History Series / YesMinister

22nd Sep '16 11:43:16 PM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Discussed in the entry for "The National Education Service". Bernard notes that Sir Humphrey could have avoided all the trouble if he had just stuck to his argument about the changing needs of education in Britain. Instead, he arrogantly flaunted his own classical education in a way calculated to make Hacker feel foolish, thus strengthening Hacker's resolve to push through and beat him.
26th Aug '16 7:28:04 AM FordPrefect
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* BanOnPolitics: [[AvertedTrope Surprisingly averted]]. For the most part, the focus of discussion is usually on the intelligence of the plot and dialogue, and the acting of Eddington, Hawthorne and Fowlds. Whatever political discussions do occur are either good natured, in keeping with the humour of the show or just kept down to a minimum. You get the odd exception, but considering how heated political discussions can get, its actually quite refreshing.

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* BanOnPolitics: [[AvertedTrope Surprisingly averted]]. For the most part, the focus of discussion is usually on the intelligence of the plot and dialogue, and the acting of Eddington, Hawthorne and Fowlds. Whatever political discussions do occur are either good natured, in keeping with the humour of the show or just kept down to a minimum. You get the odd exception, but considering how heated political discussions can get, its it's actually quite refreshing.



** One episode involves Hacker meeting the former minister for his department, now in opposition, and the two clearly get along quite well. The point is made that for all the posturing about issues in public, when it comes to the actual business of governing the ''real'' opposition is in fact the Civil Service.

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** One episode involves Hacker meeting the former minister for his department, now in opposition, and the two clearly get along quite well. The point is made that for all the posturing about issues in public, when it comes to the actual business of governing governing, the ''real'' opposition is in fact the Civil Service.
26th Aug '16 7:25:56 AM FordPrefect
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* BadBoss: It's stated in the series and [[AllThereInTheManual especially the books]] that Hacker and the then [[NoNameGiven Prime Minister]] had a somewhat adversarial relationship (Hacker having run a rival contender's in-party campaign for nomination as Prime Minister and while they lost to the PM, he still holds a grudge). Indeed, it's stated that the reason Hacker was appointed to the Department of Administrative Affairs when he'd been the Shadow Agriculture Minister for seven years was because the DAA was considered [[KickedUpstairs a unglamorous political graveyard]] (That and the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture had begged not to have him – he'd have known too much!). Indeed early in the series the PM comes close to abolishing the entire department – and by extension Hackers career altogether. However there is a turning point in their relationship where the PM becomes ''slightly'' more of a BenevolentBoss.

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* BadBoss: It's stated in the series and [[AllThereInTheManual especially the books]] that Hacker and the then [[NoNameGiven Prime Minister]] had a somewhat adversarial relationship (Hacker having run a rival contender's in-party campaign for nomination as Prime Minister and while they lost to the PM, he still holds a grudge). Indeed, it's stated that the reason Hacker was appointed to the Department of Administrative Affairs when he'd been the Shadow Agriculture Minister for seven years was because the DAA was considered [[KickedUpstairs a unglamorous political graveyard]] (That graveyard]]. (That, and the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture had begged not to have him – he'd have known too much!). much!.) Indeed early in the series the PM comes close to abolishing the entire department – and by extension Hackers Hacker's career altogether. However there is a turning point in their relationship where the PM becomes ''slightly'' more of a BenevolentBoss.
26th Aug '16 7:21:10 AM FordPrefect
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-->'''Bernard:''' Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits.

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-->'''Bernard:''' Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as [[PageThreeStunna she's got big tits.tits]].
** And note that [[DoubleEntendre the Prime Minister at the time]] was UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher.
18th Aug '16 12:27:55 AM mlsmithca
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* AlternateHistory: The show is set roughly contemporaneously to when it is made and frequently alludes to actual world events that take place during the 1980s (such as the Falklands conflict) but UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher doesn't appear to exist and the Prime Minister whose cabinet Hacker serves in is male. And, of course, Jim Hacker himself becomes Prime Minister in about 1986.
* AdHominem: Used in "Man Overboard", where Sir Humphrey decides to derail the Employment Secretary's military relocation proposal by attacking the Employment Secretary's character (by framing him as disloyal to the Prime Minister and plotting a leadership challenge) rather than attacking his proposal. He lampshades it by announcing that he's "decided to play the man instead of the ball". It ends up backfiring, however; Humphrey puts so much energy into discrediting the Employment Secretary that he doesn't remember to address the plan at all, which means that once the Employment Secretary's gone, there's nothing to stop Hacker safely implementing the plan.
* {{Adorkable}}: Bernard and his "''Gosh.''" and "''Crikey.''" and occasionally speaking at length about etymology.



