History UsefulNotes / Basketball

2nd May '16 7:06:28 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Shoni Schimmel''': Backup point guard for the Atlanta Dream, drafted #8 overall in 2014 out of Louisville, where she was the school's second-leading career scorer behind Dream teammate [=McCoughtry=]. Although she has mainly been a bench player so far, she has relevance because of her backstory. Schimmel is a [[UsefulNotes/NativeAmericans Native American]][[note]]The pride of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, a group of three closely related tribes in northeast Oregon. She has a white father, but through her mother has more than enough Native American ancestry to qualify as a fully enrolled tribal member.[[/note]] who was born and raised on an Oregon reservation, leaving with her family for UsefulNotes/{{Portland}} in high school. By that time, she already had enough of a name that Creator/{{TLC}} did a documentary on her, appropriately titled ''Off the Rez''. Schimmel went on to become the breakout star of the 2013 NCAA tournament, leading Louisville to an improbable run to the championship game that included [[DavidVersusGoliath an epic upset]] of Griner's Baylor team. Known for a flashy playing style inspired by her reservation background.[[note]]Basketball has a following at many reservations in the American West comparable to that of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball football/soccer]] in most of the world. Reservation high schools are noted for a flashy, fast-paced style of play known as "rezball". However, it should be noted that Schimmel's pre-Portland high school wasn't on a reservation.[[/note]] Voted in as an All-Star starter in 2014 and 2015 despite only starting two games in each season leading up to the event... and ended up as the 2014 ASG MVP.[[note]]Not coincidentally, Schimmel has a ''huge'' Native American following. Native Americans from ''40 states'' came to watch her last scheduled home game for Louisville in 2014.[[/note]] Midway through her rookie season, she took over the #1 spot in jersey sales from Griner.

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* '''Shoni Schimmel''': Backup A point guard for traded from the Atlanta Dream, Dream to the New York Liberty before the 2016 season, Schimmel was drafted #8 overall in 2014 out of Louisville, where she was the school's second-leading career scorer behind former Dream teammate [=McCoughtry=]. Although she has mainly been a bench player so far, she has relevance because of her backstory. Schimmel is a [[UsefulNotes/NativeAmericans Native American]][[note]]The pride of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, a group of three closely related tribes in northeast Oregon. She has a white father, but through her mother has more than enough Native American ancestry to qualify as a fully enrolled tribal member.[[/note]] who was born and raised on an Oregon reservation, leaving with her family for UsefulNotes/{{Portland}} in high school. By that time, she already had enough of a name that Creator/{{TLC}} did a documentary on her, appropriately titled ''Off the Rez''. Schimmel went on to become the breakout star of the 2013 NCAA tournament, leading Louisville to an improbable run to the championship game that included [[DavidVersusGoliath an epic upset]] of Griner's Baylor team. Known for a flashy playing style inspired by her reservation background.[[note]]Basketball has a following at many reservations in the American West comparable to that of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball football/soccer]] in most of the world. Reservation high schools are noted for a flashy, fast-paced style of play known as "rezball". However, it should be noted that Schimmel's pre-Portland high school wasn't on a reservation.[[/note]] Voted in as an All-Star starter in 2014 and 2015 despite only starting two games in each season leading up to the event... and ended up as the 2014 ASG MVP.[[note]]Not coincidentally, Schimmel has a ''huge'' Native American following. Native Americans from ''40 states'' came to watch her last scheduled home game for Louisville in 2014.[[/note]] Midway through her rookie season, she took over the #1 spot in jersey sales from Griner.
10th Apr '16 3:55:28 PM KYCubbie
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''Louisiana Tech'': The Lady Techsters were another superpower of the 80s, with four players who went on to the Women's Hall—Pam Kelly, Janice Lawrence Braxton, Kim Mulkey (now the head coach at Baylor), and Teresa Weatherspoon (see WNBA section below). They also had two Hall of Fame coaches in Sonja Hogg (Women's) and Leon Barmore (Naismith and Women's). LA Tech remained a national force into the 90s, and strongly competitive into the 21st century, but faded in the later years of Weatherspoon's tenure as head coach (2009–2014). LA Tech then fired Weatherspoon and replaced her with Tyler Summitt, the then 23-year-old son of a famous coach any women's basketball fan should know. After two seasons, things only got worse for the Lady Techsters, as Summitt abruptly resigned shortly after the end of the 2015–16 season after admitting to an "inappropriate relationship".[[note]]Early reports are that said relationship was an extramarital affair with a player, who reportedly got pregnant by Summitt.[[/note]]

