History TroubledProduction / LiveActionTV

20th Jul '16 3:54:23 AM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.

to:

** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.



** Series 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' --
"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Creator/TomBaker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).

to:

** Series 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where hit. On [[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]], the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' --
"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]"
''sets'', so they just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Creator/TomBaker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).
20th Jul '16 3:50:51 AM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.

to:

** The ending of Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.



** Series 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' -- "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Creator/TomBaker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).
** Season 17 essentially had the problems of Season 15 turned UpToEleven. Season 16 hadn't been entirely trouble-free, not least because Graham Williams was sidelined for most of the season due to health problems, but things were held together by production manager Creator/JohnNathanTurner on the filming side and script editor Anthony Read in the production office. However, Read quit at the end of the season, along with both Romana's actress Mary Tamm and K-9's voice actor John Leeson. The companion losses weren't too damaging, as new Romana actress Lalla Ward proved ''way'' more popular than her predecessor, and David Brierly was a capable enough replacement for Leeson. Read's replacement with Creator/DouglasAdams proved far more damaging; whereas Read did a lot to hold the production team and cast together, Adams was more interested in goofing around -- including going on a pub crawl in Paris with the director of "Destiny of the Daleks" during the filming of "City of Death" -- and rewriting scripts to incorporate his off-beat brand of humour. Combined with Baker acting up more than ever (now with even his tempestuous offscreen love-life bleeding into production [[note]]He was having an on-again-off-again RomanceOnTheSet with Ward, and their on-screen chemistry veers between DidTheyOrDidntThey {{UST}} to FlatJoy {{Death Glare}}s.[[/note]]) and the budget problems and labour disputes returning (in the latter case managing to totally derail production of the season finale "Shada") both Williams and Adams unsurprisingly decided to call it quits at the end of the season. Seasons 16-17 was also the victim of ExecutiveMeddling, with BBC bosses first saying that it couldn't be horrific because of the MoralGuardians, and then that Adams needed to tone down the comedy. And if ''Doctor Who'' can't be scary ''or'' funny, there's not much left.
** Even among the chaos of Season 17, "Nightmare of Eden" stands out for having one of the most troubled, disastrous shoots in the show's entire run. Already suffering the usual behind-the-scenes issues, things went further south with the hiring of ageing director Alan Bromly. Not only did Bromly not get along with Baker, Ward, or Brierly ''at all'', he insisted on using outdated shooting schedules and production techniques, making things even harder for the crew. Baker frequently refused to follow instructions and constantly picked fights with Bromly, and later on in the shoot, when it became obvious that literally no-one on the crew supported him in his arguments with the lead actor, Bromly quit, leaving Graham Williams to direct the remainder of the episode, and visual effects designer Colin Mapson to oversee editing and post-production. On the last day of filming, one of the production assistants had t-shirts reading "I survived the Nightmare of Eden!" printed up for the rest of the crew.
** "Warriors of the Deep" (Season 21). Margaret Thatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed, resulting in some truly dreadful acting all around. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka (a [[NightmareRetardant ludicrous]] panto horse creature) costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around, the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Peter Davison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became [[InkStainAdaptation an iconic example of the show being awful]] -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.
** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Season 23). The producer and script editor were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, against the wishes of the producer, recruited Robert Holmes (the Season 14 script editor) to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout with no clear winner...before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so he handed it to another writing team famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.

to:

** Series 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' -- --
"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Creator/TomBaker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).
** Season Series 17 essentially had the problems of Season Series 15 turned UpToEleven. Season Series 16 hadn't been entirely trouble-free, not least because Graham Williams was sidelined for most of the season due to health problems, but things were held together by production manager Creator/JohnNathanTurner on the filming side and script editor Anthony Read in the production office. However, Read quit at the end of the season, along with both Romana's actress Mary Tamm and K-9's voice actor John Leeson. The companion losses weren't too damaging, as new Romana actress Lalla Ward proved ''way'' more popular than her predecessor, and David Brierly was a capable enough replacement for Leeson. Read's replacement with Creator/DouglasAdams proved far more damaging; whereas Read did a lot to hold the production team and cast together, Adams was more interested in goofing around -- including going on a pub crawl in Paris with the director of "Destiny "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E1DestinyOfTheDaleks Destiny of the Daleks" Daleks]]" during the filming of "City "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E2CityOfDeath City of Death" Death]]" -- and rewriting scripts to incorporate his off-beat brand of humour. Combined with Baker acting up more than ever (now with even his tempestuous offscreen love-life bleeding into production [[note]]He was having an on-again-off-again RomanceOnTheSet with Ward, and their on-screen chemistry veers between DidTheyOrDidntThey {{UST}} to FlatJoy {{Death Glare}}s.[[/note]]) and the budget problems and labour disputes returning (in the latter case managing to totally derail production of the season finale "Shada") "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E6Shada Shada]]") both Williams and Adams unsurprisingly decided to call it quits at the end of the season. Seasons 16-17 was also the victim of ExecutiveMeddling, with BBC bosses first saying that it couldn't be horrific because of the MoralGuardians, and then that Adams needed to tone down the comedy. And if ''Doctor Who'' can't be scary ''or'' funny, there's not much left.
** Even among the chaos of Season Series 17, "Nightmare "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E4NightmareOfEden Nightmare of Eden" Eden]]" stands out for having one of the most troubled, disastrous shoots in the show's entire run. Already suffering the usual behind-the-scenes issues, things went further south with the hiring of ageing director Alan Bromly. Not only did Bromly not get along with Baker, Ward, or Brierly ''at all'', he insisted on using outdated shooting schedules and production techniques, making things even harder for the crew. Baker frequently refused to follow instructions and constantly picked fights with Bromly, and later on in the shoot, when it became obvious that literally no-one on the crew supported him in his arguments with the lead actor, Bromly quit, leaving Graham Williams to direct the remainder of the episode, and visual effects designer Colin Mapson to oversee editing and post-production. On the last day of filming, one of the production assistants had t-shirts reading "I survived the Nightmare of Eden!" printed up for the rest of the crew.
** "Warriors "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep Warriors of the Deep" (Season Deep]]" (Series 21). Margaret Thatcher MargaretThatcher announced an election and all the studio space was given to the coverage, meaning this serial lost two weeks of valuable production time. Thus most scenes were shot in one take and much of it was not even rehearsed, resulting in some truly dreadful acting all around. There were many rewrites, partially to {{Bowdlerise}} / remove political subtext that might influence the election, and partially due to a meddling PromotedFanboy obsessed with preventing {{Series Continuity Error}}s. The Myrka (a [[NightmareRetardant ludicrous]] panto horse creature) costume was completed only half an hour before filming and the paint and glue on it weren't dry -- it visibly smears on the sets as it staggers around, the actors inside the costume being light-headed from the fumes. Peter Davison Creator/PeterDavison had NoStuntDouble and got tossed into an ice-cold pool of water (after being assured that it was warm) because the BBC didn't have the budget to afford warm water. The writer wanted the base to be dark and the sets had been built with that in mind, but LawfulStupid BBC studio engineers insisted on lighting it as if it was on the surface of the sun, in line with regulations intended for chat shows. This story became [[InkStainAdaptation an iconic example of the show being awful]] -- and ExecutiveMeddling to kill the show began, with the FightSceneFailure of the Myrka sequence screened by execs to demonstrate why it didn't deserve to live.
** The "Trial of a Time Lord" arc (Season (Series 23). The producer Producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner and script editor Creator/EricSaward were desperately trying to keep the show on the television after it had been UnCancelled, seeing the serial as their 'trial' to prove to executives trying to kill the show that it still had value. They also both loathed each other and their mutual egotism caused them to purposefully derail each other's ideas out of spite. The script editor, against the wishes of the producer, recruited Robert Holmes (the Season 14 script editor) Creator/RobertHolmes to write an arc, and he came up with an excellent plot with an ambiguous ending which involved the Doctor fighting his EnemyWithout with no clear winner...before [[AuthorExistenceFailure he himself dropped dead]]. The producer canned this because he felt that it would give the executives a way in to kill the show, so he handed it to another writing team famous for their {{Camp}}y style and told them to write an unambiguous happy ending, without telling them any of what the previous script editor had planned (as legal reasons made this impossible). The result was a complete GainaxEnding, and the show went through several soft reboots in the final three seasons that followed.



** In a less tense version of this, Creator/RussellTDavies had never managed a Sci-Fi series before, and didn't really know how to properly budget it. This led him to blow the majority of the first series' budget on its second episode, "The End of the World". While the rest of Series 1 did struggle a little because of it -- the settings and sets are noticeably limited -- the show was already a guaranteed success from the revival's initial episode and remains fondly remembered today despite this.
** "Planet of the Dead" (the first of the 2009 specials) was made when the new production team was being trained by the old one. Due to location shooting in Dubai and Creator/DavidTennant only having a small gap in his schedule in which to film, the team only had six days to shoot. Unfortunately the double-decker bus prop on which the story relied got heavily damaged while transporting to Dubai. Creator/RussellTDavies decided to ThrowItIn and added lines in the script addressing the damage to the bus, but couldn't do a lot about the sandstorm that prevented shooting for several precious days!

to:

** In a less tense version of this, Creator/RussellTDavies had never managed a Sci-Fi series before, and didn't really know how to properly budget it. This led him to blow the majority of the first series' budget on its second episode, "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld The End of the World".World]]". While the rest of Series 1 did struggle a little because of it -- the settings and sets are noticeably limited -- the show was already a guaranteed success from the revival's initial episode and remains fondly remembered today despite this.
** "Planet "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead Planet of the Dead" Dead]]" (the first of the 2009 specials) was made when the new production team was being trained by the old one. Due to location shooting in Dubai and Creator/DavidTennant only having a small gap in his schedule in which to film, the team only had six days to shoot. Unfortunately the double-decker bus prop on which the story relied got heavily damaged while transporting to Dubai. Creator/RussellTDavies decided to ThrowItIn and added lines in the script addressing the damage to the bus, but couldn't do a lot about the sandstorm that prevented shooting for several precious days!



** "Let's Kill Hitler" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing several Hollywood movies, and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence on "Let's Kill Hitler" Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode (ignoring people who feel TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot due to Hitler [[AdvertisedExtra being window-dressing]] despite that being the point of the episode, or who simply hate the {{Arc}} it was in or Moffat's writing in general) are things like lazy filler jokes ("She's trying to kill me... plus, she's a woman!") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.

to:

** "Let's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler" Hitler]]" (Series 6): Creator/StevenMoffat was overseeing six episodes of ''Doctor Who'', making three film-length episodes of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and writing several Hollywood movies, and was stretched too thin and overworked. When filming was due to commence on "Let's Kill Hitler" commence, Moffat's only option was to hand the actors his first draft and hope for the best. Most of the problems people have with the episode (ignoring people who feel TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot due to Hitler [[AdvertisedExtra being window-dressing]] despite that being the point of the episode, or who simply hate the {{Arc}} it was in or Moffat's writing in general) are things like lazy filler jokes ("She's trying to kill me... plus, she's a woman!") and the [[MoodWhiplash lack of anything addressing the brutal finale of the last series]], which likely would have been fixed had Moffat had more time to write it.
20th Jul '16 3:42:52 AM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "The Reign of Terror" has a minor example that doesn't really affect the quality of what is shown on screen, but is notable for being one of the most surreal production stories in television. The main director, Henric Hirsch, had a [[CreatorBreakdown mental breakdown]] during the shoot due partially to the punishing shooting schedule and the mutual dislike between himself and Creator/WilliamHartnell, and ended up in hospital. Another director had to be drafted in at short notice to finish the job, but [[RiddleForTheAges no surviving members of the cast or crew are able to remember who it was]]. John Gorrie is the man usually credited with it and he doesn't remember doing it. The alternate theory is that the episode was effectively co-directed by producer Creator/VerityLambert and assistant director Tim Combe. For the record, the actual episode does not credit a director.[[note]] Normally this would actually imply that Lambert was the director, as Creator/TheBBC's policy until 1982 was that in the event of one person producing and directing a programme they could only be credited for the former role; however, Lambert had no actual directing credits whatsoever in her career, making it extremely unlikely that she was the sole director on the episode.[[/note]]
** "The Celestial Toymaker" was going to centre around two characters from a popular absurdist play, who never appear in the play itself, actually showing up. This caused a full-blown copyright dispute. Similarly, the budget was starved and the producer was forced to go ahead with the point of the script removed and NoBudget, resulting in a famously poor story with little in the way of structure, [[AbsenteeActor no Doctor]] and most of the action being characters playing board games. The BBC ended up in legal action anyway due to an adlib from BillyBunter {{Expy}} Cyril saying "my friends call me Billy", which caused the people who owned the ''Billy Bunter'' IP to attempt to sue. The BBC had to release a public statement saying Cyril was a perfectly legal CaptainErsatz. The fiction-world idea eventually did happen in the show, in a much more careful form, in "The Mind Robber".

to:

** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E8TheReignOfTerror The Reign of Terror" Terror]]" (Series 1) has a minor example that doesn't really affect the quality of what is shown on screen, but is notable for being one of the most surreal production stories in television. The main director, Henric Hirsch, had a [[CreatorBreakdown mental breakdown]] during the shoot due partially to the punishing shooting schedule and the mutual dislike between himself and Creator/WilliamHartnell, and ended up in hospital. Another director had to be drafted in at short notice to finish the job, but [[RiddleForTheAges no surviving members of the cast or crew are able to remember who it was]]. John Gorrie is the man usually credited with it and he doesn't remember doing it. The alternate theory is that the episode was effectively co-directed by producer Creator/VerityLambert and assistant director Tim Combe. For the record, the actual episode does not credit a director.[[note]] Normally this would actually imply that Lambert was the director, as Creator/TheBBC's policy until 1982 was that in the event of one person producing and directing a programme they could only be credited for the former role; however, Lambert had no actual directing credits whatsoever in her career, making it extremely unlikely that she was the sole director on the episode.[[/note]]
** "The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E5TheWebPlanet The Web Planet]]'s (Series 2) demanding nature took its toll on the production. The first episode required a 16-minute overrun, brought about by a variety of flubbed lines, missed cues, equipment problems, and troubles with the Zarbi costumes, one of which broke and had to be repaired. The start of recording on the third was delayed when it was found that some of the sets had not been delivered to the studio, and the Carsenome floor had not been painted. Lighting and camera problems continued to plague the increasingly frazzled cast, and this time taping went 37 minutes beyond the schedule. One of the Zarbi operators, his vision impaired by his costume, ran right into the camera. So rushed was the recording, however, that this blooper was retained in the finished episode.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E7TheCelestialToymaker The
Celestial Toymaker" Toymaker]]" (Series 3) was going to centre around two characters from a popular absurdist play, who never appear in the play itself, actually showing up. This caused a full-blown copyright dispute. Similarly, the budget was starved and the producer was forced to go ahead with the point of the script removed and NoBudget, resulting in a famously poor story with little in the way of structure, [[AbsenteeActor no Doctor]] and most of the action being characters playing board games. The BBC ended up in legal action anyway due to an adlib from BillyBunter {{Expy}} Cyril saying "my friends call me Billy", which caused the people who owned the ''Billy Bunter'' IP to attempt to sue. The BBC had to release a public statement saying Cyril was a perfectly legal CaptainErsatz. The fiction-world idea eventually did happen in the show, in a much more careful form, in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The Mind Robber".Robber]]".



** Season 5 had serious problems with the scripts thanks to some poor production decisions. The producer and script editor had developed a habit of sinking lots of time, effort and money into various script ideas and then abandoning them halfway through, forcing various last-ditch efforts. Much got hastily reordered and even shoved back a season ("The Dominators" had been planned for Season 5 but was such a disaster it was edited down into five episodes and shoved into Season 6), which upset Creator/PatrickTroughton as it meant the material was under-rehearsed, eventually striking up a deal with the producers that for Season 6 he (and the rest of the cast) would only work on one story at a time. In order to churn out competent entertainment quickly, the producers decided to focus on StrictlyFormula [[TheSiege Base Under Siege]] plots using recycled monsters, which Troughton found boring and repetitive, and at the beginning of Season 6 he announced his intention to quit the role - just after these problems had been extinguished, too.
** The ending of Season 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "The War Games", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Patrick Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.
** "Spearhead from Space" (Series 7) was derailed when the video camera operators went on strike, leading producer Derrick Sherwin to make the whole thing on film instead. This made the whole thing very expensive, which was bad enough even before Derrick Sherwin and Peter Bryant were suddenly sent to rescue a disastrous German TV production mid-shoot. Barry Letts took over at the last minute, got it done -- and got handed the producer job for the Pertwee era as a result. (The film production unwittingly meant the serial could be [[{{Remaster}} released in HD]] in the distant future, which no other Classic serial can ever be due to quirks of the usual VideoInsideFilmOutside production.)
** "Revenge of the Cybermen" (Series 12) suffered from a long string of bad luck attributed by the director to witchcraft. When scouting the ancient cave system of Wookey Hole - a place associated by the locals with bad luck and supposedly the grave of an ancient witch - for its suitability for [[BBCQuarry location shoots]], the director's wife found some Iron Age arrowheads and decided to take them home, unwittingly calling an ancient {{curse}} on the ''Doctor Who'' production team. First, the team encountered a strange individual in potholing gear who had apparently wandered into set, of whom the staff had no knowledge, which the director began to believe was the ghost of an Irish potholer who had died in the cave three years earlier. The boats used in the cave scenes repeatedly broke down; one production team member had to be replaced due to an attack of claustrophobia, and another was taken seriously ill. On a day when staff disobeyed instructions not to touch the 'Witch' formation (said to be the petrified body of the witch), Sarah Jane actress Creator/ElisabethSladen [[FatalMethodActing nearly died]] - her boat went haywire and she had to dive overboard to keep herself from smashing into the cavern wall, where a stuntman had to pull her out to save her from drowning, and who later fell ill. An electrician broke his leg when a ladder collapsed under him, and the pyrotechnician found nothing would light or work correctly. The director took the arrowheads from his wife and reburied them, after which production ran smoothly.
** "The Brain of Morbius" (Season 13) was largely the result of two writers having a falling out. Terrance Dicks submitted a story concerning a robot building a new body for a Time Lord war criminal currently stuck as a disembodied brain, but the serial got stuck as the BottleEpisode of the season, so to save money the script editor Robert Holmes rewrote it from the ground up to replace the robot with a human character. This enraged Dicks, who felt the rewrite opened up massive plot holes - he saw the story as a TurnedAgainstTheirMasters scenario about a robot that cannot understand beauty building a new body for his master, while a human would be able to understand Morbius would rather be in a better body - and was also upset about how Holmes' rewrite turned the story into more of a Film/HammerHorror pastiche than science fiction. Eventually Dicks realised he'd lost the argument and suggested Holmes replace his name on the script with 'some bland pseudonym', so Holmes passive-aggressively credited the story to "Robin Bland".
** Season 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' -- "Underworld" just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Tom Baker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).

