History Theatre / Ruddigore

7th Dec '16 2:35:19 AM Morgenthaler
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* ShoutOut ShoutOut/ToShakespeare: Robin quotes "Alas, poor ghost!" Also, his faithful servant Adam is named after a similar character in ''AsYouLikeIt''.

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* ShoutOut ShoutOut/ToShakespeare: Robin quotes "Alas, poor ghost!" Also, his faithful servant Adam is named after a similar character in ''AsYouLikeIt''.''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt''.
4th Dec '16 2:08:16 AM Xtifr
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'''''Ruddigore, [[EitherOrTitle or]] The Witch's Curse''''', described by its author as "An Entirely Original Supernatural Opera in Two Acts," was the 10th of the "Savoy operas" produced by Creator/GilbertAndSullivan. ''Ruddigore'' is a parody of the so-called "Transpontine[[labelnote:Latin]]''trans pontem,'' "across the bridge"[[/labelnote]] melodramas" of the early 19th century[[note]]such as ''East Lynne, or The Earl's Daughter''; ''Maria Marten, or The Murder in the The Red Barn''; ''The Face At The Window''; ''Sweeny Todd, or The Demon Barber of Fleet Street''; and ''Crimes At The Dark House''[[/note]], which were performed at theatres south of the Thames -- including their [[PurpleProse high-flown]] and [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe archaic]] language, the extravagances of their plots, and their recurring StockCharacters: [[TheIngenue the innocent orphaned Village Maiden]], the poor-but-honest Yeoman Hero, the [[DastardlyWhiplash sneering, snarling]] [[AristocratsAreEvil Bad Baronet]], the Honest Sailor, the [[OldRetainer Good Old Servant]], the Fallen Woman Driven Mad By A Dark Secret, and, of course, the [[OurGhostsAreDifferent Ghost]] -- in this case, a whole [[SpookyPainting Gallery]] of Ghosts.

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'''''Ruddigore, ''Ruddigore, [[EitherOrTitle or]] The Witch's Curse''''', Curse'', described by its author as "An Entirely Original Supernatural Opera in Two Acts," was the 10th of the "Savoy operas" produced by Creator/GilbertAndSullivan. ''Ruddigore'' is a parody of the so-called "Transpontine[[labelnote:Latin]]''trans pontem,'' "across the bridge"[[/labelnote]] melodramas" of the early 19th century[[note]]such as ''East Lynne, or The Earl's Daughter''; ''Maria Marten, or The Murder in the The Red Barn''; ''The Face At The Window''; ''Sweeny Todd, or The Demon Barber of Fleet Street''; and ''Crimes At The Dark House''[[/note]], which were performed at theatres south of the Thames -- including their [[PurpleProse high-flown]] and [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe archaic]] language, the extravagances of their plots, and their recurring StockCharacters: [[TheIngenue the innocent orphaned Village Maiden]], the poor-but-honest Yeoman Hero, the [[DastardlyWhiplash sneering, snarling]] [[AristocratsAreEvil Bad Baronet]], the Honest Sailor, the [[OldRetainer Good Old Servant]], the Fallen Woman Driven Mad By A Dark Secret, and, of course, the [[OurGhostsAreDifferent Ghost]] -- in this case, a whole [[SpookyPainting Gallery]] of Ghosts.
6th Nov '16 7:13:18 PM KandC
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** All the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] and marries them instead.

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** All the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] returned and marries married them instead.instead. [[SocietyMarchesOn Most modern productions opt to bring in the ghosts.]]
6th Nov '16 7:07:22 PM KandC
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* CutSong: There are two versions of Robin's second-act patter song (not the trio); neither commonly used. A few D'Oyly Carte revivals in the 20th century also used to cut Rose's part in "Happily coupled are we."
1st Oct '16 3:18:48 PM KandC
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* SurvivalMantra: Played for laughs; saying the word "Basingstoke"[[note]]a small town in northeast Hampshire, at the time noted mainly for a series of riots against the Salvation Army by employees of the local breweries[[/note]] always succeeds at bringing Mad Margaret to her senses.