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''Louisiana Tech'': The Lady Techsters were another superpower of the 80s, with four players who went on to the Women's Hall—Pam Kelly, Janice Lawrence Braxton, Kim Mulkey (now the head coach at Baylor), and Teresa Weatherspoon (see WNBA section below). They also had two Hall of Fame coaches in Sonja Hogg (Women's) and Leon Barmore (Naismith and Women's). LA Tech remained a national force into the 90s, and strongly competitive into the 21st century, but faded in the later years of Weatherspoon's tenure as head coach (2009–2014). LA Tech then fired Weatherspoon and replaced her with Tyler Summitt, the then 23-year-old son of a famous coach any women's basketball fan should know. After two seasons, things only got worse for the Lady Techsters, as Summitt abruptly resigned shortly after the end of the 2015–16 season after admitting to an "inappropriate relationship".[[note]]Early reports are that said relationship was an extramarital affair with a player, who reportedly got pregnant by Summitt.player.[[/note]]
7th Apr '16 9:11:41 PM KYCubbie
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''Louisiana Tech'': The Lady Techsters were another superpower of the 80s, with four players who went on to the Women's Hall—Pam Kelly, Janice Lawrence Braxton, Kim Mulkey (now the head coach at Baylor), and Teresa Weatherspoon (see WNBA section below). They also had two Hall of Fame coaches in Sonja Hogg (Women's) and Leon Barmore (Naismith and Women's). LA Tech remained a national force into the 90s, and strongly competitive into the 21st century, but faded in the later years of Weatherspoon's tenure as head coach (2009–2014). After firing Weatherspoon, they hired 23-year-old Tyler Summitt. You've heard of his mom. Trust us, ''you have''.

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''Louisiana Tech'': The Lady Techsters were another superpower of the 80s, with four players who went on to the Women's Hall—Pam Kelly, Janice Lawrence Braxton, Kim Mulkey (now the head coach at Baylor), and Teresa Weatherspoon (see WNBA section below). They also had two Hall of Fame coaches in Sonja Hogg (Women's) and Leon Barmore (Naismith and Women's). LA Tech remained a national force into the 90s, and strongly competitive into the 21st century, but faded in the later years of Weatherspoon's tenure as head coach (2009–2014). After firing Weatherspoon, they hired LA Tech then fired Weatherspoon and replaced her with Tyler Summitt, the then 23-year-old Tyler Summitt. You've heard son of his mom. Trust us, ''you have''.
a famous coach any women's basketball fan should know. After two seasons, things only got worse for the Lady Techsters, as Summitt abruptly resigned shortly after the end of the 2015–16 season after admitting to an "inappropriate relationship".[[note]]Early reports are that said relationship was an extramarital affair with a player, who reportedly got pregnant by Summitt.[[/note]]
6th Apr '16 12:25:19 AM KYCubbie
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** National team-wise, the male "Boomers" have nothing on the female "Opals". The Australian women - which include WNBA stars Lauren Jackson, Penny Taylor, and Sandy Brondello (the last is currently a coach) - have won medals in all Olympics since 1996, and the 2006 World Championship.

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** National team-wise, the male "Boomers" have nothing on the female "Opals". The Australian women - which include have included WNBA stars Lauren Jackson, Penny Taylor, and Sandy Brondello (the last is currently a coach) - have won medals in all Olympics since 1996, and the 2006 World Championship.



'''Duke Blue Devils''' - Current national champions. UNC's hated rivals, they have been coached since 1981 by Mike Krzyzewski ("shi-shef-skee"[[note]]only a very loose approximation of the actual Polish pronunciation[[/note]]), often referred to as Coach K.[[note]]He has also coached the US national men's basketball team in various positions since 1979, including being an assistant coach at the 1992 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames (the Dream Team) and head coach since 2006 (including the 2008 Olympic Redeem Team and 2012 Olympic Small-Ball Dream Team)[[/note]] In 2015, Coach K became the first men's head coach with 1,000 career NCAA Division I wins.[[note]]Not the first NCAA Division I coach with 1,000 wins—we'll get to the first later. He ''is'' the D-I men's coach with the most wins at one school—but only because the NCAA ordered more than 100 of Jim Boeheim's wins at Syracuse vacated; Coach K began his coaching career at Army.[[/note]] With just four Final Four appearances before Coach K came to Durham, they made it 13 times in the last 30 years, including five national championships. Duke players (Christian Laettner of the Dream Team, Elton Brand, Shane Battier, Jason Williams, J.J. Redick) aren't superstars in the NBA, though, with the notable exceptions of Mr. NiceGuy Grant Hill and Kyrie Irving (who only spent one year at the school).[[note]] He actually only played 11 games for the team due to spending most of the season sidelined with a toe injury.[[/note]]

