History SoYouWantTo / WriteASuperheroComic

30th May '16 4:21:27 PM givcon14
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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them")[[note]]Superman being arguably the most well-known example of this[[/note]].

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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them")[[note]]Superman being arguably being the most well-known example of this[[/note]].
30th May '16 4:20:18 PM givcon14
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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them")[[note]]Superman is arguably the most known example of this[[/note]].

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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them")[[note]]Superman is being arguably the most known well-known example of this[[/note]].
30th May '16 4:19:18 PM givcon14
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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them" [[note]]Superman is probably the most known example of this, though arguably Clark Kent is just as much "him" as Superman is[[/note]]).

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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them" [[note]]Superman "them")[[note]]Superman is probably arguably the most known example of this, though arguably Clark Kent is just as much "him" as Superman is[[/note]]).
this[[/note]].
30th May '16 4:18:03 PM givcon14
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Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them").

to:

Superheroes also generally require the SecretIdentity - a public superhero identity and a private civilian identity. This is not uniform, however, and there's many superheroes who only have one (and even for those who have both, sometimes it's the ''[[SecretIdentityIdentity civilian identity]]'' that's the mask, and the Superhero form is the real "them").
"them" [[note]]Superman is probably the most known example of this, though arguably Clark Kent is just as much "him" as Superman is[[/note]]).
30th Apr '16 5:23:19 PM Laevatein
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Is there any kind of SuperRegistrationAct in effect? How do the heroes feel about it, or the prospect if it happen? While American superheroes have traditionally been individualists opposed to any kind of government regulation, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/feature/2016-04-29/all-might-vs-superman-how-our-heroes-are-different/.101590 this article]] points out that in Japanese superhero series such as ''OnePunchMan'' and ''MyHeroAcademia'', superheroes seem to be in agreement that they should be regulated and anyone opposed to that is crazy.
29th Apr '16 8:06:05 AM CyberTiger88
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Introduce PsychicPowers such as telepathy into the mix and you have the potential to do JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind and other related plots.

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Introduce PsychicPowers such as telepathy {{telepathy}} into the mix and you have the potential to do JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind and other related plots.



A hero needs a suppourting cast, as well. Even if his parents are dead, an older mentor figure is often around (Ma and Pa Kent, Alfred, Aunt May...). Add a love interest, but make it filled with personality sparks and friction, nothing too smooth or easy. A hero's alter ego usually involves work -- you get your boss (Thunderbolt Ross, Perry White, J. Jonah Jameson), and minor characters like Jimmy Olsen or Rick Jones that can be good foils for our hero.

And, of course, there's your rogues' gallery...

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A hero needs a suppourting supporting cast, as well. Even if his parents are dead, an older mentor figure is often around (Ma and Pa Kent, Alfred, Aunt May...). Add a love interest, but make it filled with personality sparks and friction, nothing too smooth or easy. A hero's alter ego usually involves work -- you get your boss (Thunderbolt Ross, Perry White, J. Jonah Jameson), and minor characters like Jimmy Olsen or Rick Jones that can be good foils for our hero.

And, of course, there's your rogues' gallery...
RoguesGallery...



Sounds generic, but it's a classical archetype -- the grim doppleganger who shows the dark side of our hero. This doesn't have to mean a literal EvilTwin, just some character who is extremely similar to our hero, only evil. Superman, for example, has Bizarro. Though he began as a comedic figure, ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' showed how he can be PlayedForDrama: He has all of Superman's powers an memories, only twisted.

Spider-Man faced this kind of antagonist in the form of Venom and then Carnage. Hulk has an even better example in Maestro, a future incarnation of himself. And most of Batman's antagonists can be read as mild variations on himself, as if to show that a mere hairs breadth seperates him from a villain like the Joker (which was Moore's point in ''Comicbook/TheKillingJoke'').

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Sounds generic, but it's a classical archetype -- the grim doppleganger doppelganger who shows the dark side of our hero. This doesn't have to mean a literal EvilTwin, just [[EvilCounterpart some character who is extremely similar to our hero, only evil.evil]]. Superman, for example, has Bizarro. Though he began as a comedic figure, ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' showed how he can be PlayedForDrama: He has all of Superman's powers an and memories, only twisted.

Spider-Man faced this kind of antagonist in the form of Venom and then Carnage. Hulk has an even better example in Maestro, a future incarnation of himself. And most of Batman's antagonists can be read as mild variations on himself, as if to show that a mere hairs breadth seperates separates him from a villain like the Joker (which was Moore's point in ''Comicbook/TheKillingJoke'').



While the Dark Half resembles the hero a great deal, the Antithesis is the hero's opposite in some regard. What makes them oppisite can be concept or scope, an exception to the "stay in concept" advice earlier. For example, who is Superman's foremost foe? Lex Luthor, a mere mortal. Luthor's savvy cunning contradicts Clark Kent's farmboy ethics, Luthor's worldy wealth counters Superman's otherworldly might. And consider the Hulk again. What is Hulk's primary power? Strength. What is the antithesis of strength? Intelligence. Enter the Leader, someone who was also bombarded with Gamma Radiation. Sometimes the antithesis is even more straightforward - Captain America defends the United States and liberal-democratic values, so naturally a Nazi like Red Skull or a Fascist like Baron Zemo are decent archenemies. Sounds simplistic, but it's a way of challenging our hero's concept, of testing its mettle with a direct contradictory force.

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While the Dark Half resembles the hero a great deal, the Antithesis is [[{{Foil}} the hero's opposite in some regard. regard]]. What makes them oppisite opposite can be concept or scope, an exception to the "stay in concept" advice earlier. For example, who is Superman's foremost foe? Lex Luthor, a mere mortal. Luthor's savvy cunning contradicts Clark Kent's farmboy ethics, Luthor's worldy worldly wealth counters Superman's otherworldly might. And consider the Hulk again. What is Hulk's primary power? Strength. What is the antithesis of strength? Intelligence. Enter the Leader, someone who was also bombarded with Gamma Radiation. Sometimes the antithesis is even more straightforward - Captain America defends the United States and liberal-democratic values, so naturally a Nazi like Red Skull or a Fascist like Baron Zemo are decent archenemies. Sounds simplistic, but it's a way of challenging our hero's concept, of testing its mettle with a direct contradictory force.



Be wary when writing such a threat, though, for a couple of reasons. Forst, if you have too many epic threats, you dilute their meaning. They ought to be more rare than they've been in comics recently, and most certainly ought to come in more varieties than yet ANOTHER AlienInvasion. Secondly, there ought to be villains specific to this epic threat, not just an average enemy with high ambitions. Darkseid, for example, is inherently epic - whatever he does threatens the entire Earth. But what if the Joker decided to try and take over the planet? Forget it. Keep epic threats in the hands of epic characters. There are plenty to go around, too: Darkseid, Apocalypse, Thanos, Dark Phoenix, you name it. Even Batman has a relatively epic threat in the form of R'as Al Ghul, someone who consistently scheams to wreak havoc on the planet.

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Be wary when writing such a threat, though, for a couple of reasons. Forst, First, [[TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed if you have too many epic threats, threats]], you dilute their meaning. They ought to be more rare than they've been in comics recently, and most certainly ought to come in more varieties than yet ANOTHER AlienInvasion. Secondly, there ought to be villains specific to this epic threat, not just an average enemy with high ambitions. Darkseid, for example, is inherently epic - whatever he does threatens the entire Earth. But what if the Joker decided to try and take over the planet? Forget it. Keep epic threats in the hands of epic characters. There are plenty to go around, too: Darkseid, Apocalypse, Thanos, Dark Phoenix, you name it. Even Batman has a relatively epic threat in the form of R'as Al Ghul, someone who consistently scheams schemes to wreak havoc on the planet.



'''Power Specific Enemies''' are the easiest and most common. If, for example, you have someone super strong like the Hulk, pitting other strongmen against him will only be interesting for so long. It helps to work off Hulk's weaknesses, or work around his powers to make strength less of an advantage for him. Hulk can't exactly connect a blow with Zzzax, for example, since he's pure electricity, and pitting him against someone oltra fast, who doesn't stand still long enough to get punched, throws someone like Hulk off. Similarly, Superman is extremely powerful, but that's why Parasite poses such a threat - he can take that power away, even use it against him.

'''Concept Specific Enemies''' are a bit more valueable, though. For example, Batman resides in an urban environment. His enemy Killer Croc represents the dark underbelly of the streets and sewer ststems, the infamous crocodiles running around the drainage system which forms a well-known urban myth. Part of Hulks concept is the fact he's an outcast, so a writer could emphasise that by pitting him against a VillainWithGoodPublicity. Superman benefits from enemies related to Krypton.

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'''Power Specific Enemies''' are the easiest and most common. If, for example, you have someone super strong like the Hulk, pitting other strongmen against him will only be interesting for so long. It helps to work off Hulk's weaknesses, or work around his powers to make strength less of an advantage for him. Hulk can't exactly connect a blow with Zzzax, for example, since he's pure electricity, and pitting him against someone oltra ultra fast, who doesn't stand still long enough to get punched, throws someone like Hulk off. Similarly, Superman is extremely powerful, but that's why Parasite poses such a threat - he can take that power away, even use it against him.

'''Concept Specific Enemies''' are a bit more valueable, valuable, though. For example, Batman resides in an urban environment. His enemy Killer Croc represents the dark underbelly of the streets and sewer ststems, systems, the infamous crocodiles running around the drainage system which forms a well-known urban myth. Part of Hulks Hulk's concept is the fact he's an outcast, so a writer could emphasise emphasize that by pitting him against a VillainWithGoodPublicity. Superman benefits from enemies related to Krypton.



But everybody seems to love seeing some new, kick-ass villain step up to the plate and wreak irreperable havoc on a hero's life, like a Doomsday or a Bane. The question is, why do these foes stay on the backburner while classic foes like Lex Luthor, Joker and Green Goblin return again and again? Because the latter aren't here-goes-everything, "let's throw caution to the wind!" destroyers. Like the heroes they fight, they too are complex characters with ambitions and schemes. Pitting heroes against these [[GenericDoomsdayVillain fly-by-night anarchist destroyers]] is cheap entertainment upon which comics with inferior writing (like early Image titles) rely too much. Let villains be part of the cast, steadier personalities with whom a reader can identify. Who knows? If they're interesting enough, they may, like ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} and ComicBook/{{Venom}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher, be worth showcasing in their own title.

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But everybody seems to love seeing some new, kick-ass villain step up to the plate and wreak irreperable irreparable havoc on a hero's life, like a Doomsday or a Bane. The question is, why do these foes stay on the backburner while classic foes like Lex Luthor, Joker and Green Goblin return again and again? Because the latter aren't here-goes-everything, "let's throw caution to the wind!" destroyers. Like the heroes they fight, they too are complex characters with ambitions and schemes. Pitting heroes against these [[GenericDoomsdayVillain fly-by-night anarchist destroyers]] is cheap entertainment upon which comics with inferior writing (like early Image titles) rely too much. Let villains be part of the cast, steadier personalities with whom a reader can identify. Who knows? If they're interesting enough, they may, like ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} and ComicBook/{{Venom}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher, be worth showcasing in their own title.



The best series about solo heroes usually include a lovable, interesting cast of suppourting characters, but this can overly elevate the hero in their midst. Regardless of the fact that characters like Lois Lane are rather likeable, for instance, at some point you'll probably get tired of Superman always being the one who saves Metropolis.

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The best series about solo heroes usually include a lovable, interesting cast of suppourting supporting characters, but this can overly elevate the hero in their midst. Regardless of the fact that characters like Lois Lane are rather likeable, likable, for instance, at some point you'll probably get tired of Superman always being the one who saves Metropolis.



