History Trivia / TheGodfather

23rd Aug '17 4:33:51 AM ClintEastwood
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Added DiffLines:

* UncreditedRole: Robert Towne did uncredited work on the script, particularly on the garden scene.
10th Aug '17 1:56:45 PM ClintEastwood
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** Immediately following is a quick shot of the Corleone compound that dissolves to the scene where they discuss their next course of action.
Rocco admires Clemenza's car but Clemenza complains that the bumpers are wooden due to the war effort. He then tells Rocco that he is to kill Paulie.

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** Immediately following is a A quick shot of the Corleone compound that dissolves to the scene where they discuss their next course of action.
** Rocco admires Clemenza's car but Clemenza complains that the bumpers are wooden due to the war effort. He then tells Rocco that he is to kill Paulie.



** In the café, Clemenza tells Vito that he will never work a regular job like his father did.

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** In the café, Clemenza tells Vito that he will never work a regular job like his father did.



** At the party, Sonny's widow, Sandra, brings their daughter Francesca and her fiancé, Gardner, to see Michael. Fredo barges in to tell Michael that Pentangeli is outside. Michael gives Francesca and Gardner his blessing to get married. She sees Kay and tells her the good news.

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** At the party, Sonny's widow, Sandra, brings their daughter Francesca and her fiancé, Gardner, to see Michael. Fredo barges in to tell Michael that Pentangeli is outside. Michael gives Francesca and Gardner his blessing to get married. She sees Kay and tells her the good news.
10th Aug '17 1:53:19 PM ClintEastwood
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Added DiffLines:

* DeletedScene:
** Following Bonasera's exit in the first scene, Vito whistles at Sonny for not paying attention to business.
** During the wedding reception, Tom Hagen informs Don Vito that consigliere Genco won't last the night in the hospital.
** After the wedding, the Don and his sons are leaving the compound with Johnny Fontane to visit Genco. Vito asks Michael if Kay was able to get home all right.
** In the hospital, the Don looks at Michael's military decorations with disdain then tells Michael that he has plans for him after graduation.
** A dying Genco begs Vito to stay with him believing that Vito will somehow stop his death.
** An extended version of Jack Woltz's party for his child star, Janie.
** After being thrown out by Woltz, Tom looks up and sees Janie crying and her mother push her back into Woltz's bedroom.
** Connie and Carlo argue and she runs crying into Mama's arms. Sonny wants to confront Carlo but Vito tells him not to interfere.
** After Tom returns from Hollywood, he discusses with Vito what he has discovered about Woltz.
** Michael and Kay are in their hotel bed in New York City and don't want to go to the family compound. Michael has Kay call Tom pretending to be an operator, then Michael tells Tom that they are in New Hampshire and will be at the compound the next day.
** On the way to meet Sollozzo, Luca sees the nightclub's neon sign burn out.
** Sonny gets a call from a detective telling him about his father's shooting. He then tries to call Tom.
** Sonny tells Mama about the shooting. He then goes into Vito's study, calls Tessio and tells him to prepare his men. He then tries to call Luca.
** A quick shot of Michael driving, returning home after his father's shooting and Rocco offering to escort Michael into the house.
** Michael brings Tom's wife Theresa into the study where Sonny and Tessio are. Sonny comforts her and tells them both to wait outside but Michael stays. They discuss with Michael whether Clemenza or Paulie was the traitor. Michael tries to talk Sonny out of going to war stating Vito would not want it. Then Tom returns home and hugs Theresa.
** Immediately following is a quick shot of the Corleone compound that dissolves to the scene where they discuss their next course of action.
Rocco admires Clemenza's car but Clemenza complains that the bumpers are wooden due to the war effort. He then tells Rocco that he is to kill Paulie.
** Clemenza has Paulie check the hideout spot. He then has Paulie make a stop so he can buy some cannoli and have a meal at a restaurant.
** In Sicily, Michael and the bodyguards watch a Communist demonstration march.
** While relaxing in the afternoon sun, Fabrizio begs Michael to bring him along to America when he returns.
** Michael and his bodyguards visit his father's childhood home and find it abandoned.
** After Connie hangs up the phone on Carlo's "girlfriend", she then confronts him in the shower. Then, Carlo orders her to make him dinner.
** Bonasera is shown getting ready to return his favor to Don Vito. Bonasera tells his wife who is helping him get dressed that maybe he will be asked to be an accomplice to murder.
** After the car bomb, Michael wakes up in bed surrounded by nurses and Don Tommasino. Michael tells Tommasino to find Fabrizio and he passes out.
** Michael and Vito talk in the new garden after his return from Sicily. Michael takes responsibility for avenging the deaths of Sonny and Apollonia so Vito will not have to break his promise to the other Dons.
** Additional dialogue when Michael removes Tom from his position as consigliere.
** The final scene is Kay in a Catholic church lighting candles and praying.


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* DeletedScene:
** Don Ciccio's henchmen look for the boy Vito at his home. Vito's mother says she will bring him to Ciccio herself.
** Don Fanucci tells the theater impresario that he should feature Sicilian songs or opera and then comically sings examples.
** After Fanucci leaves, the impresario smacks his daughter for walking in at the wrong time.
** Vito sees a group of hoods jump Don Fanucci and slice his neck. This explains the scar on his neck seen later.
** Genco tells Vito about the attack on Fanucci and Vito pretends not to know about it.
** In the café, Clemenza tells Vito that he will never work a regular job like his father did.
** Vito meets Tessio for the first time outside a warehouse with Clemenza. They take the bag of guns inside to a man named Augustino Coppola. He tells his young son, Carmine Coppola, to play the flute as entertainment while he works on the guns. This is a tribute to Coppola's grandfather and father. The men also leave the warehouse with a bunch of dresses.
** Clemenza tries to sell a dress to a married woman and ends up having sex with her while Tessio and Vito wait outside.
** An additional shot of Vito driving down the street before Fanucci jumps in.
** Additional dialogue after Fanucci gets out of Vito's truck.
** Additional dialogue when Vito, Clemenza, and Tessio discuss how to handle Fanucci.
** An extended version of the scene where Vito first talks to Signor Roberto.
** Signor Roberto asks Genco if he can speak with "Don Vito".
** Clemenza brings a young Jewish boy named Hyman Suchowsky to see Vito. Clemenza wants to rename him "Johnny Lips", but Vito decides he will be called "Hyman Rothstein" after Jewish gangster Arnold Rothstein.
** When Vito returns to Sicily, he kills the two henchmen that looked for him as a boy. One he finds passed out in a hut and stabs, the other he rows up to on a lake and kills with an oar.
** A wide shot of the train leaving the station in Sicily.
** A quick shot of people waltzing at Anthony's communion party.
** A quick shot of the bandleader looking at the dancers as he is conducting.
** A man taking home movies of Tom and his family.
** Fredo shows up late to Anthony's communion party because his wife, Deana, is drunk. She runs up the driveway demanding to see Michael, then falls down and knocks down Fredo when he tries to pick her up. Fredo warns her not to embarrass him.
** A thirsty Pentangeli tries to get a beer or wine at the communion party, but all the waiters have are champagne cocktails. This explains why he is seen drinking from a garden hose.
** At the party, Sonny's widow, Sandra, brings their daughter Francesca and her fiancé, Gardner, to see Michael. Fredo barges in to tell Michael that Pentangeli is outside. Michael gives Francesca and Gardner his blessing to get married. She sees Kay and tells her the good news.
** Al Neri tells Michael that he's tracked down Fabrizio, the man who murdered Michael's first wife, Apollonia. He now runs a pizza parlor in New York and is living under the name "Fred Vincent". He was brought to New York by Barzini.
** A shot of four opera singers performing at the party.
** A quick shot of Rocco berating one of his men.
** Anthony runs towards the area where the buttonmen are sitting and Kay chases after him, warning him to stay away. She then grabs and hugs Anthony.
** Pentangeli sits with Anthony and drinks a full glass of wine in one gulp. Then, he gives Anthony a $100 bill.
** Al Neri goes to a casino and fires Klingman on orders of Michael. When Klingman won't leave, Neri smacks him, chases him into a rehearsal of a stage show and threatens him with a chair. Klingman agrees to leave, then Neri tells the performers to continue the rehearsal which he stays and watches.
** Fabrizio gets into his car outside his pizza parlor. He turns the ignition, and the car explodes. He falls out of the car and crawls around a bit before he dies.


