History TheLordOfTheRings / TropesPeoples

27th Mar '18 8:49:42 PM Toadofsteel
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* HumansAreWarriors: From the moment the Rohirrim charge sends the orcs into retreat, the Battle of Pelennor Fields is almost entirely Mannish forces on both sides of the conflict.
5th Feb '18 3:30:36 PM defciggy
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* AllTrollsAreDifferent: Tolkien's trolls are giant-like monsters with rocky hides and beast-like intelligence.[[note]]Though, since Aragorn recognises their old cave as a typical troll-cave (which had a hinged door), trolls smart enough to build simple shelters are implicictly at least relatively common.[[/note]] (The talking trolls in ''The Hobbit'' may or may not have been artistic license on Bilbo's part.) They permanently turn to stone when exposed to sunlight. The exceptions are Sauron's Olog-hai, more intelligent trolls that are resistant to the effects of sunlight.

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* AllTrollsAreDifferent: Tolkien's trolls are giant-like monsters with rocky hides and beast-like intelligence.[[note]]Though, since Aragorn recognises their old cave as a typical troll-cave (which had a hinged door), trolls smart enough to build simple shelters are implicictly implicitly at least relatively common.[[/note]] (The talking trolls in ''The Hobbit'' may or may not have been artistic license on Bilbo's part.) They permanently turn to stone when exposed to sunlight. The exceptions are Sauron's Olog-hai, more intelligent trolls that are resistant to the effects of sunlight.
21st Dec '17 6:01:11 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* YouAllMeetInAnInn: Frodo and friends first meet Aragorn in ''The Prancing Pony'', and earlier as per ''Unfinished Tales'' Gandalf and Thorin met there to set up the quest in ''The Hobbit''.

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* YouAllMeetInAnInn: Frodo and friends first meet Aragorn in ''The Prancing Pony'', and earlier as per ''Unfinished Tales'' Gandalf and Thorin met there to set up the quest in ''The Hobbit''.
21st Dec '17 5:57:31 PM fusilcontrafusil
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!Bree-land

The Men of Bree and a few other related towns are a peaceful folk who remain blissfully unaware of the tumultuous outside world, much like their hobbit neighbors. They're unknowingly protected by the Rangers of the North.

* TheEveryman: Similar to the hobbits.
* GoodCounterpart: To the ''Dunlendings'', their distant ancestors.
* {{Muggles}}: They are utterly mundane, except for co-existing with hobbits.
* OddFriendship: The men and hobbits of Bree-land lived among each other and got along splendidly.
* YouAllMeetInAnInn: Frodo and friends first meet Aragorn in ''The Prancing Pony'', and earlier as per ''Unfinished Tales'' Gandalf and Thorin met there to set up the quest in ''The Hobbit''.
18th Dec '17 3:46:46 AM fusilcontrafusil
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* BadassArmy: Though they don't assemble until the War of the Ring. The army of Arnor in its prime was mighty, as well, directly challenging Sauron and taking part in the siege of Mordor.



* MenOfSherwood: Though they don't assemble until the War of the Ring. Would be a BadassArmy if there weren't only 31 of them present, not counting Aragorn, since they gathered in haste and not everyone could make it. The army of Arnor in its prime was mighty, as well, directly challenging Sauron and taking part in the siege of Mordor.



A general term for human cultures not related to the Dúnedain, referring to the assumption that they were worshippers of Morgoth; essentially "barbarians." It's quite a derogotory term, as the Dúnedain look down on anyone who isn't related to the Númenóreans, and plenty of "Men of Darkness" weren't allied to the forces of evil at all.

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A general term for human cultures not related to the Dúnedain, referring to the assumption that they were worshippers of Morgoth; essentially "barbarians." It's As Faramir acknowledges, it's quite a derogotory term, as the Dúnedain look (of Gondor, especially) historically looked down on anyone who isn't wasn't related to the Númenóreans, and plenty of "Men of Darkness" weren't allied to the forces of evil at all.
27th Oct '17 7:09:51 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* EvilCounterpart: Umbar to Gondor and Arnor. It is the third, but also the oldest Numenorean realm in exile, and unlike the two kingdoms, was populated by Black Numenoreans loyal to Sauron.

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* EvilCounterpart: Umbar to Gondor and Arnor. It is the third, but also the oldest Numenorean realm in exile, and unlike the two kingdoms, was populated by Black Numenoreans loyal to Sauron. In the Battle of Pelennor Fields, the Harad cavalry to Rohan's.



* OneSteveLimit: Broken -- there was another group of Men called Easterlings in ''The Silmarillion''. There's no indication they were related; it was probably just a generic term for "barbarians" from the east.

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* OneSteveLimit: Broken -- there was another group of Men called Easterlings in ''The Silmarillion''. There's no indication they were related; it was probably just a generic term for "barbarians" Men from the east.



* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: The Haradrim in particular wear this hat.

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* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: The Easterlings and Haradrim in particular wear this hat.



* VillainousValor: The Haradrim keep fighting after Sauron's defeat, which [[WorthyOpponent earns them Gondor's respect]].

