History Series / TouchedByAnAngel

13th Dec '17 4:14:18 AM MCanter89
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This Creator/{{CBS}} drama, which ran from 1994--2003, follows the adventures of angel Monica (Roma Downey). Under the tutelage of supervisor [[MagicalNegro Tess]] (Della Reese), and with the frequent assistance of an angel of death named Andrew (John Dye), she's a "caseworker" who [[WalkingTheEarth goes from place to place]] to help various people overcome their problems by steering them towards God. Late in the seventh season, a fourth main character, Gloria (Valerie Bertinelli), is introduced. As she is a newly created angel, she tags along with the others to learn how to help people.

This show has been mocked for its insistently heartwarming, [[TearJerker tearjerking nature]], but its nine year run is proof it has plenty of fans, and one can't fault its good intentions and wholesomeness.

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This Creator/{{CBS}} drama, which ran from 1994--2003, 1994 to 2003, follows the adventures of angel Monica (Roma Downey). Under the tutelage of supervisor [[MagicalNegro Tess]] (Della Reese), and with the frequent assistance of an angel of death named Andrew (John Dye), she's a "caseworker" who [[WalkingTheEarth goes from place to place]] to help various people overcome their problems by steering them towards God. Late in the seventh season, a fourth main character, Gloria (Valerie Bertinelli), is introduced. As she is a newly created angel, she tags along with the others to learn how to help people.

This show has been mocked for its insistently heartwarming, [[TearJerker tearjerking nature]], but its nine year nine-year run is proof it has plenty of fans, and one can't fault its good intentions and wholesomeness.






** In one episode, this trope was actually subverted. Monica and Andrew were assigned to work with an investigative journalist who sincerely believed the senior citizens caring for several foster children were abusive. [[spoiler: they're not; it was a false alarm and partially the fault of badly cobbled footage in-universe.]]
* AdultFear: Quite a bit. The finale comes to mind, wherein [[spoiler: a K-12 school is blown up, killing every child inside.]] Other episodes involve dying children, lost children, or abused children, among other examples.

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** In one episode, this trope was actually subverted. Monica and Andrew were assigned to work with an investigative journalist who sincerely believed the senior citizens caring for several foster children were abusive. [[spoiler: they're [[spoiler:They're not; it was a false alarm and partially the fault of badly cobbled footage in-universe.]]
* AdultFear: Quite a bit. The finale comes to mind, wherein [[spoiler: a K-12 [[spoiler:a K12 school is blown up, killing every child inside.]] Other episodes involve dying children, lost children, or abused children, among other examples.



* AsLongAsThereIsEvil: Something humans and angels must learn. Monica undergoes a notable example in Season 3's "Random Acts," since the [[spoiler: attack on and near death of her assignment]] almost causes her first HeroicBSOD.
* AsLongAsThereIsOneMan: Some assignments involve the angels explaining this to a human and helping him or her confront evil. A notable example is Season 4's "Breaking Bread," wherein Matt Colletti is chosen as a prophet and [[spoiler: defeats the devil, with the angels' help, when he uses a hate group to try to divide Matt's town.]]

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* AsLongAsThereIsEvil: Something humans and angels must learn. Monica undergoes a notable example in Season 3's "Random Acts," since the [[spoiler: attack [[spoiler:attack on and near death of her assignment]] almost causes her first HeroicBSOD.
HeroicBSOD.
* AsLongAsThereIsOneMan: Some assignments involve the angels explaining this to a human and helping him or her confront evil. A notable example is Season 4's "Breaking Bread," wherein Matt Colletti is chosen as a prophet and [[spoiler: defeats [[spoiler:defeats the devil, with the angels' help, when he uses a hate group to try to divide Matt's town.]]



** One of Monica's Season 2 assignments, Claudia, is this. As a result she's become obese. Monica must help her confront the real reason behind her weight gain--[[spoiler: she covered up her sister Morgan's drunk driving on the girls' prom night, which killed Morgan's then-boyfriend. She had also supplied the booze.]]

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** One of Monica's Season 2 assignments, Claudia, is this. As a result she's become obese. Monica must help her confront the real reason behind her weight gain--[[spoiler: she gain--[[spoiler:she covered up her sister Morgan's drunk driving on the girls' prom night, which killed Morgan's then-boyfriend. She had also supplied the booze.]]



