History UsefulNotes / AlcoholismAndAlcoholAbuse

28th Dec '15 9:20:49 AM MerryMikael
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''Alcohol abuse'' is simply the regular use of alcohol to a dangerous or unhealthy degree, the regular overuse of alcohol, and/or the use of alcohol to a degree that it creates dangerous or problematic behavior on a regular basis. Almost all alcoholics are alcohol abusers, but not everyone who abuses alcohol is or will become a true alcoholic.
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''Alcohol abuse'' is simply the regular use of alcohol to a dangerous or unhealthy degree, the regular overuse of alcohol, alcohol and/or the use of alcohol to a degree that it creates dangerous or problematic behavior on a regular basis. Almost all alcoholics are alcohol abusers, but not everyone who abuses alcohol is or will become a true alcoholic.

* ''Relational problems'' from the use of alcohol is a sign of alcohol abuse. If your use of alcohol causes you to get in fights, engage in violence, or be criticized for your drinking (and the people criticizing you are ''not'' TheFundamentalist), this is likely a warning sign that you need to monitor your alcohol usage. This goes double for people with unpleasant personality shifts after they imbibe: if people begin to empty out of a room when you start drinking or you are outright told that you are mean, vicious, and abusive when drunk, ''you should not drink''. Period. If you doubt that the person telling you this is being truthful, ask around. If the general consensus is that you're an asshole when you're drunk, it's a safe bet that you are a mean drunk. Failure to moderate your drinking in this case can cost you friendships and relationships, strain family relations, give you a reputation that makes you a pariah, and possibly even cost you a job if you get verbally abusive at an office party. This goes quadruple for people who become aggressive or violent when drunk: if you gain a HairTriggerTemper when you get loaded and fly off the handle at everything, you should consider not even being near alcohol, as the stakes are far higher here.
to:
* ''Relational problems'' from the use of alcohol is a sign of alcohol abuse. If your use of alcohol causes you to get in fights, engage in violence, or be criticized for your drinking (and the people criticizing you are ''not'' TheFundamentalist), this is likely a warning sign that you need to monitor your alcohol usage. This goes double for people with unpleasant personality shifts after they imbibe: if people begin to empty out of a room when you start drinking or you are outright told that you are mean, vicious, and abusive when drunk, ''you should not drink''. Period. If you doubt that the person telling you this is being truthful, ask around. If the general consensus is that you're an asshole when you're drunk, it's a safe bet that you are a mean drunk. Failure to moderate your drinking in this case can cost you friendships and relationships, strain family relations, give you a reputation that makes you a pariah, pariah and possibly even cost you a job if you get verbally abusive at an office party. This goes quadruple for people who become aggressive or violent when drunk: if you gain a HairTriggerTemper when you get loaded and fly off the handle at everything, you should consider not even being near alcohol, as the stakes are far higher here.

** You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole.
to:
** You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole.

** You also have If a problem if an ban/an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not isn't entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole.

''Alcoholism'' is even far more serious than alcohol abuse, which can become alcoholism and is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but isn't addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases.
to:
''Alcoholism'' is even far more serious than alcohol abuse, which abuse. Alcohol abuse can become alcoholism and is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but isn't addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases.
23rd Dec '15 12:14:40 PM MerryMikael
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* If you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem. If you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. The exception is if an ejection or ban is''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party/group/etc. starting problems or you violating a dress code. ** You almost certainly have a drinking problem if you get ejected or banned because you habitually dispute or refuse to pay tabs. The only exception to this would be when someone genuinely has screwed it up or is obviously trying to rip you off. Yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you're too wasted to remember ordering is a different story. You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole. ** Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban. While it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass. It's also a great way to piss off your friends for having to carry you out or finding their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected.
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* If you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem. If you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. problem. ** The exception is if an ejection or ban is''entirely'' is ''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party/group/etc. starting problems or you violating a dress code. ** You almost certainly have a drinking problem if you get ejected or banned because you habitually dispute or refuse to pay tabs. The only exception to this would be when someone genuinely has screwed it up or is obviously trying to rip you off. Yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you're too wasted to remember ordering is a different story. story. ** You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole. ** Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban. While it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass. It's also a great way to piss off ass. ** If your friends for having have to carry you out or finding find their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected.ejected, you can be sure you've pissed off your friends.
23rd Dec '15 11:58:50 AM MerryMikael
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* Nobody can really agree on safe, moderate, healthy or whatever guidelines for drinking, and the only consistency between even the same sources over time seems to be that the new guidelines keep contradicting earlier guidelines. The only ironclad advice is that safe drinking and drinking habits become known by self-observation.
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* Nobody can really agree on safe, moderate, healthy or whatever guidelines for drinking, and the drinking. The only consistency between sources, even the same sources ones over time time, seems to be that the new guidelines keep contradicting earlier guidelines. The only ironclad advice is that safe drinking and drinking habits become known by self-observation.

** Try to avoid drinking on an empty stomach, and drink with food.
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** Try to avoid drinking on an empty stomach, and drink stomach. Drink with food.