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* DeletedScene:
** Don Altobello hands Michael and Constance an expensive check for the Vito Corleone Foundation, and Altobello declares lifetime peace between the two familes. All three embrace each other.
** A brief exchange between B.J and the Archbishop is seen during the party sequence. The Archbishop snaps softly at B.J "We had a deal!" B.J half-chuckles and says "Of course, how do you think I got all this grey hair." This scene hints early on the wrongdoings of the Archbishop, which isn't revealed until later in the theatrical version
10th Aug '17 7:04:07 AM ClintEastwood
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* AFIS100Years100YearsSeries:

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* AFIS100Years100YearsSeries:AFIS100YearsSeries::
10th Aug '17 7:02:55 AM ClintEastwood
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!!The movies:
!Part I

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!!The !The movies:
!Part !!Part I



!Part II

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!Part !!Part II



!Part III

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!Part !!Part III
10th Aug '17 5:00:34 AM ClintEastwood
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!!The novel
* MoneyDearBoy: Mario Puzo had written two acclaimed but unsuccessful novels[[note]]''The Dark Arena'', an autobiographical account of postwar Germany, and ''The Fortunate Pilgrim'', depicting a more traditional Italian-American family[[/note]], was eeking out a living as a freelance journalist and struggling with gambling debts. By his own account, a publisher suggested that Puzo's books would be more successful if he added gangsters. Puzo (who had little personal interest in the Mafia) followed his advice and ''The Godfather'' was the result.




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!Part I
* ActorInspiredElement: Creator/MarlonBrando wanted Don Corleone to look like a bulldog. Also, nowhere in the script did it say anything about the don holding a cat. That was a stray Brando found.



** The second film:
*** AFIS100Years100Movies: #32
*** AFIS100Years100HeroesAndVillains: #11 Villain, Michael Corleone
*** AFIS100Years100MovieQuotes: #58, Keep your friends close, but your enemies closer."
*** AFIS100Years100Movies10THAnniversaryEdition: #32
*** AFIS10Top10: Gangster Film, #3



* TheCastShowoff: The Don's wife, Carmella Corleone, is seen singing at the wedding. Morgana King, who played Carmella, was a gifted jazz singer, and portraying Carmella was actually her film debut, as well as her acting debut.
* CommonKnowledge: A minor example: Creator/RichardMatheson is often said to be one of the Senators in ''Part II'' (even [=IMDB=] lists him), but he's uncredited on the film, Matheson himself denies it, and there's no evidence beyond it being repeated ad nauseum.



* CreatorBacklash: Creator/AlPacino stated that he did not agree with the portrayal of Michael in ''Part III''. He didn't believe that Michael would ever feel regret or remorse for his actions, [[spoiler:especially the murder of his brother]].
* DawsonCasting: Inverted in ''Part III'' - Mary Corleone ''should'' be in her twenties (she was about 5 in ''Part II'', which took place 21 years earlier) but Creator/SofiaCoppola was still a teenager when she played her.
** Creator/AlPacino (who was 32 in the first movie) playing the 21 year old Michael Corleone. He was actually only 16 years younger than Creator/MarlonBrando, who played Michael's father, Vito Corleone.
* DevelopmentHell: The third film remained in varying stages of development for fifteen years, before Coppola and Puzo finally signed on.
* EnforcedMethodActing:
** In the "Woltz's bedroom" scene, John Marley (who played Woltz) was not told that they would be using an actual horse head for the scene, as they had used various props in rehearsals.
** In Part II, the scene with Signor Roberto struggling with the door was set up by having the actor playing Genco secretly force the door shut with a nail. The actor playing Signor Roberto was a famous Italian improv comedian and Coppola wanted to see how he'd react.
* ExecutiveMeddling:
** According to Coppola & Puzo, ''The Godfather Part III'' was meant to be titled ''The Death of Michael Corleone'' to highlight the fact that it did not follow on directly from ''Part II'', but rather was meant to be "[[DistantFinale an epilogue]]." They were overruled, with executives saying "You can't make a Godfather movie without 'The Godfather' in the title!" This after Coppola had to '''demand''' the second film be titled ''The Godfather Part II'' instead of something else.
** This also occurred during the first film as well. Stanley R. Jaffe, who was then Paramount's executive vice president and chief operations officer, along with producer Robert Evans, frequently fought with Coppola over creative matters during the film, from his decision to cast Marlon Brando and Al Pacino in the main roles, to his editing of the final product. It got so bad, in fact, that Coppola, constantly worrying about potentially being fired and replaced during the shoot, had to have the film's on-set physician prescribe him sleeping pills in order to combat his stress related insomnia. [[http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2009/03/godfather200903 "The Godfather Wars"]] gives a very thorough account of the whole odyssey.
* FakeNationality:
** American Actor (of Anglo-Irish extraction) Marlon Brando plays Italian immigrant Vito Corleone. Jewish American actor James Caan plays his son Santino. The Jewish actor Abe Vigoda plays the Italian Sal Tessio. And in an unusual subversion of Jewish actors in Hollywood playing Italians, Italian-American actor Alex Rocco plays Jewish gangster Moe Greene.
** Cuban American Andy Garcia plays Italian American Vincent Mancini.
** Creator/EliWallach, of Jewish extraction, playing Italian Mob boss Don Altobello.

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* CastTheExpert:
** According to Associate Producer Gary Fredrickson, Lenny Montana (Luca Brasi) had worked as a Mafia bodyguard, and had also bragged to Frederickson about working for the Mafia as an arsonist. Coppola claimed that when he asked Lenny if he knew how to spin a pistol, he replied, "You kiddin'?"
** Singing sensation Johnny Fontane was played by singer Al Martino.
* TheCastShowoff: The Don's wife, Carmella Corleone, is seen singing at the wedding. Morgana King, who played Carmella, was a gifted jazz singer, and portraying Carmella was actually her film debut, as well as her acting debut.
* CreatorBacklash: Creator/JamesCaan was angry that scenes giving Sonny more depth (such as his reaction to his father's shooting) were cut from the film. He confronted Robert Evans at the premiere and yelled at him, "Hey, you cut my whole fuckin' part out". Caan claimed that forty-five minutes of his character were cut.
* DawsonCasting:
Creator/AlPacino stated that he did not agree with the portrayal of Michael in ''Part III''. He didn't believe that Michael would ever feel regret or remorse for his actions, [[spoiler:especially the murder of his brother]].
* DawsonCasting: Inverted in ''Part III'' - Mary Corleone ''should'' be in her twenties (she was about 5 in ''Part II'', which took place 21 years earlier) but Creator/SofiaCoppola was still a teenager when she played her.
** Creator/AlPacino (who was 32 in the first movie)
playing the 21 year old Michael Corleone. He was actually only 16 years younger than Creator/MarlonBrando, who played Michael's father, Vito Corleone.
* DevelopmentHell: The third film remained DyeingForYourArt: Creator/MarlonBrando had to lose weight in varying stages of development for fifteen years, before Coppola and Puzo finally signed on.
order to play Don Vito Corleone.
* EnforcedMethodActing:
**
EnforcedMethodActing: In the "Woltz's bedroom" scene, John Marley (who played Woltz) was not told that they would be using an actual horse head for the scene, as they had used various props in rehearsals.
** In Part II, the scene with Signor Roberto struggling with the door was set up by having the actor playing Genco secretly force the door shut with a nail. The actor playing Signor Roberto was a famous Italian improv comedian and Coppola wanted to see how he'd react.
* ExecutiveMeddling:
** According to Coppola & Puzo, ''The Godfather Part III'' was meant to be titled ''The Death of Michael Corleone'' to highlight the fact that it did not follow on directly from ''Part II'', but rather was meant to be "[[DistantFinale an epilogue]]." They were overruled, with executives saying "You can't make a Godfather movie without 'The Godfather' in the title!" This after Coppola had to '''demand''' the second film be titled ''The Godfather Part II'' instead of something else.
** This also occurred during the first film as well.
ExecutiveMeddling: Stanley R. Jaffe, who was then Paramount's executive vice president and chief operations officer, along with producer Robert Evans, frequently fought with Coppola over creative matters during the film, from his decision to cast Marlon Brando and Al Pacino in the main roles, to his editing of the final product. It got so bad, in fact, that Coppola, constantly worrying about potentially being fired and replaced during the shoot, had to have the film's on-set physician prescribe him sleeping pills in order to combat his stress related insomnia. [[http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2009/03/godfather200903 "The Godfather Wars"]] gives a very thorough account of the whole odyssey.
* FakeNationality:
**
FakeNationality: American Actor (of Anglo-Irish extraction) Marlon Brando Creator/MarlonBrando plays Italian immigrant Vito Corleone. Jewish American actor James Caan Creator/JamesCaan plays his son Santino. The Jewish actor Abe Vigoda plays the Italian Sal Tessio. And in an unusual subversion of Jewish actors in Hollywood playing Italians, Italian-American actor Alex Rocco plays Jewish gangster Moe Greene.
** Cuban American Andy Garcia plays Italian American Vincent Mancini.
** Creator/EliWallach, of Jewish extraction, playing Italian Mob boss Don Altobello.
Greene.



