History Theatre / RichardIII

7th Jun '16 1:22:03 AM Medinoc
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* MistreatmentInducedBetrayal: Buckingham helps Richard to the throne; in return, Richard promises him an extra title of nobility. When Richard refuses to grant it to him, he soliloquizes, "Made I him king for this?" and runs off to join the nascent rebellion.

to:

* MistreatmentInducedBetrayal: Buckingham helps Richard to the throne; in return, Richard promises him an extra title of nobility. When Richard refuses to grant it to him, he soliloquizes, "Made I him king for this?" and runs off to join the nascent rebellion.rebellion (or try to, at least).
24th Jan '16 9:19:28 AM DemonDuckofDoom
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* ProtagonistTitle
10th Jan '16 10:18:43 AM morenohijazo
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* SuicideDare: [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] and [[AvertedTrope Averted]].
-->'''Lady Anne:''' Arise, dissembler; thought I wish thy death, I will not be the executioner
-->'''Gloucester:''' Then bid me kill myself, and I will do it.
-->'''Lady Anne:''' I have already
-->'''Gloucester:''' Tush, that was in thy rage; speak it again, and, even with the word, that hand, which, for thy love, did kill thy love, shall, for thy love, kill a far truer love; to both their deaths thou shalt be accessary.
10th Dec '15 8:53:13 AM wittylibrarian
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-->'''Anne''':No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity//

to:

-->'''Anne''':No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity//pity\\
10th Dec '15 8:52:36 AM wittylibrarian
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* HumansAreBastards: How Richard is able to manipulate his way to power, by playing off the ambitions and desires of everyone else.
** Also mocked in one of the play's famous passages:
-->'''Anne''':No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity//
'''Richard''':But I know none, and therefore am no beast.
18th Nov '15 9:33:53 PM PaulA
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* GodSaveUsFromTheQueen: Richard pushes this view, blaming the Queen and her newly-titled relatives for George Clarence's imprisonment:
-->Why this it is when men are ruled by women;
-->'Tis not the King that sends you to the Tower.
-->My Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she...
-->We are not safe, Clarence, we are not safe.
(In the play, it is Richard himself who is really responsible.)

to:

* GodSaveUsFromTheQueen: Richard pushes this view, blaming the Queen and her newly-titled relatives for George Clarence's imprisonment:
imprisonment (which Richard was actually responsible for himself):
-->Why this it is when men are ruled by women;
-->'Tis
women;\\
'Tis
not the King that sends you to the Tower.
-->My
Tower.\\
My
Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she...
-->We
she...\\
We
are not safe, Clarence, we are not safe.
(In the play, it is Richard himself who is really responsible.)
safe.



* HeelFaceTurn: Meta-example with the entire Yorkist faction other than Richard. In the preceding ''HenryVI'' play cycle they were the villains, but (in a process beginning in the final scene of ''Henry VI, Part 3'') in this one they're all quite nice. Particularly pronounced with George, Duke of Clarence, who in the earlier plays was a fairly historically-accurate opportunistic bastard but here becomes utterly harmless and a bit of a fool.
** In the case of Clarence there's also an in-universe case of this trope (as well as FaceHeelTurn) because he was originally fighting for the House of Lancaster until the very end, when he switched sides to York.

to:

* HeelFaceTurn: HeelFaceTurn:
** Clarence was originally fighting for the House of Lancaster until the very end, when he switched sides to York.
**
Meta-example with the entire Yorkist faction other than Richard. In the preceding ''HenryVI'' ''Theatre/HenryVI'' play cycle they were the villains, but (in a process beginning in the final scene of ''Henry VI, Part 3'') in this one they're all quite nice. Particularly pronounced with George, Duke of Clarence, who in the earlier plays was a fairly historically-accurate opportunistic bastard but here becomes utterly harmless and a bit of a fool.
** In the case of Clarence there's also an in-universe case of this trope (as well as FaceHeelTurn) because he was originally fighting for the House of Lancaster until the very end, when he switched sides to York.
fool.



* UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet: This play purports to be a chronicle of the overthrow of the Plantagenets; Richard III's death marked the end of their 331-year reign.



** Then again due to the values of the time, as a woman both orphan and widowed, Anne is helpless and requires a husband to survive



** Or so everyone thought until the [[http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii/science/spine.html discovery of Richard's remains in 2012]]
*** Except even then he wasn't a hunchback--his scoliosis probably only made his shoulders a bit uneven rather than a proper hunchback--making this yet another case of exaggerating for dramatic effect.



* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: The Little Princes. Also, in memory, Henry VI (who was portrayed in the previous plays as pious and good, but far too weak). In one scene, Anne reproves Richard for having murdered him:
-->'''Anne:''' Thou mayst be damned for that wicked deed!
--> O he was gentle, mild, and virtuous!
-->'''Richard:''' The better for the king of Heaven that hath him...
--> Let him thank me, that holp to send him thither,
--> For he was fitter for that place than Earth.

to:

* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth:
**
The Little Princes. Princes.
**
Also, in memory, Henry VI (who was portrayed in the previous plays as pious and good, but far too weak). In one scene, Anne reproves Richard for having murdered him:
-->'''Anne:''' --->'''Anne:''' Thou mayst be damned for that wicked deed!
-->
deed!\\
O he was gentle, mild, and virtuous!
-->'''Richard:''' --->'''Richard:''' The better for the king of Heaven that hath him...
-->
him...\\
Let him thank me, that holp to send him thither,
-->
thither,\\
For he was fitter for that place than Earth. Earth.



** To anyone who's done any history Richmond will look like this.

to:

** To anyone who's done any history Richmond will look like this.
18th Nov '15 9:28:29 PM PaulA
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!!Tropes in ''Richard III'' include:

* AgeLift: In various productions, he's been played by 47-year-old Creator/BasilRathbone, 48-year-old Creator/LaurenceOlivier, 51-year-old VincentPrice, 46-year-old PeterCook[[note]]it's ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' but it still counts[[/note]], 53-year-old Creator/KevinSpacey, 56-year-old Creator/IanMcKellen, and also 56-year-old Creator/AlPacino (though, bucking the trend, Richard was once played by the 35-year-old Creator/PeterDinklage). It should be noted that Richard was only ''32'' when he died at the battle of Bosworth Field, and only five years older than his usurper, HenryVII - who, unlike Richard, is usually played by a reasonably young actor. Then again, Shakespeare's Richard starts appearing in the ''HenryVI'' plays, as an adult, at a time when the historical Richard would have been a toddler, so playing him as older even in his own play makes a certain amount of sense.
** The upcoming adaptation of ''RichardIII'' by ''TheHollowCrown'' has Richard portrayed by 38 year-old BenedictCumberbatch, who (while older than Dinklage) is way closer in age to the historical Richard than most of the other well-known actors who've played him ever were.
** The same goes for Edward IV, who was actually only 40 when he died - but since he's supposed to be Richard's ''older'' brother, and is also sick/close to death during practically all of his scenes, he is usually played by older actors.

to:

!!Tropes in ''Richard III'' include:

* AgeLift: In various productions, he's been played by 47-year-old Creator/BasilRathbone, 48-year-old Creator/LaurenceOlivier, 51-year-old VincentPrice, 46-year-old PeterCook[[note]]it's ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' but it still counts[[/note]], 53-year-old Creator/KevinSpacey, 56-year-old Creator/IanMcKellen, and also 56-year-old Creator/AlPacino (though, bucking the trend, Richard was once played by the 35-year-old Creator/PeterDinklage). It should be noted that Richard was only ''32'' when he died at the battle of Bosworth Field, and only five years older than his usurper, HenryVII - who, unlike Richard, is usually played by a reasonably young actor. Then again, Shakespeare's Richard starts appearing in the ''HenryVI'' plays, as an adult, at a time when the historical Richard would have been a toddler, so playing him as older even in his own
!!The play makes a certain amount of sense.
** The upcoming adaptation of ''RichardIII'' by ''TheHollowCrown'' has Richard portrayed by 38 year-old BenedictCumberbatch, who (while older than Dinklage) is way closer in age to the historical Richard than most of the other well-known actors who've played him ever were.
** The same goes for Edward IV, who was actually only 40 when he died - but since he's supposed to be Richard's ''older'' brother, and is also sick/close to death during practically all of his scenes, he is usually played by older actors.
includes examples of:



* ConspicuousGloves: In some performances of the play, it's not uncommon for Richard to wear a glove over his [[RedRightHand withered hand]]. [[http://skemman.is/stream/get/1946/11532/28652/1/KolbrúnGunnarsBAFINAL.pdf In the English Shakespeare Company's 1990 production of the play, part of a series called “The War of The Roses,” starring Andrew Jarvis as Richard and directed by Michael Bogdanov, Jarvis wore a black glove on one hand]].
* DeathGlare:
** In the Olivier version, Richard gives the ''mother'' of all death glares to his nephew, little Richard, when the boy foolishly asks if Richard can bear him on his shoulder. The kid's so terrified that he backs away and falls over.
** Ian [=McKellan=] gets his own to Hastings when little Richard actually does it, causing him to scream in pain and fall over, and Hastings moves to help him up. This causes Hastings to have a nightmare with Richard having a boar's face.



* FauxAffablyEvil: Richard. To the point where in a recent production, the audience was enjoined to chant his name to get him to take up the throne at the public urgings of Buckingham. The fact that he likes breaking the fourth wall to point out exactly what a MagnificentBastard he is only adds to the allure.
** "I can smile, and murder whiles I smile"

to:

* FauxAffablyEvil: Richard. To the point where in a recent production, the audience was enjoined to chant his name to get him to take up the throne at the public urgings of Buckingham. The fact that he likes breaking the fourth wall to point out exactly what a MagnificentBastard he is only adds to the allure.
**
allure. "I can smile, and murder whiles I smile" smile."



* TheGhost: Princess Elizabeth of York, much talked-about and crucial to the plot as a bargaining chip but never seen (in the 1995 film, she's in a lot of the royal family scenes and gets a line reassigned from another character (in a ''completely'' different context).
** [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with Henry VI.]]
** Mistress Shore. (Who does appear, briefly and [[TheVoiceless silently]], in the Olivier film.)

to:

* TheGhost: TheGhost:
**
Princess Elizabeth of York, much talked-about and crucial to the plot as a bargaining chip but never seen (in the 1995 film, she's in a lot of the royal family scenes and gets a line reassigned from another character (in a ''completely'' different context).
** [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with Henry VI.]]
seen.
** Mistress Shore. (Who does appear, briefly and [[TheVoiceless silently]], in the Olivier film.)



** So much so that he gets played ''as Hitler''. The dude is not popular.



* OpenShirtTaunt: In the original text, the stage directions explicitly say Richard "layes his brest open" [sic] - that is, he opens his shirt/jerkin for Anne to run him through with his sword, which he has given her for the express purpose after she says she wants to see him dead. (In the 1995 film adaptation of the scene, the title character does this after giving her a dagger.) She doesn't go through with it.

to:

* OpenShirtTaunt: In the original text, the stage directions explicitly say Richard "layes his brest open" [sic] - that is, he opens his shirt/jerkin for Anne to run him through with his sword, which he has given her for the express purpose after she says she wants to see him dead. (In the 1995 film adaptation of the scene, the title character does this after giving her a dagger.) She doesn't go through with it.



* PragmaticAdaptation: In the 1955 version, Laurence Olivier thought it was a bit much for the audience to accept that Anne agrees to marry Richard in the space of about ten minutes, so he split the 'seduction scene' in two, with the main bulk of it taking place later (when they're not talking over her father-in-law's butchered corpse.)