* ''Relational problems'' from the use of alcohol is a sign of alcohol abuse. If your use of alcohol causes you to get in fights, engage in violence, or be criticized for your drinking (and the people criticizing you are ''not'' TheFundamentalist), this is likely a warning sign that you need to monitor your alcohol usage. This goes double for people with unpleasant personality shifts after they imbibe: if people begin to empty out of a room when you start drinking or you are outright told that you are mean, vicious, and abusive when drunk, ''you should not drink''. Period. If you doubt that the person telling you this is being truthful, ask around. If the general consensus is that you're an asshole when you're drunk, it's a safe bet that you are a mean drunk. Failure to moderate your drinking in this case can cost you friendships and relationships, strain family relations, give you a reputation that makes you a pariah, and possibly even cost you a job if you get verbally abusive at an office party. This goes quadruple for people who become aggressive or violent when drunk: if you gain a HairTriggerTemper when you get loaded and fly off the handle at everything, you should consider not even being near alcohol, as the stakes are far higher here. Not only are the above possibilities magnified, but getting arrested is now a very real possibility, as is getting severely injured or even killed if you fuck with the wrong person. Quite a few alcohol-related murder and manslaughter cases have boiled down to "one guy was drunk, attacked the other guy, and got beaten to death/stabbed/shot in return". Don't be one of them. * ''Legal problems'' are another warning sign of alcohol abuse. Not legal problems so much as in "I carried my beer outside the bar and got a ticket" or "someone opened a container in my car" as those aren't necessarily related to your personal usage, but if you get a DUI or drunk and disorderly conduct arrest, ''that'' is a major warning sign. While not necessarily a legal problem, it can easily turn into it if your behavior is bad enough to get the police called or result in charges being filed. * If you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem. If you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. The exception is an ejection or ban being ''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party/group/etc. started problems or you violated a dress code.
to:
* ''Relational problems'' from the use of alcohol is a sign of alcohol abuse. If your use of alcohol causes you to get in fights, engage in violence, or be criticized for your drinking (and the people criticizing you are ''not'' TheFundamentalist), this is likely a warning sign that you need to monitor your alcohol usage. This goes double for people with unpleasant personality shifts after they imbibe: if people begin to empty out of a room when you start drinking or you are outright told that you are mean, vicious, and abusive when drunk, ''you should not drink''. Period. If you doubt that the person telling you this is being truthful, ask around. If the general consensus is that you're an asshole when you're drunk, it's a safe bet that you are a mean drunk. Failure to moderate your drinking in this case can cost you friendships and relationships, strain family relations, give you a reputation that makes you a pariah, and possibly even cost you a job if you get verbally abusive at an office party. This goes quadruple for people who become aggressive or violent when drunk: if you gain a HairTriggerTemper when you get loaded and fly off the handle at everything, you should consider not even being near alcohol, as the stakes are far higher here. Not here. * This considering, not only are the above possibilities magnified, but getting arrested is now a very real possibility, as possibility. So is getting severely injured or even killed if you fuck with the wrong person. Quite a few alcohol-related murder and manslaughter cases have boiled down to "one guy was drunk, attacked the other guy, guy and got beaten to death/stabbed/shot in return". Don't be one of them. * ''Legal problems'' are another warning sign of alcohol abuse. Not legal problems so much as in "I carried my beer outside the bar and got a ticket" or "someone opened a container in my car" as those aren't necessarily related to your personal usage, but if usage. If you get a DUI or drunk and disorderly conduct arrest, ''that'' is a major warning sign. While not necessarily a legal problem, it can easily turn into it if your behavior is bad enough to get the police called or result in charges being filed. * If you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem. If you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. The exception is if an ejection or ban being ''entirely'' is''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party/group/etc. started starting problems or you violated violating a dress code.
10th Dec '15 12:17:01 PM MerryMikael
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** You almost certainly have a drinking problem if you get ejected or banned because habitually dispute or refuse to pay tabs. The only exception would be when someone genuinely has screwed it up or is obviously trying to rip you off. Yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you're too wasted to remember ordering is a different story. You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole. ** Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban. While it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass. It's also a great way to piss off your friends for having to carry you out and find their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected. * ''Regret over one's actions while under the influence'' is another major warning sign of alcohol abuse. If your drinking causes you to lose control of your actions or emotions, it may definitely be alcohol abuse. If you regularly find yourself apologizing to people when sober for the things you said and did while you were drunk, you need to take a look at your drinking. This leads back to the whole mean drunk thing; if drinking turns you into an abusive asshole, abstaining and trying to address the underlying issues behind your undesirable personality shifts is not a bad idea at all.
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** You almost certainly have a drinking problem if you get ejected or banned because you habitually dispute or refuse to pay tabs. The only exception to this would be when someone genuinely has screwed it up or is obviously trying to rip you off. Yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you're too wasted to remember ordering is a different story. You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole. ** Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban. While it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass. It's also a great way to piss off your friends for having to carry you out and find or finding their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected. * ''Regret over one's actions while under the influence'' is another major warning sign of alcohol abuse. If your drinking causes you to lose control of your actions or emotions, it may definitely be alcohol abuse. If you regularly find yourself apologizing to people when sober for the things you said and did while you were drunk, you need to take a look at your drinking. This leads back to the whole mean drunk thing; if drinking turns you into an abusive asshole, abstaining and trying to address the underlying issues behind your undesirable personality shifts is not a bad idea at all.good idea.