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* SnakesAreSinister: The Haradrim chieftain in ''The Return of the King'' has a battle flag with a black serpent.
* VillainousValor: The Easterlings and Haradrim keep fighting after Sauron's defeat, which [[WorthyOpponent earns them Gondor's respect]].
15th Oct '17 12:20:44 PM SwampAdder
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Usually called "wizards." Not really a race, but certainly not part of any other race mentioned on this page. Unbeknownst to nearly everybody in Middle-earth, Istari are spirits sent in the form of old men to counsel the resistance to Sauron. Gandalf is the most prominent, being a major character in both ''Characters/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Characters/TheHobbit''. Saruman appears extensively in the latter, and Radagast is mentioned in the former and shows up in a flashback in the latter.

* AmbiguouslyHuman: Per ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', wizards are [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Maiar]]. However, Tolkien apparently reconsidered their nature as such, and what they are exactly is not mentioned in either ''The Hobbit'' or ''The Lord Of The Rings''.

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Usually called "wizards." Not really a race, but certainly not part of any other race mentioned on this page. Unbeknownst to nearly everybody in Middle-earth, the Istari are spirits sent in the form of old men to counsel the resistance to Sauron. Gandalf is the most prominent, being a major character in both ''Characters/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Characters/TheHobbit''. Saruman appears extensively in the latter, and Radagast is mentioned in the former and shows up in a flashback in the latter.

* AmbiguouslyHuman: Per ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', wizards are [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Maiar]]. However, Tolkien apparently reconsidered their nature as such, and what they are exactly is not mentioned explained in either ''The Hobbit'' or ''The Lord Of The Rings''.



* OurAngelsAreDifferent: Despite their appearance as bent old men with long beards, the Appendices hint and ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' explicitly states that Istari are Maiar sent from Valinor to assist the Free Peoples in resisting Sauron. Maiar are the rough equivalents of Christian angels in Arda. However, there is evidence that Tolkien was reconsidering their status as such.

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* OurAngelsAreDifferent: Despite their appearance as bent old men with long beards, the Appendices hint and ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' explicitly states that Istari are Maiar sent from Valinor to assist the Free Peoples in resisting Sauron. Maiar are the rough equivalents of Christian angels in Arda. However, there is evidence that Tolkien was reconsidering their status as such.
1st Oct '17 7:56:19 AM CrimsonZephyr
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* EvilCounterpart: Umbar to Gondor and Arnor. It is the third, but also the oldest Numenorean realm in exile, and unlike the two kingdoms, was populated by Black Numenoreans loyal to Sauron.
30th Sep '17 4:51:04 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* {{Cincinnatus}}: Their effective ruling line, the Stewards, actually boasted that they have never declared themselves king, though it must be noted that this has less savory parallels. After all the emperors of Rome ('''imperator''' is simply a military term, like "commander") never declared themselves king either.

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* {{Cincinnatus}}: Their effective ruling line, the Stewards, actually boasted that they have never declared themselves king, though it must be noted that this has less savory savoury parallels. After all the emperors of Rome ('''imperator''' is simply was originally a military term, like "commander") never declared themselves king either.either... technically. In the Greek speaking world, which was much less shy of autocrats, the Emperor was commonly and informally (later formally) referred to as the ''basileus'', a Greek word translated as 'King', which came to mean Emperor in the Byzantine period.
24th Sep '17 1:39:58 PM Theriocephalus
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* OurGiantsAreBigger: And certainly more botanical.

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* OurGiantsAreBigger: And certainly more botanical. As a side note, the word "Ent" comes from an Old English word meaning "giant", and is linguistically related to "ettin" and "jotunn".


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* {{Treants}}: The {{Trope Maker}}s. In-universe, the Ents were explicitly created by the nature goddess Yavanna to protect the wilderness from the axes of civilization (and to keep the trees from becoming homicidal). They have an odd sort of immortality: they don't age and live more or less forever, but over time become stiffer, sleepier and more "treeish", rooting themselves and not stirring for increasingly long periods, eventually becoming indistinguishable from normal trees. They still live extremely long before this happens, giving them a very patient and long-term view on things: they consider reaching a decision after three days of continuous debate almost unseemly hasty.
** In a mild case of UnbuiltTrope, they have a number of characteristics later imitations lack, such as a highly variable numbers of fingers and toes and a form of gender dimorphism: male Ents live in deep forests and guard nature like later examples, but the women, the Entwives, favor agriculture and farmlands and resemble various crops and domestic trees, and were the ones who taught agriculture to early Men.
** There is also some debate about their appearance while the Peter Jackson movies popularized the "humanoid tree" image, in Tolkien's writing they're more humanoid, generally being described as giant- or troll-like beings who come to resemble trees as they age. In fact, the word "ent" is derived from an Old English word meaning "giant", and is linguistically related to "ettin" and "jotunn". However, they are stated elsewhere in Tolkien's writings to have originated as sprits that entered the world by inhabiting or mimicking trees, giving more support to an interpretation of them as literal humanoid trees.
** There are also the Huorns, which are creatures that start out as normal trees and gradually "wake up" in a sort of reverse process to the Ents growing treeish, growing more mobile and aware. They're just as protective of their forests and distrustful of intruders as true Ents, but can be much more malevolent and dangerous. A part of the Ents' job is to corral and calm the Huorns and keep them from becoming too much of a danger to others, hence the Ents being also know as the Shepherds of the Trees.
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