History Series / TheWaltons

7th Dec '17 2:29:58 PM Maddoxsort
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** Corabeth's habit of calling Ike "Mr. Godsey", as well as breaking into GratutiousFrench to sound classier (usually only making herself look prissy).

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** Corabeth's habit of calling Ike "Mr. Godsey", as well as breaking into GratutiousFrench GratuitousFrench to sound classier (usually only making herself look prissy).
7th Dec '17 2:29:39 PM Maddoxsort
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** Esther often says "Good Lord!" and, in later series, "Oh boy..." [[note]]The reason her catchphrase changed was because her stroke caused her brain to lose the ability to fluidly control her diction and elocution while speaking (it strained her to the point her words had to be as monosyllabic as possible or she couldn't get them out), and she also resolved to stop getting so worked up over everything because she thought God was punishing her with forced silence for tongue-jabbing people all the time.[[/note]]

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** Esther often says "Good Lord!" and, in later episodes of the series, "Oh boy..." [[note]]The reason her catchphrase changed was because her stroke caused her brain to lose the ability to fluidly control her diction and elocution while speaking (it strained her to the point her words had to be as monosyllabic as possible or she couldn't get them out), and she also resolved to stop getting so worked up over everything because she thought God was punishing her with forced silence for tongue-jabbing people all the time.[[/note]]


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** Corabeth's habit of calling Ike "Mr. Godsey", as well as breaking into GratutiousFrench to sound classier (usually only making herself look prissy).
7th Dec '17 2:26:00 PM Maddoxsort
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* UnreliableNarrator: Not an intentional trope, in this case, but he does contradict himself; for example, one time saying that Zebulon outlived Esther, when the opposite was true (though this was due in part to the untimely death of Will Geer, which forced the written-in, unplanned death of his character), and another saying that AJ Covington never returned to the mountain (he was back a few years later).

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* UnreliableNarrator: Not an intentional trope, in this case, but he does contradict himself; for example, one time saying that Zebulon outlived Esther, when the opposite was true (though this was due in part to the untimely death of Will Geer, which forced the written-in, unplanned death of his character), and another saying that AJ Covington never returned to the mountain (he was back a few years later). However, in the case of AJ, it was ''technically'' true because two actors played him, the first being David Huddleston, and the second being the much younger-looking George Dzundza, so in away, the AJ ''we'' knew [[LoopholeAbuse didn't come back.]]
7th Dec '17 2:21:54 PM Maddoxsort
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** Four seasons after his first heart attack and running himself ragged waiting for his wife Esther to come home from the hospital, Zebulon Walton has a second heart attack climbing up the mountain to plant flowers. He is implied to have been died instantly and [[DyingAlone by himself]], and was found keeled over dead up there. Even though he and Esther had plans to be buried together, rather than go to the difficult and heartwrenching task of carting down to the burial plot, the family found it more fitting to bury him up on the mountain, because he loved it so much.

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** Four seasons after his first heart attack and running himself ragged waiting for his wife Esther to come home from the hospital, Zebulon Walton has a second heart attack climbing up the mountain to plant flowers. He is implied to have been died instantly and [[DyingAlone by himself]], and was found keeled over dead up there. Even though he and Esther had plans to be buried together, rather than go to the difficult and heartwrenching task of carting him down to the burial plot, the family found it more fitting to bury him up on the mountain, because he loved it so much.
7th Dec '17 2:16:33 PM Maddoxsort
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* BeachEpisode: In 'The Seashore' the Waltons have to look after the Baldwins' beach house for a while.

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* BeachEpisode: In 'The Seashore' the Waltons have to look after the Baldwins' beach house for a while. It even resurrects their old tendency to go barefoot for a while, given that the setting is appropriate for such.


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** This was especially the case with Jason, who went into World War II as a conscientious objector, but ended up having to deal with actual combat. Or Ben, who was taken prisoner of war and raised hell at the Japanese POW camp.
7th Dec '17 2:12:05 PM Maddoxsort
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* DoesNotLikeShoes: Absolutely all of the Walton children preferred to go barefoot around the mountain when they were young and the weather allowed, and also went barefoot to school, as well as some of their friends, like Marsha Woolery. When Olivia joked in "The Boy From the C.C.C." about using a 50 dollar bill to buy them all shoes for the winter so they wouldn't be running around barefooted, the kids whined and moaned at the thought of wearing shoes, especially Mary Ellen, who at that point was a full-blown tomboy who loved being barefoot (and who got her dirty feet pushed off the table by her mother in "The Star" while churning butter with them propped up rather thoughtlessly), and Jim-Bob, who groaned, "Shoes?! ...''SHOES...!''" Their father replied, "It's mighty cold". Come season 5, the show underwent CerebusSyndrome, only worsened when Esther was hospitalized and the kids could no longer afford to enjoy barefoot and carefree lives. All of them had to pitch in with work, and all of them dropped the habit completely because their society was creeping into World War II and it marked their loss of innocence. A few of them already did drop this habit by then, because they had taken on jobs and educational responsibilities. Each time a Walton child permanently shoes their feet, you can take it as a mark of their maturity and their shift from child to young adult.

