History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

27th May '17 8:59:13 PM Pren
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** The 2017 Netflix revival suffered from a very rushed production schedule compared to what the show had been like before, including an entirely new method of recording the theater segments that worked off time stamps rather than actually having the movie playing in front of them, which naturally leads to the odd joke's timing being a tad off.
27th May '17 8:56:09 PM Pren
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* ''Series/TheGetDown'', the 2016 Netflix PeriodPiece about the birth of hip-hop by Creator/BazLuhrmann, has had problems from the start. The project was in DevelopmentHell for some time (so much so that a joke name for the show on set was "The Shut Down"). It ran massively over budget, eventually costing $120 million, due to the unusual approach to the show. The music and dance elements added money, as well as securing the rights to the NothingButHits soundtrack. Additional problems were caused by Luhrmann's lack of experience in television.

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* ''Series/TheGetDown'', the 2016 Netflix PeriodPiece about the birth of hip-hop by Creator/BazLuhrmann, has had problems from the start. The project was in DevelopmentHell for some time (so much so that a joke name for the show on set was "The Shut Down"). It ran massively over budget, eventually costing $120 million, due to the unusual approach to the show. The music and dance elements added money, as well as securing the rights to the NothingButHits soundtrack. Additional problems were caused by Luhrmann's lack of experience in television. The show ultimately had the embarrassing distinction of being the very first Netflix show to be cancelled after just one season, after ''five years'' of all their shows getting at least two.
17th May '17 3:28:17 PM Pren
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** Several sources announced that the script to the finale movie had finally been completed in 2017...just in time for the death of Powers Boothe. It's very likely that his character Cy Tolliver was included in the script given his prominent role in the show, meaning it will have to be heavily rewritten if Milch doesn't drop it entirely.
15th May '17 4:53:37 PM SorPepita
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* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' had its first season go off pretty swimmingly, ending up as one of the most acclaimed shows of the year...and then spent the next five years in a morass of problems.

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* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' had its first season go off pretty swimmingly, ending up as one of the most acclaimed shows of the year... and then spent the next five years in a morass of problems.



** Fellowes' obsession with SceneryPorn and portraying the lives of the early 20th century upper class led to more and more discomfort on set, especially his insistence on writing scenes around the dinner table which he then micromanaged and caused to take far longer to film than they should have...all while the food went bad under the lights and everyone had to suffer the stink.
** Finally, his writing strategy was to only write the first half of each series ahead of time, then wait to write the rest until filming was underway and he could see how the actors played off each other. This sometimes resulted in some very awkward storytelling as he decided to beef up a character's role, only to discover their actor couldn't commit to the show any further. The worst of these was Charles Edwards as Edith's love interest Michael Gregson, whose departure was so clearly a bad story option that Fellowes simply had him go missing in Germany and left his fate unknown for two years...before finally giving up and having Gregson discovered to have been killed.

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** Fellowes' obsession with SceneryPorn and portraying the lives of the early 20th century upper class led to more and more discomfort on set, especially his insistence on writing scenes around the dinner table which he then micromanaged and caused to take far longer to film than they should have... all while the food went bad under the lights and everyone had to suffer the stink.
** Finally, his writing strategy was to only write the first half of each series ahead of time, then wait to write the rest until filming was underway and he could see how the actors played off each other. This sometimes resulted in some very awkward storytelling as he decided to beef up a character's role, only to discover their actor couldn't commit to the show any further. The worst of these was Charles Edwards as Edith's love interest Michael Gregson, whose departure was so clearly a bad story option that Fellowes simply had him go missing in Germany and left his fate unknown for two years... before finally giving up and having Gregson discovered to have been killed.
15th May '17 3:47:46 PM SorPepita
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** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Series 23). Producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner and script editor Creator/EricSaward were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, against the wishes of the producer, recruited Creator/RobertHolmes to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout with no clear winner...before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so he handed it to another writing team famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.

