History Theatre / TheMiser

3rd Jan '16 10:15:58 AM ScroogeMacDuck
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* YesMan: Valere acts like this towards Harpagon.

to:

* YesMan: Valere Valère acts like this towards Harpagon.
20th Jun '15 11:53:00 AM StFan
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* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: When Jacques lists the countless meals he intends to serve at the dinner held by Harpagon, the actor is supposed to come up with his own list of exotic, expensive dishes. (If your edition of the play doesn't include the relevant footnote, then it looks as if Harpagon is freaking out over the very possibility of giving food to other people - though given how incredibly stingy he is, even that seems believable.)



* WrittenInInfirmity: Moliere, who suffered from a chronic cough, played Harpagon in the premiere; Harpagon is mentioned to be plagued by coughing as well.
4th May '15 11:57:52 AM nombretomado
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* CulturalTranslation: There is a scene where numerous worthless kitschy objects are listed, including "tapestry hangings representing the loves of Gombaud and Macée"; these were apparently characters from "an old comic pastoral" sometimes depicted on tapestries at that time. The Polish translation of the play (by Tadeusz Boy-Zelenski) replaces this with "...the courtings of [[ClassicalMythology Jupiter]]", which is much less hopelessly obscure to modern audiences.

to:

* CulturalTranslation: There is a scene where numerous worthless kitschy objects are listed, including "tapestry hangings representing the loves of Gombaud and Macée"; these were apparently characters from "an old comic pastoral" sometimes depicted on tapestries at that time. The Polish translation of the play (by Tadeusz Boy-Zelenski) replaces this with "...the courtings of [[ClassicalMythology [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Jupiter]]", which is much less hopelessly obscure to modern audiences.
12th Mar '15 7:03:42 AM Aquila89
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* ArrangedMarriage

to:

* ArrangedMarriageArrangedMarriage: Harpagon arranges his daughter to marry a much older man, because he'd take her without dowry.
13th Jan '15 5:30:11 AM Aquila89
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* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: When Jacques lists the countless meals he intends to serve at the dinner held by Harpagon, the actor is supposed to come up with his own list of exotic, expensive dishes. (If your edition of the play doesn't include the relevant footnote, then it looks as if Harpagon is freaking out over the very possibility of giving food to other people.)

to:

* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: When Jacques lists the countless meals he intends to serve at the dinner held by Harpagon, the actor is supposed to come up with his own list of exotic, expensive dishes. (If your edition of the play doesn't include the relevant footnote, then it looks as if Harpagon is freaking out over the very possibility of giving food to other people.people - though given how incredibly stingy he is, even that seems believable.)
31st Jul '13 3:53:28 AM johnnye
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Added DiffLines:


For the character archetype, see TheScrooge.
2nd Feb '13 4:32:52 PM Korodzik
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* ServileSnarker

to:

* ServileSnarkerServileSnarker: Flèche and, even more so, Master Jacques (who gets beaten for it, twice).
2nd Feb '13 4:24:38 PM Korodzik
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* CulturalTranslation: ''Theatre/TheMiser'' features a scene where numerous worthless kitschy objects are listed, including "tapestry hangings representing the loves of Gombaud and Macée"; these were apparently characters from "an old comic pastoral" sometimes depicted on tapestries at that time. The Polish translation of the play (by Tadeusz Boy-Zelenski) replaces this with "...the courtings of [[ClassicalMythology Jupiter]]", which is much less hopelessly obscure to modern audiences.

to:

* CulturalTranslation: ''Theatre/TheMiser'' features There is a scene where numerous worthless kitschy objects are listed, including "tapestry hangings representing the loves of Gombaud and Macée"; these were apparently characters from "an old comic pastoral" sometimes depicted on tapestries at that time. The Polish translation of the play (by Tadeusz Boy-Zelenski) replaces this with "...the courtings of [[ClassicalMythology Jupiter]]", which is much less hopelessly obscure to modern audiences.



* MistakenConfession: On Valere's part, as noted in OneDialogueTwoConservations, below.

to:

* MistakenConfession: On Valere's part, as noted in OneDialogueTwoConservations, OneDialogueTwoConversations, below.
2nd Feb '13 4:23:30 PM Korodzik
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* BreakingTheFourthWall: As Harpagon is freaking out over [[spoiler:the theft of his cash-box]], he notices a "crowd of people", all of whom "look at [him] and laugh".

to:

* BreakingTheFourthWall: As Harpagon is freaking out over [[spoiler:the theft of his cash-box]], he notices a "crowd of people", all of whom "look at [him] and laugh". Of course, Harpagon is on the edge of going insane with grief at this point.
* CulturalTranslation: ''Theatre/TheMiser'' features a scene where numerous worthless kitschy objects are listed, including "tapestry hangings representing the loves of Gombaud and Macée"; these were apparently characters from "an old comic pastoral" sometimes depicted on tapestries at that time. The Polish translation of the play (by Tadeusz Boy-Zelenski) replaces this with "...the courtings of [[ClassicalMythology Jupiter]]", which is much less hopelessly obscure to modern audiences.