* AdHominem: Used in "Man Overboard", where Sir Humphrey decides to derail the Employment Secretary's military relocation proposal by attacking the Employment Secretary's character (by framing him as disloyal to the Prime Minister and plotting a leadership challenge) rather than attacking his proposal. He lampshades it by announcing that he's "decided to play the man instead of the ball". It ends up backfiring, however; Humphrey puts so much energy into discrediting the Employment Secretary that he doesn't remember to address the plan at all, which means that once the Employment Secretary's gone, there's nothing to stop Hacker safely implementing the plan.
* {{Adorkable}}: Bernard and his "''Gosh.''" and "''Crikey.''" and occasionally speaking at length about etymology.
* AlternateHistory: The show is set roughly contemporaneously to when it is made and frequently alludes to actual world events that take place during the 1980s (such as the Falklands conflict) but UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher doesn't appear to exist and the Prime Minister whose cabinet Hacker serves in is male. And, of course, Jim Hacker himself becomes Prime Minister in about 1986.



* BenevolentBoss: The change from the PM being a BadBoss comes when during a official inquiry into civil service waste and inefficiency, Hacker and Humphrey manage to do a pretty good job of covering up the problems or at least stalling despite massive evidence against them. Hacker is called in for a private word with one of the PM's enforcers, who points out that the PM actually ''wants'' the truth to come out, and is annoyed by how well he's covering for the civil service. Hacker is faced with a [[TitleDrop Question Of Loyalty]] he can either further antagonize the PM, or likely burn bridges at his own department. In a blaze of glory, he chooses to reveal all. Humphrey is furious and certain it's the death knell of Hacker's career. However the PM is ''delighted'', and sends him a hand written note inviting him and his family for Sunday Lunch at Chequers in political terms a priceless reward. Whilst he never completely loses his fear of the PM, from this point in the series until Hacker becomes PM himself following the latter's retirement, it's implied after this point that they get on much more amicably, and several new powers and possible promotions are sent his way. The only other times they come close to clashing are all caused by outside influences, and don't amount to anything anyway.
** Although this doesn't stop Hacker from being delighted when the old PM dies before his CompromisingMemoirs are finished a notable chapter was titled "The Two Faces Of Jim Hacker"!

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* BenevolentBoss: The change from the PM being a BadBoss comes when during a official inquiry into civil service waste and inefficiency, Hacker and Humphrey manage to do a pretty good job of covering up the problems or at least stalling despite massive evidence against them. Hacker is called in for a private word with one of the PM's enforcers, who points out that the PM actually ''wants'' the truth to come out, and is annoyed by how well he's covering for the civil service. Hacker is faced with a [[TitleDrop Question Of Loyalty]] he can either further antagonize the PM, or likely burn bridges at his own department. In a blaze of glory, he chooses to reveal all. Humphrey is furious and certain it's the death knell of Hacker's career. However the PM is ''delighted'', and sends him a hand written note inviting him and his family for Sunday Lunch at Chequers in political terms a priceless reward. Whilst he never completely loses his fear of the PM, from this point in the series until Hacker becomes PM himself following the latter's retirement, it's implied after this point that they get on much more amicably, and several new powers and possible promotions are sent his way. The only other times they come close to clashing are all caused by outside influences, and don't amount to anything anyway. \n** Although this doesn't stop Hacker from being delighted when the old PM dies before his CompromisingMemoirs are finished a notable chapter was titled "The Two Faces Of Jim Hacker"!



* UsefulNotes/ColdWar: Particularly noted during the first ''Yes, Prime Minister'' episode, in which Hacker is informed about the [[UltimateDefenceOfTheRealm British nuclear deterrent]] (or what passes for one, at any rate).



* DebateAndSwitch: Frequently employed, often of the TakeAThirdOption variety.
** The third option at the end of "The Whiskey Priest" [[DrowningMySorrows drives Hacker to drink]], because he may be a [[DirtyCoward self-serving politician]] but he also has a [[ALighterShadeOfGrey conscience]].

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* DebateAndSwitch: Frequently employed, often of the TakeAThirdOption variety. \n** The third option at the end of "The Whiskey Priest" [[DrowningMySorrows drives Hacker to drink]], because he may be a [[DirtyCoward self-serving politician]] but he also has a [[ALighterShadeOfGrey conscience]].



* [[EveryoneHasStandards Even Amoral Civil Servants Have Standards]]: Humphrey doesn't have a lot of moral convictions, but even he is genuinely hurt and outraged in "One of Us" when everyone suspects him of being a Soviet agent.

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* [[EveryoneHasStandards Even Amoral Civil Servants Have Standards]]: EveryoneHasStandards: Humphrey doesn't have a lot of moral convictions, but even he is genuinely hurt and outraged in "One of Us" when everyone suspects him of being a Soviet agent.



* FunWithAcronyms: On the subject of UsefulNotes/KnightFever. (This is TruthInTelevision, believe it or not.)

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* FunWithAcronyms: On the subject of UsefulNotes/KnightFever. (This is TruthInTelevision, believe it or not.))[[note]] For those not acquainted with the British Honours System, various awards are handed out by the Monarch, on the recommendation of the Prime Minister. These range from the minor - CBE and OBE for pop stars, sportsmen and women, and minor Civil Servants, via knighthoods (hence SIR Terry Pratchett) to the rare 'Knights of the Garter etc'. CMG is one of the top ones. Cross of St Michael and St George. Becoming a Knight of the Order, then the 'Garter' are additions to this (promotions if you will). So a school caretaker who retires after 45 years can find himself in an ill-fitting hired suit to get his OBE, entertainers who've already gone through the various British Empire medals and are still around get the middle ranking ones and plain knighthoods, those on the inside, especially if you have rendered "great service" to the country (often assumed to be money to the PM's party for industrialists, or knowing where the bodies are buried for Civil Servants) get the biggies. It's basically a pat on the back for doing well that doesn't cost anything. Also, many orders come in various classes. In case of Order of St. Michael and St. George (MG), the classes are, in ascending order of seniority: Companion ('''C'''MG), Knight Commander ('''KC'''MG), and Knight Grand Cross ('''GC'''MG). For females, the word 'Knight' is replaced with 'Dame'.[[/note]]



** For those not acquainted with the British Honours System, various awards are handed out by the Monarch, on the recommendation of the Prime Minister. These range from the minor - CBE and OBE for pop stars, sportsmen and women, and minor Civil Servants, via knighthoods (hence SIR Terry Pratchett) to the rare 'Knights of the Garter etc'. CMG is one of the top ones. Cross of St Michael and St George. Becoming a Knight of the Order, then the 'Garter' are additions to this (promotions if you will). So a school caretaker who retires after 45 years can find him self in an ill-fitting hired suit to get his OBE, entertainers who've already gone through the various British Empire medals and are still around get the middle ranking ones and plain knighthoods, those on the inside, especially if you have rendered "great service" to the country (often assumed to be money to the PM's party - for industrialists, or knowing where the bodies are buried- for Civil Servants) get the biggies. Its basically a pat on the back for doing well that doesn't cost anything. Also, many orders come in various classes. In case of Order of St. Michael and St. George (MG), the classes are, in ascending order of seniority: Companion ('''C'''MG), Knight Commander ('''KC'''MG), and Knight Grand Cross ('''GC'''MG)[[note]] These are names of the honors for male recipients. For females word 'Knight' is replaced with 'Dame'.[[/note]].
* GallowsHumor: A few of Bernard's (often ill-received) jokes fall into this category.