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** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Series 23). Producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner and script editor Creator/EricSaward Eric Saward were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, against the wishes of the producer, recruited Creator/RobertHolmes to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout with no clear winner... before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so he handed it to another writing team famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.
15th May '17 3:44:31 PM SorPepita
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** If there's any single episode of TOS that suffered from this trope, it was "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E27TheAlternativeFactor The Alternative Factor]]" during the first season. John Drew Barrymore, John's son and Drew's father, had been cast as Lazarus, the main guest role ... and then didn't show up on the first day of filming. His agent and lawyer couldn't find him, so they cast [[LargeHam someone else]] in a big hurry (Barrymore's absence led to him getting suspended by SAG for six months after Desilu filed a grievance). The beard for the replacement was improvised from what had been designed for Barrymore, and it shows. The script has howler lines like "Starfleet has been getting reports from [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale all over the galaxy and far beyond]]..." It also had a subplot in which Lazarus became romantically involved with a black member of the crew -- which admittedly seems out of place on the eve of universal Armageddon and didn't have much to do with anything. That was actually filmed ... and hastily edited out when NBC got paranoid about how the Southern affiliates would react, resulting in the finished episode's choppy feel.

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** If there's any single episode of TOS that suffered from this trope, it was "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E27TheAlternativeFactor The Alternative Factor]]" during the first season. John Drew Barrymore, John's son and Drew's father, had been cast as Lazarus, the main guest role ...role... and then didn't show up on the first day of filming. His agent and lawyer couldn't find him, so they cast [[LargeHam someone else]] in a big hurry (Barrymore's absence led to him getting suspended by SAG for six months after Desilu filed a grievance). The beard for the replacement was improvised from what had been designed for Barrymore, and it shows. The script has howler lines like "Starfleet has been getting reports from [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale all over the galaxy and far beyond]]..." It also had a subplot in which Lazarus became romantically involved with a black member of the crew -- which admittedly seems out of place on the eve of universal Armageddon and didn't have much to do with anything. That was actually filmed ...filmed... and hastily edited out when NBC got paranoid about how the Southern affiliates would react, resulting in the finished episode's choppy feel.
15th May '17 3:43:22 PM SorPepita
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* "[[Recap/SherlockS01E01AStudyInPink A Study in Pink]]", the PilotEpisode of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', was originally shot as a 60-minute one-off movie, supposedly at cost of almost a million pounds. There were rumors the BBC was going to junk it, and they did ... by asking Creator/MarkGatiss and Creator/StevenMoffat to turn it into a series pilot instead. But that required making it longer, and they didn't think they could maintain a consistent feel since they couldn't get their original cinematographer back. So ''they shot the whole thing over''.

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* "[[Recap/SherlockS01E01AStudyInPink A Study in Pink]]", the PilotEpisode of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', was originally shot as a 60-minute one-off movie, supposedly at cost of almost a million pounds. There were rumors the BBC was going to junk it, and they did ...did... by asking Creator/MarkGatiss and Creator/StevenMoffat to turn it into a series pilot instead. But that required making it longer, and they didn't think they could maintain a consistent feel since they couldn't get their original cinematographer back. So ''they shot the whole thing over''.



** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Creator/PeterUstinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and Creator/JohnDicksonCarr were ultimately abandoned.

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** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Creator/PeterUstinov, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and Creator/JohnDicksonCarr were ultimately abandoned.
13th May '17 12:57:09 PM nombretomado
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]" (Series 21). MargaretThatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- [[SpecialEffectsFailure it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around]], the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Creator/PeterDavison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became an iconic example of the show being awful -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]" (Series 21). MargaretThatcher UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- [[SpecialEffectsFailure it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around]], the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Creator/PeterDavison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became an iconic example of the show being awful -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.
12th May '17 9:33:36 PM mlsmithca
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** The fallout was almost immediate. Critics were already suspicious when the BBC refused to screen the episodes for them in advance, and when the first episode, "Pritan", depicted the Roman invasion with dialogue mostly comprising Latin and grunting and incredibly cheaply-rendered violence, the reviews were overwhelmingly negative. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too." It was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, but audience figures dropped so quickly (not helped by the series' airing opposite the popular ITV drama ''Public Eye'') that it was booted to later in the evening and replaced with ''Series/{{Kojak}}''. By the time the final episode, "Death of Liberty", shuddered off the screens in June 1975, the series had been all but forgotten by the public. And since the series was a co-production with Time-Life, it also aired on American public television to even smaller audiences.