* ''Drinking regularly for DrowningMySorrows'' is another warning sign of alcohol abuse, and one that should be taken with far more seriousness than even the others. There is a very important saying in the recovery community regarding this: "sorrow knows how to swim."
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* ''Drinking regularly for DrowningMySorrows'' is another warning sign of alcohol abuse, and one that should abuse. It should even be taken with far more seriousness than even the others. There is a very important saying in the recovery community regarding this: "sorrow knows how to swim."

''Alcoholism'' is far more serious than even the alcohol abuse, which can become it and that is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but who is not addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases. * The alcohol abuser may binge drink at every party and may even get busted for DUI leaving one - but he/she can go days without drinking with no ill effect, ''can'' drink moderately, and/or can just go "you know, I don't want to get plastered at ''this'' party." It is a want for alcohol, even at the expense of one's health or other consequences.
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''Alcoholism'' is even far more serious than even the alcohol abuse, which can become it alcoholism and that is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but who is not isn't addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases. * The alcohol abuser may binge drink at every party and may even get busted for DUI leaving one - but he/she can go days without drinking with no ill effect, ''can'' drink moderately, and/or can just go "you know, I don't want to get plastered at ''this'' party." It is a want ''want'' for alcohol, even at the expense of one's health or other consequences.

* If you're a bouncer, this passage could best be summed up as "don't be a dickhead and do your goddamn job", but elaboration is still necessary. While odds are good that you know what you're doing and are not a shithead, it still bears repeating. The standard societal perception of bouncers tends to cleave towards "barely-verbal, troglodytic meathead who only took the job to get a chance to get away with being a violent, power-tripping asshole". This isn't true as a whole, but anyone who has worked in nightlife can tell you that there are ''definitely'' bouncers who fit this to a T. You should scrupulously avoid doing anything that could be seen as this. Basically, don't start or join in on fights, don't be a dick to patrons, don't argue with or antagonize drunks, don't blow up at rude patrons (no matter how egregious their misbehavior is), don't drink or do drugs on the job (should be a no-brainer, but, again, this is all too common in the nightlife industry), and listen to what patrons and coworkers are trying to tell you. Failure to do so could get you fired, ruin your reputation and restrict your job options to sketchy, poorly-managed shitholes. It could possibly even cause you to get your ass kicked or cost you your life if you piss off the wrong person.
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* If you're a bouncer, odds are good you can sum this passage could best be summed up as instinctively: "don't be a dickhead and do your goddamn job", but job". Even so, elaboration is still necessary. While odds are good that you know what you're doing and are not a shithead, it still bears repeating. The on the standard societal perception of bouncers is necessary. The perception tends to cleave towards "barely-verbal, troglodytic meathead who only took the job to get a chance to get away with being a violent, power-tripping asshole". This isn't true as a whole, but anyone who has worked in nightlife can tell you that there are ''definitely'' are bouncers who fit this to a T. You should scrupulously avoid doing anything that could be seen as this. Basically, don't start or join in on fights, don't be a dick to patrons, don't argue with or antagonize drunks, don't blow up at rude patrons (no matter how egregious their misbehavior is), don't drink or do drugs on the job (should be a no-brainer, but, again, this is all too common in the nightlife industry), and listen to what patrons and coworkers are trying to tell you. Failure to do so could get you fired, ruin your reputation and restrict your job options to sketchy, poorly-managed shitholes. It could possibly even cause you to get your ass kicked or cost you your life if you piss off the wrong person.

* Make sure drunk people are not vulnerable to rapists. This means, again, watching out for them until they are either sober or with someone ''they'' previously have known and trust. It means not being a rapist yourself - recognize that drunk people past a certain point of drunkenness are ''not capable'' of consent to sexual activity - even if they are outright verbally requesting it. Furthermore, if you're with someone who is drunk while a known predator is also in their vicinity, keep a close eye on both parties and be prepared to step in the minute that that predator tries to make their move. You could very easily prevent a rape that way.
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* Make sure drunk people are not vulnerable to rapists. This means, again, watching out for them until they are either sober or with someone ''they'' previously have known and trust. It means not being a rapist yourself - recognize that drunk committing rape yourself. It bears repeating: Drunk people past a certain point of drunkenness are ''not capable'' of consent to sexual activity - even if they are outright verbally requesting it. Furthermore, if you're with someone who is drunk while a known predator is also in their vicinity, keep a close eye on both parties and be prepared to step in the minute that that predator tries to make their move. You could very easily prevent a rape that way.

