History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

6th May '16 2:09:47 AM LondonKdS
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* ''Series/ThePrisoner'' has an off-screen history that is almost as convoluted and paranoia-filled as the actual show. The co-creators of the series, actor Patrick [=McGoohan=] and screenwriter George Markstein, almost immediately began to clash over what the series should be. George Markstein has gone on record stating that his idea for the series came about while [=McGoohan=] was making the [[SpyFiction spy thriller series]] ''Series/DangerMan'' and that the premise would be what would happen if [=McGoohan's=] character, John Drake, resigned and was sent to a special resort-type prison similar to a kind used to crack POW's in World War 2. [=McGoohan=] on the other hand maintains that the two characters are different and that the two shows are completely independent. Beyond the question of the central character's identity, it seems that Markstein wanted to keep the series rooted in the espionage genre, with Number Six's character as a spy imprisoned by (probably) his own side because he knew too much, while [=McGoohan=] saw the show from the start as a much more abstract surreal allegory about the relationship between the individual and society. It is likely that both creators went into the project with their own notions of what the "truth" was, and both interpretations influenced the writing and the acting. Beyond the characterization, many of the details of who created what and when were contested between [=McGoohan=] and Markstein, with the preponderance of the evidence supporting [=McGoohan=], but not completely invalidating Markstein's claims nor his influences in writing the series. Once [=McGoohan=] won his power struggle with Markstein and the show started to get seriously freaky, ExecutiveMeddling made things even more troubled. There are even conflicting claims from all concerned about how many episodes were originally planned, and whether the show was cancelled prematurely or not. Certainly, there are reports from many actors and crew members that the final episode, "Fall Out", was made in completely chaotic circumstances, with [=McGoohan=] still working on the script during recording breaks, Kenneth Griffith (who played the President) being asked to write his own dialogue, and as much of the production as possible having to be recycled from previous episodes.
16th Apr '16 4:40:31 PM HowlingSnail
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** The DVD release of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E5TheUnderwaterMenace The Underwater Menace]] was also a troubled production. Episode 3, then the only existing episode, was released as part of the Lost in Time boxset in 2004. After Episode 2 was discovered in 2011, pressure was on to release it on DVD too. The two missing episodes were originally slated to be animated (As other stories' missing episodes had been), but this was cancelled after the animation company went bust, and the DVD was cancelled too. Then, in October 2015, the story was finally released with extremely basic tele-snap reconstructions of the missing episodes, which were significantly worse than both [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet previous off]][[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E5TheWebOfFear icial efforts]] and popular fan-made ones.
24th Mar '16 10:00:09 AM OlfinBedwere
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* Creator/DouglasAdams described the creation of the TV version of ''Series/TheHitchHikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' as "not a happy production. There was a personality clash between myself and the director. And between the cast and the director. And between the tea lady and the director." Said director, Alan Bell, puts the blame on Douglas, claiming they used to make lists of his ridiculous unfilmable ideas, to which Adams would reply that Bell "cheerfully admits he will say what suits him rather than what happens to be the case. And therefore there's no point in arguing." John Lloyd, the producer and co-writer of the radio show, was annoyed that he was made "associate producer" (he felt that the fact his credit literally explodes in the ending credits was a comment on how meaningless it was) and thought Bell was too concerned with getting things done efficiently, rather than getting them done ''right''. The second series simply didn't happen: Adams wouldn't do it without Lloyd or Geoffrey Perkins; Bell wouldn't do it with them. It was suggested that Perkins could be script editor (since this would minimise his interaction with Bell), and he viewed the possibility of [[ScheduleSlip trying to wring scripts out of Adams]] under these conditions with horror. Nobody would back down, so...

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* Creator/DouglasAdams described the creation of the TV version of ''Series/TheHitchHikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' as "not a happy production. There was a personality clash between myself and the director. And between the cast and the director. And between the tea lady and the director." Said director, Alan Bell, puts the blame on Douglas, claiming they used to make lists of his ridiculous unfilmable ideas, to which Adams would reply that Bell "cheerfully admits he will say what suits him rather than what happens to be the case. And therefore there's no point in arguing." John Lloyd, the producer and co-writer of the radio show, was annoyed that he was made "associate producer" (he felt that the fact his credit literally explodes in the ending credits was a comment on how meaningless it was) and thought Bell was too concerned with getting things done efficiently, rather than getting them done ''right''. The second series simply didn't happen: Adams wouldn't do it without Lloyd or Geoffrey Perkins; Bell wouldn't do it with them. It was suggested that Perkins could be script editor (since this would minimise his interaction with Bell), and he viewed the possibility of [[ScheduleSlip trying to wring scripts out of Adams]] under these conditions with horror. Adams then suggested replacing Bell with Pennant Roberts, who had directed several of his scripts on ''Series/DoctorWho'', but this was declined on the grounds that a writer having any say in the choice of director (or, for that matter, a drama director handling what was classed as a sitcom) simply wasn't done in those days. Nobody would back down, so...
16th Feb '16 6:41:40 AM Ecgwynn
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** Prospect Park's contract required that production had to begin by a certain date, or else they would loose the license. Once funding was finally secured, the production team had only ''eight weeks'' to lease a soundstage in Connecticut, build 30 sets, begin writing episodes, casting (or re-casting) the actors, and begin production. Once cameras finally began rolling, they were writing episodes almost on the fly.

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** Prospect Park's contract required that production had to begin by a certain date, or else they would loose lose the license. Once funding was finally secured, the production team had only ''eight weeks'' to lease a soundstage in Connecticut, build 30 sets, begin writing episodes, casting (or re-casting) the actors, and begin production. Once cameras finally began rolling, they were writing episodes almost on the fly.
24th Jan '16 12:56:46 PM Morgenthaler
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** In the end, despite a court settlement, everyone lost. Without Olbermann's ratings, MSNBC went into such a decline (posting its worst ratings in a decade by February 2015) that it decided to re-tool itself away from the left-wing opinion style that Olbermann had popularized on the network. Current TV, now unable to bank on Olbermann's star power, was eventually sold to AlJazeera. Olbermann himself returned to ESPN to cover sports events and host a weeknight show (which airs on a fluid time slot), but has stated that he is finished with political punditry.

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** In the end, despite a court settlement, everyone lost. Without Olbermann's ratings, MSNBC went into such a decline (posting its worst ratings in a decade by February 2015) that it decided to re-tool itself away from the left-wing opinion style that Olbermann had popularized on the network. Current TV, now unable to bank on Olbermann's star power, was eventually sold to AlJazeera.Creator/AlJazeera. Olbermann himself returned to ESPN to cover sports events and host a weeknight show (which airs on a fluid time slot), but has stated that he is finished with political punditry.
14th Jan '16 9:28:21 PM mlsmithca
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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing told him he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.

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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including George Sanders, Peter Ustinov, Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Creator/PeterUstinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Wilmer later recalled that Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told him Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr were ultimately abandoned.
11th Jan '16 10:05:09 PM DanielCase
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** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment. Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.

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** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment.equipment (and, eventually, get jobs with another mining company working claims in ''Guyana''). Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.
11th Jan '16 9:58:36 PM DanielCase
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** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected.

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** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, work would leave, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected.
11th Jan '16 9:57:06 PM DanielCase
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** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show.

to:

** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show, and Ghanaians living in the US were criticizing their government back home for allowing the show to be produced. Permits for starting the next season were thus delayed for weeks longer than had been expected.
** During that second season, the first season began airing in Ghana. Viewers were outraged at the way their country was depicted, and gave government officials an earful. Many, including an investigating journalist, came to believe from one scene, a highlight of the first season in which Lomu chokeholds into unconsciousness a cocoa farmer who confronted the mining crews after they flattened some of his crop, that they had killed the man. The two heard that an armed militia was coming for them, and saw news reports that a warrant was out for their arrest on murder charges. Very soon producers had the helicopter they had contracted to do aerial shots fly them to the international airport in Accra, where they quickly left the country, supposedly for good.
** Back home, Discovery did its part by [[ScrewedByTheNetwork moving the show from Fridays to Sundays]], when its core demographic was mostly watching football instead, and dropping the order to six episodes. Before those had even finished airing, the decision was made to cancel the
show. The second season has never been shown in Ghana.
** It actually worked out well, mostly. The warrant, if it had ever existed, was dropped, and Lomu and Wright were able to return to Ghana on several occasions and retrieve their equipment. Many of the villagers they worked with said the two had treated them well. The government used the furore to deport many of the Chinese miners. However, the communities where the mining took place have suffered economically in their absence.
11th Jan '16 9:42:35 PM DanielCase
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* In its first season, the ''Series/GoldRush'' SpinOff ''Jungle Gold'', was a huge hit, with the Discovery Channel ordering six more episodes than were originally expected. In its second season, that order was cut to six and the series was canceled. [[http://www.buzzfeed.com/jedlipinski/how-jungle-gold-went-from-boom-to-bust#.ncqKAVEyP This story]] in ''[=BuzzFeed=]'' explains why.
** It began when Scott Lomu and George Wright, two Utah Mormons who'd been trying their luck mining for gold in Ghana after losing their shirts when the housing bubble burst came home, starting watching ''Gold Rush'', and found it much duller than their experience. They got in touch with the producers, and told them that there was more drama in one day in Ghana than there was in a week in Alaska. The producers were sold, and soon they were headed back to Ghana flush with new investment.
** At the time, gold mining in Ghana was booming. Most of those running the mining operations, however, were Chinese who did so illegally, without even getting permits, and paying no attention to environmental or labor laws. Miners also ran the risk of getting robbed by armed gangs. Lomu and Wright hoped their show could show that foreigners could make money in Ghanaian gold mining ''and'' follow the rules.
** It didn't start off well. When Lomu went back to get the show started, he found the tribal chief he'd paid thousands to keep their claim secure had instead let the Chinese come in all over it. That had to be written off while a new mining location was found.
** An attempt to avoid UnfortunateImplications instead wound up creating them. Ghanaian law forbids foreigners from mining claims 25 acres or less, although they can invest in companies that do. Since Lomu and Wright wanted to avoid the impressions the sight of two white men looking on while black Africans did backbreaking work, they often faked doing work for the cameras. However, the episodes, when aired, didn't explain this, leaving many viewers with the impression that the two were mining illegally. By the end of the first season, ''three'' separate online petitions had been started asking Discovery to cancel the show.
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