[note]]The only independent in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 seasons was NJIT, or the New Jersey Institute of Technology, which [[TheScrappy got left behind]] in the early-2010s conference realignment shuffle. They [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap finally found a home]] in the Atlantic Sun Conference.[[/note]] play in one of 32 conferences. After each team has played somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 games each season, each conference (with one exception - the IvyLeague exception--the UsefulNotes/IvyLeague grants its automatic bid to the team with the best record[[note]]though occasionally one-game playoffs are needed when there's a tie, as in 2011 and 2015[[/note]]) has its own tournament, and the champions of each conference tournament are assured a place in the NCAA tournament.[[note]] Most conferences officially recognize both regular-season and tournament champions. Besides the Ivy League, the exceptions are the ACC and (partially) SEC. The ACC abolished its regular-season championship in 1961 and recognizes only the tournament winner as its champion. The SEC, on the other hand, has awarded its official championship solely by regular-season records since 1951; even though the SEC had a tournament until the early 1950s and reinstated it in 1979, the tournament only awards the automatic NCAA bid and not the SEC championship.[[/note]]
14th Nov '15 10:55:31 AM KYCubbie
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The most recent Turkish men's title was won by a team not previously mentioned in the page.
* Turkey: They may have only four notable teams found in this country (Anadolu Efes and Fenerbahçe Ülker usually being the big two, with Beşiktaş gaining some recent notice due to them grabbing big-name NBA players like Allen Iverson and Deron Williams, and Galatasaray also picking up a recent title), but they also have some good players that came from there like Hedo Türkoğlu, Mehmet Okur, Ersan İlyasova, Ömer Aşık, Semih Erden, and recent Turk Enes Kanter. Basically, they gained interest in basketball starting in 2001 when they got a silver medal in the European Tournament and will more likely than not gain ''more'' interest with ''another'' silver medal while being the hosts for the 2010 FIBA World Championships.
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* Turkey: They may have only four or five notable teams found in this country (Anadolu Efes and Fenerbahçe Ülker usually being the big two, with Beşiktaş gaining some recent notice due to them grabbing big-name NBA players like Allen Iverson and Deron Williams, and Galatasaray and Karşıyaka also picking up a recent title), titles), but they also have some good players that came from there like Hedo Türkoğlu, Mehmet Okur, Ersan İlyasova, Ömer Aşık, Semih Erden, and recent Turk Enes Kanter. Basically, they gained interest in basketball starting in 2001 when they got a silver medal in the European Tournament and will more likely than not gain ''more'' interest with ''another'' silver medal while being the hosts for the 2010 FIBA World Championships.
4th Nov '15 9:15:27 PM KYCubbie
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''Dallas Wings'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that they would drop the Shock name.
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''Dallas Wings'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that they it would drop the Shock name.
4th Nov '15 9:14:48 PM KYCubbie
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Shock are now the Dallas Wings.
''Dallas Wings'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that they would drop the Shock name.

''Tulsa Shock'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010. Tulsa has been the league's ButtMonkey ever since. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock is unique in that Tulsa claims the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans are uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016.
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''Tulsa Shock'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010. Tulsa has been the league's ButtMonkey ever since. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock is unique in that Tulsa claims the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans are uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016.
26th Oct '15 7:13:27 PM KYCubbie
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Notre Dame is currently a notable team on the women's side.
[=UConn=] and Tennessee [[TheRival are fiercely opposed to each other]]. The rivalry became an annual series, until Summitt ended it in 2007, accusing Connecticut of improper recruiting. Attempts have been made to reconcile the two sides, or at least have them meet in the NCAA tournament. So far, no dice. Nor is either particularly fond of Rutgers.
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''Notre Dame'': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years, though the Huskies have mostly had the upper hand. National champs in 2001 and runners-up in four of the last five NCAA tournaments (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins and Jewell Loyd. [=UConn=] and Tennessee [[TheRival are fiercely opposed to each other]]. The rivalry became an annual series, until Summitt ended it in 2007, accusing Connecticut of improper recruiting. Attempts have been made to reconcile the two sides, or at least have them meet in the NCAA tournament. So far, no dice. Nor is either particularly fond of Rutgers. Rutgers. And the Huskies aren't exactly fond of Notre Dame either.