** Subverted, then double subverted, in S6's "True Confessions". Prisoner Carla insists she is innocent of murder, but no one believes her until she is exonerated after three appeals. [[spoiler: It later turns out she suppressed what actually happened, meaning she did commit the murder.]]

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** Subverted, then double subverted, in S6's "True Confessions". Prisoner Carla insists she is innocent of murder, but no one believes her until she is exonerated after three appeals. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It later turns out she suppressed what actually happened, meaning she did commit the murder.]]



* DatingWhatDaddyHates: "Last Dance" from season four turns on this trope, as the dating teenagers featured have mothers who hate each other. [[spoiler: The ending is much LighterAndSofter than Romeo and Juliet.]]

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* DatingWhatDaddyHates: "Last Dance" from season four turns on this trope, as the dating teenagers featured have mothers who hate each other. [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The ending is much LighterAndSofter than Romeo and Juliet.]]



** In "Charades," a woman is rocked to learn her father's best friend was the one who named him during the Blacklist era and drove him to suicide. She's ready to expose the truth at a ceremony but her mother begs her not to...because the "friend" is really her birth father.

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** In "Charades," a woman is rocked to learn her father's best friend was the one who named him during the Blacklist era and drove him to suicide. She's ready to expose the truth at a ceremony but her mother begs her not to... because the "friend" is really her birth father. father.



* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Happens in season six's "Til Death Do Us Part," when a distraught assignment [[spoiler: slaps Andrew.]]

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* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Happens in season six's "Til Death Do Us Part," when a distraught assignment [[spoiler: slaps [[spoiler:slaps Andrew.]]



* DisappearedDad: Many of the kids the angels help fall into either this or MissingMom (and [[HeartwarmingOrphan sometimes both.]] This can be due to death, divorce, abandonment, or many other situations. Sometimes the absent parent reappears; sometimes not.
* DiscretionShot: The episode "Anatomy Lesson" has one. Monica is working with a coroner and is instructed to remove the heart from a cadaver.

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* DisappearedDad: Many of the kids the angels help fall into either this or MissingMom (and [[HeartwarmingOrphan sometimes both.]] both]]). This can be due to death, divorce, abandonment, or many other situations. Sometimes the absent parent reappears; sometimes not.
* DiscretionShot: The episode "Anatomy Lesson" has one. Monica is working with a coroner and is instructed to remove the heart from a cadaver.



** That being said, some assignments ''do'' fear Andrew and his kind because they know or at least sense that their eternity won't be good. Of note is James Block, a criminal and con artist from Season 3 who has a near-death experience after a heart attack. Though the angels never state outright he was headed for hell, Andrew is not James' best pal when he shows up. Instead, he simply stands staring at James regretfully, backlighted at the end of a long, dark tunnel that eventually [[spoiler: tries to pull James in.]]
* DownerEnding: Some episodes could be said to have these. One of the biggest offenders is "Minute by Minute," where the screen cuts to black just before [[spoiler: a Catholic school is bombed with the human heroine, a nun, inside.]]

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** That being said, some assignments ''do'' fear Andrew and his kind because they know or at least sense that their eternity won't be good. Of note is James Block, a criminal and con artist from Season 3 who has a near-death experience after a heart attack. Though the angels never state outright he was headed for hell, Andrew is not James' James's best pal when he shows up. Instead, he simply stands staring at James regretfully, backlighted at the end of a long, dark tunnel that eventually [[spoiler: tries [[spoiler:tries to pull James in.]]
* DownerEnding: Some episodes could be said to have these. One of the biggest offenders is "Minute by Minute," where the screen cuts to black just before [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a Catholic school is bombed with the human heroine, a nun, inside.]]



* EducationMama: Mostly inverted in "Stealing Hope" from Season 6. Nineteen-year-old Ricky is the oldest son of a single mother and comes from an impoverished family where his gas station job seems to be the main source of income. He has the intelligence and writing talent to do well at the local college, but his mom refuses to allow it on the grounds that [[spoiler: she believes Ricky will abandon her as her abusive husband did.]] She comes around after the climactic incident shows her Ricky's talent.