to:

** Season Series 5 had serious problems with the scripts thanks to some poor production decisions. The producer and script editor had developed a habit of sinking lots of time, effort and money into various script ideas and then abandoning them halfway through, forcing various last-ditch efforts. Much got hastily reordered and even shoved back a season ("The Dominators" ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" had been planned for Season 5 but was such a disaster it was edited down into five episodes and shoved into Season 6), which upset Creator/PatrickTroughton as it meant the material was under-rehearsed, eventually striking up a deal with the producers that for Season 6 he (and the rest of the cast) would only work on one story at a time. In order to churn out competent entertainment quickly, the producers decided to focus on StrictlyFormula [[TheSiege Base Under Siege]] plots using recycled monsters, which Troughton found boring and repetitive, and at the beginning of Season 6 he announced his intention to quit the role - just after these problems had been extinguished, too.
** The ending of Season Series 6 was a fiasco due to multiple scripts falling through after production had started, and replacements being hurriedly written as well as extended with tons of {{Padding}}. "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games", Games]]", the grand finale of the season, was written in mere weeks to take up the space of a six-parter and a four-parter that fell through. Several more stories had to be heavily rewritten - Patrick - Troughton was going to quit at the end of the season, and lead companion Frazer Hines at first announced he would be going mid-season but later decided to quit at the end of the season with Troughton. This vacillation was bad enough to kill at least one story at the last minute - "The Prison in Space" was commissioned as a comedy serial that wrote out Jamie and when Hines announced that he was staying, the serial had to be rewritten to include him. The production team and director hated the script for various reasons (it was an outrageously sexist MarsAndVenusGenderContrast comedy set in a dystopian {{Matriarchy}} and included setpieces like Jamie disguising himself as a woman and, later, spanking Zoe to break her out of StrawFeminist brainwashing) and requested changes, and when the writer announced he was sick of rewriting the script the producer decided to cut his losses and commissioned "The Krotons" as a rush replacement. Between the production trainwreck and the lead actor departure the BBC was going to cancel the show, and so the finale is a BolivianArmyEnding that ended the Doctor's travels and kept ambiguous the Doctor's new face. The show was recommissioned because the BBC didn't have any better ideas for what to go in the slot, although it was a massive {{Retool}}.
** "Spearhead "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E1SpearheadFromSpace Spearhead from Space" Space]]" (Series 7) was derailed when the video camera operators went on strike, leading producer Derrick Sherwin to make the whole thing on film instead. This made the whole thing very expensive, which was bad enough even before Derrick Sherwin and Peter Bryant were suddenly sent to rescue a disastrous German TV production mid-shoot. Barry Letts took over at the last minute, got it done -- and got handed the producer job for the Pertwee Creator/JonPertwee era as a result. (The film production unwittingly meant the serial could be [[{{Remaster}} released in HD]] in the distant future, which no other Classic serial can ever be due to quirks of the usual VideoInsideFilmOutside production.)
** "Revenge "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E5RevengeOfTheCybermen Revenge of the Cybermen" Cybermen]]" (Series 12) suffered from a long string of bad luck attributed by the director to witchcraft. When scouting the ancient cave system of Wookey Hole - a place associated by the locals with bad luck and supposedly the grave of an ancient witch - for its suitability for [[BBCQuarry location shoots]], the director's wife found some Iron Age arrowheads and decided to take them home, unwittingly calling an ancient {{curse}} on the ''Doctor Who'' production team. First, the team encountered a strange individual in potholing gear who had apparently wandered into set, of whom the staff had no knowledge, which the director began to believe was the ghost of an Irish potholer who had died in the cave three years earlier. The boats used in the cave scenes repeatedly broke down; one production team member had to be replaced due to an attack of claustrophobia, and another was taken seriously ill. On a day when staff disobeyed instructions not to touch the 'Witch' formation (said to be the petrified body of the witch), Sarah Jane actress Creator/ElisabethSladen [[FatalMethodActing nearly died]] - her boat went haywire and she had to dive overboard to keep herself from smashing into the cavern wall, where a stuntman had to pull her out to save her from drowning, and who later fell ill. An electrician broke his leg when a ladder collapsed under him, and the pyrotechnician found nothing would light or work correctly. The director took the arrowheads from his wife and reburied them, after which production ran smoothly.
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius" Morbius]]" (Season 13) was largely the result of two writers having a falling out. Terrance Dicks Creator/TerranceDicks submitted a story concerning a robot building a new body for a Time Lord war criminal currently stuck as a disembodied brain, but the serial got stuck as the BottleEpisode of the season, so to save money the script editor Robert Holmes Creator/RobertHolmes rewrote it from the ground up to replace the robot with a human character. This enraged Dicks, who felt the rewrite opened up massive plot holes - he saw the story as a TurnedAgainstTheirMasters scenario about a robot that cannot understand beauty building a new body for his master, while a human would be able to understand Morbius would rather be in a better body - and was also upset about how Holmes' rewrite turned the story into more of a Film/HammerHorror pastiche than science fiction. Eventually Dicks realised he'd lost the argument and suggested Holmes replace his name on the script with 'some bland pseudonym', so Holmes passive-aggressively credited the story to "Robin Bland".