* NervousWreck: Harpagon.

to:

* MistakenConfession: On Valere's part, as noted in OneDialogueTwoConservations, below.
* MoneyFetish: Harpagon.
* NervousWreck: Harpagon.Harpagon throughout the entire play.
2nd Sep '12 11:40:58 AM FELH2
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''The Miser'' (''L'Avare''), written in 1668, is one of the more famous plays by {{Moliere}}.

The eponymous greedy miser is Harpagon, ruling his house with an iron hand, whose children are caught up in a number of complex love problems; son Cléante wishes to marry Marianne, whom Harpagon himself intends to marry, while daughter Élise loves Valère, who works in Harpagon's house in order to be closer to his beloved. Harpagon, however, intends to [[ArrangedMarriage marry Élise off]] to old Mr. Anselme. As usually in comedies the children, with some help, try and find out a way out of the mess.

to:

''The Miser'' (''L'Avare''), written in 1668, is one of the more famous plays by {{Moliere}}.

Creator/{{Moliere}}.

The eponymous greedy miser is Harpagon, ruling his house with an iron hand, whose children are caught up in a number of complex love problems; son Cléante wishes to marry Marianne, whom Harpagon himself intends to marry, while daughter Élise loves Valère, who works in Harpagon's house in order to be closer to his beloved. Harpagon, however, intends to [[ArrangedMarriage marry Élise off]] to old Mr. Anselme. As usually in comedies the children, with some help, try and find out a way out of the mess.
mess.



* AMacGuffinFullOfMoney: Harpagon's cash-box with ten thousand crowns.

to:

* AMacGuffinFullOfMoney: Harpagon's cash-box with ten thousand crowns.



* AsideComment: {{Subverted}}--Snarky servant Flèche says a couple of such comments, only for Harpagon to actually hear them and ask who is Flèche talking to.
* BreakingTheFourthWall: As Harpagon is freaking out over [[spoiler:the theft of his cash-box]], he notices a "crowd of people", all of whom "look at [him] and laugh".

to:

* AsideComment: {{Subverted}}--Snarky servant Flèche says a couple of such comments, only for Harpagon to actually hear them and ask who is Flèche talking to.
to.
* BreakingTheFourthWall: As Harpagon is freaking out over [[spoiler:the theft of his cash-box]], he notices a "crowd of people", all of whom "look at [him] and laugh".



* InsaneTrollLogic: Frosine uses it in act II, scene VI in hopes of convincing Harpagon that marrying Marianne will give him "a clear twelve thousand francs a year", by listing all the expensive things that Marianne does ''not'' indulge in.

to:

* InsaneTrollLogic: Frosine uses it in act II, scene VI in hopes of convincing Harpagon that marrying Marianne will give him "a clear twelve thousand francs a year", by listing all the expensive things that Marianne does ''not'' indulge in.



* TheMatchmaker: Frosine.
* NervousWreck: Harpagon.
* OneDialogueTwoConversations: Harpagon and Valere's conversation about Valere's roguish thievery--Harpagon is convinced that Valere has stolen his cash-box and demands him to return that, while Valere is certain that Harpagon is talking of Valere's love for Elise (which Harpagon doesn't actually know of).
* TheScrooge: Harpagon, who else.

to:

* TheMatchmaker: Frosine.
Frosine.
* NervousWreck: Harpagon.
Harpagon.
* OneDialogueTwoConversations: Harpagon and Valere's conversation about Valere's roguish thievery--Harpagon is convinced that Valere has stolen his cash-box and demands him to return that, while Valere is certain that Harpagon is talking of Valere's love for Elise (which Harpagon doesn't actually know of).
of).
* TheScrooge: Harpagon, who else.



* StealthInsult: Harpagon wants Elise to marry Mr. Anselme, because he'd take her without dowry. When Valère hears this, he comments: "When a man offers to marry a girl without a dowry, we ought to look no farther. Everything is comprised in that, and "without dowry" compensates for want of beauty, youth, birth, honour, wisdom, and probity." Harpagon takes it completely seriously.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: Harpagon goes to great lengths to tell his son how he totally doesn't have a money-filled cash-box hidden.
* WrittenInInfirmity: Moliere, who suffered from a chronic cough, played Harpagon in the premiere; Harpagon is mentioned to be plagued by coughing as well.
* YesMan: Valere acts like this towards Harpagon.

to:

* StealthInsult: Harpagon wants Elise to marry Mr. Anselme, because he'd take her without dowry. When Valère hears this, he comments: "When a man offers to marry a girl without a dowry, we ought to look no farther. Everything is comprised in that, and "without dowry" compensates for want of beauty, youth, birth, honour, wisdom, and probity." Harpagon takes it completely seriously.
seriously.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: Harpagon goes to great lengths to tell his son how he totally doesn't have a money-filled cash-box hidden.
hidden.
* WrittenInInfirmity: Moliere, who suffered from a chronic cough, played Harpagon in the premiere; Harpagon is mentioned to be plagued by coughing as well.
well.
* YesMan: Valere acts like this towards Harpagon.
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