History Theatre / DoctorFaustus

7th Feb '16 3:33:31 PM ading
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* FalseReassurance: Mephistopheles is totally honest, but his words (the famous "why this is hell" speech) are vague enough that Faust can stupidly interpret them however he wants to.
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* EvilMakesYouUgly: Mephistopheles implies that Lucifer before his fall was superhumanly beautiful, but the first thing Faustus does upon seeing the present-day Lucifer is ask "Who are you that look so terrible?" * FalseReassurance: Mephistopheles is totally honest, but his words (the famous "why this is hell" speech) are vague enough that Faust Faustus can stupidly interpret them however he wants to.
29th Aug '15 12:27:31 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

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* ButtDialingMordor: Though Faustus himself knows exactly what he's getting into when he starts summoning demons, ThoseTwoGuys that serve him don't. They're larking around, mimicking Faustus's incantations more as a joke than anything else, and end up summoning Mephistopheles himself. Needless to say, he's not happy at all and they get transfigured into animals.
12th Aug '15 10:24:31 PM NanoMoose
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* SycophanticServant: When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain, Satan appears before him to parades the Sins before him and ask whether they're delightful. [[YesMan Faustus agrees, emphatically, that they are]]. Because, under the circumstances, disagreeing would be a terminally bad idea.
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* SycophanticServant: When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain, Satan appears before him to parades parade the Sins before him and ask whether they're delightful. [[YesMan Faustus agrees, emphatically, that they are]]. Because, under the circumstances, disagreeing would be a terminally bad idea.
12th Aug '15 10:23:47 PM NanoMoose
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So you're a doctor in [[TheRenaissance post-medieval]] [[HolyRomanEmpire Germany]] who's getting tired of the dreary drudgery of everyday life. What to do when saving the lives of your patients no longer brings you a feeling of satisfaction and joy? Why, turn to [[BlackMagic satanic magic]] and [[DealWithTheDevil summon a devil]] to use as your own personal slave of course! [[EvilIsNotAToy We're sure you can guess what happens next.]] '''''The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus''''' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist, represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge--and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as an AntiHero, who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.
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So you're a doctor in [[TheRenaissance post-medieval]] [[HolyRomanEmpire Germany]] who's getting tired of the dreary drudgery of everyday life. What to do when saving the lives of your patients no longer brings you a feeling of satisfaction and joy? Why, turn to [[BlackMagic satanic magic]] and [[DealWithTheDevil summon a devil]] to use as your own personal slave slave, of course! [[EvilIsNotAToy We're sure you can guess what happens next.]] '''''The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus''''' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist, atheist (which is to say, someone who did not practise the faith exactly as the law said it should be practised; the word could apply to someone who was simply sceptical of the scripture as it was given, someone who blasphemed, or even a Catholic), represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge--and knowledge -- and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as an AntiHero, who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: Okay, so the moral is: if you deal with the devil, things will not end well for you. But, boy–it does look like it might be fun to have all the forces of darkness at your disposal for a little while, doesn't it?

* EvilIsNotAToy - you made a DealWithTheDevil to have magic powers in exchange for taking your soul in a few short years... really, why act surprised? [[WhatAnIdiot What did you THINK was going to happen?]]
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* EvilIsNotAToy - you EvilIsNotAToy: You made a DealWithTheDevil to have magic powers in exchange for taking your soul in a few short years... really, why act surprised? [[WhatAnIdiot What did you THINK was going to happen?]]

* FlatEarthAtheist: Despite just summoning a demon from Hell and proceeding to sell his immortal soul to the Devil, Faustus insists to Mephilstopheles' annoyance that Hell and damnation are metaphorical.
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* FlatEarthAtheist: Despite just summoning a demon from Hell and proceeding to sell his immortal soul to the Devil, Faustus insists to Mephilstopheles' Mephistophiles' annoyance that Hell and damnation are metaphorical.

* SpecialPersonNormalName: Faustus's first name is [[DramaticPause . . .]] John.
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* SpecialPersonNormalName: Faustus's first name is [[DramaticPause . . .[[DramaticPause ...]] John.

* SycophanticServant: Faustus. When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain Satan appears before him and parades the Sins in front of him and asks him aren't these so delightful and [[YesMan Faustus agrees emphatically]] (as in "please don't kill me") always agree with the scariest person in the room.
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* SycophanticServant: Faustus. When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain bargain, Satan appears before him and to parades the Sins in front of before him and asks him aren't these so delightful and ask whether they're delightful. [[YesMan Faustus agrees emphatically]] (as in "please don't kill me") always agree with agrees, emphatically, that they are]]. Because, under the scariest person in the room. circumstances, disagreeing would be a terminally bad idea.
2nd Apr '15 4:14:17 PM DoktorvonEurotrash
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* NobleDemon: You could make an argument for Mephistopheles.

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* NobleDemon: You could make an argument for Mephistopheles.
2nd Apr '15 4:12:54 PM DoktorvonEurotrash
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alphabetisation
* GetTheeToANunnery: Tons and tons. One of the minor characters mentions that he'd use magic to transform into a flea and crawl into women's plackets, quite literally slits in skirts.

* GetTheeToANunnery: Tons and tons. One of the minor characters mentions that he'd use magic to transform into a flea and crawl into women's plackets, quite literally slits in skirts.
19th Mar '15 8:09:58 PM Hodor2
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* FlatEarthAtheist: Despite just summoning a demon from Hell and proceeding to sell his immortal soul to the Devil, Faustus insists to Mephilstopheles' annoyance that Hell and damnation are metaphorical.
17th Dec '14 7:32:44 PM PrinceKaen
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* WouldHurtAChild: Before summoning Mephistopheles, Faustus mentions how he would build an altar and church to sacrifice newborns to Beelzebub on. It's unclear if he would actually do it, however.
15th Dec '13 7:35:51 PM Taylowl
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ableist slur
* SycophanticServant: Faustus. When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain Satan appears before him and parades the Sins in front of him and asks him aren't these so delightful and [[YesMan Faustus agrees emphatically]] (as in "please don't kill me") always agree with the psychopath.
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* SycophanticServant: Faustus. When Faustus is considering rescinding on their bargain Satan appears before him and parades the Sins in front of him and asks him aren't these so delightful and [[YesMan Faustus agrees emphatically]] (as in "please don't kill me") always agree with the psychopath.scariest person in the room.
10th Jul '13 9:02:18 PM InfalliableLiar
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'''''The Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus''''' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist, represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge--and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as an AntiHero, who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.
to:
'''''The Tragicall Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus''''' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist, represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge--and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as an AntiHero, who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.
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