History Series / YesMinister

13th Dec '16 4:51:08 AM 06tele
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** Humphrey actually isn't amoral: he sees his role as to ensure continuity of government and good order, so he's opposed to any kind of radical change, wherever on the political spectrum it's coming from. (Although Margaret Thatcher loved this show, Humphrey would have hated the way she drove a wrecking ball through government procedures in order to further her political agenda. Humphrey is conservative by temperament, unlike the Conservative party itself at the time this show was being made.)

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** Humphrey actually isn't amoral: he sees his believe it's the role as of the civil service to ensure continuity of government and good order, so he's opposed to any kind of radical change, wherever on the political spectrum it's coming from. (Although Margaret Thatcher loved this show, Humphrey would have hated the way she drove a wrecking ball through government civil service procedures in order to further her political agenda. Humphrey is conservative by temperament, unlike the Conservative party itself at the time this show was being made.)
13th Dec '16 3:29:29 AM 06tele
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* GreyAndGrayMorality: Sir Humphrey and Hacker, whilst both giving lip service to the good of Britain are both patently in it for their own ends, and the benefit of the Civil Service or the Party respectively. Hacker is slightly more sympathetic, as he actually possesses a conscience, but ignores it when it becomes politically inconvenient, as opposed to Humphrey, who is utterly callous and amoral. (In "The Whiskey Priest", Humphrey is [[InsultBackfire delighted]] to be called a "moral vacuum" - but he's genuinely shocked at the notion of a civil servant resigning on a point of principle.) Additionally, there are some episodes where it is Humphrey fighting for the good of Britain as a whole while Hacker maneuvers for partisan or personal gain. In "The Official Visit," for example, it is Humphrey who is outraged at the thought of paying fifty million pounds of taxpayers' money in extortion, whereas Hacker is in favor of it because of the benefits to his party. Likewise, in "The Greasy Pole," it is again Hacker selling out the national interest by blocking the construction of a politically unpopular but perfectly safe chemical plant in response to ignorant [=NIMBYism=], while Humphrey tries to persuade him to let the project go forward. Both of these are a reversal of their usual roles, where Hacker is trying (sort of) to fight for the national interest as he sees it, and Humphrey obstructs him.

to:

* GreyAndGrayMorality: Sir Humphrey and Hacker, whilst both giving lip service to the good of Britain are both patently in it for their own ends, and the benefit of the Civil Service or the Party respectively. Hacker is slightly more sympathetic, as he actually possesses a conscience, but ignores it when it becomes politically inconvenient, as opposed to Humphrey, who is utterly appears relatively callous and amoral. (In "The Whiskey Priest", Humphrey is [[InsultBackfire delighted]] to be called a "moral vacuum" - but he's genuinely shocked at the notion of a civil servant resigning on a point of principle.) Additionally, there are some episodes where it is Humphrey fighting for the good of Britain as a whole while Hacker maneuvers for partisan or personal gain. In "The Official Visit," for example, it is Humphrey who is outraged at the thought of paying fifty million pounds of taxpayers' money in extortion, whereas Hacker is in favor of it because of the benefits to his party. Likewise, in "The Greasy Pole," it is again Hacker selling out the national interest by blocking the construction of a politically unpopular but perfectly safe chemical plant in response to ignorant [=NIMBYism=], while Humphrey tries to persuade him to let the project go forward. Both of these are a reversal of their usual roles, where Hacker is trying (sort of) to fight for the national interest as he sees it, and Humphrey obstructs him.him.
** Humphrey actually isn't amoral: he sees his role as to ensure continuity of government and good order, so he's opposed to any kind of radical change, wherever on the political spectrum it's coming from. (Although Margaret Thatcher loved this show, Humphrey would have hated the way she drove a wrecking ball through government procedures in order to further her political agenda. Humphrey is conservative by temperament, unlike the Conservative party itself at the time this show was being made.)
13th Dec '16 3:22:42 AM 06tele
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-->'''Humphrey''': Prime Minister, it is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them and that every memberís recollection of them differs violently from every other memberís recollection. Consequently, we accept the convention that the official decisions are those, and only those, which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, from which it emerges with an elegant inevitability that any decision which has been officially reached will have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials and any decision which is not recorded in the minutes has not been officially reached even if one or more members believe they can recollect it, so in this particular case, if the decision had been officially reached it would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, and it isnít so it wasnít.