* MoneyDearBoy: Coppola's reason for making all three films. He was head of a very unprofitable film company when he was offered the first one (offered purely on the grounds that he was Italian), and thought it was a stupid genre movie that he didn't want to waste his time on... but he really needed the money. Coppola wanted to now move away from the studio and focus on his personal film projects ''Film/TheConversation'' and ''Film/ApocalypseNow'', which he could get finance for... Providing he made another Godfather film. Then many years later he was struggling with debts from failed projects... people went to see my Godfather movies, didn't they? Yeah, let's make another one of those. People sometimes cite this trope as a reason the third one sucked, but it was there the whole time. [[note]] However, the situations vary in one aspect: he actually wanted to do Part I and Part II to secure money for his pet projects. He ''needed'' to make Part 3 after one of those said projects not only destroyed his own studio but left him bankrupt. [[/note]]
** This could apply to the original book, too. Puzo had written two acclaimed but unsuccessful novels[[note]]''The Dark Arena'', an autobiographical account of postwar Germany, and ''The Fortunate Pilgrim'', depicting a more traditional Italian-American family[[/note]], was eeking out a living as a freelance journalist and struggling with gambling debts. By his own account, a publisher suggested that Puzo's books would be more successful if he added gangsters. Puzo (who had little personal interest in the Mafia) followed his advice and ''The Godfather'' was the result.
** This was a big reason RobertDuvall didn't return for Part III. Pacino and Keaton alone demanded huge salaries to appear, and Duvall felt grifted. To paraphrase: "Al's the lead, so I accepted he was going to make more than me. But did he have to make ''twice'' as much?"
* NumberedSequels: Cinema's TropeMaker. The first major film to use this trend was ''The Godfather Part II''. It was one of Creator/FrancisFordCoppola's three demands for working on the sequel. His two other demands were approved, but the studio highly objected to simply following the title with a number. Its success began the tradition of numbered sequels. Oddly enough, this was inverted for ''Part III''. Coppola, now without AuteurLicense, wanted to call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', but the studio wouldn't let him.
* PlayingAgainstType: Michael (especially in ''Part II'') is a more subdued and quiet role than what Creator/AlPacino usually plays. This, ironically, was also Pacino's first major role. It could be considered a positive, actor-specific example of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.
* RealLifeRelative: Coppola defines ''The Godfather'' as his own family business because several of his relatives had minor acting or production-related roles in the movies. His sister Talia Shire played Connie Corleone in all three movies. His daughter Sofia was the baby being baptised at the end of Part I, and also played Mary Corleone in Part III. His son Roman played the young Sonny Corleone in Part II. Coppola's father Carmine composed part of the score. His grandfather Francesco Pennino even composed the musical play Vito and Genco see in one of the flashbacks in Part II.
* RefittedForSequel: Vito's backstory in ''Part II'' is taken from scenes in the original novel that were left out of the first film.
* SavedFromDevelopmentHell: Paramount tried to go ahead with a third film for many years without Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, who had refused to make another sequel. About twelve scripts were written. Most of the scripts included the Corleone family being led by Michael's son Anthony, battling the CIA, Fidel Castro's Cuban government, or South American drug cartels. A 1978 draft by Mario Puzo dealt with Anthony Corleone being recruited by the CIA to assassinate a Latin American dictator. Dean Riesner also wrote a draft based on Puzo's ideas. Drafts were also written by Paramount producers Michael Eisner and Don Simpson. The film was scheduled for a Christmas 1980 release date. These scripts were discarded when Coppola decided to work on the script with Puzo. But Coppola eventually abandoned the project. Puzo wrote another script in 1986 with producer Nicholas Gage that featured Sonny Corleone's illegitimate son Vincent Mancini while showing the early life of the young Sonny Corleone. Paramount considered Creator/SidneyLumet, Costa-Gavras, Alan J. Pakula, Robert Benton, Creator/MichaelCimino and Creator/MichaelMann to direct. At one point, they were even close to signing Creator/SylvesterStallone to direct and star in the film.

