History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

23rd Nov '16 7:31:33 PM KingOdin
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* ''Series/TerraNova'', Creator/{{Fox}}'s notorious sci-fi flop from 2011, was among the most expensive TV shows in history. The pilot cost $16-20 million and the rest of the show was in the area of $4 million per episode, with hundreds of crew members and extras. It also suffered from [[http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748703954004576090300806854410 production problems]] that were indicative of the poor planning around the show. Locations for sets in Queensland were chosen largely on the basis of how they'd look on film, with almost no consideration to the weather or the task of moving equipment to and from set. As a result, expensive sets were built in the middle of northern Queensland's wet jungles, where regular flooding would force cast and crew to hike through knee-deep mud to get to work, only to find themselves infested with leeches and ticks; they eventually had to build a bridge to solve this problem. A flash flood nearly killed a security guard while he was trying to save a power generator. Furthermore, production coincided with "schoolies week", the Australian version of spring break, forcing production to put up with swarms of drunken teenagers in the nearby town. All told, while the show was initially seen as holding promise, ratings dropped and reviews got more scathing as the show went on, leading Fox to cancel what had become an expensive turkey after only a single 13-episode season.

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* ''Series/TerraNova'', Creator/{{Fox}}'s notorious sci-fi flop from 2011, was among the most expensive TV shows in history. The pilot cost $16-20 million and the rest of the show was in the area of $4 million per episode, with hundreds of crew members and extras. It also suffered from [[http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748703954004576090300806854410 production problems]] that were indicative of the poor planning around the show. Locations for sets in Queensland were chosen largely on the basis of how they'd look on film, with almost no consideration to the weather or the task of moving equipment to and from set. As a result, expensive sets were built in the middle of northern Queensland's wet jungles, where regular flooding would force cast and crew to hike through knee-deep mud to get to work, only to find themselves infested with leeches and ticks; they eventually had to build a bridge to solve this problem. A flash flood nearly killed a security guard while he was trying to save a power generator. Furthermore, production coincided with "schoolies week", the Australian version of spring break, forcing production to put up with swarms of drunken teenagers in the nearby town. All told, while the show was initially seen as holding promise, ratings dropped and reviews got more scathing as the show went on, on (though opinion did somewhat improve towards the end of its run), leading Fox to cancel what had become an expensive turkey after only a single 13-episode season.
21st Nov '16 9:49:16 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** The second-season premiere, "What Lies Ahead", was so fraught with problems that it was [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/walking-dead-creator-frank-darabonts-852491 described by later showrunner Glen Mazzara]] as a potential "show-killer" years after the fact in an unsealed deposition. Filming began in earnest during a particularly hot summer, which reportedly caused director Gwyneth Horner-Peyton to suffer from heat stroke and turn in reportedly-unusable footage to AMC (the deleted scenes shown on the DVD and in trailers appear to disprove this claim, as they are mostly well-shot). According to Darabont's own words, he went to Suzie Fitzgerald (AMC's VP of scripted programming) and told her that production would be delayed by three weeks, but she reportedly lied about having the conversation while speaking with cast and crew. Due to the contentious shooting schedule, Darabont attempted to re-edit Horner-Peyton's footage himself, going so far as to use a pseudonym ("Ardeth Bey") in the final cut. Two-thirds of the episode was lopped off in the editing room and the remaining footage was re-edited into the following installment. Additionally, the production crew had to go back and reshoot at least one scene, as evidenced by Rick inexplicably wearing his full sheriff's uniform during the scene where he attempts to radio Morgan.

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** The second-season premiere, "What "[[{{Recap/TheWalkingDeadS02E01WhatLiesAhead}} What Lies Ahead", Ahead]]", was so fraught with problems that it was [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/walking-dead-creator-frank-darabonts-852491 described by later showrunner Glen Mazzara]] as a potential "show-killer" years after the fact in an unsealed deposition. Filming began in earnest during a particularly hot summer, which reportedly caused director Gwyneth Horner-Peyton to suffer from heat stroke and turn in reportedly-unusable footage to AMC (the deleted scenes shown on the DVD and in trailers appear to disprove this claim, as they are mostly well-shot). According to Darabont's own words, he went to Suzie Fitzgerald (AMC's VP of scripted programming) and told her that production would be delayed by three weeks, but she reportedly lied about having the conversation while speaking with cast and crew. Due to the contentious shooting schedule, Darabont attempted to re-edit Horner-Peyton's footage himself, going so far as to use a pseudonym ("Ardeth Bey") in the final cut. Two-thirds of the episode was lopped off in the editing room and the remaining footage was re-edited into the following installment. Additionally, the production crew had to go back and reshoot at least one scene, as evidenced by Rick inexplicably wearing his full sheriff's uniform during the scene where he attempts to radio Morgan.



