History TroubledProduction / Theatre

17th May '17 6:46:47 PM nombretomado
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* ''Dance of the Vampires'', the Broadway version of ''Theatre/TanzDerVampire'', was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_of_the_vampires#Broadway probably doomed from the start]]. To summarize from the Other Wiki: It was supposed to open in 1998 but didn't until 2002, for reasons that ranged from having to find a new director (owing to the original, Creator/RomanPolanski, being unable to return to the U.S. without facing arrest on infamous rape charges) to the 9-11 attacks! As the ball got rolling, the script received an extensive, jokier rewrite to appeal to American audiences who no longer cared for European "megamusicals", and the changes kept on coming with the casting of Michael Crawford as Krolock; he had creative control over his dialogue, costumes, etc. Composer Jim Steinman was ultimately fired from his own show over not showing up to rehearsals. The director and choreographer, both fresh from ''{{Urinetown}}'', proved unable to handle a production of this size and style, especially with so many dueling ideas and egos about. The result lasted only 56 performances and its reputation has so far discouraged other English-language productions.

to:

* ''Dance of the Vampires'', the Broadway version of ''Theatre/TanzDerVampire'', was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_of_the_vampires#Broadway probably doomed from the start]]. To summarize from the Other Wiki: It was supposed to open in 1998 but didn't until 2002, for reasons that ranged from having to find a new director (owing to the original, Creator/RomanPolanski, being unable to return to the U.S. without facing arrest on infamous rape charges) to the 9-11 attacks! As the ball got rolling, the script received an extensive, jokier rewrite to appeal to American audiences who no longer cared for European "megamusicals", and the changes kept on coming with the casting of Michael Crawford as Krolock; he had creative control over his dialogue, costumes, etc. Composer Jim Steinman was ultimately fired from his own show over not showing up to rehearsals. The director and choreographer, both fresh from ''{{Urinetown}}'', ''Theatre/{{Urinetown}}'', proved unable to handle a production of this size and style, especially with so many dueling ideas and egos about. The result lasted only 56 performances and its reputation has so far discouraged other English-language productions.
17th Apr '17 9:35:24 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** Williams harbored his own doubts about his role, as the titular Nature God. For one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He came to view the role as "a lonely part and...a miserable part" that he couldn't get a grip on. Known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, Williams initially played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, hoping to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]]. Instead, Williams found audiences unresponsive, and soon began playing the character more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally panned: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." Kenneth Williams recalled that after one show, he was confronted by viewers who demanded to know what the play meant. It was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework ''Jack'' into something more presentable, but never finished it.

to:

