History UsefulNotes / AmericanGunPolitics

11th May '17 12:31:22 AM tommythegun
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Beyond the broad categories listed above, each state has its own particular laws concerning carrying a weapon. In many, open carry is permitted as well as concealed carry; in others (such as Florida), only concealed carry is allowed, and open carry will get you arrested for brandishing a weapon or a similar charge. In still others, open carry requires no permit but concealed carry does. Every state though has laws against brandishing, or in some cases against "going armed to the terror of the public," that make illegal displaying weapons with the intent to threaten people. Also, openly displaying firearms if you're in a local community where that isn't common or appreciated, even if it may be technically legal, is very likely to lead to "person with gun" 911 calls to the police, which have the potential to end badly.

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Beyond the broad categories listed above, each state has its own particular laws concerning carrying a weapon. In many, open carry is permitted as well as concealed carry; in others (such as Florida), only concealed carry is allowed, and open carry will get you arrested for brandishing a weapon or a similar charge. In still others, open carry requires no permit but concealed carry does. Every state though has laws against brandishing, "menacing," or in some cases against "going armed to the terror of the public," that make it illegal displaying to display weapons with the intent to threaten people. Also, openly displaying firearms if you're in a local community where that isn't common or appreciated, appreciated,[[note]]e.g., many big cities and college towns, even in states with permissive carry laws[[/note]] even if it may be technically legal, is very likely to lead to "person with gun" 911 calls to the police, which have the potential to end badly.
10th May '17 11:49:49 PM tommythegun
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The history of concealed carry in the US has shifted dramatically since the 1980s. In 1986, there were only eight shall-issue states (plus Vermont, the original "Constitutional carry" state), while the rest of the country was either may-issue or no-issue.[[note]]This included the entire South with the exception of Alabama, even Texas was a no-issue state until 1995! It may be noted however that many if not most gun control laws in the United States historically were driven by racial fears.[[/note]] Within 25 years, by 2011, that ratio had completely reversed, with only nine may-issue states left. Five years later, there were more "Constitutional carry" states than may-issue states. Laws regarding concealed carry have been and continue to be in rapid flux and development, and constitute a shifting patchwork of approaches across the states.

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The history of concealed carry in the US has shifted dramatically since the 1980s. In 1986, there were only eight shall-issue states (plus Vermont, the original "Constitutional carry" state), while the rest of the country was either may-issue or no-issue.[[note]]This included the entire South with the exception of Alabama, even Texas was a no-issue state until 1995! It may be noted however that many if not most gun control laws in the United States historically were driven by racial fears.[[/note]] Within 25 years, by 2011, that ratio had completely reversed, with only nine may-issue states left. Five years later, there were more "Constitutional carry" states than may-issue states. Laws regarding concealed carry have been and continue to be in rapid flux and development, and constitute a shifting patchwork of approaches across the states.
states. As of 2016, there were over 14.5 million concealed carry permits in the United States, meaning slightly over 6% of the U.S. adult population has one, and in ten states (not counting "Constitutional carry" states), more than 10% of the adult population has one. Three states (Florida, Pennsylvania, and Texas) each have over a million active permits issued.
9th May '17 10:16:00 PM Fireblood
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No matter which side of the debate you lie on, the rights enshrined in the second ammendment are sort of the Straw the Broke the Camel's back and started the [[UsefulNotes RevolutionaryWar]]. British Troops received word that Colonial Forces were stockpiling arms and munitions in the towns of Lexington and Concord and promptly marched out to disarm the colonists. This had already been done in Boston, but the fact that most of the people in the town used such weapons for hunting for food AND militia defense against hostile Native American attacks on the city meant that the British were essentially leaving their own citizens to die in what was still largely Wilderness. While there were numerous other reasons to rebel against England and break from her, this was the was the start of the active shooting war. The seriousness of the amendment and it's meaning isn't a recent development in US politics... it was a big factor in why the country exists at all.

