History TroubledProduction / WesternAnimation

20th Jul '17 12:43:52 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* According to the animators who worked on it, ''Sir Billi'' suffered from a hellish production, to the point where many have called it the Scottish counterpart of ''Foodfight''. Originally promoted as the first animated film from Scotland -- though by the time it was actually released it had lost that honour to ''WesternAnimation/TheIllusionist'', forcing them to instead market it as the country's first computer-animated film -- which boasted a rapidly-growing animation industry thanks to investment from both the UK national and Scottish regional governments, the project was able to attract a lot of high-profile talents including Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/AlanCumming, and one-time ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' composer Patrick Doyle. Things rapidly fell apart in production, however, as director Sascha Hartmann rapidly proved to be a PrimaDonnaDirector who demanded that the animators use his unappealing character designs with no alterations, constantly made changes to scenes which required them to be hastily re-animated (causing the quality to suffer), and also repeatedly called back the cast to re-record thier dialogue, which is noticeable in that Connery's voice is very inconsistent, either from poor health, disillusionment with the project, or both. On top of that, Hartmann not only fired any animator who protested the film's [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids inappropriately adult humour]] or his approach to managing the project in general, but even reportedly fired anyone who was actually managing to produce stand-out work, as he considered them a threat to his authority as director. By the end of production everything was being churned out hastily by a group of inexperienced animators, which ended up being evident in the less-than-stellar animation used in the finished product.
18th Jul '17 4:52:28 PM ThraggLootrippa
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' was subject to constant ExecutiveMeddling, pushing to make it [[DarkerAndEdgier more adult and cynical]]. Pixar, this being their first feature, dutifully followed the notes from the executives, even if they didn't agree with them. When a preview cut was declared unwatchable, Jeffrey Katzenberg, then head of animation at Disney, asked, with some concern, why on earth Pixar had followed all the notes he, and others, had sent. Production was shut down for two weeks, while Lasseter and the others basically rewrote the entire movie, into pretty much what they wanted in the first place. The movie would survive and get finished in time for release, though Katzenberg's job did not (he ended up quitting Disney a year before the movie's release to start up Creator/DreamWorks).

to:

** ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' was subject to constant ExecutiveMeddling, pushing to make it [[DarkerAndEdgier more adult and cynical]]. Pixar, this being their first feature, dutifully followed the notes from the executives, even if they didn't agree with them. When a preview cut was declared unwatchable, Jeffrey Katzenberg, then head of animation at Disney, asked, asked with some concern, concern why on earth Pixar had followed all the notes he, he and others, others had sent. Production was shut down for two weeks, while Lasseter and the others basically rewrote the entire movie, into pretty much what they wanted in the first place. The movie would survive and get finished in time for release, though Katzenberg's job did not (he ended up quitting Disney a year before the movie's release to start up Creator/DreamWorks).
15th Jul '17 4:16:12 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the end, while the film did modestly well at the box office, Paramount deliberately discounted the money the film made in Europe before WorldWarII broke out there, meaning the film had much overhead left to be paid, leaving the Fleischers in the red. Critical reaction was also mixed, with a cruel remark from rival Creator/WaltDisney quipping "We can make a better film than that with our second-string animators".

to:

** In the end, while the film did modestly well at the box office, Paramount deliberately discounted the money the film made in Europe before WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII broke out there, meaning the film had much overhead left to be paid, leaving the Fleischers in the red. Critical reaction was also mixed, with a cruel remark from rival Creator/WaltDisney quipping "We can make a better film than that with our second-string animators".
6th Jul '17 6:53:38 PM kablammin45
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Of all shows, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndScrappyDoo'' ran into many production problems early on. Scrappy co-creator Creator/MarkEvanier [[http://www.newsfromme.com/writings/scrappy-days/ even wrote a very lengthy essay on its troubled history]].
** By 1979, ''WesternAnimation/TheScoobyDooShow'' was on the verge of cancelation by ABC, and Joe Barbera came up with the new character to help save it. None of the on-staff writers at HannaBarbera could write a satisfactory pilot script, and Evanier, the editor of their comic book division, was chosen. Barbera and Evanier worked together to finalize the character, and Evanier eventually turned in a satisfactory pilot script, and the show was picked up for a full season and made it on the air following endless salary and billing disputes, conflicts with Standards & Practices, and much ''much'' ExecutiveMeddling.
** Casting the character's voice was difficult in its own right, and the entire pilot was recorded at least five different times. Creator/MelBlanc was Barbara's first choice to voice Scrappy, but he turned the role down over salary disagreements. Then Creator/FrankWelker was considered before Creator/DonMessick was cast, and the pilot script recorded with the entire cast. Then ABC decided they didn't like Don's version, so Creator/DawsButler was cast and the entire script re-recorded. Then they didn't like his version, and Marilyn Schreffler was cast and the script re-recorded once again before Welker was cast, and the entire script recorded a fourth time. Then Paul Winchell and Dick Beals were cast at different points, though production was haulted while Barbera once again attempted to strike a deal with Mel Blanc. Ultimately, Lennie Weinrib was cast in the role simply because he was the first choice the network wouldn't veto. Even he would end up leaving the role at the end of the season over a salary dispute, along with a personality dispute with the voice director, and Don Messick became Scrappy's permanent voice afterwords.

to:

* ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'':
**
Of all shows, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndScrappyDoo'' ran into many production problems early on. Scrappy co-creator Creator/MarkEvanier [[http://www.newsfromme.com/writings/scrappy-days/ even wrote a very lengthy essay on its troubled history]].
** *** By 1979, ''WesternAnimation/TheScoobyDooShow'' was on the verge of cancelation by ABC, and Joe Barbera came up with the new character to help save it. None of the on-staff writers at HannaBarbera could write a satisfactory pilot script, and Evanier, the editor of their comic book division, was chosen. Barbera and Evanier worked together to finalize the character, and Evanier eventually turned in a satisfactory pilot script, and the show was picked up for a full season and made it on the air following endless salary and billing disputes, conflicts with Standards & Practices, and much ''much'' ExecutiveMeddling.
** *** Casting the character's voice was difficult in its own right, and the entire pilot was recorded at least five different times. Creator/MelBlanc was Barbara's first choice to voice Scrappy, but he turned the role down over salary disagreements. Then Creator/FrankWelker was considered before Creator/DonMessick was cast, and the pilot script recorded with the entire cast. Then ABC decided they didn't like Don's version, so Creator/DawsButler was cast and the entire script re-recorded. Then they didn't like his version, and Marilyn Schreffler was cast and the script re-recorded once again before Welker was cast, and the entire script recorded a fourth time. Then Paul Winchell and Dick Beals were cast at different points, though production was haulted while Barbera once again attempted to strike a deal with Mel Blanc. Ultimately, Lennie Weinrib was cast in the role simply because he was the first choice the network wouldn't veto. Even he would end up leaving the role at the end of the season over a salary dispute, along with a personality dispute with the voice director, and Don Messick became Scrappy's permanent voice afterwords.
** According to [[https://www.reddit.com/r/television/comments/6jekz1/creator_of_be_cool_scooby_doo_comments_on_the/ this account by one of the main writers on the show]], production for ''WesternAnimation/BeCoolScoobyDoo'' was an utter nightmare full of ScheduleSlip, frequent staff change-ups, and [[ExecutiveMeddling executives at WB playing favorites with the crew members and generally meddling with the show to hell and back]].
*** The original designs chosen by the executives were apparently butt-ugly[[labelnote:*]](and considering the that art-style the final series has [[BrokenBase is still significantly divisive]], that's saying a lot)[[/labelnote]], and the crew had to fight tooth-and-nail to get designs that were more appealing.
*** The executives seemingly didn't know what kind of show they wanted to see: a subversive self-parody of the ''Scooby-Doo'' franchise with the character's personalities exaggerated or something more traditional for the series. They ended up forcing the first several episodes to be rewritten from scratch over even the slightest of issues they had with the characters, delaying the show's premiere date and wasting several hundred thousand dollars in the process. The execs then [[NeverMyFault blamed their losses on the writers]].
*** The execs arbitrarily replaced the show creator and the main writer with an inexperienced writer in the middle of the second season and gave the former two no credit for what they actually did during said season. The show creator eventually gave up and left the show due to how nasty things were getting behind the scenes and how the execs were treating him.
20th Jun '17 8:30:47 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** First off, Seth Rogen spent ''eight years'' finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later. Considering that the movie was partially made as a criticism of the AnimationAgeGhetto, it bears mentioning that Rogan had managed to sell ''Film/TheInterview'' (you know, the movie about the assasination of the then very-much-alive Kim Jung Un) several years prior with no hitches.
** Physical production was reportedly worse. In order to get quality animation on the film's small budget, co-director Greg Tiernan forced the animators to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay and threatened to blacklist them should they try to go over his head (and if you know how small the reference pools are in animation, you know this is a ''very'' low blow). The fact that Vancouver, where Nitrogen Studios is located, doesn't have an animators' union meant that Tiernan could throw his weight around like this and the artists would have nobody to complain to. Even if they could, the artist couldn't complain to anyone because there's was no animation union in and only spoke up about the dreadful working conditions after the movie was released. In the end, only ''half'' of the animators were credited, with most of the others either leaving or getting fired halfway through.
** The studio's isolation also put them in a pinch when the script went through some last-minute re-rights and the writers failed to communicate with the artists, who had no idea what to do next.