'''Connecticut Huskies''' - Although a regional power in New England for many decades, and also a founding member of the original Big East Conference in 1979, [=UConn=] didn't become a national name until the 1990s under coach Jim Calhoun. After falling short of the Final Four throughout that decade, they broke through in 1999, not only reaching the Final Four but also claiming the national title. They went on to win two more titles in 2004 and 2011 under Calhoun. After he retired just before the 2012–13 season, he was replaced by his top assistant (and former [=UConn=] player) Kevin Ollie. After being barred from the 2013 tournament for academic reasons, and being left behind in the conference realignment shuffle of the early 2010s,[[note]]Unlike NJIT, whose conference imploded around it and couldn't find a home, [=UConn=] was instead stuck in the American Athletic Conference, the football rump of the former Big East.[[/note]] they picked up a fourth national title in 2014. Among their star players are Ray Allen and Richard "Rip" Hamilton (the latter a star on the first championship team). As strong as [=UConn=] is in men's basketball, it's even stronger in women's basketball. Led by coach Geno Auriemma, the Huskies[[note]][[FlameBait not Lady Huskies]][[/note]] have won ''10'' national titles, and are currently on a streak of three titles.[[note]][=UConn=] is the only Division I school to have won the men's and women's NCAA titles in the same season—and the Huskies have done it ''twice''. The only other school to match the feat is Division II Central Missouri.[[/note]]

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'''Duke Blue Devils''' - Current national champions. UNC's hated rivals, they have been coached since 1981 by Mike Krzyzewski ("shi-shef-skee"[[note]]only a very loose approximation of the actual Polish pronunciation[[/note]]), often referred to as Coach K.[[note]]He has also coached the US national men's basketball team in various positions since 1979, including being an assistant coach at the 1992 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames (the Dream Team) and head coach since 2006 (including the 2008 Olympic Redeem Team and 2012 Olympic Small-Ball Dream Team)[[/note]] In 2015, Coach K became the first men's head coach with 1,000 career NCAA Division I wins.[[note]]Not the first NCAA Division I coach with 1,000 wins—we'll get to the first later. He ''is'' the D-I men's coach with the most wins at one school—but only because the NCAA ordered more than 100 of Jim Boeheim's wins at Syracuse vacated; Coach K began his coaching career at Army.[[/note]] With just four Final Four appearances before Coach K came to Durham, they made it 13 times in the last 30 years, including five national championships. Duke players (Christian Laettner of the Dream Team, Elton Brand, Shane Battier, Jason Williams, J.J. Redick) aren't superstars in the NBA, though, with the notable exceptions of Mr. NiceGuy Grant Hill and Kyrie Irving (who only spent one year at the school).[[note]] He actually only played 11 games for the team due to spending most of the season sidelined with a toe injury.[[/note]]

'''Connecticut Huskies''' - Although a regional power in New England for many decades, and also a founding member of the original Big East Conference in 1979, [=UConn=] didn't become a national name until the 1990s under coach Jim Calhoun. After falling short of the Final Four throughout that decade, they broke through in 1999, not only reaching the Final Four but also claiming the national title. They went on to win two more titles in 2004 and 2011 under Calhoun. After he retired just before the 2012–13 season, he was replaced by his top assistant (and former [=UConn=] player) Kevin Ollie. After being barred from the 2013 tournament for academic reasons, and being left behind in the conference realignment shuffle of the early 2010s,[[note]]Unlike NJIT, whose conference imploded around it and couldn't find a home, [=UConn=] was instead stuck in the American Athletic Conference, the football rump of the former Big East.[[/note]] they picked up a fourth national title in 2014. Among their star players are Ray Allen and Richard "Rip" Hamilton (the latter a star on the first championship team). As strong as [=UConn=] is in men's basketball, it's even stronger in women's basketball. Led by coach Geno Auriemma, the Huskies[[note]][[FlameBait not Lady Huskies]][[/note]] have won ''10'' ''11'' national titles, and are currently on a streak of three four titles.[[note]][=UConn=] is the only Division I school to have won the men's and women's NCAA titles in the same season—and the Huskies have done it ''twice''. The only other school to match the feat is Division II Central Missouri.[[/note]]



There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the better of these four, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted its two NIT wins as being part of its "championship tradition").

