History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

24th Jan '16 12:56:46 PM Morgenthaler
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** In the end, despite a court settlement, everyone lost. Without Olbermann's ratings, MSNBC went into such a decline (posting its worst ratings in a decade by February 2015) that it decided to re-tool itself away from the left-wing opinion style that Olbermann had popularized on the network. Current TV, now unable to bank on Olbermann's star power, was eventually sold to AlJazeera. Olbermann himself returned to ESPN to cover sports events and host a weeknight show (which airs on a fluid time slot), but has stated that he is finished with political punditry.
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** In the end, despite a court settlement, everyone lost. Without Olbermann's ratings, MSNBC went into such a decline (posting its worst ratings in a decade by February 2015) that it decided to re-tool itself away from the left-wing opinion style that Olbermann had popularized on the network. Current TV, now unable to bank on Olbermann's star power, was eventually sold to AlJazeera.Creator/AlJazeera. Olbermann himself returned to ESPN to cover sports events and host a weeknight show (which airs on a fluid time slot), but has stated that he is finished with political punditry.
14th Jan '16 9:28:21 PM mlsmithca
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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.
to:
** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Creator/PeterUstinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told him Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.
11th Jan '16 10:05:09 PM DanielCase
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this detail
** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment. Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.
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** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment.equipment (and, eventually, get jobs with another mining company working claims in ''Guyana''). Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.
11th Jan '16 9:58:36 PM DanielCase
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missing words
** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected.
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** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, work would leave, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected.
11th Jan '16 9:57:06 PM DanielCase
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finish last
** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show.
to:
** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected. ** During that second season, the first season began airing in Ghana. Viewers were outraged at the way their country was depicted, and gave government officials an earful. Many, including an investigating journalist, came to believe from one scene, a highlight of the first season in which Lomu chokeholds into unconsciousness a cocoa farmer who confronted the mining crews after they flattened some of his crop, that they had killed the man. The two heard that an armed militia was coming for them, and saw news reports that a warrant was out for their arrest on murder charges. Very soon producers had the helicopter they had contracted to do aerial shots fly them to the international airport in Accra, where they quickly left the country, supposedly for good. ** Back home, Discovery did its part by [[ScrewedByTheNetwork moving the show from Fridays to Sundays]], when its core demographic was mostly watching football instead, and dropping the order to six episodes. Before those had even finished airing, the decision was made to cancel the show. The second season has never been shown in Ghana. ** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment. Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.
11th Jan '16 9:42:35 PM DanielCase
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Jungle Gold (begin)
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* In its first season, the ''Series/GoldRush'' SpinOff ''Jungle Gold'', was a huge hit, with the Discovery Channel ordering six more episodes than were originally expected. In its second season, that order was cut to six and the series was canceled. [[http://www.buzzfeed.com/jedlipinski/how-jungle-gold-went-from-boom-to-bust#.ncqKAVEyP This story]] in ''[=BuzzFeed=]'' explains why. ** It began when Scott Lomu and George Wright, two Utah Mormons who'd been trying their luck mining for gold in Ghana after losing their shirts when the housing bubble burst came home, starting watching ''Gold Rush'', and found it much duller than their experience. They got in touch with the producers, and told them that there was more drama in one day in Ghana than there was in a week in Alaska. The producers were sold, and soon they were headed back to Ghana flush with new investment. ** At the time, gold mining in Ghana was booming. Most of those running the mining operations, however, were Chinese who did so illegally, without even getting permits, and paying no attention to environmental or labor laws. Miners also ran the risk of getting robbed by armed gangs. Lomu and Wright hoped their show could show that foreigners could make money in Ghanaian gold mining ''and'' follow the rules. ** It didn't start off well. When Lomu went back to get the show started, he found the tribal chief he'd paid thousands to keep their claim secure had instead let the Chinese come in all over it. That had to be written off while a new mining location was found. ** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show.
3rd Jan '16 8:28:28 AM Shoebox
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* ''Series/{{ALF}}'' had several problems during its run, mainly due to the difficulty in staging a show with a puppet (ALF) as the main star (in fact, the show was not shot in front of a live studio audience because of this). There was reportedly so much tension among the actors that one of the leads, Max Wright, simply walked off the set after the finale was shot and never said goodbye to anyone. He disliked the puppet, claiming that it got the best lines. Paul Fusco also was very particular about ALF, and disliked rehearsal. Even years later, Creator/TinaFey discussed how, when working on NBC's 75th anniversary special, ALF's crew was very hard to work with.
