History Theatre / MadameButterfly

12th Jul '17 5:38:45 PM Pichu-kun
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This opera has had countless adaptations, one with a page on this wiki being ''Theatre/MissSaigon'' and ''Manga/MademoiselleButterfly''. It also inspired the play ''Theatre/MButterfly'', and received quite a few references in Music/{{Weezer}}'s album ''Music/{{Pinkerton}}''.

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This opera has had countless adaptations, one with a page on this wiki being ''Theatre/MissSaigon'' and ''Manga/MademoiselleButterfly''. It also inspired the play ''Theatre/MButterfly'', ''Theatre/MButterfly'' and the 1922 film ''Film/TheTollOfTheSea'', and received quite a few references in Music/{{Weezer}}'s album ''Music/{{Pinkerton}}''.



* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her. The novel also gives no indication that he feels the slightest guilt for how he's treated Butterfly.

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* AdaptationalHeroism: AdaptationalHeroism:
**
Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her. The novel also gives no indication that he feels the slightest guilt for how he's treated Butterfly.



* ButNotTooForeign: The half-American child is cast as blond, usually.
** As the lyrics request.

to:

* ButNotTooForeign: The half-American child is cast as blond, usually.
**
usually. As the lyrics request.



* ConvertingForLove: An especially drastic example, since a) Butterfly's family disowns her over it, and b) Pinkerton never asked her to, and totally doesn't care that she did.

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* ConvertingForLove: ConvertingForLove:
**
An especially drastic example, since a) Butterfly's family disowns her over it, and b) Pinkerton never asked her to, and totally doesn't care that she did.



* DownerEnding: Pinkerton never returns to Butterfly, but only returns to Japan to clean up loose ends before returning to live in America with his wife. Cast out from her family, rejected by the man that she loves, facing a future of dire poverty, without her son and without honor, Butterfly commits suicide. As she dies, she gets to hear Pinkerton's voice one last time - that's as happy as it gets.
** The original short story the Opera is based on was actually a BittersweetEnding, as seen above.

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* DownerEnding: Pinkerton never returns to Butterfly, but only returns to Japan to clean up loose ends before returning to live in America with his wife. Cast out from her family, rejected by the man that she loves, facing a future of dire poverty, without her son and without honor, Butterfly commits suicide. As she dies, she gets to hear Pinkerton's voice one last time - that's as happy as it gets. \n** The original short story the Opera is based on was actually a BittersweetEnding, as seen above.



* MeaningfulName: Pinkerton, as noted above, but also the ineffectual Sharpless and the fragile Butterfly.

to:

* MeaningfulName: MeaningfulName:
**
Pinkerton, as noted above, but also the ineffectual Sharpless and the fragile Butterfly.



* StepfordSmiler: Butterfly in Act II - she hides all her pain behind a brave face, and acts bold and confident in front of strangers. In Act III, this mask completely falls away.

to:

* StepfordSmiler: StepfordSmiler:
**
Butterfly in Act II - she hides all her pain behind a brave face, and acts bold and confident in front of strangers. In Act III, this mask completely falls away.



* WhatHaveIDone: Pinkerton's reaction upon finding out Butterfly has waited three years for his return.
** However, some versions and/or translations have Pinkerton [[{{Angst}} angsting]] not so much about how he hurt Butterfly, but about [[ItsAllAboutMe how much the guilt hurts him]].

to:

* WhatHaveIDone: Pinkerton's reaction upon finding out Butterfly has waited three years for his return.
**
return. However, some versions and/or translations have Pinkerton [[{{Angst}} angsting]] not so much about how he hurt Butterfly, but about [[ItsAllAboutMe how much the guilt hurts him]].



* YamatoNadeshiko: Massively subverted. Butterfly is ''supposed'' to be a "proper Japanese woman" and a sympathetic victim of Western racism. However, technically speaking she ''fails'' at being a YamatoNadeshiko, as [[LoveMartyr she]] [[TheIngenue completely]] [[UnrequitedTragicMaiden lacks]] [[SilkHidingSteel the required core of steel]]; nowadays, poor Butterfly is seen as a TropeCodifier on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotypes_of_East_Asians_in_the_Western_world#.22China_doll.22_stereotype how NOT to write any East Asian female character]].
** In contrast to the meekness of a "proper wife," Butterfly retains much of the panache of a geisha, such as when Yamadori comes a'courting, and she sasses him, then mocks him by impersonating an American judge ready to throw him in jail, before calmly calling for tea.