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* SurvivalMantra: Played for laughs; saying the word "Basingstoke"[[note]]a small town in northeast Hampshire, at the time noted mainly for a series location of riots against the Salvation Army by employees of the local breweries[[/note]] an insane asylum[[/note]] always succeeds at bringing Mad Margaret to her senses.
20th Sep '16 2:06:53 AM Luprand
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** Played straight in the work's very title, which was changed from the original ''Ruddygore'' because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''Theatre/TheMikado''.According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]

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** Played straight in the work's very title, which was changed from the original ''Ruddygore'' because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''Theatre/TheMikado''.Theatre/TheMikado''. According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
14th May '16 4:21:22 PM nombretomado
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* KnightFever: Sir, which is a baronet's title as well as a knight's. Applies to every male member of the Murgatroyd family, and to Sir Richard Dauntless.
11th Apr '16 3:55:38 AM vivacissima
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* OldMaid: Averted with extreme prejudice by Dame Hanna. She's an old "tiger-cat" who leaps into hand-to-hand combat with her "ravisher" and terrorises him (''à la'' "[[WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys dainty Dora Stanpipe]]").

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* OldMaid: Averted with extreme prejudice by Dame Hanna.Hannah. She's an old "tiger-cat" who leaps into hand-to-hand combat with her "ravisher" and terrorises him (''à la'' "[[WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys dainty Dora Stanpipe]]").
9th Mar '16 10:25:39 AM piraml
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Added DiffLines:

* YouMakeMeSic: "Nay! It is the accusative after the verb."
9th Jan '16 11:30:29 PM Gideoncrawle
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* [[{{Bowdlerise}} Bowdlerization]]: Amazingly enough, played straight in ''Ruddigore'', which had its very title changed due to the apparent offensiveness of the original title, ''Ruddygore'' (since "ruddy" means "bloody," which was apparently the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''.) Gilbert found this just as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''The Mikado.[[note]] According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
** Also, all the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] and marries them instead. (Though they seemed to be able to get away with ''one'' resurrection.)
*** Possibly because Sir Roderick had died recently enough that it seemed reasonable that he should still be alive, if he had not been killed, whereas the idea of, say, Zorah, paired off with a [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld 300-year-old]] Sir Rupert was just too [[{{Squick}} squicky]]. Yeah, the Victorians were [[ValuesDissonance odd]].
* BurnTheWitch: How Sir Rupert Murgatroyd got his line into the mess he did.

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* [[{{Bowdlerise}} Bowdlerization]]: Amazingly enough, played {{Bowdlerization}}:
** Played
straight in ''Ruddigore'', the work's very title, which had its very title was changed due to the apparent offensiveness of from the original title, ''Ruddygore'' (since "ruddy" means because it was deemed too offensive. [[note]]"Ruddy" is a softened form of "bloody," which was apparently the F-Bomb (B-Bomb?) of the 19th and early 20th century in Britain -- as in [[Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw Shaw's]] ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''.) ''Theatre/{{Pygmalion}}''. Gilbert found this just as absurd as anyone, and suggested re-titling it ''Kensington Gore, or, Not So Good As ''The Mikado.[[note]] ''Theatre/TheMikado''.According to ''Martyn Green's Treasury of Gilbert and Sullivan'' this led to an exchange between the (gruff but witty) Gilbert and a stranger at a party: "How's ''Bloodygore'' going?" "Ruddigore!" "Oh, well, it's the same thing, you know." "Is it? Then I suppose that if I say I admire your ruddy complexion, it's the same as saying I like your bloody cheek! Well, it isn't -- and I don't!"[[/note]]
** Also, all All the ghosts coming back to life to marry the professional bridesmaids was deemed too shocking, so Sir Despard's former retinue returns [[AssPull for no apparent reason]] and marries them instead. (Though they seemed to be able to get away with ''one'' resurrection.)
*** Possibly because Sir Roderick
instead.
** When the curse is broken, the opening night libretto
had died recently enough that it seemed reasonable Roderic suggesting that he should still be alive, if he had not been killed, whereas and all the idea of, say, Zorah, paired off with ancestors could be brought back to life by a [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld 300-year-old]] Sir Rupert simple "appeal to the Supreme Court". Enough people took "Supreme Court" to mean "Supreme Being" and raised objections that the line was just too [[{{Squick}} squicky]]. Yeah, cut, so Roderic ends up "practically alive" apparently as an automatic effect of breaking the Victorians were [[ValuesDissonance odd]].
curse.
* BurnTheWitch: How Sir Rupert Murgatroyd got his line into ruthlessly persecuted witches, including burning them at the mess he did.stake. The {{curse}} which drives the plot is a DyingCurse by one such witch.