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* ''Series/{{ALF}}'' had several problems during its run, mainly due to the difficulty in staging a show traditional sitcom with a puppet (ALF) as the main star (in fact, the show was not shot in front of a live studio audience because of this).this). To accommodate the puppeteers the floor of the set was riddled with trapdoors, adding a whole new and nervewracking dimension to the human cast's attempts to hit their marks. There was reportedly so much tension among the actors that one of the leads, Max Wright, simply walked off the set after the finale was shot and never said goodbye to anyone. He disliked the puppet, claiming that it got the best lines. Paul Fusco also was very particular about ALF, and disliked rehearsal. Even years later, Creator/TinaFey discussed how, when working on NBC's 75th anniversary special, ALF's crew was very hard to work with.
2nd Jan '16 7:32:32 PM mlsmithca
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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.
to:
** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen.prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.
2nd Jan '16 7:30:14 PM mlsmithca
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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew large audiences, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. Audience figures were still very high, but plans for a third series in 1971 based on stories by Adrian Conan Doyle were ultimately abandoned when Cushing refused to return.
to:
** Despite the troubled production, the series drew large audiences, audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. Audience figures were The series still very high, drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series in 1971 based on stories ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned when Cushing refused to return.abandoned.
2nd Jan '16 7:23:06 PM mlsmithca
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** In 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen. Sadly, the production once again struggled with tight schedules (resulting in much-criticised performances) and even tighter budgets (plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons). Wilmer later asked Cushing about his experience in the role; Cushing replied he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. Plans for a third series in 1971 based on stories by Adrian Conan Doyle were ultimately abandoned.
to:
** In Despite the troubled production, the series drew large audiences, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the chance to portray the character as he was in the stories rather than as he had generally been seen on screen. Sadly, after shooting of the production two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again struggled with tight schedules (resulting in much-criticised performances) fell victim to time and even tighter budgets (plans money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons). reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later asked recalled that Cushing about his experience in the role; Cushing replied told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. Plans Audience figures were still very high, but plans for a third series in 1971 based on stories by Adrian Conan Doyle were ultimately abandoned.abandoned when Cushing refused to return.

** The second season had the ''Metalder'' footage (Ryan's armor) run out fast, so they had him get an upgrade to new armor, this time from ''Space Sheriff Shaider'' (an even '''older''' series, but I digress.) The second season limped along with its endlessly repeated StockFootage, until, by the end of the season, both ''Shaider'' and ''Spielban'' footage had run dry. They bought up a '''fourth''' ''Metal Heroes'' series, ''Juukou B-Fighter,'' but rather than run the risk of alienating kids by overhauling ''everything'' at once (''Power Rangers Zeo'' hadn't happened yet, so Saban wasn't sure if a complete visual overhaul would work; until that point, even though ''Rangers'' got new zords each season, the suits were still the same familiar ones from ''Zyuranger,'') they decided to finally chuck ''Troopers'' in the bin and instead turned ''B-Fighter'' into ''Series/BigBadBeetleborgs.''
to:
** The second season had the ''Metalder'' footage (Ryan's armor) run out fast, so they had him get an upgrade to new armor, this time from ''Space Sheriff Shaider'' (an even '''older''' series, but I digress.) series). The second season limped along with its endlessly repeated StockFootage, until, by the end of the season, both ''Shaider'' and ''Spielban'' footage had run dry. They bought up a '''fourth''' ''Metal Heroes'' series, ''Juukou B-Fighter,'' but rather than run the risk of alienating kids by overhauling ''everything'' at once (''Power Rangers Zeo'' hadn't happened yet, so Saban wasn't sure if a complete visual overhaul would work; until that point, even though ''Rangers'' got new zords each season, the suits were still the same familiar ones from ''Zyuranger,'') they decided to finally chuck ''Troopers'' in the bin and instead turned ''B-Fighter'' into ''Series/BigBadBeetleborgs.''
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