* If you have a friend who is a mean, abusive, belligerent or violent drunk and insists on drinking anyways even after having been made aware of their repellent behavior while they were sober and able to process it, you should probably not let them wander out of your sight if they're drunk. Be ready to defuse bad situations and/or break up fights and talk people out of continuing them. You never know if the person they're threatening or loudly insulting has a bad temper, is a skilled fighter or carries guns or knives on them. Even if your friend is steadily wearing away at your patience and desperately needs to accept that they have a problem and need treatment, the last thing you want is for them to wind up getting beaten to a pulp, stabbed, or shot. Beating-related deaths or permanently-crippling injuries are particularly common among drunks due to the body's greatly dulled ability to perceive pain while inebriated, which leads to people getting up from injuries or attempting to struggle out of holds that would have a sober person howling in pain. * Generally, it's best to do your best to keep drunk people from encountering law enforcement. Being drunk is temporary, but a criminal record - or being shot or even sometimes "just" beaten up and tased - is permanent. This ties into several of the above - keeping them away from driving, fights, or dangerous activities - but it also means if someone really, really drunk can be kept out of public view or any situation where they are likely to encounter police, it's a good idea to do so.
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* If you have a friend who is a mean, abusive, belligerent or violent drunk and insists on drinking anyways even after having been made aware of their repellent behavior while they were sober and able to process it, you should probably not let them wander out of your sight if they're drunk. Be ready to defuse bad situations and/or break up fights and talk people out of continuing them. You never know if the person they're threatening or loudly insulting has a bad temper, is a skilled fighter or carries guns or knives on them. Even if your friend is steadily wearing away at your patience and desperately needs to accept that they have a problem and need treatment, the last thing you want is for them to wind up getting beaten to a pulp, stabbed, stabbed or shot. Beating-related deaths or permanently-crippling injuries are particularly common among drunks due to the body's greatly dulled ability to perceive pain while inebriated, which leads to people getting up from injuries or attempting to struggle out of holds that would have a sober person howling in pain. * Generally, it's best to do your best to keep drunk people from encountering law enforcement. Being drunk is temporary, but a criminal record - or being shot or even sometimes "just" beaten up and tased - is permanent. This ties into several of the above - keeping them away from driving, fights, fights or dangerous activities - but it also means if someone really, really drunk can be kept out of public view or any situation where they are likely to encounter police, it's a good idea to do so.

Whether to call EmergencyServices, a private ambulance, or drive someone to the hospital yourself/have a sober driver drive them/call a taxi is a very complicated decision. If you have the money or connections for a private ambulance call, it is likely the very best option - medical assistance ensured to arrive solely with no law enforcement response and the person in a safe environment if they do begin experiencing a life-threatening issue. EmergencyServices is best if someone is experiencing life-threatening problems and you ''don't'' have the means for a private ambulance call - and it is ''sometimes'' possible to avoid law enforcement response if you give the person's age as being of legal age and you emphasize that there is no violence or threat of violence. Your/someone else's vehicle or a taxi, however, is the best idea IF, and only IF, the person is NOT experiencing any of the life-threatening symptoms (e.g. their breathing is fine and they are not seizing) and the concern is dehydration/sickness/vomiting or similar alone.
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Whether to call EmergencyServices, a private ambulance, ambulance or a taxi or drive someone to the hospital yourself/have a sober driver drive them/call a taxi them is a very complicated decision. If you have the money or connections for a private ambulance call, it is likely the very best option - medical assistance ensured to arrive solely with no law enforcement response and the person in a safe environment if they do begin experiencing a life-threatening issue. EmergencyServices is best if someone is experiencing life-threatening problems and you ''don't'' have the means for a private ambulance call - and it is ''sometimes'' possible to avoid law enforcement response if you give the person's age as being of legal age and you emphasize that there is no violence or threat of violence. Your/someone else's vehicle or a taxi, however, is the best idea IF, and only IF, the person is NOT experiencing any of the life-threatening symptoms (e.g. their breathing is fine and they are not seizing) and the concern is dehydration/sickness/vomiting or similar alone.
9th Dec '15 2:37:03 AM MerryMikael
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* If you're a bouncer, this passage could best be summed up as "don't be a dickhead and do your goddamn job", but elaboration is still necessary. While odds are good that you know what you're doing and are not a shithead, it should still be mentioned that, since the standard societal perception of bouncers tends to cleave towards "barely-verbal, troglodytic meathead who only took the job to get a chance to get away with being a violent, power-tripping asshole" (this isn't true as a whole, but anyone who has worked in nightlife can tell you that there are ''definitely'' bouncers who fit this to a T), you should scrupulously avoid doing anything that could be seen as this. Basically, don't start or join in on fights, don't be a dick to patrons, don't argue with or antagonize drunks, don't blow up at rude patrons (no matter how egregious their misbehavior is), don't drink or do drugs on the job (should be a no-brainer, but, again, this is all too common in the nightlife industry), and listen to what patrons and coworkers are trying to tell you. Failure to do so could get you fired, ruin your reputation and restrict your job options to sketchy, poorly-managed shitholes, or possibly even cause you to get your ass kicked or cost you your life if you piss off the wrong person. * ''DO NOT'' let someone drunk get behind the wheel of a vehicle. ''Ever.'' If someone is visibly drunk (or even if they don't seem so but you suspect they have had more than one drink in the last two hours) drive yourself if you're sober, find a sober driver in the group, call a cab or ride service, get on public transit (and keep an eye on the worst-off drunks), let the drunk people stay over at your place until sober... Drunk driving kills and injures many people every year around the world - and even when no one is injured or killed and no property is damaged, people (especially poorer people who can't fight the charges with a lawyer/don't know how to act when arrested) will face life-altering criminal charges and legal trouble. It's entirely stupid and entirely preventable.
to:
* If you're a bouncer, this passage could best be summed up as "don't be a dickhead and do your goddamn job", but elaboration is still necessary. While odds are good that you know what you're doing and are not a shithead, it should still be mentioned that, since the bears repeating. The standard societal perception of bouncers tends to cleave towards "barely-verbal, troglodytic meathead who only took the job to get a chance to get away with being a violent, power-tripping asshole" (this asshole". This isn't true as a whole, but anyone who has worked in nightlife can tell you that there are ''definitely'' bouncers who fit this to a T), you T. You should scrupulously avoid doing anything that could be seen as this. Basically, don't start or join in on fights, don't be a dick to patrons, don't argue with or antagonize drunks, don't blow up at rude patrons (no matter how egregious their misbehavior is), don't drink or do drugs on the job (should be a no-brainer, but, again, this is all too common in the nightlife industry), and listen to what patrons and coworkers are trying to tell you. Failure to do so could get you fired, ruin your reputation and restrict your job options to sketchy, poorly-managed shitholes, or shitholes. It could possibly even cause you to get your ass kicked or cost you your life if you piss off the wrong person. * ''DO NOT'' let someone drunk get behind the wheel of a vehicle. ''Ever.'' If someone is visibly drunk (or even if they don't seem so but you suspect they have had more than one drink in the last two hours) drive yourself if you're sober, find a sober driver in the group, call a cab or ride service, get on public transit (and keep an eye on the worst-off drunks), let the drunk people stay over at your place until sober... sober. Drunk driving kills and injures many people every year around the world - and even world. Even when no one is injured or killed and no property is damaged, people (especially poorer people who can't fight the charges with a lawyer/don't know how to act when arrested) will face life-altering criminal charges and legal trouble. It's entirely stupid and entirely preventable.

