History Theatre / Hamlet

16th Sep '17 1:13:48 AM LordGro
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* PleaseShootTheMessenger: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern unwittingly bear a letter to England ordering their own decapitation. [[RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead It works, too.]]

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* PleaseShootTheMessenger: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern unwittingly bear a letter to England ordering their own decapitation. [[RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead It works, too.]]
15th Sep '17 8:20:57 PM TheGreatConversation
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Added DiffLines:

* PleaseShootTheMessenger: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern unwittingly bear a letter to England ordering their own decapitation. [[RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead It works, too.]]
15th Sep '17 8:14:24 PM TheGreatConversation
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* ArtisticLicenseBiology: Poison is best administered through the ear. Who knew?



* MissingMom: Laertes and Ophelia's mother is never mentioned; they seem to form a nice little DysfunctionalFamily with Polonius alone.



* MySisterIsOffLimits: Laertes does ''not'' want Hamlet seeing Ophelia. [[JerkassHasAPoint Turns out, he was right.]]

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* MySisterIsOffLimits: Laertes does ''not'' want Hamlet seeing Ophelia. [[JerkassHasAPoint Turns As it turns out, he was right.]]



* NonActionBigBad: Claudius needs others to do the fighty bits for him. Though it seems he's pretty good at pouring poison in people's ears.



* RoyallyScrewedUp: Claudius's tendency towards murder and Hamlet's ambiguous sanity could be a comment on this trope.



* HiddenDepths: At first read, the play seems like a total StylisticSuck--a spoileriffic dumb show followed by a series of tedious heroic couplets. But when we recall that Hamlet wrote some if not most of what we see here, the play (and particularly the Player King's dense but philosophically rich filibuster) serve as a rare window into Hamlet's true beliefs and moral code.
-->'''Player King:''' Most necessary 'tis that we forget\\
To pay ourselves what to ourselves is debt:\\
What to ourselves in passion we propose,\\
The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.\\
The violence of either grief or joy\\
Their own enactures with themselves destroy:\\
Where joy most revels, grief doth most lament;\\
Grief joys, joy grieves, on slender accident.\\
This world is not for aye, nor 'tis not strange\\
That even our loves should with our fortunes change;\\
For 'tis a question left us yet to prove,\\
Whether love lead fortune, or else fortune love.



* StylisticSuck: A spoileriffic dumb show followed by a series of tedious heroic couplets. This may be Hamlet's fault, since he rewrote bits of it, and was more concerned with trying to CatchTheConscience of Claudius than with coming up with a truly decent play.
15th Sep '17 4:03:22 PM TheGreatConversation
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* AudienceMonologue: Claudius and Ophelia both indulge in a bit of soliloquy. Hamlet wallows in it.



* EtTuBrute: Hamlet is considerably shaken after discovering that even his "excellent good friends," Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, have become Claudius's spies.



* HappilyMarried: Claudius and Gertrude, ironically. They work well together, show genuine concern for each other's wellbeing, and apparently have a more-than-healthy sex life.



* HiddenDepths: Hamlet consists of nothing else.



* LonelyRichKid: Hamlet might have more meaningful connections at school in Wittenberg, but at home in Elsinore he is profoundly lonely--somewhat justified, given his [[IntelligenceEqualsIsolation extraordinary but isolating intelligence]] and the fact that [[HumansAreBastards almost everyone around him is a lying, manipulable bastard]].



* MinoredInAsskicking: Hamlet is an introspective, nonconfrontational scholar, but he ends up beating MasterSwordsman Laertes fairly easily when it comes down to it.



* MySisterIsOffLimits: Laertes does ''not'' want Hamlet seeing Ophelia. [[JerkassHasAPoint Turns out, he was right.]]



* TheOnlyOneITrust: Hamlet can tell no one about seeing the ghost he has seen, except his loyal confidante Horatio.



* ParentalSubstitute: Yorick, the long-deceased court jester, seems to have been a surrogate for Hamlet's unavailable royal progenitors.



* RabbleRouser: When Laertes learns of his father's death, he returns to Denmark and leads a mob against Claudius in a [[TheCoup coup]] for the throne. Claudius succeeds in talking Laertes out of it, and the mob is, presumably, [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse left waiting outside the throne room at Elsinore forever.]]

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* RabbleRouser: When Laertes learns of his father's death, he returns to Denmark and leads a an angry mob against Claudius in a [[TheCoup coup]] coup for the throne.throne]]. Claudius succeeds in talking Laertes out of it, and the mob is, presumably, [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse left waiting outside the throne room at Elsinore forever.]]



* RoyalBrat: An uncharitable reading of Hamlet, who has been raised in luxury and would probably spend less time agonizing over being vs not being if he spent some time with the peasants his family governs.