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* EducationMama: Mostly inverted in "Stealing Hope" from Season 6. Nineteen-year-old Ricky is the oldest son of a single mother and comes from an impoverished family where his gas station job seems to be the main source of income. He has the intelligence and writing talent to do well at the local college, but his mom refuses to allow it on the grounds that [[spoiler: she [[spoiler:she believes Ricky will abandon her as her abusive husband did.]] She comes around after the climactic incident shows her Ricky's talent.



** Also played painfully straight in Season 1's "The Hero," where James Mackey's [[EducationMama Education Papa]] tendencies cause his son Matt to [[spoiler: attempt suicide.]]
* EvilCounterpart: Kathleen, a fallen angel who faces Monica several times. [[spoiler: She returns to the side of God at the end of "Clipped Wings".]]

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** Also played painfully straight in Season 1's "The Hero," where James Mackey's [[EducationMama Education Papa]] tendencies cause his son Matt to [[spoiler: attempt [[spoiler:attempt suicide.]]
* EvilCounterpart: Kathleen, a fallen angel who faces Monica several times. [[spoiler: She [[spoiler:She returns to the side of God at the end of "Clipped Wings".]]



* ExecutiveMeddling: [[invoked]] Used in-universe in "The Medium and the Message" (a ClipShow): Monica tries to pitch a show about angels to a cynical [=TV=] exec and his staff, but they want to change her ideas to something less uplifting and wholesome (for instance, they want to take the idea of an angel of death in more of an action/horror direction).

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* ExecutiveMeddling: [[invoked]] Used in-universe in "The Medium and the Message" (a ClipShow): Monica tries to pitch a show about angels to a cynical [=TV=] TV exec and his staff, but they want to change her ideas to something less uplifting and wholesome (for instance, they want to take the idea of an angel of death in more of an action/horror direction).



* FaceHeelTurn: Monica's former search-and-rescue colleague, Kathleen, has one of these, but [[spoiler: she has a HeelFaceTurn in season 3]].

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* FaceHeelTurn: Monica's former search-and-rescue colleague, Kathleen, has one of these, but [[spoiler: she [[spoiler:she has a HeelFaceTurn in season 3]].



* ForTheEvulz: This is the primary reason Satan or his minions, such as [[spoiler: formerly]] fallen angel Kathleen, do anything. Tess lampshades it once: "Evil is for evil's sake, period."
* ForWantOfANail: In "Monica's Bad Day", her anger with a rude restaurant owner culminates in her throwing his cell phone into a fish tank. Events go from bad to worse for everyone in the restaurant, and Monica is then shown an alternate timeline in which she didn't throw away the phone and ''good'' things happened to everyone...including a woman who is suicidal. Monica and the other people must now save her in the established timeline.

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* ForTheEvulz: This is the primary reason Satan or his minions, such as [[spoiler: formerly]] [[spoiler:formerly]] fallen angel Kathleen, do anything. Tess lampshades it once: "Evil is for evil's sake, period."
* ForWantOfANail: In "Monica's Bad Day", her anger with a rude restaurant owner culminates in her throwing his cell phone into a fish tank. Events go from bad to worse for everyone in the restaurant, and Monica is then shown an alternate timeline in which she didn't throw away the phone and ''good'' things happened to everyone... including a woman who is suicidal. Monica and the other people must now save her in the established timeline.



* GoodIsBoring: Fallen angel Kathleen once tells Monica this is her justification for switching sides: "I'm having too much fun." [[spoiler: She eventually turns back to God, though.]] In a later episode, high-ranking angel Sam explains that some humans engage in sin because they believe this trope.

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* GoodIsBoring: Fallen angel Kathleen once tells Monica this is her justification for switching sides: "I'm having too much fun." [[spoiler: She [[spoiler:She eventually turns back to God, though.]] In a later episode, high-ranking angel Sam explains that some humans engage in sin because they believe this trope.
5th Dec '17 3:45:30 PM Spottedfeather
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This show has been mocked for its insistently heartwarming, [[TearJerker tearjerking nature]], but its nine year run is proof it has plenty of fans, and one can't fault its good intentions and wholesomeness. It also defied many stereotypes about religion, having episodes that declared, among other things, that God is perfectly okay with you being gay (and AIDS is most definitely not some sort of punishment), that the trappings of religion are less important than faith itself, and that you're not going to Hell for doing drugs or committing suicide. Instead of acting like fire-and-brimstone evangelists, the angels are more like Magic Therapists with a religious approach.

to:

This show has been mocked for its insistently heartwarming, [[TearJerker tearjerking nature]], but its nine year run is proof it has plenty of fans, and one can't fault its good intentions and wholesomeness. It also defied many stereotypes about religion, having episodes that declared, among other things, that God is perfectly okay with you being gay (and AIDS is most definitely not some sort of punishment), that the trappings of religion are less important than faith itself, and that you're not going to Hell for doing drugs or committing suicide. Instead of acting like fire-and-brimstone evangelists, the angels are more like Magic Therapists with a religious approach.
wholesomeness.
25th Oct '17 1:17:29 AM Statzkeen
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* SpringtimeForHitler: In "Nothing but Net", a professional basketball player has this happen when he agrees to throw a game in return for a large sum of money from some gamblers who will win big. They may well kill him if he doesn't follow through. Already known as a showboat, he figured it won't seem too out of character for him to take a bunch of ridiculous low-percentage shots, which he tries to miss on purpose, but thanks to the heavenly intervention, he makes every bucket anyway. (Andrew takes the gamblers aside when they try to confront the player afterward.)

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* SpringtimeForHitler: In "Nothing but Net", a professional basketball player has this happen when he agrees to throw a game in return for a large sum of money from some gamblers who will win big. They may well kill him if he doesn't follow through. Already known as a showboat, he figured figures it won't seem too out of character for him to take a bunch of ridiculous low-percentage shots, which he tries while actually trying to miss them on purpose, but thanks to the heavenly intervention, he makes every bucket anyway. (Andrew takes the gamblers aside when they try to confront the player afterward.)
15th Oct '17 6:52:14 PM EnglishGuruLady
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Added DiffLines:

* GoodIsBoring: Fallen angel Kathleen once tells Monica this is her justification for switching sides: "I'm having too much fun." [[spoiler: She eventually turns back to God, though.]] In a later episode, high-ranking angel Sam explains that some humans engage in sin because they believe this trope.
15th Oct '17 6:47:14 PM EnglishGuruLady
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Added DiffLines:

* ForTheEvulz: This is the primary reason Satan or his minions, such as [[spoiler: formerly]] fallen angel Kathleen, do anything. Tess lampshades it once: "Evil is for evil's sake, period."
5th Oct '17 3:52:13 PM EnglishGuruLady
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Added DiffLines:

* CourtroomEpisode: Several episodes have a jury trial or court hearing central to the plot, such as "Reasonable Doubt" (Season 2), "Smokescreen" (Season 3), "A House Divided" (Season 6), and "Virtual Reality" (Season 9). At least one of the angels usually serves as legal counsel; Tess has served as legal counsel too, but usually takes the judge's role.
1st Oct '17 6:24:13 PM DrOO7
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Added DiffLines:

* YouLookFamiliar: Gerald [=McRaney=] guest-starred as a surgeon in one episode and as Russell Greene (patriarch of the Greene family, the subject of the SpinOff ''Promised Land'') in another.
29th Aug '17 1:18:43 PM DrOO7
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* RequiredSpinoffCrossover: Aside from a few two-part episodes that started on one show and finished on the other, Tess and Andrew each separately showed up on ''Promised Land'' on several occasions.



* SpinOff: ''Promised Land'', the further adventures of one of the families the angels helped.

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* SpinOff: ''Promised Land'', which depicted the further adventures of the Greenes, one of the families the angels helped.assisted, as they traveled around the country helping people.
29th Aug '17 1:12:18 PM DrOO7
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23rd Jul '17 3:18:35 PM nombretomado
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* RecklessGunUsage: One character breaks just about [[UsefulNotes/GunSafety all the rules]] -- carelessly waving a loaded WW2-era pistol around, pointing it straight at a friend, and then removing the magazine without clearing the chamber. After all that, how unlucky is it for said gun to [[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife get knocked off a desk, unintentionally fire, and]] [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace shoot someone right in the heart]]?

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* RecklessGunUsage: One character breaks just about [[UsefulNotes/GunSafety all the rules]] -- carelessly waving a loaded WW2-era [=WW2=]-era pistol around, pointing it straight at a friend, and then removing the magazine without clearing the chamber. After all that, how unlucky is it for said gun to [[WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife get knocked off a desk, unintentionally fire, and]] [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace shoot someone right in the heart]]?
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TouchedByAnAngel