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-->'''Humphrey''': Prime Minister, it is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them and that every memberís recollection of them differs violently from every other memberís recollection. Consequently, we accept the convention that the official decisions are those, and only those, which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, from which it emerges with an elegant inevitability that any decision which has been officially reached will have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials and any decision which is not recorded in the minutes has not been officially reached even if one or more members believe they can recollect it, so in this particular case, if the decision had been officially reached it would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, and officials. And it isnít so it wasnít.
13th Dec '16 3:20:16 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

* SophisticatedAsHell: In "Man Overboard", Humphrey uses a non-swearing version of this to let Dudley the Employment Secretary realise that, due to existing administrative practices, his alleged intervention in an earlier cabinet discussion does not appear as part of the official record of the discussion and that he is, therefore, royally screwed:
-->'''Dudley''': Prime Minister, why was my request for a further discussion and your reply not minuted?\\
[''Hacker looks inquiringly at Humphrey'']
-->'''Humphrey''': Prime Minister, it is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them and that every memberís recollection of them differs violently from every other memberís recollection. Consequently, we accept the convention that the official decisions are those, and only those, which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, from which it emerges with an elegant inevitability that any decision which has been officially reached will have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials and any decision which is not recorded in the minutes has not been officially reached even if one or more members believe they can recollect it, so in this particular case, if the decision had been officially reached it would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, and it isnít so it wasnít.
13th Dec '16 3:13:44 AM 06tele
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-->'''Humphrey''': The relationship[[note]]The one between Humphrey and Hacker, that is[[/note]] which I might tentatively venture to aver has been not without some degree of reciprocal utility[[not]]Humphrey wants to suggest that Hacker and he have been useful to each other, but is hesitant to speak for Hacker[[/note]] and perhaps even occasional gratification[[note]]Humphrey admits to occasionally liking working for Hacker[[/note]], is emerging a point of irreversible bifurcation[[note]]They will shortly not be working with each other any longer[[/note]] and, to be brief, is in the propinquity of its ultimate regrettable termination.[[note]]In fact, they will almost immediately not be working with each other any longer.[[/note]]

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-->'''Humphrey''': The relationship[[note]]The one between Humphrey and Hacker, that is[[/note]] which I might tentatively venture to aver has been not without some degree of reciprocal utility[[not]]Humphrey utility[[note]]Humphrey wants to suggest that Hacker and he have been useful to each other, but is hesitant to speak for Hacker[[/note]] and perhaps even occasional gratification[[note]]Humphrey admits to occasionally liking working for Hacker[[/note]], is emerging a point of irreversible bifurcation[[note]]They will shortly not be working with each other any longer[[/note]] and, to be brief, is in the propinquity of its ultimate regrettable termination.[[note]]In fact, they will almost immediately not be working with each other any longer.[[/note]]
13th Dec '16 3:13:00 AM 06tele
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* ExpospeakGag: Humphrey's overly long speeches are a hallmark of the series, often taking up to a hundred words to say something that can be boiled down to "Merry Christmas", or "I want my key back!"

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* ExpospeakGag: Humphrey's overly long speeches are a hallmark of the series, often taking up to a hundred words to say something that can be boiled down to "Merry Christmas", or "I want my key back!"back!" Annotatable thus:
-->'''Humphrey''': The relationship[[note]]The one between Humphrey and Hacker, that is[[/note]] which I might tentatively venture to aver has been not without some degree of reciprocal utility[[not]]Humphrey wants to suggest that Hacker and he have been useful to each other, but is hesitant to speak for Hacker[[/note]] and perhaps even occasional gratification[[note]]Humphrey admits to occasionally liking working for Hacker[[/note]], is emerging a point of irreversible bifurcation[[note]]They will shortly not be working with each other any longer[[/note]] and, to be brief, is in the propinquity of its ultimate regrettable termination.[[note]]In fact, they will almost immediately not be working with each other any longer.[[/note]]



* SesquipedalianLoquaciousness: Sir Humphrey's (and occasionally Bernard's) preferred method of communication.