*** Robert Kirkman has explained in interviews that he was unhappy with how the episode "TS-19" turned out, and reportedly ran into conflict with Darabont because the latter tried to give a scientific explanation for TheVirus and hinted at events that were going on elsewhere in the world.

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*** Robert Kirkman has explained in interviews that he was unhappy with how the episode "TS-19" "[[{{Recap/TheWalkingDeadS01E06TS19}} TS-19]]" turned out, and reportedly ran into conflict with Darabont because the latter tried to give a scientific explanation for TheVirus and hinted at events that were going on elsewhere in the world.



** Half of the third-season finale, "Welcome to the Tombs", was reshot months after filming wrapped due to a perceived lack of suspense regarding [[spoiler:Andrea's fate]] (originally, [[spoiler:Milton would be shot by the Governor, and would do more to try and free her. Tyreese eventually discovered the undead Milton taking a bite out of Andrea and saved her, but she asks for a gun to kill herself with]]). It is unknown if this was the incident that caused Mazzara's departure from the production.

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** Half of the third-season finale, "Welcome "[[{{Recap/TheWalkingDeadS03E16WelcomeToTheTombs}} Welcome to the Tombs", Tombs]]", was reshot months after filming wrapped due to a perceived lack of suspense regarding [[spoiler:Andrea's fate]] (originally, [[spoiler:Milton would be shot by the Governor, and would do more to try and free her. Tyreese eventually discovered the undead Milton taking a bite out of Andrea and saved her, but she asks for a gun to kill herself with]]). It is unknown if this was the incident that caused Mazzara's departure from the production.
20th Nov '16 1:26:44 AM crazyrabbits
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** The second-season premiere, "What Lies Ahead", was so fraught with problems that it was [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/walking-dead-creator-frank-darabonts-852491 described by later showrunner Glen Mazzara]] as a potential "show-killer" years after the fact in an unsealed deposition. Filming began in earnest during a particularly hot summer, which reportedly caused director Gwyneth Horner-Peyton to suffer from heat stroke and turn in reportedly-unusable footage to AMC (the deleted scenes shown on the DVD and in trailers appear to disprove this claim, as they are mostly well-shot). According to Darabont's own words, he went to Suzie Fitzgerald (AMC's VP of scripted programming) and told her that production would be delayed by three weeks, but she reportedly lied about having the conversation while speaking with cast and crew. Due to the contentious shooting schedule, Darabont attempted to re-edit Horner-Peyton's footage himself, going so far as to use a pseudonym ("Ardeth Bey") in the final cut. Two-thirds of the episode was lopped off in the editing room and re-edited into the following installment. Additionally, the production crew had to go back and reshoot at least one scene, as evidenced by Rick inexplicably wearing his full sheriff's uniform during the scene where he attempts to radio Morgan.

to:

** The second-season premiere, "What Lies Ahead", was so fraught with problems that it was [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/walking-dead-creator-frank-darabonts-852491 described by later showrunner Glen Mazzara]] as a potential "show-killer" years after the fact in an unsealed deposition. Filming began in earnest during a particularly hot summer, which reportedly caused director Gwyneth Horner-Peyton to suffer from heat stroke and turn in reportedly-unusable footage to AMC (the deleted scenes shown on the DVD and in trailers appear to disprove this claim, as they are mostly well-shot). According to Darabont's own words, he went to Suzie Fitzgerald (AMC's VP of scripted programming) and told her that production would be delayed by three weeks, but she reportedly lied about having the conversation while speaking with cast and crew. Due to the contentious shooting schedule, Darabont attempted to re-edit Horner-Peyton's footage himself, going so far as to use a pseudonym ("Ardeth Bey") in the final cut. Two-thirds of the episode was lopped off in the editing room and the remaining footage was re-edited into the following installment. Additionally, the production crew had to go back and reshoot at least one scene, as evidenced by Rick inexplicably wearing his full sheriff's uniform during the scene where he attempts to radio Morgan.
20th Nov '16 1:25:17 AM crazyrabbits
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** The second-season premiere, "What Lies Ahead", had roughly 2/3 of its footage (which involved Rick's group revisiting the Vatos nursing home from the first season) deleted from the final print due to being "unusable", despite it being promoted in early trailers. The rest of the footage (the encounter with the horde of walkers on the highway) was merged with the following episode, and Darabont reportedly took his name off the print and used a pseudonym instead.
** As a result of the contentious season premiere, and three days after appearing at Comi-Con 2011 to promote the show, AMC [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/walking-dead-what-happened-fired-221449 fired Darabont]] and supposedly kept the reasons for his firing from the cast and crew. Various reasons were given for his sacking, including the fact that he pushed back against AMC's planned budget cuts to each episode (though it was countered that the cuts were to make the show more sustainable), that the footage shot for "What Lies Ahead" was unusable, that AMC was showing favoritism towards ''Series/MadMen'' creator Matthew Weiner by giving him an increased budget for his series and short-shifting others, and that Darabont was a notorious pain who complained about the long hours and how uneasy he felt running a television series. Further complicating matters is that the decision to fire Darabont was caused by AMC head of original programming Joel Stillerman, who supposedly used the pretext of "unusable footage" to fire Darabont.

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** The house that was intended to be used as the Hershel residence in Season 2 was initially denied usage by the religious family that owned it, as they saw the series and thought was going to be shown in something that would be trashing religion. It took Darabont stepping in personally to smooth out the matter after the owners couldn't come to an understanding with the production crew.
** The second-season premiere, "What Lies Ahead", had roughly 2/3 of its footage (which involved Rick's group revisiting the Vatos nursing home from the first season) deleted from the final print due to being "unusable", despite it being promoted in early trailers. The rest of the footage (the encounter was so fraught with the horde of walkers on the highway) problems that it was merged with the following episode, and Darabont reportedly took his name off the print and used a pseudonym instead.
** As a result of the contentious season premiere, and three days after appearing at Comi-Con 2011 to promote the show, AMC
[[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/walking-dead-creator-frank-darabonts-852491 described by later showrunner Glen Mazzara]] as a potential "show-killer" years after the fact in an unsealed deposition. Filming began in earnest during a particularly hot summer, which reportedly caused director Gwyneth Horner-Peyton to suffer from heat stroke and turn in reportedly-unusable footage to AMC (the deleted scenes shown on the DVD and in trailers appear to disprove this claim, as they are mostly well-shot). According to Darabont's own words, he went to Suzie Fitzgerald (AMC's VP of scripted programming) and told her that production would be delayed by three weeks, but she reportedly lied about having the conversation while speaking with cast and crew. Due to the contentious shooting schedule, Darabont attempted to re-edit Horner-Peyton's footage himself, going so far as to use a pseudonym ("Ardeth Bey") in the final cut. Two-thirds of the episode was lopped off in the editing room and re-edited into the following installment. Additionally, the production crew had to go back and reshoot at least one scene, as evidenced by Rick inexplicably wearing his full sheriff's uniform during the scene where he attempts to radio Morgan.
** As a result of the contentious season premiere, Darabont was [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.
com/news/walking-dead-what-happened-fired-221449 fired Darabont]] as showrunner]] midway through production of the episode "Secrets" (and just three days after appearing at [=ComiCon=] 2011). His departure reportedly caused strife and supposedly kept the reasons for his firing from uncertainty on-set, with all of the cast and crew. Various members staying quiet due to a fear of losing their jobs if they spoke out. Numerous reasons were given for his sacking, including the fact some of which he spoke about years later after he sued AMC for unpaid royalties related to his contract:
*** Robert Kirkman has explained in interviews
that he pushed back against AMC's planned was unhappy with how the episode "TS-19" turned out, and reportedly ran into conflict with Darabont because the latter tried to give a scientific explanation for TheVirus and hinted at events that were going on elsewhere in the world.
*** According to Darabont's unsealed deposition in 2016, he immediately butted heads with Joel Stillerman (AMC's head of scripted programming) right after joining the series, and that
budget cuts to each episode (though it was countered that and the cuts contentious season premiere were used as an excuse to make fire him.
*** Articles written at
the show more sustainable), that time of Darabont's departure also lay blame at the footage shot for "What Lies Ahead" was unusable, that feet of AMC was themselves, who were showing favoritism towards ''Series/MadMen'' creator Matthew Weiner by giving him an increased budget for his series and while short-shifting others, and that Darabont was a notorious pain who complained about the long hours and how uneasy he felt running a television series. Further complicating matters is that the decision to fire Darabont was caused by AMC head of original programming Joel Stillerman, who supposedly used the pretext of "unusable footage" to fire Darabont.others.