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No matter which side of the debate you lie on, the rights enshrined in the second ammendment amendment are sort of the Straw the Broke the Camel's back and started the [[UsefulNotes [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution RevolutionaryWar]]. British Troops troops received word that Colonial Forces forces were stockpiling arms and munitions in the towns of Lexington and Concord Concord, and promptly marched out to disarm the colonists. This had already been done in Boston, but the fact that most of the people in the town used such weapons for hunting for food AND militia defense against hostile Native American attacks on the city meant that the British were essentially leaving their own citizens to die in what was still largely Wilderness. wilderness. While there were numerous other reasons to rebel against England and break from her, this was the was the start of the active shooting war. The seriousness of the amendment and it's meaning isn't a recent development in US politics... it was a big factor in why the country exists at all.
20th Apr '17 2:31:22 PM tommythegun
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* LEOSA: Technically not a state policy, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officer, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.

to:

* LEOSA: Technically not a state policy, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officer, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, even off-duty and on their own time, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.
20th Apr '17 2:30:33 PM tommythegun
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* LEOSA: Technically not a state policy, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.

to:

* LEOSA: Technically not a state policy, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officers, officer, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.
20th Apr '17 2:30:01 PM tommythegun
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* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.

to:

* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, policy, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms qualification in the past year) law enforcement officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.
20th Apr '17 2:58:04 AM tommythegun
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Under current law, it's impossible for anyone (other than a current or former police officer who qualifies under LEOSA, see above) to be legally entitled to carry in all 50 states, because California and Colorado only issue permits to their own residents and neither recognizes each others' permits nor any other states' non-resident permits. It's also difficult for most people to be permitted to carry in more than maybe 40 or so states at a time, due to the limits of state reciprocity arrangements and the complicated individual requirements and broad local discretion exercised in may-issue states.

to:

Under current law, it's impossible for anyone (other than a current or former police officer who qualifies under LEOSA, see above) to be legally entitled to carry in all 50 states, states as a private citizen, because California and Colorado only issue permits to their own residents and neither recognizes each others' permits nor any other states' non-resident permits. It's also difficult effectively impossible for most people to be permitted to carry in more than maybe about 40 or so states at a time, due to the limits of state reciprocity arrangements and the complicated individual requirements and broad local discretion exercised in may-issue states, unless they have the time, resources, and desire to schmooze a lot of local officials in different states.
20th Apr '17 2:49:24 AM tommythegun
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Under current law, it's impossible for anyone (other than a current or former police officer who qualifies under LEOSA, see above) to be legally entitled to carry in all 50 states, because California and Colorado only issue permits to their own residents and neither recognizes each others' permits nor any other states' non-resident permits. It's also a practical impossibility for anyone to be permitted to carry in more than maybe 40 or so states at a time, due to the limits of state reciprocity arrangements and the complicated individual requirements and broad local discretion exercised in may-issue states.

to:

Under current law, it's impossible for anyone (other than a current or former police officer who qualifies under LEOSA, see above) to be legally entitled to carry in all 50 states, because California and Colorado only issue permits to their own residents and neither recognizes each others' permits nor any other states' non-resident permits. It's also a practical impossibility difficult for anyone most people to be permitted to carry in more than maybe 40 or so states at a time, due to the limits of state reciprocity arrangements and the complicated individual requirements and broad local discretion exercised in may-issue states.
20th Apr '17 2:41:59 AM tommythegun
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* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms training in the past year) law enforcement officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.

to:

* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms training qualification in the past year) law enforcement officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.
20th Apr '17 2:41:30 AM tommythegun
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* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms training in the past year) law enforcement officer, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.

to:

* LEOSA: Technically not a state regime, LEOSA (the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act) is a federal law originally passed in 2004 that entitles any currently serving or retired (after ten or more years of service and keeping current with firearms training in the past year) law enforcement officer, officers, whether federal, state, local, or military, to carry concealed anywhere in the United States, with very few exceptions. This essentially bypasses almost all state and local limitations on carrying, including local magazine and ammunition restrictions.
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