History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

20th Nov '17 4:14:58 PM ClintEastwood
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]" (Series 21). UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- [[SpecialEffectsFailure it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around]], the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Creator/PeterDavison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became an iconic example of the show being awful -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep]]" (Series 21). UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove {{Bowdlerise}}[=/=]remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy fan adviser Ian Levine being obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- [[SpecialEffectsFailure it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around]], the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Creator/PeterDavison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became an iconic example of the show being awful -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler]]" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing ''Film/TheAdventuresOfTinTinAndTheSecretOfTheUnicorn'', and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence, Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode ([[AudienceAlienatingPremise apart from premise problems]]) are things like lazy filler jokes ("One minute she's going to marry you and then she's going to kill you." "She's a woman.") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler]]" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing ''Film/TheAdventuresOfTinTinAndTheSecretOfTheUnicorn'', ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfTintin'', and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence, Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode ([[AudienceAlienatingPremise apart from premise problems]]) are things like lazy filler jokes ("One minute she's going to marry you and then she's going to kill you." "She's a woman.") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.
20th Nov '17 4:10:19 PM ClintEastwood
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** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.

to:

** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E4TheKrotons The Krotons]]" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E3Frontios Frontios]]" (Series 21) has a sad air hanging over its production, with the deaths of two people involved before going before the cameras. Production designer Barrie Robbins killed himself after having done much of the preparation work and was replaced by David Buckingham. The role of Range was originally given to Peter Arne, but he was murdered in his own home - the crime remains unsolved, although the prime suspect (a student Arne was in a relationship with )was later found dead in the Thames, it's not clear what the motive was. William Lucas was cast to replace him. In addition, the Tractator costumes proved overly constrictive and badly ventilated, requiring rewrites for the former and air to be pumped in during recording breaks for the latter.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E3Frontios Frontios]]" (Series 21) has a sad air hanging over its production, with the deaths of two people involved before going before the cameras. Production designer Barrie Robbins killed himself after having done much of the preparation work and was replaced by David Buckingham. The role of Range was originally given to Peter Arne, but he was murdered in his own home - the crime remains unsolved, although the prime suspect (a student Arne was in a relationship with )was with) was later found dead in the Thames, it's not clear what the motive was. William Lucas was cast to replace him. In addition, the Tractator costumes proved overly constrictive and badly ventilated, requiring rewrites for the former and air to be pumped in during recording breaks for the latter.



** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Series 23). Producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner and script editor Eric Saward were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, against the wishes of the producer, recruited Creator/RobertHolmes to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout with no clear winner... before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so he handed it to another writing team famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E1TimeAndTheRani Time and the Rani]]" (Series 24): Considering how late in the day most of the key production staffers and even Creator/SylvesterMcCoy himself were brought in, this was somewhat inevitable. It also didn't help that Andrew Cartmel didn't get along at all with writers Pip and Jane Baker, who repeatedly told him that as a novice with no prior TV experience he had no business trying to advise them on anything other than what was or wasn't feasible on the show's budget -- which was actually the thing he was ''least'' qualified to advise them on -- and didn't even always take his advice on that front. In particular, they refused to remove a scripted scene where King Solomon is abducted in the midst of the argument over who is the rightful mother of a baby just as his guard prepares to split it in two with an axe so as to give one half to each "mother"; the Bakers refused to back down on this until John Nathan-Turner pointed out that if neither he nor Cartmel were familiar with that parable, odds are most viewers at home wouldn't be either.

to:

** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Series 23). Producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner and script editor Eric Saward were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, Saward, against the wishes of the producer, JNT's wishes, recruited Creator/RobertHolmes to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout the Valeyard while falling down an abyss with no clear winner... before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer JNT canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so show. Saward refused to change the ending, as he wanted to preserve Holmes' memory and promptly resigned as script editor. JNT handed it to another writing team Pip and Jane Baker, who were famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor Saward had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E1TimeAndTheRani Time and the Rani]]" (Series 24): Considering how late in the day most of the key production staffers and even Creator/SylvesterMcCoy himself were brought in, this was somewhat inevitable. It also didn't help that the new script editor Andrew Cartmel didn't get along at all with writers Pip and Jane Baker, who repeatedly told him that as a novice with no prior TV experience he had no business trying to advise them on anything other than what was or wasn't feasible on the show's budget -- which was actually the thing he was ''least'' qualified to advise them on -- and didn't even always take his advice on that front. In particular, they refused to remove a scripted scene where King Solomon is abducted in the midst of the argument over who is the rightful mother of a baby just as his guard prepares to split it in two with an axe so as to give one half to each "mother"; the Bakers refused to back down on this until John Nathan-Turner pointed out that if neither he nor Cartmel were familiar with that parable, odds are most viewers at home wouldn't be either.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler]]" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing several Hollywood movies, and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence, Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode ([[AudienceAlienatingPremise apart from premise problems]]) are things like lazy filler jokes ("One minute she's going to marry you and then she's going to kill you." "She's a woman.") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.
** The Monks Trilogy (Series 10), a mid-season 3-part storyline, suffered a truly sad case of this. Creator/StevenMoffat's mother took deathly ill as he was working on the scripts for [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E6Extremis "Extremis"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E7ThePyramidAtTheEndOfTheWorld "The Pyramid at the End of the World"]]. While he managed to get "Extremis" into shooting shape, with only days left before filming was to start on the two episodes and no hope of pushing back production to later, the exhausted Moffat was not able to revise "Pyramid"'s script with co-writer Peter Harness; Moffat typed up the final draft of "Pyramid" ''at his mother's hospital bedside''. She ultimately succumbed to her illness. As with "Let's Kill Hitler", this personal stress shows in the finished product's IdiotPlot and its {{Cliffhanger}} that hinges on the villains suddenly disregarding the rules they laid down earlier. While Moffat did not write the conclusion [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E8TheLieOfTheLand "The Lie of the Land"]] (Toby Whithouse handled that), it was shot in the following production block and it's hard not to see its shortcomings (ThirdActStupidity on the part of the villains, a bizarre tonal shift during an extremely dramatic standoff, some out-of-character behavior for the Doctor such as [[spoiler: a regeneration fake-out]], a sentimental climax involving a character's mother, a lot of [[RecycledScript recycled plot beats]], etc.) as things that ''might'' have been ironed out had Moffat not been enduring bereavement at the time.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler]]" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing several Hollywood movies, ''Film/TheAdventuresOfTinTinAndTheSecretOfTheUnicorn'', and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence, Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode ([[AudienceAlienatingPremise apart from premise problems]]) are things like lazy filler jokes ("One minute she's going to marry you and then she's going to kill you." "She's a woman.") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.
** The Monks Trilogy (Series 10), a mid-season 3-part storyline, suffered a truly sad case of this. Creator/StevenMoffat's mother took deathly ill as he was working on the scripts for [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E6Extremis "Extremis"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E7ThePyramidAtTheEndOfTheWorld "The Pyramid at the End of the World"]]. While he managed to get "Extremis" into shooting shape, with only days left before filming was to start on the two episodes and no hope of pushing back production to later, the exhausted Moffat was not able to revise "Pyramid"'s script with co-writer Peter Harness; Moffat typed up the final draft of "Pyramid" ''at his mother's hospital bedside''. She ultimately succumbed to her illness. As with "Let's Kill Hitler", this personal stress shows in the finished product's IdiotPlot and its {{Cliffhanger}} that hinges on the villains suddenly disregarding the rules they laid down earlier. While Moffat did not write the conclusion [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E8TheLieOfTheLand "The Lie of the Land"]] (Toby Whithouse handled that), it was shot in the following production block and it's hard not to see its shortcomings (ThirdActStupidity on the part of the villains, a bizarre tonal shift during an extremely dramatic standoff, some out-of-character behavior for the Doctor such as [[spoiler: a regeneration fake-out]], a sentimental climax involving a character's Bill's mother, a lot of [[RecycledScript recycled plot beats]], etc.) as things that ''might'' have been ironed out had Moffat not been enduring bereavement at the time.
15th Nov '17 6:26:50 PM mlsmithca
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** About two-thirds of the way through the season, the cast started to gel as Dillon, Rocket and Gottfried realized that comedy was something that, like the original cast, they had to work at no matter how talented they were. An episode hosted by Karen Black managed to be consistently funny. Murphy started to emerge.
** Still, Doumanian's lack of understanding of the show, and severe responses from critics, only made the backstage drama, and the want to blackball Doumanin continue. Gilbert Gottfried was so disillusioned by the whole experience that he became more and more solemn and reclusive.