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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the better of these four, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted its their two NIT wins as being part of its their "championship tradition").



Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, starting with the current 2015–16 season, the women's game is played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]

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Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, starting with since the current 2015–16 season, the women's game is played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]



''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of five, including a 90-game winning streak that encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won the last three titles; the second of the streak in 2014 took them past rival Tennessee for the most in women's college basketball. Coach Geno Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.

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''Connecticut'': The [=UConn=] Huskies hit the national scene like a freight train in 1995 with an undefeated season—the first of five, six, including a 90-game winning streak that encompassed parts of three seasons. They've won the last three four titles; the second of the streak in 2014 took them past rival Tennessee for the most in women's college basketball. Coach basketball, and the fourth in 2016 gave coach Geno Auriemma his 11th national title, taking him past John Wooden for the most Division I titles by a head coach in either the men's or women's game. Auriemma is basically UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} distilled into a short first-generation Italian-American. Calling them Lady Huskies is pure FlameBait. They have a web page dedicated to their history of churning out WNBA stars.



''Dallas Wings'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that it would drop the Shock name.

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''Dallas Wings'': Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's MagnificentBastard status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar, superstar Skylar Diggins. Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that it would drop the Shock name.



* '''Cynthia Cooper''': The league's first MVP and a member of both the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. A sixth man at USC, she honed her skills in Italy before being assigned to the Houston Comets and proceeding to heck everyone's garbage up on her way to four straight titles before retiring in 2000. Her single-game scoring record (44) in the inaugural season stood for ten years. An all-around threat, though not a great pro coach. After coaching at a number of other colleges, she is now the head coach at her alma mater of USC.

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* '''Cynthia Cooper''': The league's first MVP and a member of both the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. A sixth man woman at USC, she honed her skills in Italy before being assigned to the Houston Comets and proceeding to heck everyone's garbage up on her way to four straight titles before retiring in 2000. Her single-game scoring record (44) in the inaugural season stood for ten years. An all-around threat, though not a great pro coach. After coaching at a number of other colleges, she is now the head coach at her alma mater of USC.



* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shot threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. An eight-time league MVP—three in the WNBA, four in the WNBL in her homeland, and one in the Korean league—basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Despite her many accomplishments, she was still an example of WhatCouldHaveBeen, as she battled near-constant shin, ankle, and knee injuries throughout her career. Retired completely from basketball in 2016 after missing almost all of 2014 and 2015 to the aftereffects of a particularly bad knee injury.

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* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shot threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. An eight-time league MVP—three in the WNBA, four in the WNBL in her homeland, and one in the Korean league—basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Despite her many accomplishments, she was still an example of WhatCouldHaveBeen, as she battled near-constant shin, ankle, and knee injuries throughout her career. Retired completely from basketball in 2016 after missing almost all of 2014 and 2015 the previous two years to the aftereffects of a particularly bad knee injury.
4th Apr '16 7:06:41 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Cynthia Cooper''': The league's first MVP. A sixth man at USC, she honed her skills in Italy before being assigned to the Houston Comets and proceeding to heck everyone's garbage up on her way to four straight titles before retiring in 2000. Her single-game scoring record (44) in the inaugural season stood for ten years. An all-around threat, though not a great pro coach. After coaching at a number of other colleges, she is now the head coach at her alma mater of USC.

* '''Becky Hammon''': A point guard out of Colorado State who played 16 seasons in the league before retiring at the end of the 2014 season. Although small by WNBA standards (5'6"/1.68 m) and not exceptionally fast, she made up for her relative lack of physical skills with an extraordinary basketball IQ. Represented Russia internationally; that country was one of her many overseas stops during her career. A six-time All-Star, Hammon was named one of the league's 15 greatest players at the league's 15th anniversary in 2011. Before the end of her final season as a player, she made headlines when the San Antonio Spurs hired her as an assistant. Hammon became the first woman to be a full-time coach in any of America's four major professional leagues.

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* '''Cynthia Cooper''': The league's first MVP.MVP and a member of both the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. A sixth man at USC, she honed her skills in Italy before being assigned to the Houston Comets and proceeding to heck everyone's garbage up on her way to four straight titles before retiring in 2000. Her single-game scoring record (44) in the inaugural season stood for ten years. An all-around threat, though not a great pro coach. After coaching at a number of other colleges, she is now the head coach at her alma mater of USC.