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* GallowsHumor:
** For those not acquainted with the British Honours System, various awards are handed out by the Monarch, on the recommendation of the Prime Minister. These range from the minor - CBE and OBE for pop stars, sportsmen and women, and minor Civil Servants, via knighthoods (hence SIR Terry Pratchett) to the rare 'Knights of the Garter etc'. CMG is one of the top ones. Cross of St Michael and St George. Becoming a Knight of the Order, then the 'Garter' are additions to this (promotions if you will). So a school caretaker who retires after 45 years can find him self in an ill-fitting hired suit to get his OBE, entertainers who've already gone through the various British Empire medals and are still around get the middle ranking ones and plain knighthoods, those on the inside, especially if you have rendered "great service" to the country (often assumed to be money to the PM's party - for industrialists, or knowing where the bodies are buried- for Civil Servants) get the biggies. Its basically a pat on the back for doing well that doesn't cost anything. Also, many orders come in various classes. In case of Order of St. Michael and St. George (MG), the classes are, in ascending order of seniority: Companion ('''C'''MG), Knight Commander ('''KC'''MG), and Knight Grand Cross ('''GC'''MG)[[note]] These are names of the honors for male recipients. For females word 'Knight' is replaced with 'Dame'.[[/note]].
* GallowsHumor:
A few of Bernard's (often ill-received) jokes fall into this category.



* GreyAndGrayMorality- Sir Humphrey and Hacker, whilst both giving lip service to the good of Britain are both patently in it for their own ends, and the benefit of the Civil Service or the Party respectively. Hacker is slightly more sympathetic, as he actually possesses a conscience, but ignores it when it becomes politically inconvenient, as opposed to Humphrey, who is utterly callous and amoral. (In "The Whiskey Priest", Humphrey is [[InsultBackfire delighted]] to be called a "moral vacuum" - but he's genuinely shocked at the notion of a civil servant resigning on a point of principle.)
** Additionally, there are some episodes where it is Humphrey fighting for the good of Britain as a whole while Hacker maneuvers for partisan or personal gain. In "The Official Visit," for example, it is Humphrey who is outraged at the thought of paying fifty million pounds of taxpayers' money in extortion, whereas Hacker is in favor of it because of the benefits to his party. Likewise, in "The Greasy Pole," it is again Hacker selling out the national interest by blocking the construction of a politically unpopular but perfectly safe chemical plant in response to ignorant [=NIMBYism=], while Humphrey tries to persuade him to let the project go forward. Both of these are a reversal of their usual roles, where Hacker is trying (sort of) to fight for the national interest as he sees it, and Humphrey obstructs him.
* GunboatDiplomacy: In "The Official Visit", after getting caught up in a foreign policy mess regarding a speech by a visiting African leader likely to prove greatly embarrassing to Her Majesty The Queen, a Foreign Office official remarks that in the old days of empire it was the sort of thing that would be resolved by sending a gunboat in as a show of force to scare everyone straight. After a brief chuckle from everyone present, Hacker remarks that "I suppose that ''is'' out of the question," in a tone which clearly suggests he's hoping it might not be. Everyone looks at him like he's grown a second head. Not least because Humphrey had pointed out that military action would be seen as a massive overreaction mere minutes before.
** Later, as prime minister, Hacker actually managed to solve an international crisis by sending a battalion of paratroopers on a "Good Will Mission" to make some soviet-backed rebels stand down.

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* GreyAndGrayMorality- GreyAndGrayMorality: Sir Humphrey and Hacker, whilst both giving lip service to the good of Britain are both patently in it for their own ends, and the benefit of the Civil Service or the Party respectively. Hacker is slightly more sympathetic, as he actually possesses a conscience, but ignores it when it becomes politically inconvenient, as opposed to Humphrey, who is utterly callous and amoral. (In "The Whiskey Priest", Humphrey is [[InsultBackfire delighted]] to be called a "moral vacuum" - but he's genuinely shocked at the notion of a civil servant resigning on a point of principle.)
**
) Additionally, there are some episodes where it is Humphrey fighting for the good of Britain as a whole while Hacker maneuvers for partisan or personal gain. In "The Official Visit," for example, it is Humphrey who is outraged at the thought of paying fifty million pounds of taxpayers' money in extortion, whereas Hacker is in favor of it because of the benefits to his party. Likewise, in "The Greasy Pole," it is again Hacker selling out the national interest by blocking the construction of a politically unpopular but perfectly safe chemical plant in response to ignorant [=NIMBYism=], while Humphrey tries to persuade him to let the project go forward. Both of these are a reversal of their usual roles, where Hacker is trying (sort of) to fight for the national interest as he sees it, and Humphrey obstructs him.
* GunboatDiplomacy: In "The Official Visit", after getting caught up in a foreign policy mess regarding a speech by a visiting African leader likely to prove greatly embarrassing to Her Majesty The Queen, a Foreign Office official remarks that in the old days of empire it was the sort of thing that would be resolved by sending a gunboat in as a show of force to scare everyone straight. After a brief chuckle from everyone present, Hacker remarks that "I suppose that ''is'' out of the question," in a tone which clearly suggests he's hoping it might not be. Everyone looks at him like he's grown a second head. Not least because Humphrey had pointed out that military action would be seen as a massive overreaction mere minutes before.
**
before. Later, as prime minister, Hacker actually managed to solve an international crisis by sending a battalion of paratroopers on a "Good Will Mission" to make some soviet-backed rebels stand down.



-->"In politics you have to learn to say things with tact and finesse, you berk!"

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-->"In --->"In politics you have to learn to say things with tact and finesse, you berk!"



* InVinoVeritas: Hacker spilling his guts after having had too much of the wine at Baillie College's High Table dinner in "Doing the Honours."

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* InVinoVeritas: InVinoVeritas:
**
Hacker spilling his guts after having had too much of the wine at Baillie College's High Table dinner in "Doing the Honours."



* MayDecemberRomance: While her age is never explicitly stated, Hacker's wife is definitely significantly younger than her husband. Diana Hoddinott, her actress is 18 years younger than Paul Eddington, who played Hacker.
** Jim shares birth and death dates with Paul, as does Humphrey with Nigel, so the same can be assumed for all the characters, making Annie 18 years younger than Jim.

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* MayDecemberRomance: While her age is never explicitly stated, Hacker's wife is definitely significantly younger than her husband. Diana Hoddinott, her actress is 18 years younger than Paul Eddington, who played Hacker.
**
Hacker. Jim shares birth and death dates with Paul, as does Humphrey with Nigel, so the same can be assumed for all the characters, making Annie 18 years younger than Jim.



* NapoleonDelusion: When Hacker finds out that he's to be Prime Minister, his first reaction is silent incredulity, then fear, then awe, until finally he squares his jaw, sticks his hand inside his jacket and stares off heroically into the middle distance, as this trope.
** Not to mention Hacker's tendency to lapse into Churchill like speeches, complete with intonation and accent, whenever contemplating the supposedly great works he's about to undertake.

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* NapoleonDelusion: When Hacker finds out that he's to be Prime Minister, his first reaction is silent incredulity, then fear, then awe, until finally he squares his jaw, sticks his hand inside his jacket and stares off heroically into the middle distance, as this trope.
**
trope. Not to mention Hacker's tendency to lapse into Churchill like speeches, complete with intonation and accent, whenever contemplating the supposedly great works he's about to undertake.



* NewscasterCameo: Ludovic Kennedy appears as himself in several episodes.
** Moira Stewart has a brief vocal cameo in 'Party Games', announcing the PM's resignation.

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* NewscasterCameo: NewscasterCameo:
**
Ludovic Kennedy appears as himself in several episodes.
** Moira Stewart Stuart has a brief vocal cameo in 'Party Games', announcing the PM's resignation.



* PassiveAggressiveKombat: A speciality of the Civil Service, who tend to dress up scathing criticisms and insults in very polite and at times deferential language.
** In "Doing the Honours", after Hacker's plan to ensure Civil Service cooperation with his plans by threatening to withhold his departmental recommendations for the current Honours list starts to spread, Sir Arnold calls Sir Humphrey in for a chat. During their conversation, Sir Arnold genially informs Humphrey that "I'm not reprimanding you, I don't have all the facts" but mildly expresses concern that, should Humphrey fail to get the plan scotched, people might start to wonder whether Humphrey was "sound". Humphrey leaves the meeting looking like someone's worked him over with a two-by-four. Later lampshaded by Bernard and Hacker when they gossip about it; Hacker describes the conversation as "a real punch-up".