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* SesquipedalianLoquaciousness: Sir Humphrey's (and occasionally Bernard's) preferred method of communication. Justified, because Sir Humphrey is practised in describing things in officialese: see ExpospeakGag above.
12th Dec '16 12:14:24 PM john_e
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Added DiffLines:

* TwoFirstNames: Considered a warning sign by Sir Bernard (as he is now):
-->Secondly, I have always had an instinctive distrust of people whose Christian names and surnames are reversible.
10th Dec '16 3:14:45 AM john_e
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Added DiffLines:

* DeathGlare: [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pQcNKFoIDE Sir Arnold's reaction]], when Sir Humphrey jokes that perhaps he ought to become a Minister.
3rd Dec '16 10:23:46 PM lucy24
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IHaveThisFriend: Whenever Bernard needs to tell Humphrey about Hacker's plans without actually telling him, he always couches his words in a series of hypothetical scenario of a hypothetical minister.

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* IHaveThisFriend: Whenever Bernard needs to tell Humphrey about Hacker's plans without actually telling him, he always couches his words in a series of hypothetical scenario of a hypothetical minister.
3rd Dec '16 6:47:38 AM SonofAkatosh
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* GunboatDiplomacy: In "The Official Visit", after getting caught up in a foreign policy mess regarding a speech by a visiting African leader likely to prove greatly embarrassing to Her Majesty The Queen, a Foreign Office official remarks that in the old days of empire it was the sort of thing that would be resolved by sending a gunboat in as a show of force to scare everyone straight. After a brief chuckle from everyone present, Hacker remarks that "I suppose that ''is'' out of the question," in a tone which clearly suggests he's hoping it might not be. Everyone looks at him like he's grown a second head. Not least because Humphrey had pointed out that military action would be seen as a massive overreaction mere minutes before. Later, as prime minister, Hacker actually managed to solve an international crisis by sending a battalion of paratroopers on a "Good Will Mission" to make some soviet-backed rebels stand down.

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* GunboatDiplomacy: In "The Official Visit", after getting caught up in a foreign policy mess regarding a speech by a visiting African leader likely to prove greatly embarrassing to Her Majesty The Queen, a Martin, the Foreign Office official Secretary, remarks that in the old days of empire it was the sort of thing that would be resolved by sending a gunboat in as a show of force to scare everyone straight. After a brief chuckle from everyone present, Hacker remarks that "I suppose that ''is'' out of the question," in a tone which clearly suggests he's hoping it might not be. Everyone looks at him like he's grown a second head. Not least because Humphrey had pointed out that military action would be seen as a massive overreaction mere minutes before. Later, as prime minister, Hacker actually managed to solve an international crisis by sending a battalion of paratroopers on a "Good Will Mission" to make some soviet-backed rebels stand down.



** In "The Key", Humphrey takes great delight in dressing down a policeman for letting him through security without checking his pass, despite the man's protests that everyone knows who Humphrey is. Humphrey issues new orders that NO ONE gets through without a pass. No One. (This is part of his broader scheme to limit access to the Prime Minister). This comes back to bite him towards the end of the episode when [[spoiler:he is locked out of No. 10, desperately tries to get back in, and is refused entry by the same policeman, who takes great delight in making sure the new rules are rigorously applied, despite Humphrey's protests.]]

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** In "The Key", Humphrey takes great delight in dressing down a policeman Bernard for letting him through security allowing Hacker's election agent into No. 10 without checking his pass, despite the man's protests that everyone knows who Humphrey is. a pass. Humphrey issues new orders that NO ONE gets through without a pass.pass or an appointment. No One. (This is part of his broader scheme to limit access to the Prime Minister). This comes back to bite him towards the end of the episode when [[spoiler:he is locked out of No. 10, desperately tries to get back in, and is refused entry by the same policeman, who takes great delight in making sure the new rules are rigorously applied, applies the rules on Bernard's instruction, despite Humphrey's protests.]]



IHaveThisFriend: Whenever Bernard needs to tell Humphrey about Hacker's plans without actually telling him, he always couches his words in a series of hypothetical scenario of a hypothetical minister.



* TheStateroomSketch: Done with a really small rail carriage and an endless series of visitors, one of whom is very fat (presumably Jumbo, Humphrey's counterpart at the Foreign Office).

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* TheStateroomSketch: Done with a really small rail carriage and an endless series of visitors, one of whom is very fat (presumably (in this case Jumbo, Humphrey's counterpart at the Foreign Office).
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