''Tulsa Shock'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010. Tulsa has been the league's ButtMonkey ever since. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock is unique in that Tulsa claims the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans are uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]] for 2016.
to:
''Tulsa Shock'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010. Tulsa has been the league's ButtMonkey ever since. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock is unique in that Tulsa claims the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans are uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]] Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016.
14th Oct '15 7:41:08 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 2011. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now remarried to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.
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* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 2011.201 1. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now remarried to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.

* '''Diana Taurasi''': Guard for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted #1 overall in 2004 out of [[RunningGag Connecticut]]. [[ArsonMurderAndLifesaving Hot-headed, foul-mouthed, charismatic, and exceedingly talented]]. Has gotten in a little bit of trouble, caught DUI in 2009 and implicated in steroid use (turned out to be a false positive from a sketchy lab). Sat out the 2015 WNBA season at the request of the Russian team she plays for during the traditional basketball season, which offered her [[MoneyDearBoy a bonus well in excess of her WNBA salary]] to sit out.[[note]]To put the financial decision in perspective, she was making slightly under the WNBA maximum salary of $107,000. Her Russian team pays her $1.5 million a season, not including the aforementioned bonus.[[/note]][[note]]In Taurasi's defense, she turned 33 during the 2015 WNBA season, and hadn't had an offseason since she was at [=UConn=]. This wasn't the first time that Taurasi had been offered a bonus to sit out a WNBA season, and several other WNBA players have reportedly been offered similar bonuses; she's just the first player who's accepted such an offer.[[/note]] * '''Lindsay Whalen''': Point guard for the Minnesota Lynx. Started out as the hometown hero of the University of Minnesota, where she graduated the all-time leading scorer. Known for her quiet yet machine-like consistency of play, she helped made women's college basketball popular in the state by bringing twice as many people to the arena during games. She won many college titles while playing. She was drafted #1 by the Connecticut Sun in 2004 and helped lead them to two Finals appearances. Was traded back to her home state of Minnesota in 2010 to play for the Lynx. In 2011, she helped lead the Lynx to their first title in WNBA history. And she did it again in 2013. Despite missing a lot of games in 2015, Whalen helped lead the Lynx to another title in 2015.
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* '''Diana Taurasi''': Guard for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted #1 overall in 2004 out of [[RunningGag Connecticut]]. [[ArsonMurderAndLifesaving Hot-headed, foul-mouthed, charismatic, and exceedingly talented]]. Has gotten in a little bit of trouble, caught DUI in 2009 and implicated in steroid use (turned out to be a false positive from a sketchy lab). Sat out the 2015 WNBA season at the request of the Russian team she plays for during the traditional basketball season, which offered her [[MoneyDearBoy a bonus well in excess of her WNBA salary]] to sit out.[[note]]To put the financial decision in perspective, she was making slightly under the WNBA maximum salary of $107,000. Her Russian team pays was paying her $1.5 million a season, not including the aforementioned bonus.[[/note]][[note]]In Taurasi's defense, she turned 33 during the 2015 WNBA season, and hadn't had an offseason since she was at [=UConn=]. This wasn't the first time that Taurasi had been offered a bonus to sit out a WNBA season, and several other WNBA players have reportedly been offered similar bonuses; she's just the first player who's accepted such an offer.[[/note]] * '''Lindsay Whalen''': Point guard for the Minnesota Lynx. Started out as the hometown hero of the University of Minnesota, where she graduated the all-time leading scorer. Known for her quiet yet machine-like consistency of play, she helped made women's college basketball popular in the state by bringing twice as many people to the arena during games. She won many college titles while playing. She was drafted #1 by the Connecticut Sun in 2004 and helped lead them to two Finals appearances. Was traded back to her home state of Minnesota in 2010 to play for the Lynx. In 2011, she helped lead the Lynx to their first title in WNBA history. And she did it again in 2013. Despite missing a lot of games in 2015, Whalen helped lead the Lynx to another title in 2015.that season.
14th Oct '15 7:20:41 PM Daylight
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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015.
to:
''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015.2015 officially becoming a dynasty.

* ''2015'': The ''Minnesota Lynx'' beat The Indiana Fever 3-2.
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* ''2015'': The ''Minnesota Lynx'' beat The the Indiana Fever 3-2.

