History Trivia / Seinfeld

25th Oct '17 8:07:05 PM Fireblood
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* DuelingShows: ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond''

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* DuelingShows: ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond''''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond''.



** The episode which suffers the worst in this regard is "The Yada Yada", as it originally ran ''26 minutes'' in its NBC premiere. [[note]]Before commercialism increased to epic proportions with TheNineties, most half-hour shows ''were'' 26 minutes.[[/note]]

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** The episode which suffers the worst in this regard is "The Yada Yada", as it originally ran ''26 minutes'' in its NBC premiere. [[note]]Before commercialism increased to epic proportions with TheNineties, most half-hour shows ''were'' 26 minutes.[[/note]]
25th Oct '17 7:46:02 PM Fireblood
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** For the most part unnoticable [[note]]For example, there are people who still think the second season premiere was filmed in New York, and not NBC's LA studio[[/note]], but in [[http://www.imcdb.org/vehicle_310663-Chevrolet-Caprice-1993.html some parts]] it's apperent. [[note]]If you can't tell, that's a California license plate on a New York taxi.[[/note]]

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** For the most part unnoticable [[note]]For example, there are people who still think the second season premiere was filmed in New York, and not NBC's LA studio[[/note]], but in [[http://www.imcdb.org/vehicle_310663-Chevrolet-Caprice-1993.html some parts]] it's apperent. apparent.[[note]]If you can't tell, that's a California license plate on a New York taxi.[[/note]]
17th Oct '17 6:21:15 AM kquinn0830
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** Averted with Puddy's Martin Brodeur jersey in "The Face Painter". Brodeur went on to play for the New Jersey Devils for two more decades after the episode aired.

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** Averted with Puddy's Martin Brodeur jersey in "The Face Painter". Brodeur went on to play for the New Jersey Devils for two more decades after the episode aired.aired and even after he retired his jersey remains a popular choice with the team's fans.
1st Oct '17 4:32:16 AM ClintEastwood
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* TechnologyMarchesOn: Cell phones could have cleared up a ''lot'' of the show's stories. And then the finale features Elaine being chastised for making an important personal call on one as if it's not important enough to make at home, which comes off very strange now.

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* TechnologyMarchesOn: TechnologyMarchesOn:
**
Cell phones could have cleared up a ''lot'' of the show's stories. And then the finale features Elaine being chastised for making an important personal call on one as if it's not important enough to make at home, which comes off very strange now.now.
** Current viewers probably wonder why George doesn't just ebay that book he took into the bathroom with him at the bookstore.
28th Sep '17 3:08:00 PM ClintEastwood
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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Because it mines everyday life for most of its humor, the show is this trope to such an extent that watching it is like stepping back into TheNineties.

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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Because it mines everyday life UnintentionalPeriodPiece:
** "The Bubble Boy" has Jerry and Elaine getting lost when the car they are following to their destination goes through a light turning red that they have to stop at. Modern viewers can be excused
for most of its humor, having no idea why this would be a problem at all; GPS would solve this problem, as would cell phones. Jerry and crew having neither immediately marks the show is as mid-90s. (And for you younger readers -- yes, this trope used to such an extent happen. You had to hope that watching it the person you were following would notice you weren't behind them any more and pull over to wait for you.)
** The finale featured a bit where Elaine
is reprimanded by Jerry for calling someone to ask about their health on a cell phone (rather than calling on their home phone). With the ubiquity of cell phones in the new millennium--to the point where some people don't even ''have'' a home phone--it seems almost laughably outdated to suggest that calling someone on a cell phone rather than a home phone would be seen as rude.
*** In general, the widespread use of cellphone technology a few decades after many of these episodes were aired would have made the plots of a few episodes easily resolvable. For instance, the episode "The Boyfriend, Part 1" has part of its plot revolve around George attempting to scam the unemployment office by giving them Jerry's phone number and claiming that to be his new employer. Jerry goes along with it, but the scheme gets derailed when Kramer answers the phone in complete ignorance of the scam while Jerry is out. If this were done on a show set when cell phones were nearly ubiquitous, it'd be easy to question why George wouldn't have given the unemployment office Jerry's cell phone number instead. In addition, this particular plot might have just fallen apart from the start in the age of widespread use of internet search engines if a savvy unemployment office employee bothered to look up George's fake company and find that "Vandelay Industries" doesn't exist.
** "The Puerto Rican Day Parade" heavily features a guy with a laser pointer as a plot point. Laser pointers is treated as a novelty object, and a plotline hinges on a movie theater patron trolling the audience by pointing one at the screen, which was a brief fad in the 90s.
** Any episodes involving airports due to the fact that the characters are always shown as waiting right outside arrival gates. As well as the fact that it,
like stepping back into TheNineties.any other show set in New York City, is bound to feature a shot of the Twin Towers.
** When Elaine starts dating a man who shaves his head, Jerry visibly reacts to his appearance and later quips to Elaine, "Is he from the future?" Fittingly, shaved heads would become much more mainstream after a few years.