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* HostilityOnTheSet: During filming, Creator/JamesCaan and Gianni Russo did not get along and were frequently at loggerheads. During filming Sonny's beating of Carlo, Caan nearly hit Russo with the stick he threw at him, and actually broke two of Russo's ribs and chipped his elbow.
* MoneyDearBoy: Coppola's reason for making all three films. He Coppola was head of a very unprofitable film company when he was offered the first one directing job (offered purely on the grounds that he was Italian), and thought it was a stupid genre movie that he didn't want to waste his time on... but he really needed the money. Coppola wanted to now move away from the studio and focus on his personal film projects ''Film/TheConversation'' and ''Film/ApocalypseNow'', which he could get finance for... Providing he made another Godfather film. Then many years later he was struggling
* OrphanedReference: While arguing
with debts from failed projects... people went Tom, Sonny laments, "Pop got Genco and I got you". This refers to Vito's former consigliere Genco Abbandando, who appeared in a deleted scene where Vito takes his sons to see my Godfather movies, didn't they? Yeah, let's make another one of those. People sometimes cite this trope as a reason the third one sucked, but it was there the whole time. [[note]] However, the situations vary in one aspect: he actually wanted to do Part I and Part II to secure money for his pet projects. He ''needed'' to make Part 3 after one of those said projects not only destroyed his own studio but left him bankrupt. [[/note]]
** This could apply to the original book, too. Puzo had written two acclaimed but unsuccessful novels[[note]]''The Dark Arena'', an autobiographical account of postwar Germany, and ''The Fortunate Pilgrim'', depicting a more traditional Italian-American family[[/note]], was eeking out a living as a freelance journalist and struggling with gambling debts. By his own account, a publisher suggested that Puzo's books would be more successful if he added gangsters. Puzo (who had little personal interest in the Mafia) followed his advice and ''The Godfather'' was the result.
** This was a big reason RobertDuvall didn't return for Part III. Pacino and Keaton alone demanded huge salaries to appear, and Duvall felt grifted. To paraphrase: "Al's the lead, so I accepted he was going to make more than me. But did he have to make ''twice'' as much?"
* NumberedSequels: Cinema's TropeMaker. The first major film to use this trend was ''The Godfather Part II''. It was one of Creator/FrancisFordCoppola's three demands for working on the sequel. His two other demands were approved, but the studio highly objected to simply following the title with a number. Its success began the tradition of numbered sequels. Oddly enough, this was inverted for ''Part III''. Coppola, now without AuteurLicense, wanted to call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', but the studio wouldn't let him.
* PlayingAgainstType: Michael (especially in ''Part II'') is a more subdued and quiet role than what Creator/AlPacino usually plays. This, ironically, was also Pacino's first major role. It could be considered a positive, actor-specific example of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.
hospital.
* RealLifeRelative: Coppola defines ''The Godfather'' as his own family business because several of his relatives had minor acting or production-related roles in the movies. His sister Talia Shire played Connie Corleone in all three movies. His daughter Sofia was the baby being baptised at the end of Part I, and also played Mary Corleone in Part III. His son Roman played the young Sonny Corleone in Part II. Coppola's his father Carmine composed part of the score. His grandfather Francesco Pennino even composed score.
* ScullyBox: Both Creator/MarlonBrando and Creator/JamesCaan had to wear lifts for
the musical play Vito and Genco see in one of the flashbacks in Part II.
* RefittedForSequel: Vito's backstory in ''Part II'' is taken from scenes in the original novel that were left out of the first film.
* SavedFromDevelopmentHell: Paramount tried to go ahead with a third film for many years without Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, who had refused to make another sequel. About twelve scripts were written. Most of the scripts included the Corleone family being led by Michael's son Anthony, battling the CIA, Fidel Castro's Cuban government, or South American drug cartels. A 1978 draft by Mario Puzo dealt with Anthony Corleone being recruited by the CIA to assassinate a Latin American dictator. Dean Riesner also wrote a draft based on Puzo's ideas. Drafts were also written by Paramount producers Michael Eisner and Don Simpson. The film was scheduled for a Christmas 1980 release date. These scripts were discarded when Coppola decided to work on the script with Puzo. But Coppola eventually abandoned the project. Puzo wrote another script in 1986 with producer Nicholas Gage that featured Sonny Corleone's illegitimate son Vincent Mancini while showing the early life of the young Sonny Corleone. Paramount considered Creator/SidneyLumet, Costa-Gavras, Alan J. Pakula, Robert Benton, Creator/MichaelCimino and Creator/MichaelMann to direct. At one point, they were even close to signing Creator/SylvesterStallone to direct and star in the film.
movie.



* SequelGap: ''Part III'' was released in 1990, 16 years after the previous installment.
* StarMakingRole:
** Creator/AlPacino (Michael), Creator/DianeKeaton (Kay), and Creator/JohnCazale (Fredo), who sadly didn't get much time to enjoy it due to his early death from cancer.
** Creator/RobertDeNiro (Young Vito) in ''Part II''.

to:

* SequelGap: ''Part III'' was released in 1990, 16 years after the previous installment.
* StarMakingRole:
**
StarMakingRole: Creator/AlPacino (Michael), Creator/DianeKeaton (Kay), and Creator/JohnCazale (Fredo), who sadly didn't get much time to enjoy it due to his early death from cancer.
** Creator/RobertDeNiro (Young Vito) in ''Part II''.
cancer.



** "Michael Corleone says hello!"



* TroubledProduction: All three films suffered from this.

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* TroubledProduction: All three films suffered from this.TroubledProduction:



*** To begin with, pretty much everybody involved was only in it for the money. Mario Puzo, author of the original book, sold the film rights to Paramount for $12,500 (rising to $50,000 if it was filmed) having only written a hundred pages, chiefly because he was in debt to his bookie. Coppola, meanwhile, hated the book, and only took the job of directing the film because a) his production company American Zoetrope was out of money, and b) Paramount pushed hard for him on account of him being Italian (which it was hoped would assuage the concerns of Italian-American groups). Even then, Coppola was only brought in after several established directors like Costa-Gavras and Arthur Penn declined.

to:

*** ** To begin with, pretty much everybody involved was only in it for the money. Mario Puzo, author of the original book, sold the film rights to Paramount for $12,500 (rising to $50,000 if it was filmed) having only written a hundred pages, chiefly because he was in debt to his bookie. Coppola, meanwhile, hated the book, and only took the job of directing the film because a) his production company American Zoetrope was out of money, and b) Paramount pushed hard for him on account of him being Italian (which it was hoped would assuage the concerns of Italian-American groups). Even then, Coppola was only brought in after several established directors like Costa-Gavras and Arthur Penn declined.



*** Coppola's relationship with the Paramount executives was chaotic they hated the casting, the lighting, the writing, the music, the length, everything. For one, Paramount wanted to jettison the novel's period setting for modern-day New York. Equally controversial was the casting of Creator/MarlonBrando, which Coppola pushed hard for and Paramount pushed just as hard against due to his star having seriously fallen at the time, due to both a string of flops and his primadonna reputation. Coppola faked a heart attack in order to get the Paramount executives to relent. Creator/AlPacino wasn't popular with the Paramount brass either, who preferred an established star like Robert Redford and were unimpressed by Pacino's screen test and early rushes.
*** Production wasn't that troubled on-set, apart from a delay due to Pacino twisting his ankle, but it's a miracle that no significant problems emerged. Coppola got no respect from the crew, many of whom thought that the movie was a piece of crap and that he didn't know what he was doing; several of his assistant directors openly complained to the studio brass. He expected to be fired at any point, and indeed, the executives were considering replacing him with Elia Kazan. He also got into an argument with cinematographer Gordon Willis.
*** All the way through post-production, Coppola feuded with producer Robert Evans over the film's style and pacing. One particular argument involved Evans demanding that Coppola include an intermission after Michael murders Solozzo and McCluskey. Later, Evans demanded that Coppola cut the film down to a 135 minute runtime. Coppola complied, only to be chewed out afterwards for "ruining" the film. Afterwards, he reedited it to the original length without complaint.
*** Despite the film's ultimate success, the experience left the entire cast and crew profoundly drained. Ruddy later said that "It was the most miserable film I can think of to make. Nobody enjoyed one day of it." Unsurprisingly, it proved increasingly difficult to reunite cast and crew for the sequels.
** ''Part II'' was easier only by comparison. After the first film, Coppola joked that the only sequel he'd make is ''Film/AbbottAndCostello Meet the Godfather'', and it took a lot of arm-twisting by Paramount to change his mind.
*** Coppola stated his terms upfront: he would only return if Paramount would a) give him complete AuteurLicense, b) produce his pet project, ''Film/TheConversation'' in return, c) ensure that Robert Evans have nothing to do with the movie. To Coppola's surprise, Paramount complied with his requests; their only concern was his decision to [[NumberedSequel include Part II in the title]]. However, Al Ruddy (with whom Coppola had a good relationship on the first film) refused to return, leaving Coppola to produce it himself.
*** Shooting in the Dominican Republic (standing in for Cuba) proved the biggest problem: nonstop rainstorms delayed filming for weeks, while Al Pacino, Lee Strasberg and several crew members came down with tropical illnesses. Pacino took three weeks to recover, and Strasberg was so debilitated [[WrittenInInfirmity his infirmity was written into his character]]. There were also concerns about the parallel storylines of Vito and Michael, especially after Coppola delivered a disastrous rough cut, forcing a last minute reedit.
*** The cast caused trouble as well. Pacino [[ThePrimaDonna caused headaches throughout production]], demanding a massive salary and heavy script rewrites. He frequently complained about Coppola's slow pace, yelling "''Film/{{Serpico}}'' only took nineteen days!" and threatening to quit. Richard S. Castellano (Clemenza) refused to return, leading to Michael V. Gazzo's eleventh-hour casting as SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute, Frank Pentangeli. Gazzo himself caused difficulties through heavy drinking; Coppola claims that Gazzo was drunk filming Pentangeli's Senate testimony. Creator/JamesCaan demanded the same salary as the first film for his brief cameo as Sonny; Creator/MarlonBrando backed out at the last minute. But all of that was chump change compared to Coppola's much-anticipated follow-up...
** Part III had been in DevelopmentHell for over a decade, with [[http://articles.latimes.com/1990-12-25/entertainment/ca-7119_1_godfather-iii numerous scripts written throughout the '70s and '80s]] and other directors attached. Coppola repeatedly refused the project until financial woes forced him to take it. After accepting, Paramount gave Coppola and Mario Puzo just six weeks to write the script, and a hard year to complete filming. Coppola and Puzo initially wanted to call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', emphasizing it was a standalone "epilogue" rather than a direct sequel. In an ironic reversal of ''Part II'', Paramount insisted on the numbered title.
*** Again, the biggest problems involved the cast, who weren't any more eager than Coppola to revisit the franchise. Al Pacino and Diane Keaton both demanded massive salary hikes: Pacino initially demanded such an exorbitant amount that Coppola threatened to open the movie with Michael's funeral. Robert Duvall refused to return over a pay dispute, while Joe Spinell died just before filming started, forcing Coppola and Puzzo to [[RememberTheNewGuy create replacement characters]]. Most notoriously, Creator/WinonaRyder dropped out of the part of Mary at the last minute, forcing Creator/SofiaCoppola to step in, never mind how she allegedly REALLY didn't want to do it. Actual filming was relatively smooth, but media coverage of its behind-the-scenes turmoil lead to a massive HypeBacklash after its eventual release.

