History Theatre / MadameButterfly

22nd Aug '16 11:49:42 AM vifetoile
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* FlowersOfRomance: At the end of Act II, Butterfly and Suzuki sing the "Flower Duet" where they decorate the house with all the flowers in the garden, transforming the simple house into a bower worthy of a rapturous reunion.
16th Jun '16 7:26:21 PM vifetoile
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* AsianSpeekeeEngrish: Played straight in the novel - Butterfly only speaks English because Pinkerton has forbidden her from speaking Japanese in his house, and her dialogue is painful to read today. Averted in the opera, where everyone speaks perfect Italian - see YouNoTakeCandle, below.


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* YouNoTakeCandle: Played straight in the novel - see AsianSpeekeeEngrish, above. But where Long used Japanese character's broken English to make them seem inferior, Puccini completely averts the trope by having everyone speak perfect Italian. Furthermore, in terms of pure ''music,'' Butterfly is far and away the most eloquent and soulful of the cast.
14th Jun '16 5:37:05 PM vifetoile
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** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what the mother will think.

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** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what how the mother will think.feel.



* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]

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* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast toast, "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]
14th Jun '16 5:33:39 PM vifetoile
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* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]
14th Jun '16 2:10:07 PM vifetoile
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* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her.

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* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her. The novel also gives no indication that he feels the slightest guilt for how he's treated Butterfly.
** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what the mother will think.
5th Jun '16 2:24:59 PM vifetoile
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* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her.
* AgeLift: In the original novel, Suzuki is younger than Butterfly. On-stage, she's usually cast as being older than Butterfly, giving them a MaidAndMaiden dynamic.


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* MaidAndMaiden: Butterfly, the plucky heroine, is the Maiden (albeit a married one) and practical, kindhearted Suzuki is her Maid.
4th Jun '16 9:43:38 AM AzureOwl
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* JerkassHasAPoint: The matchmaker Goro's efforts to get Butterfly to divorce Pinkerton and marry prince Yamadori may have arisen from his own self interest and he went about it very badly, but Goro was absolutely right about Cio-Cio San's situation and the marriage would have been incredibly beneficial to her.
1st Jun '16 12:17:26 PM ironballs16
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** The original short story the Opera is based on was actually a BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: when Butterfly was about to commit suicide, she hesitates long enough that Suzuki can intervene, pinching Butterfly and Pinkerton's son hard enough to make him cry, preventing her from going through with it. Instead, the story ends that the house was empty when Pinkerton and Kate arrive to take his son the next day]].

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** The original short story the Opera is based on was actually a BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: when Butterfly was about to commit suicide, she hesitates long enough that Suzuki can intervene, pinching Butterfly and Pinkerton's son hard enough to make him cry, preventing her from going through with it. Instead, the story ends that the house was empty when Pinkerton and Kate arrive to take his son the next day]].BittersweetEnding, as seen above.
1st Jun '16 12:15:51 PM ironballs16
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** The original short story the Opera is based on was actually a BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: when Butterfly was about to commit suicide, she hesitates long enough that Suzuki can intervene, pinching Butterfly and Pinkerton's son hard enough to make him cry, preventing her from going through with it. Instead, the story ends that the house was empty when Pinkerton and Kate arrive to take his son the next day]].
23rd May '16 6:21:34 AM lalaTKG
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* WickedStepmother: Averted - Kate is the cause of much of Butterfly's misfortune, including losing her son, but it's compleely unintentional on her part. She's been put in a very awkward position by her husband but is clearly determined to do the right thing and raise his half-Japanese child. She promises she'll care for him as her own son, and is deeply sorry for Butterfly, begging for her forgiveness.

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* WickedStepmother: Averted - Kate is the cause of much of Butterfly's misfortune, including losing her son, but it's compleely completely unintentional on her part. She's been put in a very awkward position by her husband but is clearly determined to do the right thing and raise his half-Japanese child. She promises she'll care for him as her own son, and is deeply sorry for Butterfly, begging for her forgiveness.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.MadameButterfly