* YoungerThanTheyLook: Richard has been portrayed as a creepy old man when he was only 32 when he died.

to:


!!Adaptations with their own pages include:

* YoungerThanTheyLook: ''Film/RichardIII'' (1995 film with Creator/IanMcKellen as Richard)
* ''Series/TheHollowCrown'' (TV adaptation of the history plays with Creator/BenedictCumberbatch as Richard)

!!Other productions and adaptations add examples of:

* AgeLift:
**
Richard has been portrayed as a creepy old man when he was only 32 when he died.died at the battle of Bosworth Field. In various productions, he's been played by 35-year-old Creator/PeterDinklage, 38-year-old Creator/BenedictCumberbatch, 46-year-old Creator/PeterCook[[note]]it's ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' but it still counts[[/note]], 47-year-old Creator/BasilRathbone, 48-year-old Creator/LaurenceOlivier, 51-year-old Creator/VincentPrice, 53-year-old Creator/KevinSpacey, 56-year-old Creator/IanMcKellen, and also 56-year-old Creator/AlPacino. Then again, Shakespeare's Richard starts appearing in the ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays, as an adult, at a time when the historical Richard would have been a toddler, so playing him as older even in his own play makes a certain amount of sense.
** The same goes for Edward IV, who was actually only 40 when he died - but since he's supposed to be Richard's ''older'' brother, and is also sick/close to death during practically all of his scenes, he is usually played by older actors.
* ConspicuousGloves: In some performances of the play, it's not uncommon for Richard to wear a glove over his [[RedRightHand withered hand]]. [[http://skemman.is/stream/get/1946/11532/28652/1/KolbrúnGunnarsBAFINAL.pdf In the English Shakespeare Company's 1990 production of the play, part of a series called “The War of The Roses,” starring Andrew Jarvis as Richard and directed by Michael Bogdanov, Jarvis wore a black glove on one hand]].
* DeathGlare: In the Olivier version, Richard gives the ''mother'' of all death glares to his nephew, little Richard, when the boy foolishly asks if Richard can bear him on his shoulder. The kid's so terrified that he backs away and falls over.
* PragmaticAdaptation: In the 1955 version, Laurence Olivier thought it was a bit much for the audience to accept that Anne agrees to marry Richard in the space of about ten minutes, so he split the 'seduction scene' in two, with the main bulk of it taking place later (when they're not talking over her father-in-law's butchered corpse.)
7th Nov '15 1:55:58 AM Ciara25
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** The upcoming adaptation of ''RichardIII'' by ''TheHollowCrown'' has Richard portrayed by 38 year-old BenedictCumberbatch, which (while older than Dinklage) is way closer to the historical Richard than most of the actors ever were.

to:

** The upcoming adaptation of ''RichardIII'' by ''TheHollowCrown'' has Richard portrayed by 38 year-old BenedictCumberbatch, which who (while older than Dinklage) is way closer in age to the historical Richard than most of the other well-known actors who've played him ever were.
5th Sep '15 9:20:17 AM Pren
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* DeathGlare: In the Olivier version, Richard gives the ''mother'' of all death glares to his nephew, little Richard, when the boy foolishly asks if Richard can bear him on his shoulder. The kid's so terrified that he backs away and falls over.

to:

* DeathGlare: DeathGlare:
**
In the Olivier version, Richard gives the ''mother'' of all death glares to his nephew, little Richard, when the boy foolishly asks if Richard can bear him on his shoulder. The kid's so terrified that he backs away and falls over.
** Ian [=McKellan=] gets his own to Hastings when little Richard actually does it, causing him to scream in pain and fall over, and Hastings moves to help him up. This causes Hastings to have a nightmare with Richard having a boar's face.
2nd Jul '15 11:37:56 PM Sagetsu
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Added DiffLines:

** The upcoming adaptation of ''RichardIII'' by ''TheHollowCrown'' has Richard portrayed by 38 year-old BenedictCumberbatch, which (while older than Dinklage) is way closer to the historical Richard than most of the actors ever were.
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