* '''Seimone Augustus''': Forward for the Minnesota Lynx. Discovered in high school for her promising basketball talent. She was even featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated for women, promoting her as the possible female Michael Jordan. Her success continued during her college years at Louisiana State University where she won many awards including College Player of the Year. She lead her college team to three Final Four appearances. She was drafted #1 overall by the Minnesota Lynx in 2006, where she quickly made her presence known by winning Rookie of the Year. In 2011, when another promising rookie named Maya Moore joined the team, she lead the Minnesota Lynx to their first WNBA title and won the Finals MVP Award. In 2013, she once again helped lead the Lynx to their second title in franchise history.
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* '''Seimone Augustus''': Forward for the Minnesota Lynx. Discovered in high school for her promising basketball talent. She was even featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated for women, promoting her as the possible female Michael Jordan. Her success continued during her college years at Louisiana State University where she won many awards including College Player of the Year. She lead her college team to three Final Four appearances. She was drafted #1 overall by the Minnesota Lynx in 2006, where she quickly made her presence known by winning Rookie of the Year. In 2011, when another promising rookie named Maya Moore joined the team, she lead the Minnesota Lynx to their first WNBA title and won the Finals MVP Award. In 2013, she once again helped lead the Lynx to their second title in franchise history. history. In 2015, she came back from an injury just in time for the playoffs and helped led the Lynx to a third WNBA title.

* '''Maya Moore''': Forward for the Minnesota Lynx, drafted #1 overall in 2011 out of Connecticut. She helped lead the Minnesota Lynx to their first WNBA championship in 2011, and won Rookie of the Year. Finished a close second to Candace Parker for the regular season MVP Award in 2013, but won the Finals MVP Award by helping lead Minnesota to their second title in franchise history. And she still has her own shoe.
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* '''Maya Moore''': Forward for the Minnesota Lynx, drafted #1 overall in 2011 out of Connecticut. She helped lead the Minnesota Lynx to their first WNBA championship in 2011, and won Rookie of the Year. Finished a close second to Candace Parker for the regular season MVP Award in 2013, but won the Finals MVP Award by helping lead Minnesota to their second title in franchise history. In 2015, she led the Lynx to a third WNBA title. And she still has her own shoe.

* '''Lindsay Whalen''': Point guard for the Minnesota Lynx. Started out as the hometown hero of the University of Minnesota, where she graduated the all-time leading scorer. Known for her quiet yet machine-like consistency of play, she helped made women's college basketball popular in the state by bringing twice as many people to the arena during games. She won many college titles while playing. She was drafted #1 by the Connecticut Sun in 2004 and helped lead them to two Finals appearances. Was traded back to her home state of Minnesota in 2010 to play for the Lynx. In 2011, she helped lead the Lynx to their first title in WNBA history. And she did it again in 2013.
to:
* '''Lindsay Whalen''': Point guard for the Minnesota Lynx. Started out as the hometown hero of the University of Minnesota, where she graduated the all-time leading scorer. Known for her quiet yet machine-like consistency of play, she helped made women's college basketball popular in the state by bringing twice as many people to the arena during games. She won many college titles while playing. She was drafted #1 by the Connecticut Sun in 2004 and helped lead them to two Finals appearances. Was traded back to her home state of Minnesota in 2010 to play for the Lynx. In 2011, she helped lead the Lynx to their first title in WNBA history. And she did it again in 2013. Despite missing a lot of games in 2015, Whalen helped lead the Lynx to another title in 2015.
14th Oct '15 7:16:20 PM Daylight
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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. ''Phoenix Mercury'': Founded in 1997, named as a counterpart to the Phoenix Suns... and they play like them too. Sometimes called the Merc, while multiple players at once are Mercs. Three-time and current champions.
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''Minnesota Lynx'': Founded in 1999, named as a counterpart to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Survived several rough seasons to stockpile approximately a metric crapton of young talent that is as of 2011 paying dividends. Once they picked up collegiate superstar Maya Moore and hometown hero Lindsay Whalen, [[TookALevelInBadass momentum immediately began to shift in their direction]]. Finally won a title in 2011. They made it back to the Finals in 2013 and won their second title by beating the same team they faced in 2011, the Atlanta Dream. They won their third title in five years when they beat the Indiana Fever in 2015. ''Phoenix Mercury'': Founded in 1997, named as a counterpart to the Phoenix Suns... and they play like them too. Sometimes called the Merc, while multiple players at once are Mercs. Three-time and current champions.

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* ''2015'': The ''Minnesota Lynx'' beat The Indiana Fever 3-2.
12th Oct '15 8:50:31 PM KYCubbie
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Sheryl Swoopes got married to the fellow she was engaged to.
* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 2011. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now engaged to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.
to:
* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 2011. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now engaged remarried to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.
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