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** The fallout was almost immediate. Critics were already suspicious when the BBC refused to screen the episodes for them in advance, and when the first episode, "Pritan", depicted "Pritân", boasted a script that seemed more concerned than anything else with the linguistic argument that Britain is only so named because of a misunderstanding by the Roman invasion with dialogue mostly comprising Latin invaders[[note]] More precisely, according to Churchill, the original Celtic inhabitants of what is now called Britain were the '''P'''ritans - ancient Greek explorers referred to them as the ''Pretani'' - but the Romans thought they were the same people as the Brythons in what is now Brittany (and who also lived in what are now Cornwall and grunting Wales).[[/note]] and incredibly cheaply-rendered violence, used pitifully obvious rubber props for dismembered body parts, the reviews were overwhelmingly negative. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too." It was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, but audience figures dropped so quickly (not helped by the series' airing opposite the popular ITV drama ''Public Eye'') that it was booted to later in the evening and replaced with ''Series/{{Kojak}}''. By the time the final episode, "Death of Liberty", shuddered off the screens in June 1975, the series had been all but forgotten by the public. And since the series was a co-production with Time-Life, it also aired on American public television to even smaller audiences.
12th May '17 1:49:38 AM mlsmithca
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* ''Series/CountdownWithKeithOlbermann'' became this near the end of its existence, and the experience put {{Keith Olbermann}}'s career as a political commentator on hiatus for several years. Where to begin?

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* Part of the reason Creator/TheBBC's 26-episode miniseries ''Churchill's People'' was such a catastrophic flop was a severely troubled production.
** Series creator Gerard Savory had been pitching the idea of adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into a dramatic prestige project since shortly after Churchill himself died in 1965. Unfortunately, the books are saturated not just with Churchill's political biases, but with his personal interests, focusing on political and military minutiae and having little to say about social history or the development of agriculture and industry (UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that Churchill should have called the books ''Things in History That Interested Me''). This meant the stories and characters had to be largely invented by the writers to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life. Almost every episode had a different writer and a different director, resulting in highly variable quality for both the scripts (which wheeled back and forth between stilted {{Info Dump}}s and anachronistic lines such as "I'll smash your face in!") and, despite the "who's who" of acting talent present (name a stage or TV performer active in Britain in the 1970s and they probably appeared in an episode), the performances.
** It took until early 1973 for production to finally begin, and with the energy crisis gripping Britain at the time, the budget for the series was slashed to a meagre £1.25 million (less than £50,000 per episode). This resulted in the series being entirely shot on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes, and the tacky effects (such as visible nozzles spraying "fog" on a suspiciously flat Scottish heath) and "crowds" of a dozen people at most were pathetically obvious throughout. Individual incidents also set production back; Dennis Waterman, playing King Harold II on the eve of the Battle of Hastings, accidentally hit himself in the eye not with an arrow (as allegedly happened to the real Harold) but with the lace of his cloak, requiring medical attention and a return to the makeup chair. Finally, the series was scheduled to begin as part of the celebration of what would have been Churchill's 100th birthday in 1974, but industrial action at the BBC led it to be postponed until New Year's Eve that year.
** The fallout was almost immediate. Critics were already suspicious when the BBC refused to screen the episodes for them in advance, and when the first episode, "Pritan", depicted the Roman invasion with dialogue mostly comprising Latin and grunting and incredibly cheaply-rendered violence, the reviews were overwhelmingly negative. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too." It was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, but audience figures dropped so quickly (not helped by the series' airing opposite the popular ITV drama ''Public Eye'') that it was booted to later in the evening and replaced with ''Series/{{Kojak}}''. By the time the final episode, "Death of Liberty", shuddered off the screens in June 1975, the series had been all but forgotten by the public. And since the series was a co-production with Time-Life, it also aired on American public television to even smaller audiences.
* ''Series/CountdownWithKeithOlbermann'' became this near the end of its existence, and the experience put {{Keith Olbermann}}'s KeithOlbermann's career as a political commentator on hiatus for several years. Where to begin?
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