* '''Becky Hammon''': A point guard out of Colorado State who played 16 seasons in the league before retiring at the end of the 2014 season. Although small by WNBA standards (5'6"/1.68 m) and not exceptionally fast, she made up for her relative lack of physical skills with an extraordinary basketball IQ. Represented Russia internationally; that country was one of her many overseas stops during her career. A six-time All-Star, Hammon was named one of the league's 15 greatest players at the league's 15th anniversary in 2011. Before the end of her final season as a player, she made headlines when the San Antonio Spurs hired her as an assistant.assistant (effective at season's end). Hammon became the first woman to be a full-time coach in any of America's four major professional leagues.



* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shot threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. An eight-time league MVP—three in the WNBA, four in the WNBL in her homeland, and one in the Korean league—basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Despite her many accomplishments, she was still an example of WhatCouldHaveBeen, as she battled near-constant shin, ankle, and knee injuries throughout her career. Retired from all basketball in 2016 after missing almost all of 2014 and 2015 to the aftereffects of a particularly bad knee injury.

* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and the league, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star. A BaseBreaker at her finest. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.

* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 201 1. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now remarried to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.

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* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shot threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. An eight-time league MVP—three in the WNBA, four in the WNBL in her homeland, and one in the Korean league—basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Despite her many accomplishments, she was still an example of WhatCouldHaveBeen, as she battled near-constant shin, ankle, and knee injuries throughout her career. Retired completely from all basketball in 2016 after missing almost all of 2014 and 2015 to the aftereffects of a particularly bad knee injury.

* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and the league, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star.All-Star, and member of the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. A BaseBreaker at her finest. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.

* '''Sheryl Swoopes''': One of the game's greats, originally assigned to the Houston Comets, later with the Seattle Storm and, after a two-year retirement, the Tulsa Shock for one final season in 201 1.2011. A brilliant defensive player and incredible slasher in her prime. Her marriage to her high school sweetheart and pregnancy with son Jordan was [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday heavily marketed by the league]]. [[SuddenlySexuality Revealed]] in 2005 that she was gay and in a relationship with her former assistant coach Alisa Scott. [[BiTheWay Now remarried to a man.]] If you're having trouble keeping up, you're not the only one. After retiring for good, she went into coaching, and is now the head women's coach at Loyola University Chicago.
Chicago. Will enter the Naismith Hall in 2016, but not yet in the Women's Hall.



* '''Teresa Weatherspoon''': A fiery point guard, "Spoon" was assigned to the New York Liberty in 1997 and left there after the 2003 season. [[FanonDiscontinuity We do not discuss her 2004 season with the Sparks.]] Best known for her buzzer-beating halfcourt heave in Game 2 of the 1999 Finals to win the game for New York and extend the series; it was selected the greatest moment in league history during the 15th anniversary season of 2011. Coached at her alma mater, Louisiana Tech, for five seasons until being fired in 2014.

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* '''Teresa Weatherspoon''': A fiery point guard, "Spoon" was assigned to the New York Liberty in 1997 and left there after the 2003 season. [[FanonDiscontinuity We do not discuss her 2004 season with the Sparks.]] Best known for her buzzer-beating halfcourt heave in Game 2 of the 1999 Finals to win the game for New York and extend the series; it was selected the greatest moment in league history during the 15th anniversary season of 2011. Coached at her alma mater, Louisiana Tech, for five seasons until being fired in 2014.
2014. Member of the Women's Hall, but not yet in the Naismith Hall.
2nd Apr '16 11:52:24 PM KYCubbie
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''Notre Dame'': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years, though the Huskies have mostly had the upper hand. National champs in 2001 and runners-up in four of the last five NCAA tournaments (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins and Jewell Loyd.

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''Notre Dame'': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years, though the Huskies have mostly had the upper hand. National champs in 2001 and runners-up in four of the last five NCAA tournaments in TheNewTens (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins and Jewell Loyd.
2nd Apr '16 11:47:25 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shoots threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. Basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Still playing in her homeland, but hasn't played in the States since injuries kept her out of both the 2013 and 2014 WNBA seasons.

