History Theatre / TheThreepennyOpera

12th Mar '17 11:46:35 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''Die Dreigroschenoper'' (1931): There have been many movie adaptations. This is the first one and it actually involved Brecht, Weill and Lenya directed by G. W. Pabst (of ''Film/PandorasBox'' fame). It is notable for featuring most of the cast from the original production: Ernst Busch as the Street-Singer/Narrator, Carola Neher as Polly Peachum, Fritz Rasp as Beggar King Peachum and Lotte Lenya as Jenny (who sings "Seerauben Jenny).

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* ''Die Dreigroschenoper'' (1931): There have been many movie adaptations. This is the first one and it actually involved Brecht, Weill and Lenya directed by G. W. Pabst (of ''Film/PandorasBox'' fame). It is notable for featuring most of the cast from the original production: Ernst Busch as the Street-Singer/Narrator, Carola Neher as Polly Peachum, Fritz Rasp as Beggar King Peachum and Lotte Lenya as Jenny (who sings "Seerauben Jenny). Currently available on Creator/TheCriterionCollection (alongside a French version also directed by Pabst).
12th Mar '17 1:04:28 PM JulianLapostat
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** [[invoked]]A more famous example has pretty much become AscendedCanon. In the original production, the song known as PirateJenny was to be sung by Polly and intended to be an ImagineSpot about how much she hates her family and dreams of escape. Later productions, and the 1931 Film version, gave it to Lotte Lenya's Jenny whose performance gave it the now familiar meaning of an oppressed woman's fantasy ImagineSpot of revolutionary justice.

to:

** [[invoked]]A more famous example has pretty much become AscendedCanon. In the original production, the song known as PirateJenny was to be sung by Polly and intended to be an ImagineSpot about how much she hates her family and dreams of escape. Later productions, and the 1931 Film version, gave it to Lotte Lenya's Jenny whose performance gave it Jenny. By merely changing the character and singer, and especially Lenya's performance, the song acquired its now familiar meaning of an oppressed woman's fantasy ImagineSpot of revolutionary justice. justice and retribution.


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* ImagineSpot: What "Pirate Jenny" is in the Brecht-Weill original, but it paints such a vivid image that its easy to mistake it as an actual call for revolution and upliftment.
12th Mar '17 1:02:10 PM JulianLapostat
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* TheCoverChangesTheMeaning: Bobby Darin's famous version of "Mack the Knife" is faithful in the first and second verses (which describes Mack as a rogue connected to mysterious murders, UndisclosedFunds, and suspicious sightings) but the following verses can be described either as propaganda or RomanticizedAbuse when compared to the original, since it makes Mack the Knife's victims sound like willing conquests to a rake:
--> ''Now Jenny Diver, ho, ho, yeah, Sukey Tawdry\\
Ooh, Miss Lotte Lenya and old Lucy Brown\\
Oh, the line forms on the right, babe\\
Now that Macky's back in town''
** A more accurate translation (by Frank [=McGuinness=]) renders that as:
--> ''Jenny Towler\\
Poor wee Jenny,\\
There they found her\\
Knife in breast.''

to:

* TheCoverChangesTheMeaning: TheCoverChangesTheMeaning:
**
Bobby Darin's famous version of "Mack the Knife" is faithful in the first and second verses (which describes Mack as a rogue connected to mysterious murders, UndisclosedFunds, and suspicious sightings) but the following verses can be described either as propaganda or RomanticizedAbuse when compared to the original, since it makes Mack the Knife's victims sound like willing conquests to a rake:
--> ''Now
rake.
** [[invoked]]A more famous example has pretty much become AscendedCanon. In the original production, the song known as PirateJenny was to be sung by Polly and intended to be an ImagineSpot about how much she hates her family and dreams of escape. Later productions, and the 1931 Film version, gave it to Lotte Lenya's
Jenny Diver, ho, ho, yeah, Sukey Tawdry\\
Ooh, Miss Lotte Lenya and old Lucy Brown\\
Oh,
whose performance gave it the line forms on the right, babe\\
Now that Macky's back in town''
** A more accurate translation (by Frank [=McGuinness=]) renders that as:
--> ''Jenny Towler\\
Poor wee Jenny,\\
There they found her\\
Knife in breast.''
now familiar meaning of an oppressed woman's fantasy ImagineSpot of revolutionary justice.
12th Mar '17 12:52:25 PM JulianLapostat
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* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: "The Cannon Song" evokes this. John, Jim and George are three friends who sign up for the CallToAdventure. They end up committing atrocities against people in colonial outposts and eventually end up as ShellShockedVeterans, disgraced for being deserters or in the case of George, shot for looting:

to:

* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: "The Cannon Song" evokes this. John, Jim and George are three friends who sign up for the CallToAdventure. They end up committing atrocities against people in colonial outposts and eventually end up as ShellShockedVeterans, ShellShockedVeteran, disgraced for being deserters or in the case of George, shot for looting:
12th Mar '17 12:52:01 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''There are some who are in darkness\\

to:

-> --> ''There are some who are in darkness\\


Added DiffLines:

* HistoricalDomainCharacter: In the 1931 film, UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria actually does show up in the Beggars Protest March during her coronation parade. She is shown quite unsympathetically needless to say.
12th Mar '17 12:50:38 PM JulianLapostat
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* AffablyEvil: Macheath's gang.

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* AdaptationExpansion: In Pabst's film, the Beggar's March which Peachum threatens and blackmails Brown with, actually does go ahead and interfere with Queen Victoria's parade. However, it loses any effect it might have to upset the order once Macheath and the Beggar King resolve their differences. The final shot, shows the beggars sullenly marching in the darkness, their exploitation continuing unchanged.
* AffablyEvil: Macheath's gang. gang like to see themselves as this, but it's only an illusion to their depravity.



* FullCircleRevolution: The DarkReprise added by Brecht to the 1931 film version which plays over the failed Beggar's March reflects this:
-> ''There are some who are in darkness\\
And the others are in light\\
And you see the ones in brightness\\
Those in darkness drop from sight."



* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: "The Cannon Song"

to:

* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: "The Cannon Song"Song" evokes this. John, Jim and George are three friends who sign up for the CallToAdventure. They end up committing atrocities against people in colonial outposts and eventually end up as ShellShockedVeterans, disgraced for being deserters or in the case of George, shot for looting:
--> '''Macheath''':''[[IgnoredEpiphany But young men's blood goes on being red]]''\\
'''Tiger Brown''': ''And the army goes ahead recruiting.''
12th Mar '17 12:36:24 PM JulianLapostat
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** The music and lyrics by Weill and Brecht mirrors, intentionally, common folk music and music hall style songs and ballads but attacks the entire genre by exposing it as best a coping mechanism for living with poverty, injustice, abuse and other crimes. Where such folk music often by means of euphemism, suggestion and implication commented on reigning issues of the day, Brecht and Weill's music directly highlights it and brings it to the forefront and only makes the characters sentimentalism about poverty even more absurd. This is made obvious in "What Keeps Mankind Alive" which is all about people ignoring or forgetting the ugliness in their own lives and society and putting a StepfordSmiler and accepting the facade of a CrapsaccharineWorld.

to:

** The music and lyrics by Weill and Brecht mirrors, intentionally, common folk music and music hall style songs and ballads but attacks the entire genre by exposing it as best a coping mechanism for living with poverty, injustice, abuse and other crimes. Where such folk music often by means of euphemism, suggestion and implication commented on reigning issues of the day, Brecht and Weill's music directly highlights it and brings it to the forefront and only makes the characters sentimentalism about poverty even more absurd. This is made obvious in "What Keeps Mankind Alive" which is all about people ignoring or forgetting the ugliness in their own lives and society and putting society, becoming a StepfordSmiler and accepting the facade façade of a CrapsaccharineWorld.
12th Mar '17 12:34:37 PM JulianLapostat
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** Likewise, certain common archetypes to the crime genre and the Victorian era, are directly attacked and exposed. Brecht's Mack the Knife is not a LoveableRogue but other characters project that archetype on to him and he uses that sentiment to better exploit his friends, lovers and prostitutes. Unlike John Gay's original work, where Macheath is rakish and funny, Brecht's Mackie is a violent pimp, and the play reminds the audience that Mack and Tiger Brown committed many atrocities and war crimes in India as part of the colonial service, which is somehow more legal and acceptable than his open crimes in London.