to:

** About two-thirds of the way through the season, the cast started to gel as Dillon, Rocket and Gottfried realized that comedy was something that, like the original cast, they had to work at no matter how talented they were. An episode hosted by Karen Black managed to be consistently funny. Murphy started to emerge.
**
emerge. Still, Doumanian's lack of understanding of the show, and severe responses from critics, only made the backstage drama, drama and the want attempts to blackball Doumanin Doumanian continue. Gilbert Gottfried was so disillusioned by the whole experience that he became more and more solemn and reclusive.
15th Nov '17 6:23:21 PM mlsmithca
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* Risley's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.

to:

* ** Risley's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.



* "[[Recap/SherlockS01E01AStudyInPink A Study in Pink]]", the PilotEpisode of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', was originally shot as a 60-minute one-off movie, supposedly at cost of almost a million pounds. There were rumors the BBC was going to junk it, and they did... by asking Creator/MarkGatiss and Creator/StevenMoffat to turn it into a series pilot instead. But that required making it longer, and they didn't think they could maintain a consistent feel since they couldn't get their original cinematographer back. So ''they shot the whole thing over''.

to:

* It's a wonder that "[[Recap/SherlockS01E01AStudyInPink A Study in Pink]]", the PilotEpisode of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', wasn't both the beginning ''and'' end of the series.
** It
was originally shot as a 60-minute one-off movie, supposedly at cost of almost a million pounds. There were rumors the BBC was going to junk it, and they did... by asking Creator/MarkGatiss and Creator/StevenMoffat to turn it into a series pilot instead. But that required making it longer, and they didn't think they could maintain a consistent feel since they couldn't get their original cinematographer back. So ''they shot the whole thing over''.
26th Oct '17 11:28:33 AM Twentington
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* ''Series/TheView''. The talk show went pretty smoothly for 8 seasons, though a couple co-hosts left at various points to pursue other opportunities, it wasn't until Star Jones and Meredith Viera left at the end of Season 9 that the show really began to be get lots of attention for the regular on and off-screen problems it's known for today.

to:

* ''Series/TheView''. The talk show went pretty smoothly for 8 seasons, though a couple co-hosts left at various points to pursue other opportunities, it wasn't until Star Jones and Meredith Viera left at the end of Season 9 that the show really began to be get lots of attention for the regular on and off-screen problems it's known for today.



** Rosie O'Donnell! Her infamous season on the show included many on-screen fights with conservative-minded co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck. One of them got so-bad, the show utilized a split-screen of Rosie and Elisabeth arguing, prompting Rosie to leave the show the next day. In addition, Rosie's insulting comments to Creator/DonaldTrump and Kelly Ripa got the show lots of negative attention, and Walters and O'Donnell reportedly had many backstage feuds.

to:

** Rosie O'Donnell! Her infamous season on the show included many on-screen fights with conservative-minded co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck. One of them got so-bad, so bad, the show utilized a split-screen of Rosie and Elisabeth arguing, prompting Rosie to leave the show the next day. In addition, Rosie's insulting comments to Creator/DonaldTrump UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump and Kelly Ripa got the show lots of negative attention, and Walters and O'Donnell reportedly had many backstage feuds.
24th Oct '17 4:18:39 AM OlfinBedwere
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** Near the middle of the season, lead actor Ted Danson announced that it would be his final season. The writers approached Creator/WoodyHarrelson to take over as the lead actor, but he declined unless Danson stayed on. Other actors were also starting to grow bored of their roles and wanted out of the series, too, forcing the writers to hustle their resources together to write in an ending that made sense. As the season came to a close, many characters were given closure that seemed to come almost out of nowhere. Lillith's actress, Creator/BebeNeuwirth, also strangely disappeared mid-season and made very few appearances.