** Season Series 15: The previous producer Philip Hinchcliffe had been sacked due to MoralGuardians, and in revenge he boosted the budgets for the final two serials of Season 14, meaning that incoming producer Graham Williams was money-starved just at the time a crippling UK recession and industrial strikes hit (leading to a memorable occasion where the budget was so low they couldn't even afford ''sets'' -- "Underworld" -- "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" just used ([[SpecialEffectsFailure poorly executed]]) [[ChromaKey CSO]] to put the actors into MiniatureEffects). The companion character Leela was originally intended to be added for only three stories in Season 14 but was kept around as a regular due to the incoming team's desire to cause as little upset as possible with everything else going wrong. ExecutiveMeddling forced the writers to remove all of the horror from the scripts of what had at the time been a GothicHorror show - jokes were used to plug the gaps but with varying degrees of wit. Long-serving script editor Creator/RobertHolmes quit halfway through the season due to a combination of money problems and burnout. The stories were hastily re-edited to insert a {{toyetic}} RobotDog KidAppealCharacter added by executive mandate and shown out of order, spoiling the character development going on. Tom Baker's Creator/TomBaker's mental health, which had begun failing him in Season 14, tanked - he loathed both companion characters, wanted to be the sole star, and started threatening to quit in order to WagTheDirector into letting him do whatever he wanted while also bullying his co-star Louise Jameson [[CannotTellFictionFromReality due to his dislike of the character she played]], who quit after this series due to his treatment of her. The showrunners tried to keep Jameson in by writing her final story as if she was not leaving, leading to a terrible StrangledByTheRedString ending of her [[LastMinuteHookup inexplicably deciding to marry someone she'd just met]]. Despite all this, the fandom opinion of Season 15 is that it's SoOkayItsAverage - two bad stories, one okayish story, and three good ones (including two all-time classics).
11th Jun '16 3:57:28 PM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Season Two of ''Series/{{Damages}}'' was severely troubled off-screen in a way that explains many of its [[SeasonalRot on-screen problems]]. Most of these were down to casting a [[Creator/WilliamHurt season secondary lead]] who had never done a TV drama series before and was completely unprepared for the bruising schedule and long days of recording. After some very bad behaviour, this led to the character who had been intended as the key figure in the season's plot having to have his involvement and screen time severely cut, leading to a very oddly-paced and unfocused season.
6th Jun '16 7:30:05 AM Pren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' had its first season go off pretty swimmingly, ending up as one of the most acclaimed shows of the year...and then spent the next five years in a morass of problems. Many of the actors grew increasingly unhappy with how little they were given to do as the show's scope grew larger, with several of them quitting along the way. Some of these were major characters, forcing Julian Fellowes to hastily write their deaths to explain their absence, the most damaging being Dan Stevens as half of the show's major romantic couple Matthew Crawley. Fellowes was so furious at Stevens for this that he refused to so much as let his name be spoken on set for the remainder of the show, and even downplayed Matthew's huge role in the first three series as much as possible, with him hardly ever being mentioned again. Fellowes' obsession with SceneryPorn and portraying the lives of the early 20th century upper class led to more and more discomfort on set, especially his insistence on writing scenes around the dinner table which he then micromanaged and caused to take far longer to film than they should have...all while the food went bad under the lights and everyone had to suffer the stink. Finally, his writing strategy was to only write the first half of each series ahead of time, then wait to write the rest until filming was underway and he could see how the actors played off each other. This sometimes resulted in some very awkward storytelling as he decided to beef up a character's role, only to discover their actor couldn't commit to the show any further. The worst of these was Charles Edwards as Edith's love interest Michael Gregson, whose departure was so clearly a bad story option that Fellowes simply had him go missing in Germany and kept his fate up in the air for two years before finally giving up and having him discovered to have been killed. By the time the show ended, it was widely regarded as a joke and Fellowes' slow CreatorBreakdown over all the problems left his reputation quite a bit lower than when he'd started.