to:

* PassiveAggressiveKombat: A speciality of the Civil Service, who tend to dress up scathing criticisms and insults in very polite and at times deferential language.
**
language. In "Doing the Honours", after Hacker's plan to ensure Civil Service cooperation with his plans by threatening to withhold his departmental recommendations for the current Honours list starts to spread, Sir Arnold calls Sir Humphrey in for a chat. During their conversation, Sir Arnold genially informs Humphrey that "I'm not reprimanding you, I don't have all the facts" but mildly expresses concern that, should Humphrey fail to get the plan scotched, people might start to wonder whether Humphrey was "sound". Humphrey leaves the meeting looking like someone's worked him over with a two-by-four. Later lampshaded by Bernard and Hacker when they gossip about it; Hacker describes the conversation as "a real punch-up".



* PutOnABus: Frank Weisel, Hacker's political advisor in the first series of ''Yes, Minister'', was written out of the show by the end of that season because the authors couldn't find much use for his overtly political character in a show that was supposed to focus on the conflict between government and administration.

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* PutOnABus: PutOnABus:
**
Frank Weisel, Hacker's political advisor in the first series of ''Yes, Minister'', was written out of the show by the end of that season because the authors couldn't find much use for his overtly political character in a show that was supposed to focus on the conflict between government and administration.



* {{Qurac}}: In "The Moral Dimension," Hacker visits [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qumran_%28fictional_country%29 Qumran]], a fictional Muslim country based on a Gulf Arab state -- in fact, the scene where Hacker and his staff secretly consume alcohol was based on a real-life incident that happened on a British diplomatic visit to Pakistan.

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* {{Qurac}}: {{Qurac}}:
**
In "The Moral Dimension," Hacker visits [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qumran_%28fictional_country%29 Qumran]], a fictional Muslim country based on a Gulf Arab state -- in fact, the scene where Hacker and his staff secretly consume alcohol was based on a real-life incident that happened on a British diplomatic visit to Pakistan.



* RunningGag: the fact that Hacker's studies at the LSE don't compare to the {{Oxbridge}} education of Sir Humphrey.

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* RunningGag: the The fact that Hacker's studies at the LSE don't compare to the {{Oxbridge}} education of Sir Humphrey.



* {{Self Insert Fic}} Possibly the only time the author of a SelfInsertFic performed alongside the stars. Helps if you're MargaretThatcher.

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* {{Self Insert Fic}} SelfInsertFic: Possibly the only time the author of a SelfInsertFic performed alongside the stars. Helps if you're MargaretThatcher.



* TakeAThirdOption: In "Party Games," Hacker becomes the kingmaker in the battle to select his party's new leader (and therefore Prime Minister), and his decision pretty much comes down to whether he'd prefer to be the next Chancellor of the Exchequer or the next Foreign Secretary. Bernard persuades him that neither of those is really that desirable, and persuades him to take the third option -- become the Prime Minister himself.
** Also played with when Hacker, initially believing the 'third option' Bernard is pushing him towards is Home Secretary, makes it clear that even ''he's'' aware that that option isn't worth it:

to:

* TakeAThirdOption: In "Party Games," Hacker becomes the kingmaker in the battle to select his party's new leader (and therefore Prime Minister), and his decision pretty much comes down to whether he'd prefer to be the next Chancellor of the Exchequer or the next Foreign Secretary. Bernard persuades him that neither of those is really that desirable, and persuades him to take the third option -- become the Prime Minister himself.
**
himself. Also played with when Hacker, initially believing the 'third option' Bernard is pushing him towards is Home Secretary, makes it clear that even ''he's'' aware that that option isn't worth it:



* ThinkOfTheChildren: In "The National Education Service", Sir Humphrey is genuinely considering whether he should just let Hacker's education reform pass, [[PetTheDog because it's in best interest of children]]. Sir Arnold puts him back in line, quite bluntly stating: "[[KickTheDog Nevermind the children!]]".
* ThrowTheDogABone: Every so often, when the moon was right and the writers were feeling kind, Hacker would win out over Humphrey. This became gradually more frequent during ''Yes, Prime Minister'' as Hacker's power and experience grew. In "The Key", he has Humphrey at the brink of madness.