* CompletelyMissingThePoint: Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about his mates' kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... decided not to, just now. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.
** Rose Maybud follows etiquette to an excruciating degree, but doesn't seem to understand that the point of etiquette is to keep everyone comfortable. For further details refer to her song, "If somebody there chanced to be."
*** Note that Rose's dependence on her book of etiquette is itself a parody of the [[ForgottenTrope melodramatic trope]] of a character left a [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] by a dead parent and regarding it as a moral guide to be obeyed to the letter. This ''may'' be Gilbert's extremely subtle TakeThat at the Nonconformists in Britain who were noted both for their Biblical literalism and for their opposition to the theatre.

to:

* CompletelyMissingThePoint: CompletelyMissingThePoint:
**
Richard Dauntless's "I shipped d'ye see" sent French newspapers into such an uproar over the perceived attack on the French that Sullivan was never able to get his works performed in Paris from then on. The song is actually about a British sailor talking about his mates' kindness when their sloop ''turned tail and fled'' from a formidable French frigate, which ''of course'' they could have taken on... but... um... decided not to, just now. Because fighting them would be mean. Yeah, that's it.
** Rose Maybud follows etiquette to an excruciating degree, but doesn't seem to understand that the point of etiquette is to keep everyone comfortable. For further details refer to her song, "If somebody there chanced to be."
*** Note that Rose's
" [[note]]Rose's dependence on her book of etiquette is itself a parody of the [[ForgottenTrope melodramatic trope]] of a character left a [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] by a dead parent and regarding it as a moral guide to be obeyed to the letter. This ''may'' be Gilbert's extremely subtle TakeThat at the Nonconformists in Britain who were noted both for their Biblical literalism and for their opposition to the theatre.[[/note]]



* DyingCurse: The {{curse}} on the Murgatroyd line was pronounced by a witch whilst being burned at the stake.



* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: Sir Despard Murgatroyd.

to:

* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast:
**
Sir Despard Murgatroyd.Murgatroyd, the DesignatedVillain of Act I.



* PatterSong: "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation."
** The patter is lampshaded in the final verse. (''See'' SelfDeprecation, ''below''.)

to:

* PatterSong: "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation."
**
situation". The nature of patter songs is lampshaded in the final verse. (''See'' SelfDeprecation, ''below''.)verse:
--> This particularly rapid unintelligible patter
-->Isn't generally heard, and if it is it doesn't matter!



* SelfDeprecation: In "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation":'

to:

* SelfDeprecation: SelfDeprecation:
**
In "My eyes are fully open to my awful situation":'



* VillainSong: Subverted in "Oh, why am I moody and sad" -- Despard is ''complaining'' about being the DesignatedVillain because of his {{curse}}. Also "When the night wind howls" and "Henceforth all the crimes" (er, sort of).

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* VillainSong: VillainSong:
**
Subverted in "Oh, why am I moody and sad" -- Despard is ''complaining'' about being the DesignatedVillain because of his {{curse}}. Also "When the night wind howls" and "Henceforth all the crimes" (er, sort of).
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