History Theatre / Hamlet

15th Jan '18 5:31:13 PM jormis29
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* The play ''I Hate Hamlet'' in which a TV star has to play Hamlet on stage but is unsure. So he gets help from the ghost of one of the greatest Hamlets, John Barrymore.

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* The play ''I Hate Hamlet'' in which a TV star has to play Hamlet on stage but is unsure. So he gets help from the ghost of one of the greatest Hamlets, John Barrymore.Creator/JohnBarrymore.
10th Jan '18 11:33:51 AM TheGreatConversation
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* DarkIsNotEvil: Our hero is infamous for his exclusively black outfits, [[HiddenDepths which he actually wears in mourning for his father]].

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* DarkIsNotEvil: Our hero is infamous for his exclusively hero's [[IconicOutfit iconic black outfits, [[HiddenDepths which he actually wears in mourning for his father]].costume]].


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* IconicOutfit: Our hero is infamous for his exclusively black outfits, [[HiddenDepths which he actually wears in mourning for his father]].
9th Jan '18 7:43:26 PM TheGreatConversation
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* HeavenAbove: King Claudius uses the sky twice as a divine metaphor to explain how horrid his soul has become:
** He starts off his remorseful prayer by saying his offense is so rank that "it smells to heaven." Obviously, if something can be smelled from the sky, that is way too strong. So Claudius is saying his sin is as strong as that smell and as difficult to get rid of.
** As the King begins to think his remorse is futile, he asks of his sin, "Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens to wash it white as snow?" He seems to think the answer is no, since he did something infinitely evil, and like rain in the earthly heavens, there can only be so much forgiveness in the celestial {{Heaven}}.

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* HeavenAbove: King The characters follow the tradition of their religion in regarding Heaven and God as being "above"--such as when Claudius uses the sky twice as a divine metaphor to explain how horrid his soul has become:
** He starts off his remorseful prayer by saying his offense is so rank
laments that "it his "offense is rank, / It smells to heaven." Obviously, if something can be smelled from the sky, Heaven" and later that is way too strong. So Claudius is saying his sin is as strong as that smell and as difficult to get rid of.
** As the King begins to think his remorse is futile, he asks of his sin, "Is
there not is "not rain enough in the sweet heavens heavens" to wash it white as snow?" He seems to think [[OutDamnedSpot the answer is no, since he did something infinitely evil, and like rain in the earthly heavens, there can only be so much forgiveness in the celestial {{Heaven}}.metaphorical blood]] off his hands.



* HonestAdvisor: Hamlet can count on Horatio to speak his mind, unlike the fawning [[YesMan Yes-Men]] Hamlet is usually attended by.
-->'''Horatio:''' 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider so.



* YesMan: Horatio, though he occasionally crosses the line into ServileSnarker, is honestly devoted to his prince and plays this trope pretty [[{{Irony}} straight]].

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* YesMan: Horatio, though he occasionally crosses the line into ServileSnarker, Horatio is so honestly devoted to his prince that he's able to play both Yes-Man and plays this trope pretty [[{{Irony}} straight]].HonestAdvisor.
9th Jan '18 2:34:28 PM DustSnitch
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Added DiffLines:

* HeavenAbove: King Claudius uses the sky twice as a divine metaphor to explain how horrid his soul has become:
** He starts off his remorseful prayer by saying his offense is so rank that "it smells to heaven." Obviously, if something can be smelled from the sky, that is way too strong. So Claudius is saying his sin is as strong as that smell and as difficult to get rid of.
** As the King begins to think his remorse is futile, he asks of his sin, "Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens to wash it white as snow?" He seems to think the answer is no, since he did something infinitely evil, and like rain in the earthly heavens, there can only be so much forgiveness in the celestial {{Heaven}}.
31st Dec '17 8:37:21 AM TheGreatConversation
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Hamlet is the Prince of Denmark, whose uncle Claudius has ascended the throne after Hamlet's own father mysteriously passed away. Hamlet receives evidence that Claudius [[TheKingslayer murdered the late king]] to [[TheUsurper seize power]], and is commanded to exact {{Revenge}}, choosing to cover his behavior by [[ObfuscatingInsanity faking insanity]]. As the play progresses, however, it becomes obvious that Hamlet is highly reluctant to follow through with the murder . . . and ambiguous as to how much of his madness is actually fake. Complicating matters are a number of other characters: Ophelia, the former object of Hamlet's affections; Polonius, her father and royal chancellor; Gertrude, Hamlet's mother who has now married her brother-in-law; [[TheDividual Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]], Hamlet's college buddies now conscripted to spy on him; and Claudius himself, who is well aware that Hamlet is Denmark's rightful heir [[note]]Typical rules of primogeniture say that the king's son takes the throne after him, even if the king has a brother, although we do hear Dennmark's monarchy is theoretically elective in the play[[/note]] and has started scheming to remove him from the picture.