* ThrowTheDogABone: Every so often, when the moon was right and the writers were feeling kind, Hacker would win out over Humphrey. This became gradually more frequent during ''Yes, Prime Minister'' as Hacker's power and experience grew. In "The Key", he has Humphrey at the brink of madness.



* TheWatson: Jim Hacker's personal private secretary Bernard, to whom Sir Humphrey is often obliged to explain how things really work in the civil service. Hacker also frequently has to explain to Bernard how things work from the political side of things.
** In other instances, Bernard has to explain to Hacker how things really work -- often in order to help Hacker attempt to win the day.
* ThinkOfTheChildren: In "The National Education Service", Sir Humphrey is genuinely considering whether he should just let Hacker's education reform pass, [[PetTheDog because it's in best interest of children]]. Sir Arnold puts him back in line, quite bluntly stating: "[[KickTheDog Nevermind the children!]]".

to:

* TheWatson: Jim Hacker's personal private secretary Bernard, to whom Sir Humphrey is often obliged to explain how things really work in the civil service. Hacker also frequently has to explain to Bernard how things work from the political side of things. \n** In other instances, Bernard has to explain to Hacker how things really work -- often in order to help Hacker attempt to win the day.
* ThinkOfTheChildren: In "The National Education Service", Sir Humphrey is genuinely considering whether he should just let Hacker's education reform pass, [[PetTheDog because it's in best interest of children]]. Sir Arnold puts him back in line, quite bluntly stating: "[[KickTheDog Nevermind the children!]]".
day.



* HoistByHisOwnPetard:


to:

* HoistByHisOwnPetard:

18th Aug '16 12:13:55 AM GliderPro
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''Yes, Minister'' (1980-1988) is a [[BritCom British]] SitCom about Jim Hacker (Creator/PaulEddington), an inexperienced cabinet minister ([[NoPartyGiven party never specified]]), and his permanent secretary, Sir Humphrey Appleby (Creator/NigelHawthorne), who really runs the department. The original three seasons were followed by ''Yes, Prime Minister'', in which Jim Hacker became PM.

to:

''Yes, Minister'' (1980-1988) is a [[BritCom British]] SitCom about Jim Hacker (Creator/PaulEddington), an inexperienced cabinet minister ([[NoPartyGiven party never specified]]), and his permanent secretary, Sir Humphrey Appleby (Creator/NigelHawthorne), who really runs the department. The original three seasons were followed by ''Yes, Prime Minister'', in which Jim Hacker became PM.
PM. There was also a 1987 DOS PC [[VideoGame/YesPrimeMinister video game]] in which the player acted as Hacker and tried to make it through a week without tanking in the polls.
14th Jul '16 10:23:42 PM gemmabeta2
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* KickedUpstairs: Frequently referenced, and may have popularised the phrase. Specifically, Hacker lives in perpetual terror of being sent to the House of Lords, since it has no meaningful political influence whatsoever and, for all the pomp and circumstance and titles, is basically a place where failing political careers go to die.

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* KickedUpstairs: Frequently referenced, and may have popularised the phrase. Specifically, Hacker lives in perpetual terror of being sent to the House of Lords, since it has no meaningful political influence whatsoever and, for all the pomp and circumstance and titles, is basically a place where failing political careers go to die. And later, Hacker was honestly tempted about taking an job with the European Union, apparently, there is a point where the quality of the gravy train makes being kicked upstairs worth it.
14th Jul '16 10:18:15 PM gemmabeta2
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Added DiffLines:

** Later, as prime minister, Hacker actually managed to solve an international crisis by sending a battalion of paratroopers on a "Good Will Mission" to make some soviet-backed rebels stand down.
5th Jul '16 4:15:11 AM DoctorNemesis
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* AdHominem: Used in "Man Overboard", where Sir Humphrey decides to derail the Employment Secretary's military relocation proposal by attacking the Employment Secretary's character (by framing him as disloyal to the Prime Minister and plotting a leadership challenge) rather than attacking his proposal. He lampshades it by announcing that he's "decided to play the man instead of the ball". It ends up backfiring, however; Humphrey puts so much energy into discrediting the Employment Secretary that he doesn't address the plan at all, which means that once the Employment Secretary's gone, there's nothing to stop Hacker safely implementing the plan.