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* DoesNotLikeShoes: DoesNotLikeShoes:
**
Absolutely all of the Walton children preferred to go barefoot around the mountain when they were young and the weather allowed, and also went barefoot to school, as well as some of their friends, like Marsha Woolery. When Olivia joked in "The Boy From the C.C.C." about using a 50 dollar bill to buy them all shoes for the winter so they wouldn't be running around barefooted, the kids whined and moaned at the thought of wearing shoes, especially Mary Ellen, who at that point was a full-blown tomboy who loved being barefoot (and who got her dirty feet pushed off the table by her mother in "The Star" while churning butter with them propped up rather thoughtlessly), and Jim-Bob, who groaned, "Shoes?! ...''SHOES...!''" Their father replied, "It's mighty cold". Season 4's "The Burn Out" seemed to be the last episode where they did this, because the house caught fire and some of the children reentered the damaged house barefooted due to fleeing at night and came to realize this was unsuitable for them anymore. Jim-Bob even has mismatched shoes with him due to throwing out some clothes at random in the dark. After remarking "I could go barefoot," Olivia tells him it's much too cold for that, and basically vetoes the idea. Come season 5, the show underwent CerebusSyndrome, only worsened when Esther was hospitalized and the kids could no longer afford to enjoy barefoot and carefree lives. All of them had to pitch in with work, and all of them dropped the habit completely because their society was creeping into World War II and it marked their loss of innocence. A few of them already did drop this habit by then, because they had taken on jobs and educational responsibilities. Each time a Walton child permanently shoes their feet, you can take it as a mark of their maturity and their shift from child to young adult.



** Humorously in Season 7's "The Outsider", Cindy turns out to be an aversion to this trope (Ben's brand new wife), as notes she wants a throw rug for the bed so she doesn't have to feel the cold wood floor under her bare feet when she gets out of bed, only serving to differentiate her from the other Waltons further.



* FamilyDrama

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* FamilyDramaFamilyDrama: One of the pioneers of the genre, portraying a big and generally warm-hearted family as the most important installment of life over possessions and notoriety, facing a lot of hardship. The Waltons as a model American family became so iconic that Creator/NormanRockwell painted them.
25th Nov '17 10:31:47 AM Mdumas43073
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Series creator Earl Hamner, Jr. based the show on his own childhood experiences, which he had previously mined for the 1961 novel ''Spencer's Mountain'' (itself adapted as a 1963 film starring Creator/HenryFonda and Creator/MaureenOHara). Prior to the actual series, CBS aired a MadeForTVMovie in 1971 called ''The Homecoming: A Christmas Story'', which featured Patricia Neal as Olivia Walton, Andrew Duggan as John Walton Sr., and Creator/EdgarBergen as Grandpa; these roles would be re-cast for the series (and the movie hadn't been intended as a pilot; a series was only proposed after the favorable critical and audience reaction to the movie).

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Series creator Earl Hamner, Hamner Jr. based the show on his own childhood experiences, which he had previously mined for the 1961 novel ''Spencer's Mountain'' (itself adapted as a 1963 film starring Creator/HenryFonda and Creator/MaureenOHara). Prior to the actual series, CBS aired a MadeForTVMovie in 1971 called ''The Homecoming: A Christmas Story'', which featured Patricia Neal as Olivia Walton, Andrew Duggan as John Walton Sr., and Creator/EdgarBergen as Grandpa; these roles would be re-cast for the series (and the movie hadn't been intended as a pilot; a series was only proposed after the favorable critical and audience reaction to the movie).
25th Nov '17 10:30:09 AM Mdumas43073
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The remarkable thing is that this series began on CBS around the same time as its notorious "rural purge", in which shows like ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'' and ''Series/GreenAcres'' were cancelled en masse as not appealing to the desirable audience demographics from 1968 through 1973. It was expected to die a quick death like the few remaining survivors of the "rural purge" would eventually do. Instead of dying a quick death against ''Series/TheModSquad'' and ''The Flip Wilson Show'' as expected, the show soon killed ''them'' and went on for a successful nine-year run. Some have called it the lone survivor of the "rural purge" although the show began during it, not right before it. The show and its cast also picked up several Emmy Awards and a Peabody.

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The remarkable thing is that this series began on CBS around the same time as its notorious "rural purge", in which shows like ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'' and ''Series/GreenAcres'' were cancelled en masse as for not appealing to the desirable audience demographics from 1968 through 1973. It was expected to die a quick death like the few remaining survivors of the "rural purge" would eventually do. Instead of dying a quick death against ''Series/TheModSquad'' and ''The Flip Wilson Show'' as expected, the show soon killed ''them'' and went on for a successful nine-year run. Some have called it the lone survivor of the "rural purge" although the show began during it, not right before it. The show and its cast also picked up several Emmy Awards and a Peabody.
25th Nov '17 10:29:40 AM Mdumas43073
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The remarkable thing is that this series began on CBS around the same time as its notorious "rural purge" in which shows like ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'' and ''Series/GreenAcres'' were cancelled en masse as not appealing to the desirable audience demographics from 1968 through 1973. It was expected to die a quick death like the few remaining survivors of the "rural purge" would eventually do. Instead of dying a quick death against ''Series/TheModSquad'' and ''The Flip Wilson Show'' as expected, the show soon killed ''them'' and went on for a successful nine-year run. Some have called it the lone survivor of the "rural purge" although the show began during it, not right before it. The show and its cast also picked up several Emmy Awards and a Peabody.

to:

The remarkable thing is that this series began on CBS around the same time as its notorious "rural purge" purge", in which shows like ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'' and ''Series/GreenAcres'' were cancelled en masse as not appealing to the desirable audience demographics from 1968 through 1973. It was expected to die a quick death like the few remaining survivors of the "rural purge" would eventually do. Instead of dying a quick death against ''Series/TheModSquad'' and ''The Flip Wilson Show'' as expected, the show soon killed ''them'' and went on for a successful nine-year run. Some have called it the lone survivor of the "rural purge" although the show began during it, not right before it. The show and its cast also picked up several Emmy Awards and a Peabody.
4th Aug '17 8:47:11 PM TroperBeDoper
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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-
20th-century Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).

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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-
20th-century
early-20th-century Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheWaltons