History Theatre / Ruddigore

20th Sep '16 2:06:53 AM Luprand
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** Played straight in the work's very title, which was changed from the original ''Ruddygore'' because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''Theatre/TheMikado''.According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]

to:

** Played straight in the work's very title, which was changed from the original ''Ruddygore'' because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''Theatre/TheMikado''.Theatre/TheMikado''. According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
14th May '16 4:21:22 PM nombretomado
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* KnightFever: Sir, which is a baronet's title as well as a knight's. Applies to every male member of the Murgatroyd family, and to Sir Richard Dauntless.
11th Apr '16 3:55:38 AM vivacissima
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* OldMaid: Averted with extreme prejudice by Dame Hanna. She's an old "tiger-cat" who leaps into hand-to-hand combat with her "ravisher" and terrorises him (''à la'' "[[WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys dainty Dora Stanpipe]]").

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* OldMaid: Averted with extreme prejudice by Dame Hanna.Hannah. She's an old "tiger-cat" who leaps into hand-to-hand combat with her "ravisher" and terrorises him (''à la'' "[[WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys dainty Dora Stanpipe]]").
9th Mar '16 10:25:39 AM piraml
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Added DiffLines:

* YouMakeMeSic: "Nay! It is the accusative after the verb."
9th Jan '16 11:30:29 PM Gideoncrawle
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* [[{{Bowdlerise}} Bowdlerization]]: Amazingly enough, played straight in ''Ruddigore'', which had its very title changed due to the apparent offensiveness of the original title, ''Ruddygore'' (since "ruddy" means "bloody," which was apparently the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''.) Gilbert found this just as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''The Mikado.[[note]] According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
** Also, all the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] and marries them instead. (Though they seemed to be able to get away with ''one'' resurrection.)
*** Possibly because Sir Roderick had died recently enough that it seemed reasonable that he should still be alive, if he had not been killed, whereas the idea of, say, Zorah, paired off with a [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld 300-year-old]] Sir Rupert was just too [[{{Squick}} squicky]]. Yeah, the Victorians were [[ValuesDissonance odd]].
* BurnTheWitch: How Sir Rupert Murgatroyd got his line into the mess he did.

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* [[{{Bowdlerise}} Bowdlerization]]: Amazingly enough, played {{Bowdlerization}}:
** Played
straight in ''Ruddigore'', the work's very title, which had its very title was changed due to the apparent offensiveness of from the original title, ''Ruddygore'' (since "ruddy" means because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was apparently the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''.) ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this just as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''The Mikado.[[note]] ''Theatre/TheMikado''.According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
** Also, all All the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] and marries them instead. (Though they seemed to be able to get away with ''one'' resurrection.)
*** Possibly because Sir Roderick
instead.
** When the curse is broken, the opening night libretto
had died recently enough that it seemed reasonable Roderic suggesting that he should still be alive, if he had not been killed, whereas and all the idea of, say, Zorah, paired off with ancestors could be brought back to life by a [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld 300-year-old]] Sir Rupert simple "appeal to the Supreme Court". Enough people took "Supreme Court" to mean "Supreme Being" and raised objections that the line was just too [[{{Squick}} squicky]]. Yeah, cut, so Roderic ends up "practically alive" apparently as an automatic effect of breaking the Victorians were [[ValuesDissonance odd]].
curse.
* BurnTheWitch: How Sir Rupert Murgatroyd got his line into ruthlessly persecuted witches, including burning them at the mess he did.stake. The {{curse}} which drives the plot is a DyingCurse by one such witch.



* CompletelyMissingThePoint: Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about his mates' kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... decided not to, just now. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.
** Rose Maybud follows etiquette to an excruciating degree, but doesn't seem to understand that the point of etiquette is to keep everyone comfortable. For further details refer to her song, "If somebody there chanced to be."
*** Note that Rose's dependence on her book of etiquette is itself a parody of the [[ForgottenTrope melodramatic trope]] of a character left a [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] by a dead parent and regarding it as a moral guide to be obeyed to the letter. This ''may'' be Gilbert's extremely subtle TakeThat at the Nonconformists in Britain who were noted both for their Biblical literalism and for their opposition to the theatre.

to:

* CompletelyMissingThePoint: CompletelyMissingThePoint:
**
Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about his mates' kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... decided not to, just now. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.
** Rose Maybud follows etiquette to an excruciating degree, but doesn't seem to understand that the point of etiquette is to keep everyone comfortable. For further details refer to her song, "If somebody there chanced to be."
*** Note that Rose's
" [[note]]Rose's dependence on her book of etiquette is itself a parody of the [[ForgottenTrope melodramatic trope]] of a character left a [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] by a dead parent and regarding it as a moral guide to be obeyed to the letter. This ''may'' be Gilbert's extremely subtle TakeThat at the Nonconformists in Britain who were noted both for their Biblical literalism and for their opposition to the theatre.[[/note]]



* DyingCurse: The {{curse}} on the Murgatroyd line was pronounced by a witch whilst being burned at the stake.



* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: Sir Despard Murgatroyd.

to:

* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast:
**
Sir Despard Murgatroyd.Murgatroyd, the DesignatedVillain of Act I.



* PatterSong: "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation."
** The patter is lampshaded in the final verse. (''See'' SelfDeprecation, ''below''.)

to:

* PatterSong: "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation."
**
situation". The nature of patter songs is lampshaded in the final verse. (''See'' SelfDeprecation, ''below''.)verse:
--> This particularly rapid unintelligible patter
-->Isn't generally heard, and if it is it doesn't matter!