to:

** Likewise, certain common archetypes to the crime genre and the Victorian era, are directly attacked and exposed. Brecht's Mack the Knife is not a LoveableRogue but other characters project that archetype on to him and he uses that sentiment to better exploit his friends, lovers and prostitutes. Unlike John Gay's original work, where Macheath is rakish and funny, Brecht's Mackie is a violent pimp, and the play reminds the audience that Mack and Tiger Brown committed many atrocities and war crimes in India as part of the colonial service, which is somehow more legal and acceptable than his open crimes in London.
12th Mar '17 12:25:36 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Deconstruction}}: Brecht's Alienation Effect was all about creating this sensibility and cultivating it among his audience:
** The music and lyrics by Weill and Brecht mirrors, intentionally, common folk music and music hall style songs and ballads but attacks the entire genre by exposing it as best a coping mechanism for living with poverty, injustice, abuse and other crimes. Where such folk music often by means of euphemism, suggestion and implication commented on reigning issues of the day, Brecht and Weill's music directly highlights it and brings it to the forefront and only makes the characters sentimentalism about poverty even more absurd. This is made obvious in "What Keeps Mankind Alive" which is all about people ignoring or forgetting the ugliness in their own lives and society and putting a StepfordSmiler and accepting the facade of a CrapsaccharineWorld.
** Likewise, certain common archetypes to the crime genre and the Victorian era, are directly attacked and exposed. Brecht's Mack the Knife is not a LoveableRogue but other characters project that archetype on to him and he uses that sentiment to better exploit his friends, lovers and prostitutes. Unlike John Gay's original work, where Macheath is rakish and funny, Brecht's Mackie is a violent pimp, and the play reminds the audience that Mack and Tiger Brown committed many atrocities and war crimes in India as part of the colonial service, which is somehow more legal and acceptable than his open crimes in London.
12th Mar '17 11:28:59 AM JulianLapostat
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* BreakoutPopHit: Mac The Knife. Hilariously so. But thanks to Bowdlerlization

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* BreakoutPopHit: Mac The Knife. Hilariously so. But thanks to Bowdlerlization"Pirate Jenny", "What Keeps Mankind Alive", "Mack the Knife". No matter the version, Weill's music and Brecht's distinctly ironic lyrics have an ongoing afterlife in popular culture.



* SinisterTangoMusic: Macheath and Jenny have a "romantic" tango song about their past relationship when he used to pimp her, which is mildly sinister in the traditional but [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ku8RVgRejMs bowdlerised Blitzstein English translation]]. The German original and later more accurate translations go even further by referring to violent abuse and back-street abortion. The differing titles reflect this. In German it is called "Zuhalterballade" (Pimp's Ballad) and in English it is called "The Ballad of Immoral Earnings" which is apt since it is a classically Victorian euphemism.

to:

* SinisterTangoMusic: Macheath and Jenny have a "romantic" tango song about their past relationship when he used to pimp her, which is mildly sinister in the traditional but [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ku8RVgRejMs bowdlerised Blitzstein English translation]]. The German original and later more accurate translations go even further by referring to violent abuse and back-street abortion. The differing titles reflect this. In German it is called "Zuhalterballade" (Pimp's Ballad) and in English it is called "The Ballad of Immoral Earnings" which is apt for the setting, since it is a classically Victorian euphemism.
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