* If you have a friend who is a mean, abusive, belligerent, or violent drunk and who insists on drinking anyways even after having been made aware of their repellent behavior while they were sober and able to process it, you should probably not let them wander out of your sight if they're drunk. Be ready to defuse bad situations and/or break up fights and talk people out of continuing them, as you never know if the person they're threatening or loudly insulting has a bad temper, is a skilled fighter, or carries guns or knives on them. Even if your friend is steadily wearing away at your patience and desperately needs to accept that they have a problem and need treatment, the last thing you want is for them to wind up getting beaten to a pulp, stabbed, or shot; beating-related deaths or permanently-crippling injuries are particularly common among drunks due to the body's greatly dulled ability to perceive pain while inebriated, which leads to people getting up from injuries or attempting to struggle out of holds that would have a sober person howling in pain.
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* If you have a friend who is a mean, abusive, belligerent, belligerent or violent drunk and who insists on drinking anyways even after having been made aware of their repellent behavior while they were sober and able to process it, you should probably not let them wander out of your sight if they're drunk. Be ready to defuse bad situations and/or break up fights and talk people out of continuing them, as you them. You never know if the person they're threatening or loudly insulting has a bad temper, is a skilled fighter, fighter or carries guns or knives on them. Even if your friend is steadily wearing away at your patience and desperately needs to accept that they have a problem and need treatment, the last thing you want is for them to wind up getting beaten to a pulp, stabbed, or shot; beating-related shot. Beating-related deaths or permanently-crippling injuries are particularly common among drunks due to the body's greatly dulled ability to perceive pain while inebriated, which leads to people getting up from injuries or attempting to struggle out of holds that would have a sober person howling in pain.

* Most importantly, ''NEVER, EVER, EVER, EVER LEAVE A SEVERELY DRUNK PERSON ALONE.'' This encompasses all of the above and the points below - always make sure an adult who is at least ''somewhat'' sober is keeping an eye on anyone who is overwhelmingly drunk until they sober up. (In an absolute pinch "buzzed" people are okay for supervising - in that someone who's only had a couple beers or smoked a little bit of a joint watching someone who is in a far more worse state is better than ''nobody'' watching them)
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* Most importantly, ''NEVER, EVER, EVER, EVER LEAVE A SEVERELY DRUNK PERSON ALONE.'' This encompasses all of the above and the points below - always below. Always make sure an adult who is at least ''somewhat'' sober is keeping an eye on anyone who is overwhelmingly drunk until they sober up. (In In an absolute pinch "buzzed" people are okay for supervising - in that someone who's only had a couple beers or smoked a little bit of a joint watching someone who is in a far more worse state is better than ''nobody'' watching them) them.