to:

* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' had its first season go off pretty swimmingly, ending up as one of the most acclaimed shows of the year...and then spent the next five years in a morass of problems. Many of the actors grew increasingly unhappy with how little they were given to do as the show's scope grew larger, with several of them quitting along the way. Some of these were major characters, forcing Julian Fellowes to hastily write their deaths to explain their absence, the most damaging being Dan Stevens as half of the show's major romantic couple Matthew Crawley. Fellowes was so furious at Stevens for this that he refused to so much as let his name be spoken on set for the remainder of the show, and even downplayed Matthew's huge role in the first three series as much as possible, with him hardly ever being mentioned again. This resulted in the show feeling like a trashy soap opera more than the highbrow drama that was intended, and reviews quickly soured. Fellowes' obsession with SceneryPorn and portraying the lives of the early 20th century upper class led to more and more discomfort on set, especially his insistence on writing scenes around the dinner table which he then micromanaged and caused to take far longer to film than they should have...all while the food went bad under the lights and everyone had to suffer the stink. Finally, his writing strategy was to only write the first half of each series ahead of time, then wait to write the rest until filming was underway and he could see how the actors played off each other. This sometimes resulted in some very awkward storytelling as he decided to beef up a character's role, only to discover their actor couldn't commit to the show any further. The worst of these was Charles Edwards as Edith's love interest Michael Gregson, whose departure was so clearly a bad story option that Fellowes simply had him go missing in Germany and kept his fate up in the air for two years before finally giving up and having him discovered to have been killed. By the time the show ended, it was widely regarded as a joke and Fellowes' slow CreatorBreakdown over all the problems left his reputation quite a bit lower than when he'd started.
5th Jun '16 9:23:47 AM Pren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' had its first season go off pretty swimmingly, ending up as one of the most acclaimed shows of the year...and then spent the next five years in a morass of problems. Many of the actors grew increasingly unhappy with how little they were given to do as the show's scope grew larger, with several of them quitting along the way. Some of these were major characters, forcing Julian Fellowes to hastily write their deaths to explain their absence, the most damaging being Dan Stevens as half of the show's major romantic couple Matthew Crawley. Fellowes was so furious at Stevens for this that he refused to so much as let his name be spoken on set for the remainder of the show, and even downplayed Matthew's huge role in the first three series as much as possible, with him hardly ever being mentioned again. Fellowes' obsession with SceneryPorn and portraying the lives of the early 20th century upper class led to more and more discomfort on set, especially his insistence on writing scenes around the dinner table which he then micromanaged and caused to take far longer to film than they should have...all while the food went bad under the lights and everyone had to suffer the stink. Finally, his writing strategy was to only write the first half of each series ahead of time, then wait to write the rest until filming was underway and he could see how the actors played off each other. This sometimes resulted in some very awkward storytelling as he decided to beef up a character's role, only to discover their actor couldn't commit to the show any further. The worst of these was Charles Edwards as Edith's love interest Michael Gregson, whose departure was so clearly a bad story option that Fellowes simply had him go missing in Germany and kept his fate up in the air for two years before finally giving up and having him discovered to have been killed. By the time the show ended, it was widely regarded as a joke and Fellowes' slow CreatorBreakdown over all the problems left his reputation quite a bit lower than when he'd started.
6th May '16 2:09:47 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/ThePrisoner'' has an off-screen history that is almost as convoluted and paranoia-filled as the actual show. The co-creators of the series, actor Patrick [=McGoohan=] and screenwriter George Markstein, almost immediately began to clash over what the series should be. George Markstein has gone on record stating that his idea for the series came about while [=McGoohan=] was making the [[SpyFiction spy thriller series]] ''Series/DangerMan'' and that the premise would be what would happen if [=McGoohan's=] character, John Drake, resigned and was sent to a special resort-type prison similar to a kind used to crack POW's in World War 2. [=McGoohan=] on the other hand maintains that the two characters are different and that the two shows are completely independent. Beyond the question of the central character's identity, it seems that Markstein wanted to keep the series rooted in the espionage genre, with Number Six's character as a spy imprisoned by (probably) his own side because he knew too much, while [=McGoohan=] saw the show from the start as a much more abstract surreal allegory about the relationship between the individual and society. It is likely that both creators went into the project with their own notions of what the "truth" was, and both interpretations influenced the writing and the acting. Beyond the characterization, many of the details of who created what and when were contested between [=McGoohan=] and Markstein, with the preponderance of the evidence supporting [=McGoohan=], but not completely invalidating Markstein's claims nor his influences in writing the series. Once [=McGoohan=] won his power struggle with Markstein and the show started to get seriously freaky, ExecutiveMeddling made things even more troubled. There are even conflicting claims from all concerned about how many episodes were originally planned, and whether the show was cancelled prematurely or not. Certainly, there are reports from many actors and crew members that the final episode, "Fall Out", was made in completely chaotic circumstances, with [=McGoohan=] still working on the script during recording breaks, Kenneth Griffith (who played the President) being asked to write his own dialogue, and as much of the production as possible having to be recycled from previous episodes.
16th Apr '16 4:40:31 PM HowlingSnail
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The DVD release of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E5TheUnderwaterMenace The Underwater Menace]] was also a troubled production. Episode 3, then the only existing episode, was released as part of the Lost in Time boxset in 2004. After Episode 2 was discovered in 2011, pressure was on to release it on DVD too. The two missing episodes were originally slated to be animated (As other stories' missing episodes had been), but this was cancelled after the animation company went bust, and the DVD was cancelled too. Then, in October 2015, the story was finally released with extremely basic tele-snap reconstructions of the missing episodes, which were significantly worse than both [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet previous off]][[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E5TheWebOfFear icial efforts]] and popular fan-made ones.
24th Mar '16 10:00:09 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/DouglasAdams described the creation of the TV version of ''Series/TheHitchHikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' as "not a happy production. There was a personality clash between myself and the director. And between the cast and the director. And between the tea lady and the director." Said director, Alan Bell, puts the blame on Douglas, claiming they used to make lists of his ridiculous unfilmable ideas, to which Adams would reply that Bell "cheerfully admits he will say what suits him rather than what happens to be the case. And therefore there's no point in arguing." John Lloyd, the producer and co-writer of the radio show, was annoyed that he was made "associate producer" (he felt that the fact his credit literally explodes in the ending credits was a comment on how meaningless it was) and thought Bell was too concerned with getting things done efficiently, rather than getting them done ''right''. The second series simply didn't happen: Adams wouldn't do it without Lloyd or Geoffrey Perkins; Bell wouldn't do it with them. It was suggested that Perkins could be script editor (since this would minimise his interaction with Bell), and he viewed the possibility of [[ScheduleSlip trying to wring scripts out of Adams]] under these conditions with horror. Nobody would back down, so...