** Showrunner Glen Mazzara (who took over production duties from Darabont) left at the end of the third season, which confused many fans who enjoyed the third season's jump in quality. This move was reportedly due to creative differences between Mazzara and AMC over various parts of the episodes.
** Half of the third-season finale, "Welcome to the Tombs", was reshot months after filming wrapped due to a perceived lack of suspense regarding [[spoiler:Andrea's fate]] (originally, [[spoiler:Milton would be shot by the Governor, and would do more to try and free Andrea. Tyreese eventually discovered the undead Milton taking a bite out of Laurie, and saved her, but she asks for a gun to kill herself with]]). It is unknown if this was the incident that caused Mazzara's departure from the production.

to:

** Showrunner Glen Mazzara (who took over production duties from Darabont) left at the end of the third season, which confused many fans who enjoyed the third season's jump in quality. This move was reportedly due to creative differences between Mazzara and AMC over various parts of the episodes.
episodes. According to [[http://io9.gizmodo.com/5974585/apparently-glen-mazzara-left-the-walking-dead-tv-show-because-robert-kirkman-made-him one article]], Mazzara stalled production several times due to a lack of material to work with, and Kirkman reportedly forced him out at the end of the season.
** Half of the third-season finale, "Welcome to the Tombs", was reshot months after filming wrapped due to a perceived lack of suspense regarding [[spoiler:Andrea's fate]] (originally, [[spoiler:Milton would be shot by the Governor, and would do more to try and free Andrea. her. Tyreese eventually discovered the undead Milton taking a bite out of Laurie, Andrea and saved her, but she asks for a gun to kill herself with]]). It is unknown if this was the incident that caused Mazzara's departure from the production.production.
** [[http://www.onlocationvacations.com/2015/11/18/some-senoia-ga-residents-are-so-over-the-walking-dead/ Residents in Senoia, Georgia]] (where the Alexandria Safe Zone scenes are filmed) eventually got so fed up that the production crew had taken over a large chunk of town (along with curious fans and on-set spies showing up to sneak video and photos away from the set) that they repeatedly complained to the local city council about it, causing some strife between the town and the production crew.
19th Nov '16 1:13:31 AM philipnova798
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Added DiffLines:

** The effects for the show itself also proved no end of production issues with the crew:
*** The main company hired to do the series, Creator/TheHowardAndersonCompany, managed to do both pilots on a decent time scale. But when it came to the first ''actual'' episode produced ("[[Recap/StarTrekS1E10TheCorbomiteManeuver The Corbomite Maneuver]]"), their workload increased to the point where there was no choice but to hire other vendors to help out with the show.
*** One of these, effects veteran Linwood Dunn's Film Effects of Hollywood, would go on to produce most of the effects during the first and second seasons[[note]]and would be further joined by several other houses, namely The Westheimer Company, Van Der Veer Photo Effects and Creator/CinemaResearch[[/note]]. By the time season 2 started, Dunn and the studio were clearly not getting along with each other (The company worked on the series on an episodic basis), resulting in sub-par effects given to the supervisors and editors[[note]]in one instance, the company finished four composite shots of the Enterprise, but only sent them ''two'' due to their poor quality.[[/note]]. The company left the series by the time of season 3 due to budget cuts, but their involvement left a sour taste in everyone's mouths.
*** The 11-foot model of the Enterprise was, in fact, one of the reasons why Dunn's company was hired to begin with. As the ship proved too huge for both of the studios Anderson's crew to work with. Once Film Effects was dropped from the series, the model and its 3-foot counterpart were subsequently retired, with heavy use of StockFootage being used for the ship for the third season.
18th Nov '16 5:04:36 PM CumbersomeTercel
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** Series VII had a lot of trouble just getting to the point where they could even make it. Craig Charles was imprisoned due to a (eventually proven false) rape allegation, while Chris Barrie decided that he wanted to leave the show to focus on his own sitcom, ''Series/TheBrittasEmpire'' (eventually just starring in two episodes of Series VII, with cameos in two more). More seriously however, the strain of ''Red Dwarf USA'' and Series VI had caused the Grant Naylor writing partnership to collapse, leaving Doug Naylor to write the show alongside a bunch of new writers whose work always required extensive retooling. This time the troublesome creative process proved obvious on-screen, with Series VII being a ratings hit, but near-universally considered the show's worst season by some distance.