There are also many others, including inpatient rehabs, outpatient rehab programs, one on one counseling, and more. There are programs specially for military members or ex-military (generally, you can find out about these in the US by contacting the Veterans Administration), programs for the LGBTQI community (there's generally meetings listed at community centers), for atheists or secularists who still want to do 12-step but without references to the "higher power," and alternatively, for devout religious believers who want to specify their higher power as their object of worship. And there's also harm reduction measures, listed above, whether via MM or via one's own ideas (e.g. thinking about what you can do to reduce alcohol intake or behave responsibly even if planning on getting drunk, for example, substituting a larger liquid volume drink for one with more alcohol, spacing out alcoholic drinks with nonalcoholic ones, making sure one is not driving or doing other hazardous things until sober) - which are especially valuable for alcohol abusers or overusers to ''prevent'' becoming alcoholics.
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There are also many others, including inpatient rehabs, outpatient rehab programs, one on one counseling, and more. There are programs specially for military members or ex-military (generally, you can find out about these in the US by contacting the Veterans Administration), programs for the LGBTQI community (there's generally meetings listed at community centers), for atheists or secularists who still want to do 12-step but without references to the "higher power," and alternatively, for devout religious believers who want to specify their higher power as their object of worship. And there's There's also harm reduction measures, listed above, whether via MM or via one's own ideas (e.g. thinking about what you can do to reduce alcohol intake or behave responsibly even if planning on getting drunk, for example, substituting a larger liquid volume drink for one with more alcohol, spacing out alcoholic drinks with nonalcoholic ones, making sure one is not driving or doing other hazardous things until sober) - which are especially valuable for alcohol abusers or overusers to ''prevent'' becoming alcoholics.
9th Dec '15 2:24:49 AM MerryMikael
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* ''Legal problems'' are another warning sign of alcohol abuse. Not legal problems so much as in "I carried my beer outside the bar and got a ticket" or "someone opened a container in my car" as those aren't necessarily related to your personal usage, but if you get a DUI or drunk and disorderly conduct arrest, ''that'' is a major warning sign. Also, while not necessarily a legal problem (though it can easily turn into this if your behavior is bad enough to get the police called or result in charges being filed), if you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem, and if you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. (The only possible exception is an ejection or ban that is ''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party group/etc started problems, you violated a dress code). If it's because you started or participated in a fight, were obnoxious, belligerent, or verbally abusive, habitually disputed or refused to pay tabs (the only exception being when someone genuinely did screw it up or is obviously trying to rip you off; yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you were too wasted to remember ordering it is a different story), sexually harassed other patrons or staff, or sat around all day being annoying and disruptive, you almost certainly have a drinking problem (and if it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole). Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban; while it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass, and it's also a great way to piss off your friends when they repeatedly have to carry you out and always find their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected.
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* ''Legal problems'' are another warning sign of alcohol abuse. Not legal problems so much as in "I carried my beer outside the bar and got a ticket" or "someone opened a container in my car" as those aren't necessarily related to your personal usage, but if you get a DUI or drunk and disorderly conduct arrest, ''that'' is a major warning sign. Also, while While not necessarily a legal problem (though problem, it can easily turn into this it if your behavior is bad enough to get the police called or result in charges being filed), if filed. *If you find yourself getting 86'd[[note]]restaurant slang for being ejected as a consequence of bad behavior[[/note]] from establishments, chances are good that you have a problem, and if problem. If you receive a ban from one, you ''definitely'' have a problem. (The only possible The exception is an ejection or ban that is being ''entirely'' unrelated to drinking - e.g. over a dispute over not tipping/leaving a bad review in the case of spectacularly bad service, someone else in your band/party group/etc band/party/group/etc. started problems, problems or you violated a dress code). If it's because you started or participated in a fight, were obnoxious, belligerent, or verbally abusive, habitually disputed or refused to pay tabs (the only exception being when someone genuinely did screw it up or is obviously trying to rip you off; yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you were too wasted to remember ordering it is a different story), sexually harassed other patrons or staff, or sat around all day being annoying and disruptive, you code. ** You almost certainly have a drinking problem (and if you get ejected or banned because habitually dispute or refuse to pay tabs. The only exception would be when someone genuinely has screwed it up or is obviously trying to rip you off. Yelling "I didn't order this shit!" because you're too wasted to remember ordering is a different story. You also have a problem if an ejection or a ban comes because you've started or participated in a fight, been obnoxious, belligerent or verbally abusive, sexually harassed other patrons or staff or been sitting around all day being annoying and disruptive. If it's not entirely related to drinking, you might just be an asshole). asshole. ** Not knowing your limits is another common reason for a ban; while ban. While it's generally not related to serious alcohol problems, regularly trying to match your friends shot-for-shot despite being unable to and then getting obnoxious or abusive ''will'' eventually make you PersonaNonGrata when the bar staff get sick of having to deal with your drunk ass, and it's ass. It's also a great way to piss off your friends when they repeatedly have for having to carry you out and always find their nights getting cut short because you got the entire party ejected.

** If you are on certain medications that you are advised to not mix alcohol with, ''don't''. This is because the interactions between those medications and alcohol can kill you, or can make the medications not work, or can cause other issues. When your doctor or pharmacist tells you that you cannot drink while taking a medication, they are ''not'' saying it to legally cover their ass in most instances - they are saying it because that med has a dangerous interaction with alcohol. If you are uncertain as to whether a medication can interact with even moderate drinking safely or you think the doctor or pharmacist is just making a big deal out of nothing, ''look it up yourself'' before you take a drink.
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** If you are on certain medications that you are advised to not mix alcohol with, ''don't''. This is because the interactions between those medications and alcohol can kill you, or can make the medications not work, work or can cause other issues. When your doctor or pharmacist tells you that you cannot drink while taking a medication, they are ''not'' saying it to legally cover their ass in most instances - they are saying it because that med has a dangerous interaction with alcohol. If you are uncertain as to whether a medication can interact with even moderate drinking safely or you think the doctor or pharmacist is just making a big deal out of nothing, ''look it up yourself'' before you take a drink.