to:

** Near the middle of the season, lead actor Ted Danson announced that it would be his final season. The writers approached Creator/WoodyHarrelson to take over as the lead actor, but he declined unless Danson stayed on. Other actors were also starting to grow bored of their roles and wanted out of the series, too, forcing the writers to hustle their resources together to write in an ending that made sense. This eventually resulted in series creators Glen and Les Charles -- who had mostly stayed in hands-off executive producer roles since Shelley Long left the series and was replaced by Kirstie Alley at the start of Season 6 -- having to come back and write the finale themselves after Anderson and O'Shannon couldn't come up with a workable storyline. As the season came to a close, many characters were given closure that seemed to come almost out of nowhere. Lillith's actress, Creator/BebeNeuwirth, also strangely disappeared mid-season and made very few appearances.
18th Oct '17 6:31:51 AM JoeDavis
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** Still, Doumanian's lack of understanding of the show, and severe responses from critics, only made the backstage drama, and the want to blackball Doumanin continue. Gilbert Gottfried became so disillusioned by the whole experience that he became more and more solemn and reclusive.

to:

** Still, Doumanian's lack of understanding of the show, and severe responses from critics, only made the backstage drama, and the want to blackball Doumanin continue. Gilbert Gottfried became was so disillusioned by the whole experience that he became more and more solemn and reclusive.
18th Oct '17 5:16:17 AM JoeDavis
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** However, that's as far as fairness goes. The putative stars of her cast - Creator/DennyDillon, Creator/GilbertGottfried and Creator/CharlesRocket - acted like they had it made just by virtue of being on ''Saturday Night Live'', and to others it showed. At the end of a meeting after the cast and writers had worked on material for several weeks, Doumanian asked if anyone had any comments or suggestions. Piscopo, dismayed by what he had seen so far, was about to suggest she fire everyone and start over, until Dillon spoke up that she didn't like having white wine in her dressing room and wanted a bottle of red instead. At that point he realized the problem went all the way to the top.
** Dillon's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.

to:

** However, that's as far as fairness goes. The putative stars of her cast - including Creator/DennyDillon, Creator/GilbertGottfried Creator/GilbertGottfried, and Creator/CharlesRocket - acted like they had it made just by virtue of being on ''Saturday Night Live'', and to others it showed. At the end of a meeting after the cast and writers had worked on material for several weeks, Doumanian asked if anyone had any comments or suggestions. Piscopo, dismayed by what he had seen so far, was about to suggest she fire everyone and start over, until Dillon Ann Risley spoke up that she didn't like having white wine in her dressing room and wanted a bottle of red instead. At that point he realized the problem went all the way to the top.
** Dillon's * Risley's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.


Added DiffLines:

** Still, Doumanian's lack of understanding of the show, and severe responses from critics, only made the backstage drama, and the want to blackball Doumanin continue. Gilbert Gottfried became so disillusioned by the whole experience that he became more and more solemn and reclusive.
17th Oct '17 9:17:15 PM mlsmithca
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E7TheCelestialToymaker The Celestial Toymaker]]" (Series 3) was going to centre around two characters from a popular absurdist play, who never appear in the play itself, actually showing up. This caused a full-blown copyright dispute. Similarly, the budget was starved and the producer was forced to go ahead with the point of the script removed and NoBudget, resulting in a famously poor story with little in the way of structure, [[AbsenteeActor no Doctor]] and most of the action being characters playing board games. The BBC ended up in legal action anyway due to an adlib from [[Literature/Greyfriars Billy Bunter]] {{Expy}} Cyril saying "my friends call me Billy", which caused the people who owned the ''Billy Bunter'' IP to attempt to sue. The BBC had to release a public statement saying Cyril was a perfectly legal CaptainErsatz. The fiction-world idea eventually did happen in the show, in a much more careful form, in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The Mind Robber]]".