* SelfDeprecation: In "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation":'

to:

* SelfDeprecation: SelfDeprecation:
**
In "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation":'



* VillainSong: Subverted in "Oh, why am I moody and sad" -- Despard is ''complaining'' about being the DesignatedVillain because of his {{curse}}. Also "When the night wind howls" and "Henceforth all the crimes" (er, sort of).

to:

* VillainSong: VillainSong:
**
Subverted in "Oh, why am I moody and sad" -- Despard is ''complaining'' about being the DesignatedVillain because of his {{curse}}. Also "When the night wind howls" and "Henceforth all the crimes" (er, sort of).
9th Jan '16 10:49:27 PM Gideoncrawle
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[[folder:Reception]]
Critical reception of the piece was decidedly cooler than that of the preceding operas. Hisses were heard at the initial performance on January 21, 1887; some critics commented unfavourably on the staleness of Gilbert's criticism of melodramatic conventions and "dancing Quakers"[[note]]a reference to Sir Despard and Mad Margaret's dance in the second act -- which was, however, praised for its drollery by other critics, though even those were inclined to give the credit to the performers, Rutland Barrington and Jessie Bond[[/note]], some thought Sullivan's music far too heavy and serious for the ghostly capers of "the dead of the night's high noon" (a view privately shared by Gilbert himself) -- even the costumes, on which Gilbert and impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte had taken great pains, were criticized for inaccuracy. [[note]]For instance, Sir Despard's hat would "surely have been made of beaver or otter, rather than glossy silk."(!)[[/note]]

Further, controversies which seem ridiculous to moderns, and were dubious even in VictorianLondon, attached themselves to the piece. The original title was ''Rudd'''y'''gore''; an extraordinary qualm was raised because "ruddy" was used as a euphemism for "bloody" -- and "'bloody' was a dirty word!" (This led Gilbert to quip later, "we were within an ace of changing it from ''Ruddygore'' to ''Kensington Gore, or Robin and Richard were two Pretty Men''." (Another possible subtitle was ''Not-Half-So-Good-As-The-Mikado'') Another quip Gilbert made regarding this claim was that "Then I suppose if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't - and I don't!"). Still more bizarre was the controversy stirred up by the London correspondent of ''Le Figaro'', a Frenchman with the unconvincing name of T. Johnson, who accused the duo of insulting the Republic with Richard Dauntless's song of the "Poor Parley-voo" -- a song which tells of [[CompletelyMissingThePoint the flight of a British sloop from the formidable guns of a French man-o'-war!]] The pair responded with a flowery letter to ''Le Figaro'', disclaiming any intention of deriding ''[[GratuitousFrench la Marine d'une nation aussi brave que chevaleresque]]''[[labelnote:English]]"The navy of so brave and chivalrous a nation"[[/labelnote]] and pointing out that French farces regularly used such terms as "'' 'Rosbif' et 'Goddam' ''" to refer to British soldiers. Another strange qualm affected the conduct of the piece itself, when Victorian audiences showed themselves squeamish over the PairTheSpares ending which involved the "professional bridesmaids" partnering with the long-dead-but-newly-revivified ghosts of ''all'' of Robin's ancestors -- so the ending was altered to resurrect only Sir Roderick and to bring back the "Bucks and Blades" of Act I to make up the numbers.

The opera was not revived by the Savoyards until 1920, when it was played in a shortened and altered version, with an entirely new overture by Geoffrey Toye. More recent productions have more or less restored Creator/GilbertAndSullivan's original (sometimes reversing even alterations made by the duo themselves).
[[/folder]]
6th Nov '15 11:48:13 AM JustTroper
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* BarefootLoon[=/=]DoesNotLikeShoes: Mad Margaret is often played this way.



* DoesNotLikeShoes: Mad Margaret is often played this way.
11th Oct '15 4:48:20 PM nombretomado
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An AnimatedAdaptation of the opera by British animation company Halas and Batchelor appeared in 1966. There have been three Live Action Television adaptations, in 1972, 1982, and 2005; the 1982 version featured VincentPrice as Sir Despard. ''Ruddigore'' is also the focus of the PhryneFisher novel ''Ruddy Gore''.

to:

An AnimatedAdaptation of the opera by British animation company Halas and Batchelor appeared in 1966. There have been three Live Action Television adaptations, in 1972, 1982, and 2005; the 1982 version featured VincentPrice as Sir Despard. ''Ruddigore'' is also the focus of the PhryneFisher Literature/PhryneFisher novel ''Ruddy Gore''.
31st Aug '15 10:20:00 PM foxley
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Added DiffLines:

* BigBookOfWar: Rose Maybud was raised from birth by a "little book of etiquette," the contents of which are never known except that Rose herself is an expert in all matters of propriety as a result.
29th Jun '15 8:40:22 AM Jeduthun
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** And this dialogue:
-->'''[[TheOphelia Mad Margaret]]:''' But see, they come Sir Despard and his evil crew! Hide, hide they are all mad quite mad!
-->'''Rose:''' What makes you think that?
-->'''Margaret:''' Hush! [[LampshadeHanging They sing choruses in public.]] That's mad enough, I think.



* TakeThatUs:
-->'''[[TheOphelia Mad Margaret]]:''' But see, they come Sir Despard and his evil crew! Hide, hide they are all mad quite mad!
-->'''Rose:''' What makes you think that?
-->'''Margaret:''' Hush! [[LampshadeHanging They sing choruses in public.]] That's mad enough, I think.
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