* StandardRoyalCourt: Elsinore, the Danish castle where the play takes place.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Reynaldo is an agent of Polonius's sent to both spy on and ruin the reputation of Laertes when the latter leaves for France. Whatever actual impact Reynaldo has on anything is never touched on, and he hasn't returned to Denmark by the end of the play.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: WhatHappenedToTheMouse
** Marcellus is the Danish watchman who takes first Horatio, then Hamlet himself to see the ghost. He witnesses Hamlet's first reactions to the ghost and is privy to much discussion of the apparition, including Hamlet's plan to fake insanity. He is neither seen nor mentioned again after Act I.
**
Reynaldo is an agent of Polonius's sent to both spy on and ruin the reputation of Laertes when the latter leaves for France. Whatever actual impact Reynaldo has on anything is never touched on, and he hasn't returned to Denmark by the end of the play.
15th Sep '17 11:48:18 AM TheGreatConversation
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* CainAndAbel: The premise. Hamlet's uncle, Claudius, murdered his brother (Hamlet's father) for the throne. But surprise! The dead king is still very much around, and he commands Hamlet to get back at Claudius for him, violently. [[ShoutOut Allusions to the Biblical Cain and Abel]] are sprinkled throughout the play.



* GoLookAtTheDistraction: Hamlet sends Polonius and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern to "Bid the players make haste" so that he can talk with Horatio in private.



* PreAsskickingOneLiner: Before Hamlet and Laertes wrestle over Ophelia's corpse.
-->'''Laertes''' The Devil take thy soul!



* PurpleProse: Horatio gets pretty verbose when Hamlet's not around.[[note]]Ironically, he speaks in ''verse''. But his unnecessarily flowery descriptions exceed the Shakespearean norm by enough to merit this trope.[[/note]]
** Why say "this same time last night" when you ''could'' say . . .
--->'''Horatio:''' Last night of all,\\
When yond same star that's westward from the pole\\
Had made his course to illume that part of heaven\\
Where now it burns . . .
** And why call it "the moon" when you could call it . . .
--->'''Horatio:''' the moist star,\\
Upon whose influence Neptune's empire stands . . .
* RabbleRouser: When Laertes learns of his father's death, he returns to Denmark and leads a mob against Claudius in a [[TheCoup coup]] for the throne. Claudius succeeds in talking Laertes out of it, and the mob is, presumably, [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse left waiting outside the throne room at Elsinore forever.]]



* ShamingTheMob: When Laertes and his followers invade Elsinore.
-->'''Gertude:''' How cheerfully on the false trail they cry!\\
O, this is counter, you false Danish dogs!



* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Hamlet's final soliloquy at the end of Act IV. News of Fortinbras's supposed intentions to fiercely defend a "little patch of ground" forces Hamlet to confront his own unwillingness to follow through with his revenge. He concludes that it is most definitely time to act--but the conviction, unsurprisingly, does not last long.

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* WhyAreYouNotMySon: In his first scene, Claudius publicly names Hamlet as his heir and implores him to "Think of [[RoyalWe us]] as of a father," but not until he has addressed Laertes's suit to return to France and made it quite clear who his favorite young nobleman really is.[[note]] He [[SayMyName addresses Laertes by name]] ''five times'' in twelve lines here.[[/note]]
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Hamlet's final soliloquy at the end of Act IV. News of Fortinbras's supposed intentions military action to fiercely (supposedly) defend a "little patch of ground" forces Hamlet to confront his own unwillingness to follow through with his revenge. He concludes that it is most definitely time to act--but the conviction, unsurprisingly, does not last long.



* YouKilledMyFather: The main plot. Also the motive driving Laertes to kill first Claudius, then Hamlet when Claudius talks him down, and Fortinbras to overthrow the Dane.

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* YouKilledMyFather: The main plot. Also the motive driving Laertes to kill first Claudius, then Hamlet when Claudius talks him down, and Fortinbras to overthrow seize the Dane.throne of Denmark.
15th Sep '17 10:02:08 AM TheGreatConversation
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* TheConsigliere: Played with. Hamlet often asks his devoted NumberTwo, Horatio, for his advice or opinion, but unfailingly disregards it.



* TheDragon
** Laertes becomes one to BigBad Claudius in Act IV.
** Also Gertrude, in productions where she was in on the murder of King Hamlet.

to:

* TheDragon
** Laertes becomes one to BigBad Claudius in Act IV.
** Also Gertrude, in productions where she was in on the murder of
TheDragon: Before Hamlet can ([[KillHimAlready finally]]) kill King Hamlet.Claudius, he must win the duel with Laertes, Claudius's newly appointed NumberTwo.



* MultilayerFacade: Is Hamlet sane, faking insanity? Or is he insane faking sanity faking insanity?



* ObfuscatingInsanity: Hamlet fakes insanity as part of his plot to kill Claudius and avenge his father. Or hell, maybe he is actually insane. Or possibly he's faking insanity ''and'' is actually insane.

