History Theatre / Lysistrata

15th Jan '16 6:29:16 PM Hemma
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* UnbuiltTrope: Aristophanes wrote the play as a farce, which ridiculed female empowerment. Later interpretations of the LysistrataGambit are usually more literal, as a feminist strategy.
25th Dec '15 7:05:33 PM syckls
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This is the TropeNamer for the LysistrataGambit, a more X-rated version of ExiledToTheCouch. And, if it's performed by a cast with enough balls to do it justice, it is still side-splittingly funny today.

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This is the TropeNamer for the LysistrataGambit, a more X-rated version of ExiledToTheCouch. And, if it's performed by a cast with enough balls (and ovaries) to do it justice, it is still side-splittingly funny today.
7th Nov '15 3:28:18 PM Goldfritha
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** And this standard persisted to the early modern period of Europe (1400-1800).
23rd Jun '14 2:45:52 PM henry42
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And if you think that the previous summary was full of hot and steamy innuendo, you should be aware that the play itself is a hell of a lot raunchier. We're not joking about the burdens: the costumes for male characters include a GagPenis. Oh, and, the vow sworn by the women includes very explicit detail of what they are forswearing, such as agreeing not to "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch like the lioness on the cheese grater]]" ([[ComicSutra No, we don't know what that means either]]. It's been lost to the mists of time. All we have from the historical record is a menu from a Greek brothel, on which this position is [[ComicSutra the most expensive act you can purchase from a prostitute]]. Imaginations, start your engines).

to:

And if you think that the previous summary was full of hot and steamy innuendo, you should be aware that the play itself is a hell of a lot raunchier. We're not joking about the burdens: the costumes for male characters include a GagPenis. Oh, and, the vow sworn by the women includes very explicit detail of what they are forswearing, such as agreeing not to "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch like the lioness on the cheese grater]]" ([[ComicSutra No, (No, we don't know what that means either]].either. It's been lost to the mists of time. All we have from the historical record is a menu from a Greek brothel, on which this position is [[ComicSutra the most expensive act you can purchase from a prostitute]]. Imaginations, start your engines).
23rd Jun '14 2:45:18 PM henry42
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And if you think that the previous summary was full of hot and steamy innuendo, you should be aware that the play itself is a hell of a lot raunchier. We're not joking about the burdens: the costumes for male characters include a GagPenis. Oh, and, the vow sworn by the women includes very explicit detail of what they are forswearing, such as agreeing not to "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch like the lioness on the cheese grater]]" ([[NoodleIncident No, we don't know what that means either]]. It's been lost to the mists of time. All we have from the historical record is a menu from a Greek brothel, on which this position is [[ComicSutra the most expensive act you can purchase from a prostitute]]. Imaginations, start your engines).

to:

And if you think that the previous summary was full of hot and steamy innuendo, you should be aware that the play itself is a hell of a lot raunchier. We're not joking about the burdens: the costumes for male characters include a GagPenis. Oh, and, the vow sworn by the women includes very explicit detail of what they are forswearing, such as agreeing not to "[[HeadTiltinglyKinky crouch like the lioness on the cheese grater]]" ([[NoodleIncident ([[ComicSutra No, we don't know what that means either]]. It's been lost to the mists of time. All we have from the historical record is a menu from a Greek brothel, on which this position is [[ComicSutra the most expensive act you can purchase from a prostitute]]. Imaginations, start your engines).
23rd Jun '14 2:44:29 PM henry42
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The play takes place during UsefulNotes/ThePeloponnesianWar, when Athens and Sparta were embroiled in a hard, sweaty, nasty conflict. Lysistrata, an Athenian woman who is sick of all this war nonsense, manages to convince a large group of women from several city-states (including Sparta) to come together for a meeting, wherein she proposes a dramatic tactic: they (the women) should swear a vow to bring about the end of the war by refusing to have sex with their men until there is peace. As a more practical measure they seize hold of the root of the war effort: the Acropolis, which contains Athens' treasury. The menfolk laugh at the absurdity of this idea: in Ancient Greece, AllWomenAreLustful, and indeed Lysistrata and her friend Calonice must constantly prevent their co-conspirators from sneaking out to, shall we say, [[IsThatWhatTheyreCallingItNow engage enemy forces]]. With the women's resolve shown to be firm and upstanding, the menfolk, their ability to make war now wilted and slumping, and tormented by [[RagingStiffie enormous, err, burdens]], agree to work out a peace treaty. Celebration ensues.

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The play takes place during UsefulNotes/ThePeloponnesianWar, when Athens and Sparta were embroiled in a hard, sweaty, nasty conflict. Lysistrata, an Athenian woman who is sick of all this war nonsense, manages to convince a large group of women from several city-states (including Sparta) to come together for a meeting, wherein she proposes a dramatic tactic: they (the women) should swear a vow to bring about the end of the war by refusing to have sex with their men until there is peace. As a more practical measure they seize hold of the root of the war effort: the Acropolis, which contains Athens' treasury. The menfolk laugh at the absurdity of this idea: in Ancient Greece, AllWomenAreLustful, and indeed Lysistrata and her friend Calonice must constantly prevent their co-conspirators from sneaking out to, shall we say, [[IsThatWhatTheyreCallingItNow [[UnusualEuphemism engage enemy forces]]. With the women's resolve shown to be firm and upstanding, the menfolk, their ability to make war now wilted and slumping, and tormented by [[RagingStiffie enormous, err, burdens]], agree to work out a peace treaty. Celebration ensues.
13th Jun '14 2:07:38 PM Doodler
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* LysistrataGambit: TropeNamer

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* LysistrataGambit: TropeNamerTropeNamer. UnbuiltTrope as well, since the women clearly have trouble withholding their urges while more modern versions of the trope show it as effortless.
22nd Apr '14 3:20:10 PM NoChorus
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** It should be noted that unlike in modern culture where size equates to virility, in Ancient Greek culture the size of your member correlates to how much control you have over your sexual urges. You can guess what this implies about the men in the play.
16th Jan '14 1:13:27 PM ironballs16
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* BatteringRam: The women barricade themselves in the Acropolis and vowed to withhold sex from their husbands. So we get a scene where the much-deprived men of Athens grab a big trunk of wood and ram it against the doors of the Acropolis again and again, desperately trying to force their way inside...

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* BatteringRam: The women barricade themselves in the Acropolis and vowed to withhold sex from their husbands. So we get a scene where the much-deprived men of Athens [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything grab a big trunk of wood and ram it against the doors of the Acropolis again and again, again]], desperately trying to force their way inside...
25th Nov '13 8:36:20 PM Kimera757
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Added DiffLines:

*BatteringRam: The women barricade themselves in the Acropolis and vowed to withhold sex from their husbands. So we get a scene where the much-deprived men of Athens grab a big trunk of wood and ram it against the doors of the Acropolis again and again, desperately trying to force their way inside...
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Lysistrata