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* '''Lauren Jackson''': A versatile "stretch four" (i.e., power forward who shoots shot threes well enough to force defenses to guard her beyond the arc) from Australia, she spent her entire WNBA career for the Seattle Storm, from her overall #1 selection in 2001 through 2012. Basketball's An eight-time league MVP—three in the WNBA, four in the WNBL in her homeland, and one in the Korean league—basketball's definitely InTheBlood for her. You may know her as [[MsFanService that blonde chick who posed naked in 2004]]. Still playing in Despite her homeland, but hasn't played in the States since many accomplishments, she was still an example of WhatCouldHaveBeen, as she battled near-constant shin, ankle, and knee injuries kept throughout her out career. Retired from all basketball in 2016 after missing almost all of both the 2013 and 2014 WNBA seasons.
and 2015 to the aftereffects of a particularly bad knee injury.
28th Mar '16 9:41:11 PM Lirodon
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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament whose semifinals and championship game are always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly.

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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament whose played at home arenas, with semifinals and championship game are always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly.
regularly (the NIT is generally considered to be the better of these four, and the Tulsa Golden Hurricane have frequently promoted its two NIT wins as being part of its "championship tradition").
23rd Mar '16 10:31:40 PM KYCubbie
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** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product is listed as a guard and forward for the Chicago Sky—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman[[note]]frequently used term for her listed positional combination[[/note]], stretch four, point forward[[note]]a forward who can handle the ball well enough to run a team's offense[[/note]], combo guard[[note]]combination of point guard and shooting guard[[/note]]... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. While she's been named to three All-Star teams so far, also being the top vote-getter in 2015, the 2015 game was the first she actually got to play in.[[note]]She missed the 2013 game to a concussion and the 2014 game to the aftereffects of Lyme disease.[[/note]] In 2015, she also set an all-time league record for free-throw percentage (almost unheard of for center-sized players), led the league in scoring, and earned MVP honors.
*** Also notable as perhaps the only high-profile WNBA player today who's never played overseas. A big part of it is her extreme charitable involvement during the traditional basketball season. EDD is a high-profile ambassador for Special Olympics[[note]]a cause close to her heart; her older sister has multiple disabilities[[/note]] and Lyme disease charities,[[note]]in 2008, she caught Lyme disease, which was initially misdiagnosed; she's suffered the aftereffects ever since[[/note]] and is involved in many other charitable causes.

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** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product is listed as a guard and forward for the Chicago Sky—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman[[note]]frequently used term for her listed positional combination[[/note]], stretch four, point forward[[note]]a forward who can handle the ball well enough to run a team's offense[[/note]], combo guard[[note]]combination of point guard and shooting guard[[/note]]... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. While she's been named to three All-Star teams so far, also being the top vote-getter in 2015, the 2015 game was the first she actually got to play in.[[note]]She missed the 2013 game to a concussion and the 2014 game to the aftereffects of Lyme disease.[[/note]] In 2015, she also set an all-time league record for free-throw percentage (almost unheard (unheard of for center-sized players), players),[[note]]EDD shot 94.95% that season. Only five ''NBA'' players have shot for a better percentage in a season. All five were guards, and the tallest of these, Ray Allen, is listed at the same height as EDD.[[/note]] led the league in scoring, and earned MVP honors.
*** Also notable as perhaps the only high-profile WNBA player today who's never played overseas. A big part of it is her extreme charitable involvement during the traditional basketball season. EDD is a high-profile ambassador for Special Olympics[[note]]a cause close to her heart; her older sister has multiple disabilities[[/note]] and Lyme disease charities,[[note]]in 2008, she caught Lyme disease, which was initially misdiagnosed; she's suffered the aftereffects ever since[[/note]] and is involved in many other charitable causes.
18th Mar '16 11:52:57 PM Lirodon
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There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament whose semifinals and championship game are always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiminfg for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly.

to:

There is another tournament, the National Invitation Tournament, a 32-team tournament whose semifinals and championship game are always played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The NIT is one year older than the NCAA tournament and was once its equal. But now, it's a tournament for teams that don't make the Big Dance, with its winner being derisively called the "69th best team in the country".[[note]]However, it is argued that an NIT winner could probably best some of the teams which only made it in the Big Dance as conference champions.[[/note]] There are also three other tournaments, the College Basketball Invitational (16-team field), the [=CollegeInsider.com=] Postseason Tournament (32-team field), and the Vegas 16 (new for the 2015–16 season; it has an [[ArtifactTitle 8-team]] field, but were aiminfg aiming for 16); collectively, all four of them are pretty much college basketball's equivalent to those otherwise useless bowl games whose only purpose are to give Creator/{{ESPN}} and friends something to do in late December. The majority of fans never take them seriously, and teams turn down those bids regularly.
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