* ''Dangerous behavior while under the influence'' is another warning sign that should be taken with the utmost seriousness. It means that your irresponsible use of alcohol is ''immediately life-threatening'', as opposed to liver damage or cancer or other long-term effects. If you find yourself getting into even one car accident drunk, walking on a freeway, fighting people twice your size and stronger than you (or even just randomly going up to people and starting shit with them - you never know when someone might be a trained martial artist or have weapons on them), engaging in unwanted or unsafe sex, jumping from windows or other heights, using firearms, attempting or even contemplating suicide, breaking bones or sustaining other injuries requiring hospital treatment or anything similar while drunk, you need to either immediately stop drinking or seek treatment for alcoholism. This is also a major warning sign that you may be self-medicating or triggering another underlying mental illness with alcohol.
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* ''Dangerous behavior while under the influence'' is another warning sign that should be taken with the utmost seriousness. It means that your your(or another person's) irresponsible use of alcohol is ''immediately life-threatening'', as opposed to liver damage or cancer or other long-term effects. If you find yourself getting into even one car accident drunk, walking on a freeway, fighting people twice your size and stronger than you (or even just randomly going up to people and starting shit with them - you never know when someone might be a trained martial artist or have weapons on them), engaging in unwanted or unsafe sex, jumping from windows or other heights, using firearms, attempting or even contemplating suicide, breaking bones or sustaining other injuries requiring hospital treatment or anything similar while drunk, you need to either immediately stop drinking or seek treatment for alcoholism. This is also a major warning sign that you may be self-medicating or triggering another underlying mental illness with alcohol.

* ''DO NOT'' overserve, if you are hosting a party or bartending yourself - realize there is a point at which people ''should not'' consume more alcohol. Don't be afraid to cut them off and supply them with nonalcoholic beverages at least until they've had time to process some of what they've had. If you are a bartender and decide that a customer is too drunk to continue serving but is also too profitable to cut off and lose out on tips, you can at least severely water down their drinks and substitute alcoholic components for non-alcoholic substitutes, as the body loses the ability to perceive alcohol after a certain point anyways. While morally dubious, it IS a win-win situation for you nonetheless - if they don't notice or protest, they'll keep throwing money at you, and if they do, they'll look like any other drunken asshole bitching about how weak the drinks are and will get hauled out by the bouncers. ** As a secondary tip for bartenders/servers: alcohol and caffeine are an okay combination but only to a point. After that point, it leads to everything from people being "awake drunk," (e.g. drunk but not aware how drunk they are) to actual heart attacks and poisonings (because both intensify the other's cardiotoxicity). Over two drinks with an energy drink or strong coffee as mixer is generally a very bad idea - if someone is repeatedly ordering such, try to steer them toward something with a non-caffeinated mixer even ''before'' you cut off the alcohol. Also, try to avoid doing Jagertrains for large groups who order lots of Jagerbombs - while they look impressive and can net handsome tips, it's impossible to keep track of that many people. If one of them decides to drink multiple Jagerbombs and has a bad reaction, your ass ''will'' be on the line.
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* ''DO NOT'' overserve, if you are hosting a party or bartending yourself - realize yourself. Realize there is a point at which people ''should not'' consume more alcohol. Don't be afraid to cut them off and supply them with nonalcoholic beverages at least until they've had time to process some of what they've had. If you are a bartender and decide that a customer is too drunk to continue serving but is also too profitable to cut off and lose out on tips, you can at least severely water down their drinks and substitute alcoholic components for non-alcoholic substitutes, as the body loses the ability to perceive alcohol after a certain point anyways. While morally dubious, it IS a win-win situation for you nonetheless - if nonetheless. If they don't notice or protest, they'll keep throwing money at you, and if you. If they do, they'll look like any other drunken asshole bitching about how weak the drinks are and will get hauled out by the bouncers. ** As a secondary tip for bartenders/servers: alcohol and caffeine are an okay combination but only to a point. After that point, it leads to everything from people being "awake drunk," (e.g. drunk but not aware how drunk they are) to actual heart attacks and poisonings (because both intensify the other's cardiotoxicity). Over two drinks with an energy drink or strong coffee as mixer is generally a very bad idea - if idea. If someone is repeatedly ordering such, try to steer them toward something with a non-caffeinated mixer even ''before'' you cut off the alcohol. Also, try to avoid doing Jagertrains Jaegertrains for large groups who order lots of Jagerbombs - while Jagerbombs. While they look impressive and can net handsome tips, it's impossible to keep track of that many people. If one of them decides to drink multiple Jagerbombs and has a bad reaction, your ass ''will'' be on the line.
29th Nov '15 2:18:32 AM MerryMikael
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*** On that note, there are some medications where very limited or moderate drinking ''is'' okay, but heavy, frequent drinking or becoming drunk causes the problem. With those, you ''must'' know your limit (if you can only have one drink, you can only have one drink, if you can only drink once a week, you can only drink once a week) and adhere to it - and if you cannot, you shouldn't even begin drinking.
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*** On that note, there are some medications where very limited or moderate drinking ''is'' okay, but heavy, frequent drinking or becoming drunk causes the problem. With those, you ''must'' know your limit (if limit. If you can only have one drink, you can only have one drink, if drink. If you can only drink once a week, you can only drink once a week) and adhere week. Adhere to it - and if it. If you cannot, you shouldn't even begin drinking.