to:

** First off, Seth Rogen spent ''eight years'' finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later. Considering Mind you, Seth had no problem pitching ''The Interview'' to Sony despite its heavy themes, so that should speak volumes.
** Once things started rolling,
the movie was partially made as a criticism of the AnimationAgeGhetto, it bears mentioning that Rogan had managed to sell ''Film/TheInterview'' (you know, the movie about the assasination of the then very-much-alive Kim Jung Un) several years prior with no hitches.
** Physical production was reportedly worse. In order to get quality animation on the film's small budget, co-director
problems only continued. Director Greg Tiernan forced was proven to be cruel towards the animators at Nitrogen Studios. He forced them to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay and threatened thanks to blacklist them should they try to go over his head (and if you know how small the reference pools are in animation, you know this is a ''very'' film's low blow). The fact that Vancouver, where Nitrogen Studios is located, doesn't have an animators' union meant that Tiernan could throw his weight around like this and the artists budget. Any animators who stood up against Tiernan's tyranny would have nobody to complain to. Even if they could, be fired and blackballed from the artist couldn't complain to anyone because there's was no animation union company along with going uncredited in and only spoke up about the dreadful working conditions after the movie was released. In the end, movie. Speaking of which, only ''half'' of the animators who worked on the film were credited, credited. Sadly, Greg got away with most of his vile actions because there is no animation union in Vancouver, where Nitrogen is located. This means that the others either leaving or getting fired halfway through.
man could do as he pleased with his employees. Even worse, those poor people had nowhere to turn to stop the abuse.
** The studio's isolation also put them in a pinch when There were several changes made to the script went through some last-minute re-rights during production at short notice and the writers failed to communicate with little communication to the artists, folks at Nitrogen, who had little to no idea what to do next.
19th Jun '17 10:23:08 PM NWolfman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** First off, Seth Rogen spent ''eight years'' finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later. Mind you, Seth had no problem pitching ''The Interview'' to Sony despite its heavy themes, so that should speak volumes.
** Once things started rolling, the problems only continued. Director Greg Tiernan was proven to be cruel towards the animators at Nitrogen Studios. He forced them to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay thanks to the film's low budget. Any animators who stood up against Tiernan's tyranny would be fired and blackballed from the company along with going uncredited in the movie. Speaking of which, only ''half'' of the animators who worked on the film were credited. Sadly, Greg got away with his vile actions because there is no animation union in Vancouver, where Nitrogen is located. This means that the man could do as he pleased with his employees. Even worse, those poor people had nowhere to turn to stop the abuse.
** There were several changes made to the script during production at short notice and with little communication to the folks at Nitrogen, who had little to no idea what to do next.

to:

** First off, Seth Rogen spent ''eight years'' finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later. Mind you, Seth had no problem pitching ''The Interview'' to Sony despite its heavy themes, so Considering that should speak volumes.
** Once things started rolling,
the problems only continued. Director movie was partially made as a criticism of the AnimationAgeGhetto, it bears mentioning that Rogan had managed to sell ''Film/TheInterview'' (you know, the movie about the assasination of the then very-much-alive Kim Jung Un) several years prior with no hitches.
** Physical production was reportedly worse. In order to get quality animation on the film's small budget, co-director
Greg Tiernan was proven to be cruel towards forced the animators at Nitrogen Studios. He forced them to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay thanks and threatened to blacklist them should they try to go over his head (and if you know how small the film's reference pools are in animation, you know this is a ''very'' low budget. Any animators who stood up against Tiernan's tyranny blow). The fact that Vancouver, where Nitrogen Studios is located, doesn't have an animators' union meant that Tiernan could throw his weight around like this and the artists would be fired have nobody to complain to. Even if they could, the artist couldn't complain to anyone because there's was no animation union in and blackballed from only spoke up about the company along with going uncredited in dreadful working conditions after the movie. Speaking of which, movie was released. In the end, only ''half'' of the animators who worked on the film were credited. Sadly, Greg got away credited, with his vile actions because there is no animation union in Vancouver, where Nitrogen is located. This means that most of the man could do as he pleased with his employees. Even worse, those poor people had nowhere to turn to stop the abuse.
others either leaving or getting fired halfway through.
** There were several changes made to The studio's isolation also put them in a pinch when the script during production at short notice went through some last-minute re-rights and the writers failed to communicate with little communication to the folks at Nitrogen, artists, who had little to no idea what to do next.
18th Jun '17 9:56:30 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the end, while the film did modestly well at the box office, Paramount deliberately discounted the money the film made in Europe before WorldWarII broke out there, meaning the film had much overhead left to be paid, leaving the Fleischers in the red. Critical reaction was also mixed, with a cruel remark from rival WaltDisney quipping "We can make a better film than that with our second-string animators".

to:

** In the end, while the film did modestly well at the box office, Paramount deliberately discounted the money the film made in Europe before WorldWarII broke out there, meaning the film had much overhead left to be paid, leaving the Fleischers in the red. Critical reaction was also mixed, with a cruel remark from rival WaltDisney Creator/WaltDisney quipping "We can make a better film than that with our second-string animators".
7th May '17 1:55:50 PM therealjackieboy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons Jetsons: The Movie]]'' had a bad production thanks to both George O'Hanlon and Mel Blanc dying before they could finish recording their lines (with O'Hanlon dying immediately after recording his lines in the booth due to a second stroke. If that wasn't enough, recording for George took a lot of work due to O'Hanlon having a hard time reading the script due to his first stroke, causing the voice director to make him repeat what he says), causing Jeff Bergman to have to finish for them, and severe ExecutiveMeddling by Universal such as replacing Janet Waldo with pop singer Tiffany as the voice of Judy Jetson, and by making it a musical due to their growing popularity in the late 80's. All of this caused the film to bomb at the box office, and kill off ''The Jetsons'' series.



* ''Animation/TheTragedyOfMan'', a highly ambitious and faithful retelling of a 1800s Hungarian theatrical play of the same name, started production in 1983, and the animating process began in 1988. A couple years later, the Soviet Union collapsed, taking Hungary's former studio system with it, along with shoving the country's already waning animation industry further downhill. Without state-sponsored backing, what was initially envisioned as a 6 year project only landed in theaters in 2011 -- the time frame was indeed correct, the animation did take about 6 years to complete, with the rest of that time being spent on trying to raise funds. Each of the film's 15 acts, all done in their own distinct art and animation style, were completed out of order and showcased at various film festivals to get funding. Most of the voice actors had to be replaced as the originals got too old for their roles. In the end, director Marcell Jankovics licencing his older animated short ''Sisyphus'' for a GM car commercial gave him a financial boost, and he was happy the movie got finished at all.