to:

*** ** Coppola's relationship with the Paramount executives was chaotic they hated the casting, the lighting, the writing, the music, the length, everything. For one, Paramount wanted to jettison the novel's period setting for modern-day New York. Equally controversial was the casting of Creator/MarlonBrando, which Coppola pushed hard for and Paramount pushed just as hard against due to his star having seriously fallen at the time, due to both a string of flops and his primadonna reputation. Coppola faked a heart attack in order to get the Paramount executives to relent. Creator/AlPacino wasn't popular with the Paramount brass either, who preferred an established star like Robert Redford and were unimpressed by Pacino's screen test and early rushes.
*** ** Production wasn't that troubled on-set, apart from a delay due to Pacino twisting his ankle, but it's a miracle that no significant problems emerged. Coppola got no respect from the crew, many of whom thought that the movie was a piece of crap and that he didn't know what he was doing; several of his assistant directors openly complained to the studio brass. He expected to be fired at any point, and indeed, the executives were considering replacing him with Elia Kazan. He also got into an argument with cinematographer Gordon Willis.
*** ** All the way through post-production, Coppola feuded with producer Robert Evans over the film's style and pacing. One particular argument involved Evans demanding that Coppola include an intermission after Michael murders Solozzo and McCluskey. Later, Evans demanded that Coppola cut the film down to a 135 minute runtime. Coppola complied, only to be chewed out afterwards for "ruining" the film. Afterwards, he reedited it to the original length without complaint.
*** ** Despite the film's ultimate success, the experience left the entire cast and crew profoundly drained. Ruddy later said that "It was the most miserable film I can think of to make. Nobody enjoyed one day of it." Unsurprisingly, it proved increasingly difficult to reunite cast and crew for the sequels.
** ''Part II'' * WagTheDirector: Mario Puzo was easier only by comparison. After very proud of one particular line from the first film, Coppola joked novel - "A lawyer with a briefcase can steal more than a hundred men with guns". He was adamant that the only sequel he'd make is ''Film/AbbottAndCostello Meet the Godfather'', and it took a lot of arm-twisting by Paramount to change his mind.
*** Coppola stated his terms upfront: he would only return if Paramount would a) give him complete AuteurLicense, b) produce his pet project, ''Film/TheConversation'' in return, c) ensure that Robert Evans have nothing to do with the movie. To Coppola's surprise, Paramount complied with his requests; their only concern was his decision to [[NumberedSequel include Part II
be used in the title]]. However, Al Ruddy (with whom Coppola had a good relationship on the first film) refused to return, leaving Coppola to produce it himself.
*** Shooting in the Dominican Republic (standing in for Cuba) proved the biggest problem: nonstop rainstorms delayed filming for weeks, while Al Pacino, Lee Strasberg and several crew members came down with tropical illnesses. Pacino took three weeks to recover, and Strasberg was so debilitated [[WrittenInInfirmity his infirmity was written into his character]]. There were also concerns about the parallel storylines of Vito and Michael, especially after Coppola delivered a disastrous rough cut, forcing a last minute reedit.
*** The cast caused trouble as well. Pacino [[ThePrimaDonna caused headaches throughout production]], demanding a massive salary and heavy script rewrites. He frequently complained about Coppola's slow pace, yelling "''Film/{{Serpico}}'' only took nineteen days!" and threatening to quit. Richard S. Castellano (Clemenza) refused to return, leading to Michael V. Gazzo's eleventh-hour casting as SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute, Frank Pentangeli. Gazzo himself caused difficulties through heavy drinking; Coppola claims that Gazzo was drunk filming Pentangeli's Senate testimony. Creator/JamesCaan demanded the same salary as the first film for his brief cameo as Sonny;
film, but Creator/MarlonBrando backed out at the last minute. But all of that was chump change compared to Coppola's much-anticipated follow-up...
** Part III had been in DevelopmentHell for over a decade, with [[http://articles.latimes.com/1990-12-25/entertainment/ca-7119_1_godfather-iii numerous scripts written throughout the '70s and '80s]] and other directors attached. Coppola repeatedly refused the project until financial woes forced him to take it. After accepting, Paramount gave Coppola and Mario Puzo just six weeks to write the script, and a hard year to complete filming. Coppola and Puzo initially wanted to call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', emphasizing
felt it was a standalone "epilogue" rather than a direct sequel. In an ironic reversal of ''Part II'', Paramount insisted on the numbered title.
*** Again, the biggest problems involved the cast, who weren't any more eager than Coppola to revisit the franchise. Al Pacino
too preachy and Diane Keaton both demanded massive salary hikes: Pacino initially demanded such an exorbitant amount that Coppola threatened to open the movie with Michael's funeral. Robert Duvall refused to return over a pay dispute, while Joe Spinell died just before filming started, forcing Coppola and Puzzo to [[RememberTheNewGuy create replacement characters]]. Most notoriously, Creator/WinonaRyder dropped out of the part of Mary at the last minute, forcing Creator/SofiaCoppola to step in, never mind how she allegedly REALLY didn't want to do it. Actual filming it was relatively smooth, but media coverage of its behind-the-scenes turmoil lead to a massive HypeBacklash after its eventual release. excised.



** A large list of actors were considered for the part of Vito Corleone:
*** Music/FrankSinatra tried very hard to be cast. This would have made Vito's conversation with Johnny Fontane one of the funniest {{Actor Allusion}}s ever. He also turned down the role of Don Altobello in Part III.

to:

** * WhatCouldHaveBeen:
***
A large list of actors were considered for the part of Vito Corleone:
*** ** Music/FrankSinatra tried very hard to be cast. This would have made Vito's conversation with Johnny Fontane one of the funniest {{Actor Allusion}}s ever. He also turned down the role of Don Altobello in Part III.



** Creator/MartinSheen and Creator/DeanStockwell auditioned for the role of Michael Corleone.
** Creator/RodSteiger campaigned hard for the role of Michael, even though he was too old for the part.
** Creator/WarrenBeatty, Creator/JackNicholson, and Creator/DustinHoffman were all offered the part of Michael Corleone, but all refused. (Beatty was also offered directing and producing duties.)

to:

** Creator/MartinSheen and Creator/DeanStockwell auditioned for the role of Michael Corleone.
** Creator/RodSteiger campaigned hard for the role of Michael, even though he was too old for the part.
** Creator/WarrenBeatty, Creator/JackNicholson, and Creator/DustinHoffman were all offered the part of Michael Corleone, but all refused. (Beatty was also offered directing and producing duties.)) Creator/MartinSheen and Creator/DeanStockwell auditioned for the role, while Creator/RodSteiger campaigned hard, even though he was too old for the part.