* ''Dangerous behavior while under the influence'' is another warning sign that should be taken with the utmost seriousness, as it means that your irresponsible use of alcohol is ''immediately life-threatening,'' as opposed to liver damage or cancer or other long-term effects. If you find yourself getting into even one car accident drunk, walking on a freeway, fighting people twice your size and stronger than you (or even just randomly going up to people and starting shit with them - you never know when someone might be a trained martial artist or have weapons on them), engaging in unwanted or unsafe sex, jumping from windows or other heights, using firearms, attempting or even contemplating suicide, breaking bones or sustaining other injuries requiring hospital treatment, or anything similar while drunk, you need to either immediately stop drinking or seek treatment for alcoholism. This is also a major warning sign that you may be self-medicating or triggering another underlying mental illness with alcohol. ''Alcoholism'' is far more serious than even the alcohol abuse that can become it and that is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but who is not addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases.
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* ''Dangerous behavior while under the influence'' is another warning sign that should be taken with the utmost seriousness, as it seriousness. It means that your irresponsible use of alcohol is ''immediately life-threatening,'' life-threatening'', as opposed to liver damage or cancer or other long-term effects. If you find yourself getting into even one car accident drunk, walking on a freeway, fighting people twice your size and stronger than you (or even just randomly going up to people and starting shit with them - you never know when someone might be a trained martial artist or have weapons on them), engaging in unwanted or unsafe sex, jumping from windows or other heights, using firearms, attempting or even contemplating suicide, breaking bones or sustaining other injuries requiring hospital treatment, treatment or anything similar while drunk, you need to either immediately stop drinking or seek treatment for alcoholism. This is also a major warning sign that you may be self-medicating or triggering another underlying mental illness with alcohol. ''Alcoholism'' is far more serious than even the alcohol abuse that abuse, which can become it and that is always a part of it. The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is that alcoholism is a literal physical and emotional ''addiction'' to alcohol itself. Someone who is abusing alcohol but who is not addicted (yet) can, even if they drink problematically, manage their drinking. TheAlcoholic cannot, at least not without outside help and therapy in almost all cases.

* TheAlcoholic, on the other hand, ''needs'' to use alcohol or will go into a possibly fatal withdrawal syndrome called delirium tremens, cannot stop drinking once he or she begins to drink, even if the circumstances would demand moderation or sobriety. Alcoholic drinking is a need or compulsive behavior - an alcoholic may drink even when they do not want to do so.
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* TheAlcoholic, on the other hand, ''needs'' to use alcohol or will go into a possibly fatal withdrawal syndrome called delirium tremens, cannot stop drinking once he or she begins to drink, even if the circumstances would demand moderation or sobriety. Alcoholic drinking is a need or compulsive behavior - an alcoholic may drink even when they do not ''not'' want to do so.
22nd Oct '15 8:07:43 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** More seriously, if you or someone that you know begins to show serious memory issues (''especially'' when coupled with the manifestation of false memories), issues with eye movement, a decline in mental functioning (including hallucinations), an abnormal gait, and any number of deficits with language, motor planning, sensory processing, or executive functioning that occur when not intoxicated or experiencing withdrawal, medical attention should be sought ''immediately'', as these are the hallmarks of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, a life-threatening thiamine deficiency that is frequently present in long-term alcoholics who have largely stopped eating and sustain themselves through drinking.
3rd Jul '15 5:37:27 PM RevolutionStone
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* Physical health problems as a direct result of your alcohol use are a major warning sign that you may have a serious problem with alcohol. If you are clinically malnourished or anemic as a direct result of your drinking or the money you spend on it, if you have abnormal liver function tests or outright develop cirrhosis or alcoholic hepatitis or hepatocellular carcinoma, if you have even ''one'' episode of vomiting blood or passing blood rectally, if you have a seizure, or you or others around you are noticing a sharp decline in mental performance, it's probably time to consider getting treatment.

Whether someone can ever drink responsibly again after having been an alcoholic is an issue of [[FlameWar fierce debate]]: one side (that of most therapeutic opinion and of Alcoholics Anonymous) says that complete abstinence is required for anyone who ever reached the point of physical addiction (or, in some cases, even short of that threshold) and insists that any consumption of alcohol after beginning rehabilitation is a relapse. The other side (championed by Moderation Management, Rational Recovery, and some other therapists) postulates that it is ''possible'' for someone who was once an alcoholic to drink responsibly/on a limited basis - given the variables of personal willpower to do so, and structured settings to reduce temptation to overconsume or revert to addictive use.
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Whether someone can ever drink responsibly again after having been an alcoholic is an issue of [[FlameWar fierce debate]]: one side (that of most therapeutic opinion and of Alcoholics Anonymous) says that complete abstinence is required for anyone who ever reached the point of physical addiction (or, in some cases, even short of that threshold) and insists that any consumption of alcohol after beginning rehabilitation is a relapse. The other side (championed by Moderation Management, Rational Recovery, and some other therapists) postulates that it is ''possible'' for someone who was once an alcoholic to drink responsibly/on a limited basis - given the variables of personal willpower to do so, and structured settings to reduce temptation to overconsume or revert to addictive use. \n That said, with the development of medication treatments that can, if properly adhered to, restore the ability to stop drinking/"have enough," moderation/harm reduction ''can'' possibly be a more viable alternative to abstinence than it was in the past when it relied solely on self-control that an alcoholic almost always by definition doesn't have.
28th Jun '15 9:10:33 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** If you are an inexperienced drinker, do not try to keep up with veteran.
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** If you are an inexperienced drinker, do not try to keep up with veteran.veterans.

** You drink without care to quality or taste.
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** You drink without care to caring about quality or taste.

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** People only know the "drunk you" or you don't even know what your sober personality is. ** You drink without care regularly use "hair of the dog" to quality or taste.deal with hangovers.
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