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E7TheCelestialToymaker The Celestial Toymaker]]" (Series 3) was going to centre around two characters from a popular absurdist play, who never appear in the play itself, actually showing up. This caused a full-blown copyright dispute. Similarly, the budget was starved and the producer was forced to go ahead with the point of the script removed and NoBudget, resulting in a famously poor story with little in the way of structure, [[AbsenteeActor no Doctor]] and most of the action being characters playing board games. The BBC ended up in legal action anyway due to an adlib from [[Literature/Greyfriars [[Literature/{{Greyfriars}} Billy Bunter]] {{Expy}} Cyril saying "my friends call me Billy", which caused the people who owned the ''Billy Bunter'' IP to attempt to sue. The BBC had to release a public statement saying Cyril was a perfectly legal CaptainErsatz. The fiction-world idea eventually did happen in the show, in a much more careful form, in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The Mind Robber]]".



* The first few years of ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'' were rough on co-creator, writer, producer and star Steve Smith. The production crew only had limited studio time to film the first season, so they were forced to do some marathon shootings to pull it off. Smith was also plagued with ExecutiveMeddling in the first three seasons, including trying to pressure him into making the show more like a traditional sitcom. With the fourth through sixth seasons, the production company had to pay for its own airtime, something Smith later said was a stupid thing to do. Things became much better when the Creator/{{CBC}} [[NetworkToTheRescue picked up the show during the seventh season]], where it remained for the final nine seasons of its run.



* The first few years of ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'' were rough on co-creator, writer, producer and star Steve Smith. The production crew only had limited studio time to film the first season, so they were forced to do some marathon shootings to pull it off. Smith was also plagued with ExecutiveMeddling in the first three seasons, including trying to pressure him into making the show more like a traditional sitcom. With the fourth through sixth seasons, the production company had to pay for its own airtime, something Smith later said was a stupid thing to do. Things became much better when the Creator/CBC [[NetworkToTheRescue picked up the show during the seventh season]], where it remained for the final nine seasons of its run.
16th Oct '17 4:46:39 AM Scifimaster92
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* Production on ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'' had an absolute whale of a time thanks to the [[ThePrimaDonna antics]] of lead actor Kevin Sorbo, who demanded that the show focus more and more on him at the expense of his co-stars, as well as [[ExecutiveMeddling executive demands]] to make the show more episodic and [[StatusQuoIsGod maintain the status quo at all costs]]. All of these factors led to showrunner Robert Hewitt Wolfe being fired after the end of season two, taking all pretense of character or story development along with him. Wolfe has since written a one-act play, ''Coda'', which is a compressed form of his original plan for the series. Sorbo's antics also [[StarDerailingRole put a permanent dent in the actor's career]], and he soon descended into [[TheFundamentalist religious fundamentalism]], being unable to secure roles in anything except TV movies and Christploitation films such as ''Film/GodsNotDead''.

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* Production on ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'' had an absolute whale of a time thanks to the [[ThePrimaDonna antics]] of lead actor Kevin Sorbo, Creator/KevinSorbo, who demanded that the show focus more and more on him at the expense of his co-stars, as well as [[ExecutiveMeddling executive demands]] to make the show more episodic and [[StatusQuoIsGod maintain the status quo at all costs]]. All of these factors led to showrunner Robert Hewitt Wolfe being fired after the end of season two, taking all pretense of character or story development along with him. Wolfe has since written a one-act play, ''Coda'', which is a compressed form of his original plan for the series. Sorbo's antics also [[StarDerailingRole put a permanent dent in the actor's career]], and he soon descended into [[TheFundamentalist religious fundamentalism]], being unable to secure roles in anything except TV movies and Christploitation films such as ''Film/GodsNotDead''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.LiveActionTV