** Coppola's rough cut of ''Part II'' ran almost ''six hours'' in length. Vito's storyline extended into the Prohibition Era, including a gang war with UsefulNotes/AlCapone and Luca Brasi's exploits as Vito's hatchet man. Michael's story continued, gaining political influence in 1960s Washington through his connections with Senator Geary (implying a role in the [[Main/WhoShotJFK Kennedy assassination]], among other things). Little of this footage survived, aside from the handful of deleted scenes used in the television reedit, and one or two stills showing Creator/RobertDeNiro as middle-aged Vito. Many of the ideas were recycled for Mark Winegardner's sequel novels and the putative scripts for ''Part IV''.
** Coppola wanted Creator/JamesCagney to play Hyman Roth in Part II, even visiting the Hollywood legend at his home. Cagney passed on it.
** Creator/JoePesci was considered for the younger Peter Clemenza.
** ''Part III'' was originally to be about the breakdown between Michael and Tom. However, Tom was written out when Creator/RobertDuvall, demanded to be paid the same as or marginally close to the amount that Al Pacino was getting.
** Creator/WinonaRyder was supposed to play Mary in ''Part III'' but she opted to film ''Mermaids'' instead. Rebecca Schaeffer was also up for the part of Mary before she was murdered. Music/{{Madonna}} lobbied for the role, even meeting with Coppola and De Niro, but she was deemed too old for the part. Creator/JuliaRoberts turned it down in order to star in ''Film/PrettyWoman''. Creator/BridgetFonda auditioned before being cast as Grace Hamilton.
** Originally Clemenza was to return in ''Part II'' but the actor made too many demands, and the character was replaced with Pentangeli. Given the scenes of Clemenza bonding with Michael and [[spoiler:advising him on his first hit]] in the first film, it would have made the events of the second even more tragic.
** Coppola [[http://st-eutychus.com/2011/coppola-on-the-metaphor-behind-the-godfather/ wanted Brando to return in the sequel and play the part of young Vito]], but it never came to pass.
** Creator/MarlonBrando was supposed to appear in the birthday party flashback at the end of ''Part II''. But due to a dispute with Paramount he never turned up for the shoot, forcing Coppola to rewrite the scene on the spot, in which Vito is TheGhost.
** [[spoiler:Kay was originally supposed to have a genuine miscarriage in Part II. It was Creator/TaliaShire's idea that she would have an abortion instead, as the ultimate way to hurt Michael. To thank her for this idea, Creator/FrancisFordCoppola wrote in the scene in which she tearfully asks Michael to forgive Fredo]].
** Joe Spinell was originally supposed to reprise his role as Willi Cicci in ''Part III'', in which he would have taken over the Corleones' New York operation, but Spinell died before production. Cicci's role in the story was replaced by new character Joey Zasa, played by Joe Mantegna.
** Rocco Lampone was also featured in early drafts of ''Part III''. It's unclear how the filmmakers would explain away [[spoiler:Rocco getting killed in the closing minutes of ''Part II'']].
** Coppola wanted to make a fourth movie written by Mario Puzo with a similar layout to ''Part II'', focusing on both the Corleones' rise to power under Vito and Sonny's leadership, and the present-day fall of the Corleone empire under Vincent, but many of the actors along with Paramount were disinterested and the project was abandoned after the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death of Mario Puzo]], though the unused screenplay was later made into a novel called "The Family Corleone" and Paramount did win back the rights in 2012 to make more films, so they could do an adaption of the novel if they wanted to.
** Coppola initially didn't want to direct ''Part II'', and instead recommended a young, up-and-coming director: Creator/MartinScorsese. Paramount rejected the idea because Scorsese was too unknown at the time.



** Leone was one of several directors offered ''The Godfather'' before Coppola. Arthur Penn also declined, because he didn't want to make another gangster film so soon after ''Film/BonnieAndClyde''. Another early choice was [[Film/{{Z}} Costa-Gavras]], who liked the novel but didn't feel knowledgeable enough about American culture to direct the movie. [[Film/HighNoon Fred]] [[Theatre/AManForAllSeasons Zinnemann]], [[Film/{{Bullitt}} Peter Yates]] and even [[Film/AHardDaysNight Richard Lester]] were considered before Coppola signed on.
** Coppola wanted to call the third movie "The Death Of Michael Corleone" but the studios nixed it. It might not be a big deal but it would probably have lessened the comparisons to the first two movies and made it clear it was an epilogue as Coppola intended. Also the title would have gotten audiences to expect Michael would be killed and made the ending where [[spoiler: his daughter Mary is killed and instead and he actually dies years later]] a complete surprise.

to:

** Leone was one of several directors offered ''The Godfather'' before Coppola. Arthur Penn also declined, because he didn't want to make another gangster film so soon after ''Film/BonnieAndClyde''. Another early choice was [[Film/{{Z}} Costa-Gavras]], who liked the novel but didn't feel knowledgeable enough about American culture to direct the movie. Creator/EliaKazan, Creator/PeterBogdanovich, [[Film/HighNoon Fred]] [[Theatre/AManForAllSeasons Zinnemann]], [[Film/{{Bullitt}} Peter Yates]] and even [[Film/AHardDaysNight Richard Lester]] were considered before Coppola signed on.
** Fabrizio, Michael's Sicilian bodyguard who planted the bomb that killed Appolonia, was supposed to be found by Michael at a pizza parlor he opens in America and subsequently blown away with a shotgun at the end of the movie as per the novel (though Michael isn't his killer in the novel). This scene was filmed but ultimately cut because the makeup artists plastered Angelo Infanti with so much fake blood that the scene looked ridiculous. Hence, the reshot scene where he's killed via CarBomb as the ultimate poetic justice.
** Robert Evans originally wanted Music/HenryMancini to score the film.