** Elaine's subplot in the finale is centered around the idea that it's rude to make important phone calls on your cell phone rather than waiting until you get home. Their use has become much more accepted since.
** In "The Contest," Elaine discovers John Kennedy Jr. goes to her gym and hopes to start dating him. He would die in a plane crash just five years later.

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** Elaine's subplot in the finale is centered around the idea that it's rude to make important phone calls on your cell phone rather than waiting until you get home. Their use has become much more accepted since.
** In
"The Contest," Elaine discovers Contest" has John F. Kennedy Jr. goes to joining her gym and hopes to start dating him. He would die in aerobics class, a plane crash just five few years later.before he crashed his plane, killing himself and his wife. It's especially uncomfortable when she dreamily says "Elaine Benes Kennedy Jr."
25th Sep '17 4:32:04 AM Doug86
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* {{Defictionalization}}: For a while during TheTurnOfTheMillennium, Eggo had toaster muffin tops. In fact, their advertising gimmick to get people to "Leggo" your Eggo muffin tops was to pretend you were having muffin ''stumps''.

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* {{Defictionalization}}: For a while during TheTurnOfTheMillennium, the TurnOfTheMillennium, Eggo had toaster muffin tops. In fact, their advertising gimmick to get people to "Leggo" your Eggo muffin tops was to pretend you were having muffin ''stumps''.
17th Sep '17 5:43:52 PM glickmam
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** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.

to:

** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno Creator/JayLeno to replace Johnny Carson Creator/JohnnyCarson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.
17th Sep '17 5:41:32 PM glickmam
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** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman.

to:

** In addition, Bob Balaban's recurring role of Russell Dalrymple, the fictitious president of NBC who works with Jerry and George on a television pilot and later becomes Elaine's love interest, was modeled on then NBC Entertainment president Warren Littlefield, who had allowed David and Seinfeld to produce the ''Seinfeld'' pilot. Amusingly, Balaban later went on to play Littlefield outright in the 1996 made-for-TV film ''The Late Shift'', a dramatization of the struggles that occurred at NBC when Littlefield selected Jay Leno to replace Johnny Carson on ''Series/TheTonightShow'', instead of Creator/DavidLetterman.Creator/DavidLetterman, as well as narrate the audiobook version of ''Top of the Rock: Inside the Rise and Fall of Must See TV'', a book Littlefield co-wrote with T.R. Pierson which documented Littlefield's career at NBC.
11th Sep '17 9:08:46 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed by the publicity was ''great''!

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew from ever coming to his kitchen]].kitchen, in person no less]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed so upset by the publicity was ''great''!
10th Sep '17 4:40:50 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.

to:

** The famous Soup Nazi was based on a real soup kitchen owner in New York. He did not take it well, and [[IResembleThatRemark banned the entire cast and crew of the show from ever coming to his kitchen]]. [[InsultBackfire Wayne Knight was actually proud of this -- he'd eaten there when he lived in New York and would usually have an unpleasant time]] time -- and be shortchanged a strawberry.]] Ironically, Jason Alexander had eaten there a lot too, but never had a bad experience.experience.
--> '''Wayne Knight:''' The fact that he was annoyed by the publicity was ''great''!
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