** Williams harbored his own doubts about his role, as the titular Nature God. For one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He came to view the role Jack as "a lonely part and...a miserable part" that he couldn't get a grip on. Known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, Williams initially played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, hoping to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]]. Instead, When Williams found audiences unresponsive, and soon he began playing the character more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally panned: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." Kenneth Williams recalled that after one show, he was and Bryant were confronted by viewers who demanded to know what the play meant. It was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework ''Jack'' into something more presentable, but never finished it.
17th Apr '17 9:27:33 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: a fantasy parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, then encounters a Nature God who offers the protagonist his powers [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that ensured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.
** While Bolt landed a murderer's row of acting talent - Creator/KennethWilliams, Dame Edith Evans, Sian Phillips and Michael Bryant - they were dreadfully miscast, especially Evans who, at age 75, was simply too old for her character, written as a fortysomething businesswoman. Worse, Evans acted the prima donna on set, constantly demanding rewrites to make her character more sympathetic, fussing over minor details about her performance, and refusing to wear any wardrobe beyond the clothes she wore to the theater. All of this, naturally, aggravated her costars, Bolt and director Noel Willman to no end. Kenneth Williams' mockery of Evans' obnoxious behavior became one of his signature bits when appearing on talk shows and interview programs.
** Williams also found his own role (the titular Nature god) extremely taxing. For one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for the part. Williams, known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting and began playing the role more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally panned: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The play was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play into something more presentable, but never finished it.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: a fantasy parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, then encounters a Nature God who offers the protagonist his powers [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play It also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that ensured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory baffling and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, even offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.
** While Bolt landed a murderer's row of acting talent - Creator/KennethWilliams, Dame Edith Evans, Sian Phillips and Michael Bryant - they were dreadfully miscast, especially either dubious about the material themselves, or else miscast. Evans who, was the worst offender in all regards: at age 75, she was simply too old for her character, written conceived by Bolt as a fortysomething businesswoman. Worse, Evans acted the prima donna on set, constantly demanding She forgot or else refused to learn her lines, asked Bolt for rewrites to make her character more sympathetic, fussing over minor details about her performance, and refusing to wear any wardrobe occasionally refused costuming beyond the clothes she wore to the theater. All of this, naturally, aggravated theater, and clashed with her costars, Bolt and costars. In particular, she irritated Kenneth Williams by asking director Noel Willman to no end. Kenneth Williams' mockery if Williams should be replaced, within earshot of the actor. Years later, Williams would make his impression of Evans' obnoxious prima donna behavior became one of his signature bits when appearing on a recurring joke in interviews and talk shows and interview programs.
show appearances.
** Williams also found harbored his own role (the doubts about his role, as the titular Nature god) extremely taxing.God. For one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for came to view the part. Williams, known role as "a lonely part and...a miserable part" that he couldn't get a grip on. Known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, Williams initially played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but hoping to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]]. Instead, Williams found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting unresponsive, and soon began playing the role character more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally panned: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The Kenneth Williams recalled that after one show, he was confronted by viewers who demanded to know what the play meant. It was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play ''Jack'' into something more presentable, but never finished it.



* Creator/JohnOsborne's biggest theatrical flop was 1959's ''The World of Paul Slickey'', a broad musical satire of England's tabloid press. Coming at the height of his fame and acclaim, its difficult production and critical pounding proved a massive shock to Osborne and his fans.
** Despite his notoriety, Osborne couldn't find anyone willing to produce or direct the play, even his Royal Court collaborators Tony Richardson and George Devine. He ultimately turned to independent producer Donald Albery and a trio of amateur investors for funds, while deciding to direct it himself. Osborne's inexperience (he had never directed a West End production before, only minor repertory plays) led to some poor casting and directorial decisions, especially turning down Creator/SeanConnery (admittedly, little-known at that time) and Robert Stephens for the title character in favor of Dennis Lotis, a singer with little acting experience. He was also adamant about keeping his incoherent musical numbers intact, even though his producers tactfully suggested that they could stand some rewrites.
** ''Slickey'' premiered to one of the worst opening nights in West End history. Audiences started booing halfway through the performance, and continued mocking and talking back to the actors for the remainder of the show. During the curtain call, the audience booed and threw garbage at the stage, prompting actress Adrienne Corri to flip them off while instructing them to "Go fuck yourselves!" Osborne himself later claimed that he was chased by an angry mob up Charing Cross Road. Creator/NoelCoward, who attended the show and joined the booing, proclaimed it "appalling from every point of view," a criticism universally echoed by critics.
17th Apr '17 3:12:40 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: a fantasy parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, encounters a Nature God who offers the protagonist his powers, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: a fantasy parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, then encounters a Nature God who offers the protagonist his powers, powers [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured ensured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.
17th Apr '17 3:11:15 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to gain his powers, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a fantasy parable about an office worker who visits his boss's estate in the countryside, is tempted by encounters a Nature God to gain who offers the protagonist his powers, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's colleagues found the play unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, offered Bolt a chance to write a history play on the English Civil War if he abandoned ''Jack''.
17th Apr '17 3:10:06 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about an office worker who visits a family estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's theatrical colleagues found the play unsatisfactory; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, tried to convince Bolt to drop ''Gentle Jack'' and write a play for the RSC on the English Civil War instead.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about an office worker who visits a family his boss's estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, gain his powers, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's theatrical colleagues found the play unsatisfactory; unsatisfactory and tried warning him away from the project; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, tried to convince offered Bolt a chance to drop ''Gentle Jack'' and write a history play for the RSC on the English Civil War instead.if he abandoned ''Jack''.
17th Apr '17 3:04:56 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about an office worker who visits a family estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's theatrical colleagues found the play unsatisfactory; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, tried to convince Bolt to drop ''Gentle Jack'' and write a play for the RSC on the English Civil War again.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about an office worker who visits a family estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's theatrical colleagues found the play unsatisfactory; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, tried to convince Bolt to drop ''Gentle Jack'' and write a play for the RSC on the English Civil War again.instead.
17th Apr '17 3:04:35 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about a meek office worker who visits a family estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the odd central premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline. Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, had offered Bolt a chance to write an historical play on the English Civil War, which Bolt declined to make ''Gentle Jack''. Hall commented that "If (Bolt) had come to me with ''Gentle Jack'', I have to say politely that I would have turned it down."
** While Bolt landed a murderer's row of acting talent - Creator/KennethWilliams, Dame Edith Evans, Sian Phillips and Michael Bryant among them - they were dreadfully miscast, especially Evans who, at age 75, was simply too old for her character, written as a fortysomething businesswoman. Worse, Evans acted the prima donna on set, constantly demanding rewrites to make her character more sympathetic, fussing over minor details about her performance and refusing to wear any wardrobe beyond the clothes she wore to the theater. All of this, naturally, aggravated her costars, Bolt and director Noel Willman to no end. Kenneth Williams' mockery of Evans' obnoxious behavior became one of his signature bits when appearing on talk shows and interview programs.
** Williams also found his role (the titular Nature god) extremely trying: for one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for the part. Williams, known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting and began playing the role more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally loathed by critics and audiences alike: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The play was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play into something more presentable, but never finished it.

to:

** For starters, [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the play itself was a hard sell]]: it was a parable about a meek an office worker who visits a family estate in the countryside, is tempted by a Nature God to abandon civilization and become a God himself, [[FaustianBargain if he'll agree to murder one of his friends]]. Besides the odd central premise, the play also featured LotsAndLotsOfCharacters with their own subplots that deviated from the main storyline. storyline, along with elaborate set design and stage direction that assured an expensive production. Many of Bolt's theatrical colleagues found the play unsatisfactory; Peter Hall, director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, had offered tried to convince Bolt a chance to drop ''Gentle Jack'' and write an historical a play for the RSC on the English Civil War, which Bolt declined to make ''Gentle Jack''. Hall commented that "If (Bolt) had come to me with ''Gentle Jack'', I have to say politely that I would have turned it down."
War again.
** While Bolt landed a murderer's row of acting talent - Creator/KennethWilliams, Dame Edith Evans, Sian Phillips and Michael Bryant among them - they were dreadfully miscast, especially Evans who, at age 75, was simply too old for her character, written as a fortysomething businesswoman. Worse, Evans acted the prima donna on set, constantly demanding rewrites to make her character more sympathetic, fussing over minor details about her performance performance, and refusing to wear any wardrobe beyond the clothes she wore to the theater. All of this, naturally, aggravated her costars, Bolt and director Noel Willman to no end. Kenneth Williams' mockery of Evans' obnoxious behavior became one of his signature bits when appearing on talk shows and interview programs.
** Williams also found his own role (the titular Nature god) extremely trying: for taxing. For one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for the part. Williams, known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting and began playing the role more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally loathed by critics and audiences alike: panned: Bolt claimed that the critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The play was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play into something more presentable, but never finished it.
17th Apr '17 1:18:03 PM AllenbysEyes88
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** Nonetheless, Williams found his role (the titular Nature god) extremely trying: for one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for the part. Williams, known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting and began playing the role more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally loathed by critics and audiences alike: Bolt claimed that the audience "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The play was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play into something more presentable, but never finished it.