* ''Animation/TheTragedyOfMan'', a highly ambitious and faithful retelling of a 1800s Hungarian theatrical play of the same name, started production in 1983, and the animating process began in 1988. A couple years later, the Soviet Union collapsed, taking Hungary's former studio system with it, along with shoving the country's already waning animation industry further downhill. Without state-sponsored backing, what was initially envisioned as a 6 year project only landed in theaters in 2011 -- the time frame was indeed correct, the animation did take about 6 years to complete, with the rest of that time being spent on trying to raise funds. Each of the film's 15 acts, all done in their own distinct art and animation style, were completed out of order and showcased at various film festivals to get funding. Most of the voice actors had to be replaced as the originals got too old for their roles. In the end, director Marcell Jankovics licencing his older animated short ''Sisyphus'' for a GM car commercial gave him a financial boost, and he was happy the movie got finished at all.
27th Apr '17 5:24:44 PM Vrahno
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Animation/TheTragedyOfMan'', a highly ambitious and faithful retelling of a 1800s Hungarian theatrical play of the same name, started production in 1983, and the animating process began in 1988. A couple years later, the Soviet Union collapsed, taking Hungary's former studio system with it, along with shoving the country's already waning animation industry further downhill. Without state-sponsored backing, what was initially envisioned as a 6 year project only landed in theaters in 2011 -- the time frame was indeed correct, the animation did take about 6 years to complete, with the rest of that time being spent on trying to raise funds. Each of the film's 15 acts, all done in their own distinct art and animation style, were completed out of order and showcased at various film festivals to get funding. Most of the voice actors had to be replaced as the originals got too old for their roles. In the end, director Marcell Jankovics licencing his older animated short ''Sisyphus'' for a GM car commercial gave him a financial boost, and he was happy the movie got finished at all.
16th Apr '17 11:18:41 AM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Bluth and Goldman have since taken to crowd-funding a prequel film to their 1983 game ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'' in the hopes of making a proper comeback, after years in DevelopmentHell. As of this writing, production has been slow.

to:

*** ** Bluth and Goldman have since taken to crowd-funding a prequel film to their 1983 game ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'' in the hopes of making a proper comeback, after years in DevelopmentHell. As of this writing, production has been slow.



** First off, Seth Rogen spent 8 YEARS finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later.
*** Mind you, Seth had no problem pitching The Interview to Sony despite its heavy themes, so that should speak volumes.
** Once things started rolling, the problems only continued. Director Greg Tiernan was proven to be cruel towards the animators at Nitrogen Studios. He forced them to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay thanks to the film's low budget. If one was to stand up against Tiernan's tyranny, the animator would be fired and blackmailed from the company along with going uncredited in the movie's credits. Speaking of which, only ''half'' of the animators who worked on SP were credited.
*** Sadly, Greg got away with his vile actions because there is no animation union in Vancouver, where Nitrogen is located. This means that the man could do as he pleased with his employees. Even worse, those poor people had no one to turned to to stop the abuse.
** Did we mention that there was several changes to the script during production? This meant that the folks at Nitrogen had little to no idea what to do next due to this gross mismanagement practice.

to:

** First off, Seth Rogen spent 8 YEARS ''eight years'' finding a studio interested in the project. Those that were sent the script rejected it due to the religious subject matter and obscene content. Even Sony, the eventual distributor of the film, rejected it at first sight until Rogen re-sent the script to them a couple of years later.
***
later. Mind you, Seth had no problem pitching The Interview ''The Interview'' to Sony despite its heavy themes, so that should speak volumes.
** Once things started rolling, the problems only continued. Director Greg Tiernan was proven to be cruel towards the animators at Nitrogen Studios. He forced them to work overtime 7 days a week without extra pay thanks to the film's low budget. If one was to stand Any animators who stood up against Tiernan's tyranny, the animator tyranny would be fired and blackmailed blackballed from the company along with going uncredited in the movie's credits. movie. Speaking of which, only ''half'' of the animators who worked on SP the film were credited.
***
credited. Sadly, Greg got away with his vile actions because there is no animation union in Vancouver, where Nitrogen is located. This means that the man could do as he pleased with his employees. Even worse, those poor people had no one nowhere to turned to turn to stop the abuse.
** Did we mention that there was There were several changes made to the script during production? This meant that production at short notice and with little communication to the folks at Nitrogen Nitrogen, who had little to no idea what to do next due to this gross mismanagement practice.next.
This list shows the last 10 events of 101. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.WesternAnimation