to:

* Creator/DouglasAdams described the creation of the TV version of ''Series/TheHitchHikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' as "not a happy production. There was a personality clash between myself and the director. And between the cast and the director. And between the tea lady and the director." Said director, Alan Bell, puts the blame on Douglas, claiming they used to make lists of his ridiculous unfilmable ideas, to which Adams would reply that Bell "cheerfully admits he will say what suits him rather than what happens to be the case. And therefore there's no point in arguing." John Lloyd, the producer and co-writer of the radio show, was annoyed that he was made "associate producer" (he felt that the fact his credit literally explodes in the ending credits was a comment on how meaningless it was) and thought Bell was too concerned with getting things done efficiently, rather than getting them done ''right''. The second series simply didn't happen: Adams wouldn't do it without Lloyd or Geoffrey Perkins; Bell wouldn't do it with them. It was suggested that Perkins could be script editor (since this would minimise his interaction with Bell), and he viewed the possibility of [[ScheduleSlip trying to wring scripts out of Adams]] under these conditions with horror. Adams then suggested replacing Bell with Pennant Roberts, who had directed several of his scripts on ''Series/DoctorWho'', but this was declined on the grounds that a writer having any say in the choice of director (or, for that matter, a drama director handling what was classed as a sitcom) simply wasn't done in those days. Nobody would back down, so...
16th Feb '16 6:41:40 AM Ecgwynn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Prospect Park's contract required that production had to begin by a certain date, or else they would loose the license. Once funding was finally secured, the production team had only ''eight weeks'' to lease a soundstage in Connecticut, build 30 sets, begin writing episodes, casting (or re-casting) the actors, and begin production. Once cameras finally began rolling, they were writing episodes almost on the fly.

to:

** Prospect Park's contract required that production had to begin by a certain date, or else they would loose lose the license. Once funding was finally secured, the production team had only ''eight weeks'' to lease a soundstage in Connecticut, build 30 sets, begin writing episodes, casting (or re-casting) the actors, and begin production. Once cameras finally began rolling, they were writing episodes almost on the fly.
This list shows the last 10 events of 306. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.LiveActionTV