to:

** Nonetheless, Williams also found his role (the titular Nature god) extremely trying: for one, he had to learn Welsh for large passages of the script, turning to Sian Phillips for help. He also found himself increasingly doubting his fitness for the part. Williams, known for his broad comic acting in the Film/CarryOn films, played Jack as a subtly menacing AntiVillain, but found audiences unresponsive to his deviation from typecasting and began playing the role more and more broadly as the show's run continued. Williams was heartbroken by the negative reviews his performance received, and always blamed himself for the show's failure.
** When ''Gentle Jack'' premiered in November 1963, it was universally loathed by critics and audiences alike: Bolt claimed that the audience critics "sat like mice, actively hating it" while Michael Bryant complained that audiences "thought we were disgusting." The play was retired after seventy-five performances; its failure convinced Bolt to largely abandon the stage for the screen, agreeing to write the script for ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' immediately after its run concluded. Bolt spent his later years trying to rework the play into something more presentable, but never finished it.



** Despite his notoriety, Osborne couldn't find a director or producer willing to produce or direct the play, even his Royal Court collaborators Tony Richardson and George Devine. He ultimately turned to independent producer Donald Albery and a trio of amateur investors for funds, while deciding to direct it himself. Osborne's inexperience (he had never directed a West End production before, only minor repertory plays) led to some poor casting and directorial decisions, especially turning down Creator/SeanConnery (admittedly, mostly-unknown at that time) and Robert Stephens for the title character in favor of Dennis Lotis, a singer with little acting experience. He was also adamant about keeping his nearly-incoherent musical numbers intact, even though his producers tactfully suggested that they could stand some rewrites.

to:

** Despite his notoriety, Osborne couldn't find a director or producer anyone willing to produce or direct the play, even his Royal Court collaborators Tony Richardson and George Devine. He ultimately turned to independent producer Donald Albery and a trio of amateur investors for funds, while deciding to direct it himself. Osborne's inexperience (he had never directed a West End production before, only minor repertory plays) led to some poor casting and directorial decisions, especially turning down Creator/SeanConnery (admittedly, mostly-unknown little-known at that time) and Robert Stephens for the title character in favor of Dennis Lotis, a singer with little acting experience. He was also adamant about keeping his nearly-incoherent incoherent musical numbers intact, even though his producers tactfully suggested that they could stand some rewrites.
17th Apr '17 12:31:36 PM AllenbysEyes88
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Despite his notoriety, Osborne couldn't find a director or producer willing to produce or direct the play, even his habitual Royal Court collaborators Tony Richardson and George Devine. He ultimately turned to independent producer Donald Albery and a trio of amateur investors for funds, while deciding to direct it himself. Osborne's inexperience (he had never directed a West End production before, only minor repertory plays)led to some poor casting and directorial decisions, especially turning down Robert Stephens and Creator/SeanConnery (admittedly, mostly-unknown at that time) for the title character in favor of singer Dennis Lotis. He was also adamant about keeping his nearly-incoherent musical numbers intact, even though his producers tactfully suggested that they could stand some rewrites.

to:

** Despite his notoriety, Osborne couldn't find a director or producer willing to produce or direct the play, even his habitual Royal Court collaborators Tony Richardson and George Devine. He ultimately turned to independent producer Donald Albery and a trio of amateur investors for funds, while deciding to direct it himself. Osborne's inexperience (he had never directed a West End production before, only minor repertory plays)led plays) led to some poor casting and directorial decisions, especially turning down Robert Stephens and Creator/SeanConnery (admittedly, mostly-unknown at that time) and Robert Stephens for the title character in favor of Dennis Lotis, a singer Dennis Lotis.with little acting experience. He was also adamant about keeping his nearly-incoherent musical numbers intact, even though his producers tactfully suggested that they could stand some rewrites.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.Theatre