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* ObfuscatingInsanity: Hamlet fakes insanity as part of his plot to kill Claudius and avenge his father. Or hell, maybe he is actually insane. [[MultilayerFacade Or possibly he's faking insanity ''and'' is actually insane.insane]].



* OneWayTrip: One interpretation of V.2. The audience cannot accept that Hamlet would fail to recognize the duel with Laertes (who hates him), arranged by Claudius (who wants him dead), as the obvious death trap it is. His resigned detachment from the situation seems to imply that he is prepared to die--as long as he takes Claudius down first.



* StraightMan: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern play this to Hamlet . . . Until he realizes they're there to spy on him.

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* StraightMan: StraightMan
**
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern play this to Hamlet . . . Until he realizes they're there to spy on him.
** Horatio to Hamlet, always.



* SwordFight: Act V culminates in a duel between Laertes and Hamlet orchestrated by Claudius in order to kill Hamlet with either a poisoned drink or the poisoned sword he provides Laertes. The plan backfires when Queen Gertrude drinks the poison, Hamlet hits Laertes with the poison sword, Laertes exposes Claudius with his dying breath and Hamlet kills Claudius, only for Hamlet to succumb to his poisonous injuries moments later.

to:

* SwordFight: Act V culminates in a duel between Laertes and Hamlet orchestrated by Claudius in order to kill Hamlet with either a poisoned drink or the poisoned sword he provides Laertes. The plan backfires when Queen Gertrude drinks the poison, Hamlet hits Laertes with the poison sword, Laertes exposes Claudius with his dying breath breath, and Hamlet kills Claudius, only for Hamlet to succumb to his poisonous injuries moments later.later.
* TamperingWithFoodAndDrink: Just in case the poisoned foil doesn't off Hamlet, Claudius prepares some poisoned wine for him. He attempts to ward off suspicion by drinking from the cup himself and ''then'' dropping the poison in, [[RefugeInAudacity calling it a "pearl" for Hamlet in celebration of his triumph]]. Hamlet doesn't seem fooled ("I'll play this bout first: set it by awhile"), but then Gertrude pulls an accidental PoisonedChaliceSwitcheroo and drinks from the goblet herself. Later, Hamlet forces Claudius to drink from the poisoned chalice, and Horatio [[TogetherInDeath attempts suicide]] with it.
6th Sep '17 12:37:32 PM fruitstripegum
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* EvilUncle: Claudius murdered his brother to gain the throne and married his brother's wife to secure it. He plots to have Hamlet killed as soon as he realizes Hamlet means him trouble, but this crosses over with good old ProperlyParanoid.



* EvilUncle: Claudius murdered his brother to gain the throne and married his brother's wife to secure it. He plots to have Hamlet killed as soon as he realizes Hamlet means him trouble, but this crosses over with good old ProperlyParanoid.
3rd Sep '17 11:45:36 AM Phediuk
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* VagueAge: Piecing together several of the gravedigger's lines seems to reveal that Hamlet is 30. However, he is unmarried, frequently referred to as "young," and at the start of the play revealed to be attending university, which would have been nearly unheard of for someone past his early twenties. Besides, his emotional and mental states hardly seem congruent with a mature adult. Since no more than a few weeks can have passed since Act IV, some scholars believe Shakespeare wished to impose a new maturity on the very much changed Hamlet of Act V. It is also possible that [[StealthInsult the gravedigger was simply mocking him]].

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* VagueAge: Piecing together several of the gravedigger's lines seems to reveal that Hamlet is 30.30; additionally, Hamlet says he remembers Yorick, who died twenty-three years prior. However, he is unmarried, frequently referred to as "young," and at the start of the play revealed to be attending university, which would have been nearly unheard of for someone past his early twenties. Besides, his emotional and mental states hardly seem congruent with a mature adult. Since no more than a few weeks can have passed since Act IV, some scholars believe Shakespeare wished to impose a new maturity on the very much changed Hamlet of Act V. It is also possible that [[StealthInsult the gravedigger was simply mocking him]].
3rd Sep '17 11:43:46 AM Phediuk
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* ManChild: Hamlet is apparently 30, if the gravedigger is to be believed, but continues to live with his parents, has not found a wife, does not possess a castle or any other feudal fief, and in general has not accomplished anything one would expect of a college-educated nobleman. (Many, though not necessarily all, scholars think that he's actually in his late teens or maybe early twenties.)

to:

* ManChild: Hamlet is apparently 30, if 30; the gravedigger is to be believed, but states this outright, and Hamlet himself says that he remembers Yorick, who died twenty-three years prior. On the other hand, he continues to live with his parents, has not found a wife, does not possess a castle or any other feudal fief, and in general has not accomplished anything one would expect of a college-educated nobleman. (Many, though not necessarily all, (Some scholars think that he's actually in his late teens or maybe early twenties.)
1st Sep '17 8:26:14 AM Morwen
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** Columbine = determination

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** Columbine = determinationmale adultery


Added DiffLines:

***Rue also symbolizes female adultery
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