!Part II
* ActorAllusion: [[Film/MeanStreets Robert De Niro]] is seen running over the rooftops of Little Italy during the annual Feast of San Rocco festival.
* AFIS100Years100YearsSeries:
** AFIS100Years100Movies: #32
** AFIS100Years100HeroesAndVillains: #11 Villain, Michael Corleone
** AFIS100Years100MovieQuotes: #58, Keep your friends close, but your enemies closer."
** AFIS100Years100Movies10THAnniversaryEdition: #32
** AFIS10Top10: Gangster Film, #3
* CommonKnowledge: A minor example: Creator/RichardMatheson is often said to be one of the Senators in ''Part II'' (even [=IMDB=] lists him), but he's uncredited on the film, Matheson himself denies it, and there's no evidence beyond it being repeated ad nauseum.
* TheDanza: Merle Johnson is played by Troy Donahue, whose real name is Merle Johnson.
* EnforcedMethodActing: The scene with Signor Roberto struggling with the door was set up by having the actor playing Genco secretly force the door shut with a nail. The actor playing Signor Roberto was a famous Italian improv comedian and
Coppola wanted to see how he'd react.
* MoneyDearBoy: Coppola wanted to now move away from the studio and focus on his personal film projects ''Film/TheConversation'' and ''Film/ApocalypseNow'', which he could get finance for... Providing he made another Godfather film. Then many years later he was struggling with debts from failed projects... people went to see my Godfather movies, didn't they? Yeah, let's make another one of those.
* NumberedSequels: Cinema's TropeMaker. This was the first major film to use this trend. It was one of Creator/FrancisFordCoppola's three demands for working on the sequel. His two other demands were approved, but the studio highly objected to simply following the title with a number. Its success began the tradition of numbered sequels.
* PlayingAgainstType: Michael, especially in this film, is a more subdued and quiet role than what Creator/AlPacino usually plays. This, ironically, was also Pacino's first major role. It could be considered a positive, actor-specific example of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.
* RealLifeRelative: Coppola's son Roman played the young Sonny Corleone and his grandfather Francesco Pennino composed the musical play Vito and Genco see in one of the flashbacks.
* RefittedForSequel: Vito's backstory is taken from scenes in the original novel that were left out of the first film.
* StarMakingRole: Along with ''Film/MeanStreets'', this really put Creator/RobertDeNiro on the map.
* ThrowItIn: Danny Aiello's line, "Michael Corleone says hello", was completely ad-libbed. Coppola loved it and asked him to do it again in the retakes. Aiello later claimed (on Creator/GilbertGottfried's podcast) that, due to being nervous about working with Coppola, he didn't hear himself when he said the line and, to this day, has no idea why he said it.
* TroubledProduction: Filming was easier than the first only by comparison. After the first film, Coppola joked that the only sequel he'd make is ''Film/AbbottAndCostello Meet the Godfather'', and it took a lot of arm-twisting by Paramount to change his mind.
** Coppola stated his terms upfront: he would only return if Paramount would a) give him complete AuteurLicense, b) produce his pet project, ''Film/TheConversation'' in return, c) ensure that Robert Evans have nothing to do with the movie. To Coppola's surprise, Paramount complied with his requests; their only concern was his decision to [[NumberedSequel include Part II in the title]]. However, Al Ruddy (with whom Coppola had a good relationship on the first film) refused to return, leaving Coppola to produce it himself.
** Shooting in the Dominican Republic (standing in for Cuba) proved the biggest problem: nonstop rainstorms delayed filming for weeks, while Al Pacino, Lee Strasberg and several crew members came down with tropical illnesses. Pacino took three weeks to recover, and Strasberg was so debilitated [[WrittenInInfirmity his infirmity was written into his character]]. There were also concerns about the parallel storylines of Vito and Michael, especially after Coppola delivered a disastrous rough cut, forcing a last minute reedit.
** The cast caused trouble as well. Pacino [[ThePrimaDonna caused headaches throughout production]], demanding a massive salary and heavy script rewrites. He frequently complained about Coppola's slow pace, yelling "''Film/{{Serpico}}'' only took nineteen days!" and threatening to quit. Richard S. Castellano (Clemenza) refused to return, leading to Michael V. Gazzo's eleventh-hour casting as SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute, Frank Pentangeli. Gazzo himself caused difficulties through heavy drinking; Coppola claims that Gazzo was drunk filming Pentangeli's Senate testimony. Creator/JamesCaan demanded the same salary as the first film for his brief cameo as Sonny; Creator/MarlonBrando backed out at the last minute.
* WhatCouldHaveBeen:
** Coppola's rough cut ran almost ''six hours'' in length. Vito's storyline extended into the Prohibition Era, including a gang war with UsefulNotes/AlCapone and Luca Brasi's exploits as Vito's hatchet man. Michael's story continued, gaining political influence in 1960s Washington through his connections with Senator Geary (implying a role in the [[Main/WhoShotJFK Kennedy assassination]], among other things). Little of this footage survived, aside from the handful of deleted scenes used in the television reedit, and one or two stills showing Creator/RobertDeNiro as middle-aged Vito. Many of the ideas were recycled for Mark Winegardner's sequel novels and the putative scripts for ''Part IV''.
** Coppola wanted Creator/JamesCagney to play Hyman Roth, even visiting the Hollywood legend at his home. Cagney passed on it.
** Creator/JoePesci was considered for the younger Peter Clemenza.
** Coppola initially didn't want to direct the sequel, and instead recommended a young, up-and-coming director: Creator/MartinScorsese. Paramount rejected the idea because Scorsese was too unknown at the time.
** Originally Clemenza was to return but the actor made too many demands, and the character was replaced with Pentangeli. Given the scenes of Clemenza bonding with Michael and [[spoiler:advising him on his first hit]] in the first film, it would have made the events of the second even more tragic.
** Coppola [[http://st-eutychus.com/2011/coppola-on-the-metaphor-behind-the-godfather/ wanted Brando to return in the sequel and play the part of young Vito]], but it never came to pass.
** Creator/MarlonBrando was supposed to appear in the birthday party flashback at the end of ''Part II''. But due to a dispute with Paramount he never turned up for the shoot, forcing Coppola to rewrite the scene on the spot, in which Vito is TheGhost.
** [[spoiler:Kay was originally supposed to have a genuine miscarriage in Part II. It was Creator/TaliaShire's idea that she would have an abortion instead, as the ultimate way to hurt Michael. To thank her for this idea, Creator/FrancisFordCoppola wrote in the scene in which she tearfully asks Michael to forgive Fredo]].
** In the original script, Tom gains Senator Geary's support by paying off his gambling debts.
* WrittenInInfirmity: Lee Strasberg (Hyman Roth) became seriously ill after contracting a tropical disease while filming in the Dominican Republic. Rather than recast the role, Coppola rewrote Strasberg's scenes to make Roth's health a major plot point.

