History Theatre / SundayInTheParkWithGeorge

25th Mar '17 6:19:29 PM HamburgerTime
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicenseHistory: A deliberate example. Dot never existed; Georges Seurat's real life mistress was named Madeleine Knoblock, and while they had two children both died young, hence no grandchildren or great-grandchildren could have existed either. [[GossipyHens The Celestes]] do mention a rumor that Georges has another woman, leaving the door open for Madeleine to exist in this world as well, but it's unknown if it's her or Dot who's the "other."


Added DiffLines:

* DCupDistress: Dot briefly wishes, among other things, that her bust was smaller so she could be in the Follies, but quickly dismisses the idea as silly.


Added DiffLines:

* DisposableFiance: Louis the baker, Dot's husband, is essentially a Bland Perfection type that actually gets the girl - Dot laments that the only thing wrong with him is that ''nothing's'' wrong with him.
25th Sep '15 10:45:24 PM tvinsomne
Is there an issue? Send a Message


http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Sunday_patinkin_peters_a.JPG

to:

http://static.[[quoteright:400:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Sunday_patinkin_peters_a.JPG
JPG]]
14th Nov '14 2:07:58 PM Chalkos
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicenseGeography: The first act is set on the isle of La Grande Jatte, in Paris. On at least two occasions, characters comment upon the construction of the Eiffel Tower, which they claim is visible on the far bank. In reality, the tower is more than a mile away, and viewing it (especially at an early stage of construction) would require being able to see across a large oxbow of the Seine and a substantial section of city.
9th Jul '14 3:45:38 PM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message
19th May '14 2:54:53 PM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* DotingGrandparent: Marie to George. She embarrasses him from time to time, but is also deeply fond of him and proud as can be of his art.
19th May '14 2:48:39 PM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The second act focuses on Georges's fictional descendant, George, who is also an artist. George's particular genre, however, "Chromolumes," are not only expensive, but [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible utterly meaningless to everyone except George.]] Even the audience. How is he supposed to find inspiration, and, perhaps just as importantly, funding, in a world that really doesn't care about originality?

to:

The second act focuses on Georges's fictional descendant, George, who is also an artist. George's particular genre, medium, however, is not painting but "Chromolumes," are not only expensive, but a very avant-garde and cutting-edge idea of George's own invention. Sadly, they're [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible utterly meaningless to everyone except George.]] Even the audience.And they're also expensive as hell to put together. How is he supposed to find inspiration, and, perhaps just as importantly, funding, in a world that really doesn't care about originality?
19th May '14 2:47:28 PM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It centers, in the first act, on a fictionalized version of Georges Seurat and his mistress, Dot. Dot loves Georges for his passion and his art, but can't understand him, nor does he pay as much attention to her as she needs. They are caught up by the stream of petty rivalries, jealousies, spats, and smug feelings that dominate the interactions of Parisians on their Sunday visits to La Grande Jatte. As criticism of his work mounts, Georges grows less and less attentive of the world around him, even as the facade of civility and happiness collapses completely. Much to everyone's surprise, Georges manages to create a painting that is not only a masterful display of color and light, but an image of a perfect, peaceful Sunday that has never, really, existed, but outlives all the squabbles and smugness of its actual subjects.

to:

It centers, in the first act, on a fictionalized version of Georges Seurat and his mistress, Dot. Dot loves Georges for his passion and his art, but can't understand him, nor does he pay as much attention to her as she needs. They are caught up by the stream of petty rivalries, jealousies, spats, and smug feelings artistic pretentions that dominate the interactions of Parisians on their Sunday visits to La Grande Jatte. As criticism of his work mounts, Georges grows less and less attentive of the world around him, even as Dot leaves him and the facade of civility and happiness collapses completely. Much to everyone's surprise, Georges manages to create a painting that is not only a masterful display of color and light, but an image of a perfect, peaceful Sunday that has never, really, existed, but outlives all the squabbles and smugness of its actual subjects.
5th Mar '14 5:55:09 PM saltyoldbones
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AsideGlance: Dot gives one to the audience when the man standing next to her in the painting tells her she has "excellent concentration."
26th Jul '13 12:02:56 AM vifetoile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It centers, in the first act, on a fictionalized version of Georges Seurat and his mistress, Dot. Dot loves Georges for his passion and his art, but can't understand him, nor does he pay as much attention to her as she needs. They are caught up by the stream of petty rivalries, jealousies, spats, and smug feelings that dominate the interactions of Parisians on their Sunday visits to La Grande Jatte. As criticism of his work mounts, Georges grows less and less attentive of the world around him, even as his own mother laments that they're destroying the beautiful skyline with their ugly tower. Much to everyone's surprise, Georges manages to create a painting that is not only a masterful display of color and light, but an image of a perfect, peaceful Sunday that has never, really, existed, but outlives all the squabbles and smugness of its actual subjects.

to:

It centers, in the first act, on a fictionalized version of Georges Seurat and his mistress, Dot. Dot loves Georges for his passion and his art, but can't understand him, nor does he pay as much attention to her as she needs. They are caught up by the stream of petty rivalries, jealousies, spats, and smug feelings that dominate the interactions of Parisians on their Sunday visits to La Grande Jatte. As criticism of his work mounts, Georges grows less and less attentive of the world around him, even as his own mother laments that they're destroying the beautiful skyline with their ugly tower.facade of civility and happiness collapses completely. Much to everyone's surprise, Georges manages to create a painting that is not only a masterful display of color and light, but an image of a perfect, peaceful Sunday that has never, really, existed, but outlives all the squabbles and smugness of its actual subjects.
25th Jul '13 6:41:06 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The original production, with Creator/MandyPatinkin as Georges and Creator/BernadettePeters as Dot, was televised in 1986. A revival occured in 2008.

to:

The original production, with Creator/MandyPatinkin as Georges and Creator/BernadettePeters as Dot, was televised captured on television in 1986. A revival occured in 2008.
This list shows the last 10 events of 15. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.SundayInTheParkWithGeorge