History Trivia / Seinfeld

17th Sep '17 5:43:52 PM glickmam
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** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.

to:

** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno Creator/JayLeno to replace Johnny Carson Creator/JohnnyCarson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.
17th Sep '17 5:41:32 PM glickmam
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** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman.

to:

** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman.Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.
11th Sep '17 9:08:46 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed by the publicity was ''great''!

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew from ever coming to his kitchen]].kitchen, in person no less]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed so upset by the publicity was ''great''!
10th Sep '17 4:40:50 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time]] time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed by the publicity was ''great''!
22nd Aug '17 4:58:14 AM ClintEastwood
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* MeanCharacterNiceActor: The four main characters are defined by their wretched selfishness and callous behavior. The four actors playing them, meanwhile, are seen embracing, laughing together and just being plain happy to see each other in blooper reels.

to:

* MeanCharacterNiceActor: {{McLeaned}}: Almost twenty years after its airing, the most controversial twist ever on the show (Susan's death) was revealed by [[WordOfGod Jason Alexander himself]] to be more than just a creative decision: Heidi Swedberg was reportedly very difficult to work with, not so much as a person but as an actress her instincts were not on board with the rest of the cast[[note]]Alexander said that she was originally a minor character who had a network executive look to her, so her acting was not considered as much when she was cast. When she became a bigger character, Alexander found it very difficult to get a good comedic rhythm with her, while the cast and crew thought it was a hysterical [[Creator/GeorgeBurns George and Gracie act]] (maybe an accidental EnforcedMethodActing was involved). When the rest of the cast started having more scenes with her they understood why Alexander was so flummoxed[[/note]]. While the writers knew they needed to end her engagement to George somehow, by virtue of the "No Hugging, No Learning" rule, the idea of actually ''killing'' her stemmed from a remark Julia Louis Dreyfus made during a cast lunch after a particularly excruciating bit of filming with Swedberg: "Don't you just wanna kill her?"
* RealLife/MeanCharacterNiceActor:
The four main characters are defined by their wretched selfishness and callous behavior. The four actors playing them, meanwhile, are seen embracing, laughing together and just being plain happy to see each other in blooper reels.



* {{Missing Episode}}: "The Puerto Rican Day" has a scene where Kramer (accidentally) burns a Puerto Rican flag. Many viewers were highly offended, and NBC decided to leave the episode out of syndication for several years. Although it does occasionally air on local stations today, many stations still skip it (including TBS) and those that don't often cut out the flag-burning scene. You can see it uncut on DVD, though.

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* {{Missing Episode}}: MissingEpisode: "The Puerto Rican Day" has a scene where Kramer (accidentally) burns a Puerto Rican flag. Many viewers were highly offended, and NBC decided to leave the episode out of syndication for several years. Although it does occasionally air on local stations today, many stations still skip it (including TBS) and those that don't often cut out the flag-burning scene. You can see it uncut on DVD, though.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Almost twenty years after its airing, the most controversial twist ever on the show (Susan's death) was revealed by [[WordOfGod Jason Alexander himself]] to be more than just a creative decision: Heidi Swedberg was reportedly very difficult to work with, not so much as a person but as an actress her instincts were not on board with the rest of the cast[[note]]Alexander said that she was originally a minor character who had a network executive look to her, so her acting was not considered as much when she was cast. When she became a bigger character, Alexander found it very difficult to get a good comedic rhythm with her, while the cast and crew thought it was a hysterical [[Creator/GeorgeBurns George and Gracie act]] (maybe an accidental EnforcedMethodActing was involved). When the rest of the cast started having more scenes with her they understood why Alexander was so flummoxed[[/note]]. While the writers knew they needed to end her engagement to George somehow, by virtue of the "No Hugging, No Learning" rule, the idea of actually ''killing'' her stemmed from a remark Julia Louis Dreyfus made during a cast lunch after a particularly excruciating bit of filming with Swedberg: "Don't you just wanna kill her?"



* WriteWhatYouKnow: Creator/LarryDavid based the George character off of himself, and many of the plotlines allegedly were based on real life experiences he had, and how he reacted to them.

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* WriteWhatYouKnow: WriteWhoYouKnow:
**
Creator/LarryDavid based the George character off of himself, and many of the plotlines allegedly were based on real life experiences he had, and how he reacted to them.
21st Jul '17 8:41:36 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there and would regularly be denied a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot and never had a bad experience.

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would regularly be denied a strawberry.]] usually have an unpleasant time]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot and too, but never had a bad experience.
21st Jul '17 3:51:27 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]].

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there and would regularly be denied a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot and never had a bad experience.
24th Jun '17 6:06:05 PM glickmam
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* IronyAsSheIsCast: Creator/JasonAlexander rather impressively sings badly on purpose for George's answering machine message, despite being an accomplished Broadway singer.

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* IronyAsSheIsCast: IronyAsSheIsCast:
**
Creator/JasonAlexander rather impressively sings badly on purpose for George's answering machine message, despite being an accomplished Broadway singer.singer.
** Barney Martin, who played Jerry's father, Morty Seinfeld, often commented that many Jewish viewers of the show would tell him how much his character reminded them of their own fathers, despite him actually being of Irish Catholic extraction.
8th May '17 4:21:43 PM Goatllama
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** Jerry's rapped attention to George's "The sea was angry that day, my friends" monologue in "The Marine Biologist" was the result of the real Jerry's astonishment at how Jason Alexander was flawlessly reciting a monologue he'd been instructed to memorize mere minutes before the cameras rolled.

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** Jerry's rapped rapt attention to George's "The sea was angry that day, my friends" monologue in "The Marine Biologist" was the result of the real Jerry's astonishment at how Jason Alexander was flawlessly reciting a monologue he'd been instructed to memorize mere minutes before the cameras rolled.
22nd Apr '17 9:54:24 AM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

* TheRedStapler: Sales in Pez skyrocketed the week after "The Pez Despenser" aired. The company later acknowledged this by making dispensers made to look like the four main characters.
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