!Part III
* CreatorBacklash: Creator/AlPacino stated that he did not agree with the portrayal of Michael. He didn't believe that Michael would ever feel regret or remorse for his actions, [[spoiler:especially the murder of his brother]].
* DawsonCasting: Inverted - Mary Corleone ''should'' be in her twenties (she was about 5 in ''Part II'', which took place 21 years earlier) but Creator/SofiaCoppola was still a teenager when she played her.
* DevelopmentHell: The film remained in varying stages of development for fifteen years, before Coppola and Puzo finally signed on.
* ExecutiveMeddling: According to Coppola & Puzo, the film was meant to be titled ''The Death of Michael Corleone'' to highlight the fact that it did not follow on directly from ''Part II'', but rather was meant to be "[[DistantFinale an epilogue]]." They were overruled, with executives saying "You can't make a Godfather movie without 'The Godfather' in the title!" This after Coppola had to '''demand''' the second film be titled ''The Godfather Part II'' instead of something else.
* FakeNationality:
** Cuban American Andy Garcia plays Italian American Vincent Mancini.
** Creator/EliWallach, of Jewish extraction, playing Italian Mob boss Don Altobello.
* MoneyDearBoy:
** People sometimes cite this trope as a reason the film sucked. However, the situations vary in one aspect: he actually wanted to do Part I and Part II to secure money for his pet projects. He ''needed'' to make Part III after one of those said projects not only destroyed his own studio but left him bankrupt.
** This was a big reason RobertDuvall didn't return. Pacino and Keaton alone demanded huge salaries to appear, and Duvall felt grifted. To paraphrase: "Al's the lead, so I accepted he was going to make more than me. But did he have to make ''twice'' as much?"
* NumberedSequels: Oddly enough, this was inverted. Coppola, now without AuteurLicense, wanted to
call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', but the studio wouldn't let him.
* RealLifeRelative: Creator/SophiaCoppola plays Mary Corleone.
* SavedFromDevelopmentHell: Paramount tried to go ahead with a
third film for many years without Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, who had refused to make another sequel. About twelve scripts were written. Most of the scripts included the Corleone family being led by Michael's son Anthony, battling the CIA, Fidel Castro's Cuban government, or South American drug cartels. A 1978 draft by Mario Puzo dealt with Anthony Corleone being recruited by the CIA to assassinate a Latin American dictator. Dean Riesner also wrote a draft based on Puzo's ideas. Drafts were also written by Paramount producers Michael Eisner and Don Simpson. The film was scheduled for a Christmas 1980 release date. These scripts were discarded when Coppola decided to work on the script with Puzo. But Coppola eventually abandoned the project. Puzo wrote another script in 1986 with producer Nicholas Gage that featured Sonny Corleone's illegitimate son Vincent Mancini while showing the early life of the young Sonny Corleone. Paramount considered Creator/SidneyLumet, Costa-Gavras, Alan J. Pakula, Robert Benton, Creator/MichaelCimino and Creator/MichaelMann to direct. At one point, they were even close to signing Creator/SylvesterStallone to direct and star in the film.
* SequelGap: The film was released in 1990, 16 years after the previous installment.
* StarDerailingRole: Creator/SophiaCoppola isn't an actress by trade to begin with, and was a last minute replacement after Creator/WinonaRyder fell ill. However, her heavily criticized performance, as well as charges of nepotism, effectively ended her acting career. However, she has enjoyed much greater success following in her father's footsteps as a director in her own right.
* TroubledProduction:
** The film had been in DevelopmentHell for over a decade, with [[http://articles.latimes.com/1990-12-25/entertainment/ca-7119_1_godfather-iii numerous scripts written throughout the '70s and '80s]] and other directors attached. Coppola repeatedly refused the project until financial woes forced him to take it. After accepting, Paramount gave Coppola and Mario Puzo just six weeks to write the script, and a hard year to complete filming. Coppola and Puzo initially wanted to call it ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', emphasizing it was a standalone "epilogue" rather than a direct sequel. In an ironic reversal of ''Part II'', Paramount insisted on the numbered title.
** Again, the biggest problems involved the cast, who weren't any more eager than Coppola to revisit the franchise. Al Pacino and Diane Keaton both demanded massive salary hikes: Pacino initially demanded such an exorbitant amount that Coppola threatened to open the
movie with Michael's funeral. Robert Duvall refused to return over a pay dispute, while Joe Spinell died just before filming started, forcing Coppola and Puzzo to [[RememberTheNewGuy create replacement characters]]. Most notoriously, Creator/WinonaRyder dropped out of the part of Mary at the last minute, forcing Creator/SofiaCoppola to step in, never mind how she allegedly REALLY didn't want to do it. Actual filming was relatively smooth, but media coverage of its behind-the-scenes turmoil lead to a massive HypeBacklash after its eventual release.
* WhatCouldHaveBeen:
** The film was originally to be about the breakdown between Michael and Tom. However, Tom was written out when Creator/RobertDuvall, demanded to be paid the same as or marginally close to the amount that Al Pacino was getting.
** Creator/WinonaRyder was supposed to play Mary in ''Part III'' but she opted to film ''Mermaids'' instead. Rebecca Schaeffer was also up for the part of Mary before she was murdered. Music/{{Madonna}} lobbied for the role, even meeting with Coppola and De Niro, but she was deemed too old for the part. Creator/JuliaRoberts turned it down in order to star in ''Film/PrettyWoman''. Creator/BridgetFonda auditioned before being cast as Grace Hamilton.
** Joe Spinell was originally supposed to reprise his role as Willi Cicci, in which he would have taken over the Corleones' New York operation, but Spinell died before production. Cicci's role in the story was replaced by new character Joey Zasa, played by Joe Mantegna.
** Rocco Lampone was also featured in early drafts. It's unclear how the filmmakers would explain away [[spoiler:Rocco getting killed in the closing minutes of ''Part II'']].
** Coppola wanted to make a fourth movie written by Mario Puzo with a similar layout to ''Part II'', focusing on both the Corleones' rise to power under Vito and Sonny's leadership, and the present-day fall of the Corleone empire under Vincent, but many of the actors along with Paramount were disinterested and the project was abandoned after the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death of Mario Puzo]], though the unused screenplay was later made into a novel called
"The Death Of Michael Family Corleone" but and Paramount did win back the studios nixed it. It might not be a big deal but it would probably have lessened rights in 2012 to make more films, so they could do an adaption of the comparisons to the first two movies and made it clear it was an epilogue as Coppola intended. Also the title would have gotten audiences to expect Michael would be killed and made the ending where [[spoiler: his daughter Mary is killed and instead and he actually dies years later]] a complete surprise.novel if they wanted to.



** Fabrizio, Michael's Sicilian bodyguard who planted the bomb that killed Appolonia, was supposed to be found by Michael at a pizza parlor he opens in America and subsequently blown away with a shotgun at the end of the movie as per "The Godfather" novel (though Michael isn't his killer in the novel). This scene was filmed but ultimately cut because the makeup artists plastered Angelo Infanti with so much fake blood that the scene looked ridiculous. Hence, the reshot scene where he's killed via CarBomb as the ultimate poetic justice.
* WorkingTitle: Creator/FrancisFordCoppola lobbied intensely for the third film to be called ''The Death of Michael Corleone'', but in the end was overruled by the studio.
* WrittenInInfirmity: Lee Strasberg (Hyman Roth) became seriously ill after contracting a tropical disease filming ''Part II'' in the Dominican Republic. Rather than recast the role, Coppola rewrote Strasberg's scenes to make Roth's health a major plot point.

to:

** Fabrizio, Michael's Sicilian bodyguard who planted the bomb that killed Appolonia, was supposed to be found by Michael at a pizza parlor he opens in America and subsequently blown away with a shotgun at the end of the movie as per "The Godfather" novel (though Michael isn't his killer in the novel). This scene was filmed but ultimately cut because the makeup artists plastered Angelo Infanti with so much fake blood that the scene looked ridiculous. Hence, the reshot scene where he's killed via CarBomb as the ultimate poetic justice.
* WorkingTitle: Creator/FrancisFordCoppola lobbied intensely for Coppola wanted to call the third film to be called movie ''The Death of Of Michael Corleone'', Corleone'' but in the end studios nixed it. It might not be a big deal but it would probably have lessened the comparisons to the first two movies and made it clear it was overruled by the studio.
* WrittenInInfirmity: Lee Strasberg (Hyman Roth) became seriously ill after contracting a tropical disease filming ''Part II'' in the Dominican Republic. Rather than recast the role,
an epilogue as Coppola rewrote Strasberg's scenes intended. Also the title would have gotten audiences to make Roth's health expect Michael would be killed and made the ending where [[spoiler: his daughter Mary is killed and instead and he actually dies years later]] a major plot point.
complete surprise.
22nd Jul '17 10:30:59 PM danlansdowne
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** In Part II, the scene with Signor Roberto struggling with the door was set up by having the actor playing Genco secretly force the door shut with a nail. The actor playing Signor Roberto was a famous Italian comedian and Coppola wanted to see how he'd react.

to:

** In Part II, the scene with Signor Roberto struggling with the door was set up by having the actor playing Genco secretly force the door shut with a nail. The actor playing Signor Roberto was a famous Italian improv comedian and Coppola wanted to see how he'd react.
16th Jul '17 3:09:38 PM ClintEastwood
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* LeftItIn: When the old Italian man at the wedding gets on stage to join in singing Che La Luna, there's a blink and you'll miss it moment where his dentures get loose mid-song.



** Creator/JerryVanDyke, Creator/BruceDern, Creator/SteveMcQueen and Creator/PaulNewman auditioned for Tom Hagen.

to:

** Creator/JerryVanDyke, Creator/BruceDern, Creator/SteveMcQueen Creator/SteveMcQueenActor and Creator/PaulNewman auditioned for Tom Hagen.
5th Jul '17 2:42:37 PM SPBurke
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Added DiffLines:

** This was a big reason RobertDuvall didn't return for Part III. Pacino and Keaton alone demanded huge salaries to appear, and Duvall felt grifted. To paraphrase: "Al's the lead, so I accepted he was going to make more than me. But did he have to make ''twice'' as much?"
10th Jun '17 7:53:24 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* BeamMeUpScotty: A non-verbal example. Most parodies of the infamous "Horse's head in the bed" scene depict the recipient simply rolling over and seeing the offending head within their line of sight without having to get up first. In the actual film, however, Jack Woltz feels and sees blood on his sheets and finds Khartoum's head by his feet instead.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.TheGodfather