to:

* YamatoNadeshiko: Massively subverted. Butterfly is ''supposed'' to be a "proper Japanese woman" and a sympathetic victim of Western racism. However, technically speaking she ''fails'' at being a YamatoNadeshiko, as [[LoveMartyr she]] [[TheIngenue completely]] [[UnrequitedTragicMaiden lacks]] [[SilkHidingSteel the required core of steel]]; nowadays, poor Butterfly is seen as a TropeCodifier on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotypes_of_East_Asians_in_the_Western_world#.22China_doll.22_stereotype how NOT to write any East Asian female character]].
**
character]]. In contrast to the meekness of a "proper wife," Butterfly retains much of the panache of a geisha, such as when Yamadori comes a'courting, and she sasses him, then mocks him by impersonating an American judge ready to throw him in jail, before calmly calling for tea.
13th May '17 10:41:24 PM Dravencour
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* {{Seppuku}}: Butterfly's father's knife is used for this.
** SpurnedIntoSuicide: Butterfly's ultimate fate.

to:

* {{Seppuku}}: Butterfly's father's knife is used for this.
** SpurnedIntoSuicide: Butterfly's ultimate fate.
this, and is ultimately used by Butterfly to commit ''jigai'' once [[SpurnedIntoSuicide it becomes clear to her]] that Pinkerton will never be with her and that she will never see her child again.
21st Apr '17 7:06:42 AM QueenofSwords
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** Of course, Butterfly's submissiveness and naivete could just as easily be attributed to the fact that she is only 15 years old at the beginning of the story and 18 by the end.
2nd Feb '17 1:39:00 PM StillWeepingWillow
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* GratuitousEnglish: Pinkerton and Sharpless both exclaim "America Forever!" after Pinkerton's first aria. Also, Butterfly's name should rightly either be Cio-Cio San (Japanese) or Farfella (Italian), but everyone calls her by the English translation of her name.

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* GratuitousEnglish: Pinkerton and Sharpless both exclaim "America Forever!" after Pinkerton's first aria. Also, Butterfly's name should rightly either be Cio-Cio San (Japanese) or Farfella Farfalla (Italian), but everyone calls her by the English translation of her name.
22nd Aug '16 11:49:42 AM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

* FlowersOfRomance: At the end of Act II, Butterfly and Suzuki sing the "Flower Duet" where they decorate the house with all the flowers in the garden, transforming the simple house into a bower worthy of a rapturous reunion.
16th Jun '16 7:26:21 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

* AsianSpeekeeEngrish: Played straight in the novel - Butterfly only speaks English because Pinkerton has forbidden her from speaking Japanese in his house, and her dialogue is painful to read today. Averted in the opera, where everyone speaks perfect Italian - see YouNoTakeCandle, below.


Added DiffLines:

* YouNoTakeCandle: Played straight in the novel - see AsianSpeekeeEngrish, above. But where Long used Japanese character's broken English to make them seem inferior, Puccini completely averts the trope by having everyone speak perfect Italian. Furthermore, in terms of pure ''music,'' Butterfly is far and away the most eloquent and soulful of the cast.
14th Jun '16 5:37:05 PM vifetoile
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** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what the mother will think.

to:

** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what how the mother will think.feel.



* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]

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* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast toast, "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]
14th Jun '16 5:33:39 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

* RewatchBonus: In Anthony Minghella's filmed production of ''Madama Butterfly,'' watch Sharpless when Pinkerton announces a toast "To the day I wed a real American bride!" Sharpless [[EveryoneHasStandards throws his drink away rather than toast to that.]]
14th Jun '16 2:10:07 PM vifetoile
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* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her.

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her. The novel also gives no indication that he feels the slightest guilt for how he's treated Butterfly.
** Kate (named Adelaide in the novel) is also made kinder and empathetic in the opera; in the novel she looks forward to taking away the baby and doesn't care what the mother will think.
5th Jun '16 2:24:59 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Pinkerton. In the novel, he's the one who bans Butterfly from seeing her family. In the play, he thinks they're silly, but is understandably horrified by their renunciation of her.
* AgeLift: In the original novel, Suzuki is younger than Butterfly. On-stage, she's usually cast as being older than Butterfly, giving them a MaidAndMaiden dynamic.


Added DiffLines:

* MaidAndMaiden: Butterfly, the plucky heroine, is the Maiden (albeit a married one) and practical, kindhearted Suzuki is her Maid.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.MadameButterfly