to:

* AdHominem: Used in "Man Overboard", where Sir Humphrey decides to derail the Employment Secretary's military relocation proposal by attacking the Employment Secretary's character (by framing him as disloyal to the Prime Minister and plotting a leadership challenge) rather than attacking his proposal. He lampshades it by announcing that he's "decided to play the man instead of the ball". It ends up backfiring, however; Humphrey puts so much energy into discrediting the Employment Secretary that he doesn't remember to address the plan at all, which means that once the Employment Secretary's gone, there's nothing to stop Hacker safely implementing the plan.



* HoistByHisOwnPetard:
** Humphrey's gambit in "Man Overboard" to get rid of the Employment Secretary in order to foil his plan to move half of the [[BritsWithBattleships armed forces]] OopNorth backfires spectacularly in the very last minute of the episode when [[spoiler:Hacker decides that now that the Employment Secretary is gone, he can implement the plan anyway and take the credit for it himself. It's only then that Humphrey realises that he spent so much time engineering the Employment Secretary's downfall that he never bothered to discredit the actual plan, leaving him with no counter argument -- and as Hacker unwittingly points out, he's actually strengthened several of the arguments ''for'' it without realizing]].
** In "The Key", Humphrey takes great delight in dressing down a policeman for letting him through security without checking his pass, despite the man's protests that everyone knows who Humphrey is. Humphrey issues new orders that NO ONE gets through without a pass. No One. (This is part of his broader scheme to limit access to the Prime Minister). This comes back to bite him towards the end of the episode when [[spoiler:he is locked out of No. 10, desperately tries to get back in, and is refused entry by the same policeman, who takes great delight in making sure the new rules are rigorously applied, despite Humphrey's protests.]]



* HoistByHisOwnPetard:
** Humphrey's gambit in "Man Overboard" to get rid of the Employment Secretary in order to foil his plan to move half of the [[BritsWithBattleships armed forces]] OopNorth backfires spectacularly in the very last minute of the episode when [[spoiler:Hacker decides that now that the Employment Secretary is gone, he can implement the plan anyway and take the credit for it himself. It's only then that Humphrey realises that he spent so much time engineering the Employment Secretary's downfall that he never bothered to discredit the actual plan, leaving him with no counter argument -- and as Hacker unwittingly points out, he's actually unwittingly strengthened several of the arguments ''for'' it]].
** In "The Key", Humphrey takes great delight in dressing down a policeman for letting him through security without checking his pass, despite the man's protests that everyone knows who Humphrey is. Humphrey issues new orders that NO ONE gets through without a pass. No One. (This is part of his broader scheme to limit access to the Prime Minister). This comes back to bite him towards the end of the episode when [[spoiler:he is locked out of No. 10, desperately tries to get back in, and is refused entry by the same policeman, who takes great delight in making sure the new rules are rigorously applied, despite Humphrey's protests.]]
21st May '16 5:24:38 AM DoctorNemesis
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** In one episode, Hacker and Humphrey are having one of their debates when Hacker brings up some facts to prove his point. Humphrey superciliously notes that his facts are statistical, which can be altered or doctored. When the debate gets a bit more heated, Humphrey begins to point out that statistics exist to prove ''his'' point, only to catch himself and present them as 'facts'. Hacker immediately jumps on the hypocrisy of claiming that his facts are merely statistics while Humphrey's statistics are facts.

to:

** In one episode, Hacker and Humphrey are having one of their debates when Hacker brings up some facts to prove his point. Humphrey superciliously notes that his facts are statistical, which can be altered or doctored. When the debate gets a bit more heated, Humphrey begins to point out that statistics exist to prove ''his'' point, only to catch himself and present them as 'facts'. Hacker immediately jumps on the hypocrisy of claiming Humphrey trying to claim that his Hacker's facts are merely statistics while Humphrey's his own statistics are facts.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.YesMinister