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** Series VII had a lot of trouble just getting to the point where they could even make it. Craig Charles Creator/CraigCharles was imprisoned due to a (eventually proven false) rape allegation, while Chris Barrie decided that he wanted to leave the show to focus on his own sitcom, ''Series/TheBrittasEmpire'' (eventually just starring in two episodes of Series VII, with cameos in two more). More seriously however, the strain of ''Red Dwarf USA'' and Series VI had caused the Grant Naylor writing partnership to collapse, leaving Doug Naylor to write the show alongside a bunch of new writers whose work always required extensive retooling. This time the troublesome creative process proved obvious on-screen, with Series VII being a ratings hit, but near-universally considered the show's worst season by some distance.
16th Nov '16 10:41:24 AM Pren
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** ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo'' had production troubles in its first half. Producer Jonathan Tzachor wanted to embrace the source footage ''Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger''[='=]s slapstick comedy and then story editor Doug Sloan wanted to continue ''Series/PowerRangersZeo''[='=]s more serious bent of the franchise growing up. This led to severe mood whiplash, like a villain planting bombs that Rangers needed to deactivate before they blew up and kill people while having goofy concepts like Tommy reading the new zords' instruction manual. Eventually Doug Sloan left and was replaced with Judd Lynn right when it came time to jettison the old cast (save the new kid appeal character they just brought in) and replace them with a new cast. As Judd Lynn was in agreement on playing closer to ''Carranger''[='=]s comedy, the product became a lot more cohesive in the show's second half.

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** ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo'' had production troubles in its first half. Producer Jonathan Tzachor wanted to embrace the source footage ''Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger''[='=]s slapstick comedy and then story editor Doug Sloan wanted to continue ''Series/PowerRangersZeo''[='=]s more serious bent of the franchise growing up. This led to severe mood whiplash, like a villain planting bombs that Rangers needed to deactivate before they blew up and kill people while having goofy concepts like Tommy reading the new zords' instruction manual. Eventually Doug Sloan left and was replaced with Judd Lynn right when it came time to jettison the old cast (save the new kid appeal character they just brought in) and replace them with a new cast. Then the crew didn't even have the decency to tell the actors they were all about to lose their jobs, until some of them overheard the makeup team gossiping about it. As Judd Lynn was in agreement on playing closer to ''Carranger''[='=]s comedy, the product became a lot more cohesive in the show's second half.
16th Nov '16 10:35:55 AM Pren
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead Planet of the Dead]]" (the first of the 2009 specials) was made when the new production team was being trained by the old one. Due to location shooting in Dubai and Creator/DavidTennant only having a small gap in his schedule in which to film, the team only had six days to shoot. Unfortunately the double-decker bus prop on which the story relied got heavily damaged while transporting to Dubai. Creator/RussellTDavies decided to ThrowItIn and added lines in the script addressing the damage to the bus, but couldn't do a lot about the sandstorm that prevented shooting for several precious days!

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead Planet of the Dead]]" (the first of the 2009 specials) was made when the new production team was being trained by the old one. Due to location shooting in Dubai and Creator/DavidTennant only having a small gap in his schedule in which to film, the team only had six days to shoot. Unfortunately the double-decker bus prop on which the story relied got heavily damaged while transporting to Dubai. Creator/RussellTDavies decided to ThrowItIn and added lines in the script addressing the damage to the bus, bus (which results in a plot hole, or at least a major WhatAnIdiot moment, as the driver's confidence that he can go back through the portal unscathed wasn't changed despite the massive damage it now was written as causing to the bus), but couldn't do a lot about the sandstorm that prevented shooting for several precious days!
10th Nov '16 5:09:08 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* In the late summer of 1993, with Michael Jackson having just launched the Asian leg of his ''Dangerous'' tour, the rest of the Jackson family was preparing a ''Jackson Family Honors'' pretaped television AwardShow / charity benefit for December that would feature most of the family (plus other acts like Dionne Warwick and Celine Dion) performing their hits and presenting a pair of humanitarian awards to Berry Gordy and Elizabeth Taylor. And then...