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Hamlet is the Prince of Denmark, whose uncle Claudius has ascended the throne after Hamlet's own father mysteriously passed away. Hamlet receives evidence that Claudius [[TheKingslayer murdered the late king]] to [[TheUsurper seize power]], and is commanded to exact {{Revenge}}, choosing to cover his behavior by [[ObfuscatingInsanity faking insanity]]. As the play progresses, however, it becomes obvious that Hamlet is highly reluctant to follow through with the murder . . . and ambiguous as to how much of his madness is actually fake. Complicating matters are a number of other characters: Ophelia, the former object of Hamlet's affections; Polonius, her father and Claudius's meddling royal chancellor; Gertrude, Hamlet's mother who has now married her brother-in-law; [[TheDividual Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]], Hamlet's college buddies now conscripted to spy on him; and Claudius himself, who is well aware that Hamlet is Denmark's rightful heir [[note]]Typical rules of primogeniture say that the king's son takes the throne after him, even if the king has a brother, although we do hear Dennmark's monarchy is theoretically elective in the play[[/note]] and has started scheming to remove him from the picture.



* ElectiveMonarchy: In the world of Shakespeare's ''Hamlet'', the Danish monarchy is elective, as it also was in reality until the late 1600s (though in practice, the eldest son was pretty much always elected). This is the reason why Claudius is king instead of Hamlet himself. Hamlet describes his uncle as having "popp'd in between the election and my hopes", and later says that he foresees that "the election lights on Fortinbras" as he himself is dying (and the Danish royal line with him), giving his nod to Prince Fortinbras of Norway, whose leadership he had soliloquized approvingly about earlier.

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* ElectiveMonarchy: In the world of Shakespeare's ''Hamlet'', the The Danish monarchy is apparently elective, as it also was in reality until the late 1600s (though in practice, the eldest son was pretty much always elected). This is the reason why Claudius is king instead of Hamlet himself. Hamlet describes his uncle as having "popp'd in between the election and my hopes", and later says that he foresees that "the election lights on Fortinbras" as he himself is dying (and the Danish royal line with him), giving his nod to Prince Fortinbras of Norway, whose leadership he had soliloquized approvingly about earlier.him).
29th Dec '17 4:53:22 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* ElectiveMonarchy: In the world of Shakespeare's ''Hamlet'', the Danish monarchy is elective, as it also was in reality until the late 1600s (though in practice, the eldest son was pretty much always elected). This is the reason why Claudius is king instead of Hamlet himself. Hamlet describes his uncle as having "popp'd in between the election and my hopes", and later says that he foresees that "the election lights on Fortinbras" as he himself is dying (and the Danish royal line with him), giving his nod to Prince Fortinbras of Norway, whose leadership he had soliloquized approvingly about earlier.
26th Dec '17 2:52:21 PM TheGreatConversation
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->''"To be, or not to be . . . "''

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->''"To be, be or not to be . . . "''
20th Dec '17 11:47:45 PM TheGreatConversation
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20th Dec '17 11:32:28 PM TheGreatConversation
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* UnfinishedBusiness: King Hamlet rises from the grave to command Hamlet to avenge his murder. He himself has been BarredFromTheAfterlife, or at least from Heaven, because of the sins he was not allowed time to seek absolution for before his death.
19th Dec '17 4:44:00 PM TheGreatConversation
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* GodLivesInTheSky: King Claudius uses the sky twice as a metaphor to explain how horrid his soul has become:
** He starts off his remorseful prayer by saying his offense is so rank that "it smells to heaven." Obviously, if something can be smelled from the sky, that is way too strong. So Claudius is saying his sin is as strong as that smell and as difficult to get rid of.
** As the King begins to think his remorse is futile, he asks of his sin, "Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens to wash it white as snow?" He seems to think the answer is no, since he did something infinitely evil, and like rain in the earthly heavens, there can only be so much forgiveness in the celestial {{Heaven}}.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Hamlet