Though the earliest superhero teams, like the ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica and the AllStarSquadron were simply single heroes assembling together, newer groups have more interdependent team members who rely upon each other. The first great team in this sense has to be the ComicBook/FantasticFour, which remains one of the deeper, more fascinating teams out there. First of all, have you noticed how rarely they've been seperate from one another? There's a reason for this - they need each other to work. The most isolated character of the bunch is the Thing -- who, sure enough, had his own title for many years, probably because his m.o. is the most self-contained: he must tragically cope with the physical deformity his great power has cursed him with, forever isolating him from humanity.

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Though the earliest superhero teams, like the ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica and the AllStarSquadron were simply single heroes assembling together, newer groups have more interdependent team members who rely upon each other. The first great team in this sense has to be the ComicBook/FantasticFour, which remains one of the deeper, more fascinating teams out there. First of all, have you noticed how rarely they've been seperate separate from one another? There's a reason for this - they need each other to work. The most isolated character of the bunch is the Thing -- who, sure enough, had his own title for many years, probably because his m.o. is the most self-contained: he must tragically cope with the physical deformity his great power has cursed him with, forever isolating him from humanity.



Regardless, many series have attempted to recreate the chemistry of these teams, some with more success than others. One of the biggest facters in some teams' flatness is their creators trying too hard to make the personalities clash too much, ether too extremely or too simplisticly. The examples above all include heavy doses of friendship, comradery, even a few relationships - the tension they contain is balanced by cooperation. Hopefully, new teams to come our way will reflect complexity, depth, and the full range of human emotions (not just egotism, confrontation, and tension) that made classic superhero teams so spectacular.

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Regardless, many series have attempted to recreate the chemistry of these teams, some with more success than others. One of the biggest facters factors in some teams' flatness is their creators trying too hard to make the personalities clash too much, ether too extremely or too simplisticly. simplistically. The examples above all include heavy doses of friendship, comradery, comradely, even a few relationships - the tension they contain is balanced by cooperation. Hopefully, new teams to come our way will reflect complexity, depth, and the full range of human emotions (not just egotism, confrontation, and tension) that made classic superhero teams so spectacular.
11th Apr '16 4:25:37 AM Laevatein
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Well, for superheroes, you generally need [[StockSuperpowers superpowers]] -- although of course Franchise/{{Batman}} [[BadassNormal got around without them]]. But then, some might say that his CrazyPrepared abilities and superhuman level of [[CrimefightingWithCash easily accessible monetary wealth]] are superpowers in and of themselves....

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Well, for superheroes, you generally need [[StockSuperpowers superpowers]] -- although of course Franchise/{{Batman}} [[BadassNormal got around without them]]. But then, some might say that his CrazyPrepared abilities and abilities, superhuman level of [[CrimefightingWithCash easily accessible monetary wealth]] wealth]], and alleged [[AdoredByTheNetwork company favouritism]] are superpowers in and of themselves....
30th Mar '16 11:47:04 AM worldbreaker
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There used to be a time when DeathIsCheap was a daring approach but over time its constant use has made it a punchline to todays comic fanbase. Even character death has been handled as nothing more than a cheap gimmick to boost sales rather than a captivating story plot point.


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To those who are tire of the DeathIsCheap approach that the superhero genre usually gets then why not have it that Death Is NOT Cheap? Not just for the villain but for the hero aswell. To really make it that nobody is safe why not take a daring method by killing off your title character just to drive the point home. Especially to showcase that PlotArmor is futile. Just make sure that you have other interesting characters to replace the main character and not have your story become too grim dark in the process. As the old saying goes: "There's always darkness before dawn"
25th Mar '16 11:32:24 AM worldbreaker
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City Building: Say you don't want to have a series set in an already established city? Having it be set in a fictional city provides more creative freedom to build your own city lore with its quirky little residents. ''ComicBook/AstroCity,'' is the comic to read if you need an example of how to do a comic based in a fictional city.
15th Mar '16 9:35:43 PM Goldfritha
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Or even a superpowered person who chooses a job having nothing to do with crime, fighting or committing. Though that will mean very atypical plots, unless you focus on people trying to coerce him into one or the other.
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