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* In the late summer of 1993, with Michael Jackson Music/MichaelJackson having just launched the Asian leg of his ''Dangerous'' tour, the rest of the Jackson family was preparing a ''Jackson Family Honors'' pretaped television AwardShow / charity benefit for December that would feature most of the family (plus other acts like Dionne Warwick and Celine Dion) performing their hits and presenting a pair of humanitarian awards to Berry Gordy and Elizabeth Taylor.Creator/ElizabethTaylor. And then...



* ''Series/{{Luck}}'' was the most personal project of David Milch's career, playing into his lifelong love of horse racing. Unfortunately, what seemed like a match made in heaven on paper when Michael Mann was brought in as the primary director quickly went south. Exact details are scarce, but Richard Kind and Nick Nolte have both testified that the two had very different ideas for what the show should be, and they were also both very used to getting their own way with the creative process by this point. And if that wasn't enough, despite numerous precautions while filming the actual horse race scenes, three horses were killed over the course of filming. HBO execs quickly canned it after a single season thanks to that public relations nightmare.

to:

* ''Series/{{Luck}}'' was the most personal project of David Milch's career, playing into his lifelong love of horse racing. Unfortunately, what seemed like a match made in heaven on paper when Michael Mann Creator/MichaelMann was brought in as the primary director quickly went south. Exact details are scarce, but Richard Kind and Nick Nolte Creator/NickNolte have both testified that the two had very different ideas for what the show should be, and they were also both very used to getting their own way with the creative process by this point. And if that wasn't enough, despite numerous precautions while filming the actual horse race scenes, three horses were killed over the course of filming. HBO execs quickly canned it after a single season thanks to that public relations nightmare.



** Bruce Willis (who played David Addison), by contrast, started out the series being very friendly to Shepherd and the production crew. However, once ''Film/DieHard'' became a smash hit, he realized he was meant for a movie career and became detached from the job, as well as had a strained working relationship with Shepherd.

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** Bruce Willis Creator/BruceWillis (who played David Addison), by contrast, started out the series being very friendly to Shepherd and the production crew. However, once ''Film/DieHard'' became a smash hit, he realized he was meant for a movie career and became detached from the job, as well as had a strained working relationship with Shepherd.
9th Nov '16 1:47:33 PM Pren
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* The shooting of the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' was interrupted by constant rain, resulting in their set getting flooded and some of the equipment washed away and/or waterlogged. They had to drive to the nearest town, which was something like half an hour away, to buy hairdryers to dry off the cameras. In addition, natural rain doesn't show up properly on camera, meaning they had to fake rain all over their poor actors at the same time as trying to keep equipment from getting washed away. Then there was the other problem they had just before shooting; Evangeline Lily, who is Canadian, had some problems with getting her work visa, causing them to delay her scenes and almost have to recast the female lead in the middle of shooting.

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* The shooting of the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' was interrupted by constant rain, resulting in their set getting flooded and some of the equipment washed away and/or waterlogged. They had to drive to the nearest town, which was something like half an hour away, to buy hairdryers to dry off the cameras. In addition, natural rain doesn't show up properly on camera, meaning they had to fake rain all over their poor actors at the same time as trying to keep equipment from getting washed away. Then there was the other problem they had just before shooting; Evangeline Lily, who is Canadian, had some problems with getting her work visa, causing them to delay her scenes and almost have to recast the female lead in the middle of shooting. And it was all nicely bookended when Matthew Fox was almost killed during filming of the series finale, when Terry O'Quinn was mistakenly given a real knife for their climactic fight scene.
* ''Series/{{Luck}}'' was the most personal project of David Milch's career, playing into his lifelong love of horse racing. Unfortunately, what seemed like a match made in heaven on paper when Michael Mann was brought in as the primary director quickly went south. Exact details are scarce, but Richard Kind and Nick Nolte have both testified that the two had very different ideas for what the show should be, and they were also both very used to getting their own way with the creative process by this point. And if that wasn't enough, despite numerous precautions while filming the actual horse race scenes, three horses were killed over the course of filming. HBO execs quickly canned it after a single season thanks to that public relations nightmare.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.LiveActionTV