History Series / TheWaltons

4th Aug '17 8:47:11 PM TroperBeDoper
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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-
20th-century Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).

to:

* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-
20th-century
early-20th-century Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).
15th Jul '17 2:55:37 PM nombretomado
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* WorldWarII: Begins creeping into the story as early as season 4, takes off with "The Cloudburst", worsens after "The Inferno", and consumes the story at the start of season 6. Seasons 7 and 8 directly deal with its impact on Walton's Mountain, and season 9 sees it come to an end.
15th Jul '17 2:54:02 PM nombretomado
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The Waltons are a large family who run a saw mill on Walton's Mountain in rural Virginia, and the series depicts their grinding struggle to make ends meet during the TheGreatDepression, and later WorldWarII. As initial lead character (and adult narrator) John-Boy Walton noted, they didn't have much money, but they had a lot of love and fortitude to keep the whole brood going through thick and thin.

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The Waltons are a large family who run a saw mill on Walton's Mountain in rural Virginia, and the series depicts their grinding struggle to make ends meet during the TheGreatDepression, and later WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. As initial lead character (and adult narrator) John-Boy Walton noted, they didn't have much money, but they had a lot of love and fortitude to keep the whole brood going through thick and thin.
10th Apr '17 11:15:43 PM Maddoxsort
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* ManlyTears: Almost ''nothing'' makes John Walton cry. The only thing that evoked '''real''' tears from him was seeing his oldest son lost in a coma with very little evidence that he was recovering.



** Judge Baldwin, the long-dead father of the Baldwin ladies. His portrait hangs on their fireplace mantle wall, and they constantly praise their papa for being their father, but the man sounded like a terror in the flesh, as he was bent on keeping his daughters single, lived 20 years after a stroke in a half-vegetated state, and Ashley Longworth was his own personal BerserkButton. In fact, you'd be hard pressed to hear about their mother considering how little she gets talked about compared to him.

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** Judge Baldwin, the long-dead father of the Baldwin ladies. His portrait hangs on their fireplace mantle wall, and they constantly praise their papa for being their father, but the man sounded like a terror in the flesh, as he was bent on keeping his daughters single, lived 20 years after a stroke in a half-vegetated state, and Ashley Longworth was his own personal BerserkButton. In fact, you'd be hard pressed hard-pressed to hear about their mother considering how little she gets talked about compared to him.



* RealityEnsues: Jim-Bob desperately wanted to be a pilot in the Air Corps and even went as far as to get a tattoo of the Air Corps Insignia (which, to this day, he regrets). Unfortunately, bad eyesight runs in the Walton family (Esther, John, and John-Boy all need reading glasses) a vision screening revealed his eyesight was poor and he would never be able to qualify to fly for them. This sort of soul-crushing thing happens to a multitude of people who try to fly in the military only to learn their vision, the single most crucial aspect of the screen, doesn't cut the mustard.

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** While John-Boy is being cared for during his coma and the doctors see his son as a liability because he's just taking up space, John ''explodes''.
* RealityEnsues: Jim-Bob desperately wanted to be a pilot in the Air Corps and even went as far as to get a tattoo of the Air Corps Insignia (which, to this day, he regrets). Unfortunately, bad eyesight runs in the Walton family (Esther, John, and John-Boy all need reading glasses) glasses). To his great dismay, a vision screening revealed his eyesight was poor and he would never be able to qualify to fly for them.them and killed his dream half-grown. This sort of soul-crushing thing happens to a multitude of people who try to fly in the military only to learn their vision, the single most crucial aspect of the screen, doesn't cut the mustard.
10th Apr '17 11:09:09 PM Maddoxsort
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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-20th-century Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).

to:

* AnimatedAdaptation: Not officially, but in 1974 Creator/HannaBarbera created an {{Expy}} called ''These Are the Days'', about the early-20th-century early-
20th-century
Day family (who might as well have been called Walton).



* {{Adorkable}}: John-Boy acts all gawky around women has a thing for and gets bashful when given praise for his work.
** Even though Elizabeth acts all tough and spunky as she grows up, her RaggedyAnn doll [[IconicItem never leaves her bedroom no matter how old she gets.]]



* CartwrightCurse: Many of the guys Erin has shown interest in end up dead not long after (of the ones that survive, they turn to be of poor character). Even when she got married, her husband already had an infamous reputation as a Northridge and ended up being unfaithful, so she had her marriage annulled, only to run into ''another'' unfaithful suitor who was already in the process of cheating on his own spouse to avoid an unhappy marriage.
** Ashley Longworth Jr. consistently tried to court Erin, but he rejected religion and also pulled a DearJoan on her. Ironically, it backfired on him when his lover suddenly died (perhaps as karmic punishment for spurning Erin and the heathen lifestyle he had chosen) and ''he'' was on the receiving end of the curse instead of Erin.

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* CartwrightCurse: Many of the guys Erin has shown interest in end up dead not long after (of the ones that survive, they turn to be of poor character). Even when she got married, her husband already had an infamous reputation as a Northridge and ended up being unfaithful, so she had her marriage annulled, only to run into ''another'' unfaithful suitor who was already in the process of cheating on his own spouse to avoid an unhappy marriage.
marriage. Sadly, she shot herself in the foot with the one person who truly loved her (G. W. Haines) by rejecting his marriage proposal because she had already gone through the pain of a previous proposal falling through the cracks, which made him join the Army when it was too much to bear and ultimately led him to get killed in a training accident when their relationship actually took off and she realized the feelings between them were genuine.
** Ashley Longworth Jr. consistently tried to court Erin, but he rejected religion and also pulled a DearJoan [[DearJohnLetter Dear Joan letter]] on her. Ironically, it backfired on him when his lover suddenly died (perhaps as karmic punishment for spurning Erin and the heathen lifestyle he had chosen) and ''he'' was on the receiving end of the curse instead of Erin.Erin.
** Jim-Bob also had notoriously bad luck with girls, and was the least church-going man in the family next to John. Eventually, he just embraces his bachelorhood, lets himself go, and becomes a [[BigFun rotund mechanic.]]



** Esther often says "Good Lord!" and, in later series, "Oh boy...".

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** Esther often says "Good Lord!" and, in later series, "Oh boy..."." [[note]]The reason her catchphrase changed was because her stroke caused her brain to lose the ability to fluidly control her diction and elocution while speaking (it strained her to the point her words had to be as monosyllabic as possible or she couldn't get them out), and she also resolved to stop getting so worked up over everything because she thought God was punishing her with forced silence for tongue-jabbing people all the time.[[/note]]



* CousinOliver: Olivia's cousin Rose and her young grandchildren Serena and Jeffrey were brought on briefly during season eight and nine. Rose filled in for Esther after Ellen Corby left the show and Jeffrey and Serena took on the cute kid roles now that Elizabeth and Jim-Bob were both teenagers.

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* CousinOliver: Olivia's cousin Rose and her young grandchildren Serena and Jeffrey were brought on briefly during season eight and nine. Rose filled in for Esther after Ellen Corby left the show and Jeffrey and Serena took on the cute kid roles now that Elizabeth and Jim-Bob were both teenagers. [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome When they proved to be unpopular additions, their roles swiftly and quietly vanished.]]



* DistinguishedGentlemanPipe: Both John and John-Boy smoked pipes earlier on in the show. John eventually kicked the habit because he stopped enjoying it, and John-Boy, even though he was old enough to smoke, always did so in private until he had a horrific experience in "The Burn Out" when the Walton House caught on fire and he was led to believe his pipe was the cause (though it's implied Zeb's unattended space heater was the true culprit). Feeling guilty, he resolved to never smoke again.

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* DistinguishedGentlemanPipe: DistinguishedGentlemansPipe: Both John and John-Boy smoked pipes earlier on in the show. John eventually kicked the habit because he stopped enjoying it, and John-Boy, even though he was old enough to smoke, always did so in private until he had a horrific experience in "The Burn Out" when the Walton House caught on fire and he was led to believe his pipe was the cause (though it's implied Zeb's unattended space heater was the true culprit). Feeling guilty, he resolved to never smoke again.



** John-Boy suggested to Bob in "The Chivaree", a CityMouse who kept obsessively shining his NiceShoes, that he should try going barefoot because it was fun. Bob scoffed at this. True to form, he got chivareed after his marriage and ended up stumbling through the would in his PJs with bare feet.

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** John-Boy suggested to Bob in "The Chivaree", a CityMouse who kept obsessively shining his NiceShoes, that he should try going barefoot because it was fun. Bob scoffed at this. True to form, he got chivareed after his marriage and ended up stumbling through the would in his PJs pajamas with bare feet.



** There's this gem from the first episode ("The Foundling", where a deaf girl is left on their property):
-->'''Elizabeth''': Daddy, where ''did'' you [[WhereDoBabiesComeFrom find]] me..?
-->'''John''': Well sweetie... I found you hiding behind one of your mother's [[UnusualEuphemism smiles.]]



* TheGreatDepression

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* TheGreatDepressionTheGreatDepression: The first three seasons of the show take place in the midst of the Great Depression, but by season 4 it begins to come to an end.


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** John-Boy slips into this when he has a victory shout of, '''"YAAAAAHHHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!"'''


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** Judge Baldwin, the long-dead father of the Baldwin ladies. His portrait hangs on their fireplace mantle wall, and they constantly praise their papa for being their father, but the man sounded like a terror in the flesh, as he was bent on keeping his daughters single, lived 20 years after a stroke in a half-vegetated state, and Ashley Longworth was his own personal BerserkButton. In fact, you'd be hard pressed to hear about their mother considering how little she gets talked about compared to him.


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* RealityEnsues: Jim-Bob desperately wanted to be a pilot in the Air Corps and even went as far as to get a tattoo of the Air Corps Insignia (which, to this day, he regrets). Unfortunately, bad eyesight runs in the Walton family (Esther, John, and John-Boy all need reading glasses) a vision screening revealed his eyesight was poor and he would never be able to qualify to fly for them. This sort of soul-crushing thing happens to a multitude of people who try to fly in the military only to learn their vision, the single most crucial aspect of the screen, doesn't cut the mustard.


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* RomancingTheWidow: This is how Harvey Foster (himself a widower) ends up with Verdie Grant.
** One of Esther's old beaus comes to visit her after Zeb passes on, having gone through a stroke like she did and outlived his wife Betty.
** Rose Burton outlived her husband Burt, a train conductor on the Northwestern line. However, she had a beau prior to him named Stanley Perkins, who was a traveling salesman and a dancer. Eventually, he comes back into her life and tries once to win her heart, but she declines him. The second time, he's ready to give up Rose turns him down again, and Rose considers saying yes, but she discovers her heart itself is too weak for them to go traveling like he has always done. However, TrueLoveConquers all and Stanley doesn't care if he can't travel anymore, so the two get married.


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** Olivia frequently urges her husband to come to church more often because she is a straight-laced Baptist and he is a realist who is a little skeptical of the faith. She also encourages John to get baptized, as does Elizabeth at one point, but John was stubborn enough that, according to John-Boy's narration, he went to the grave unbaptized.
** The Baldwin ladies, being naive, shut-in spinsters who live stuck exclusively in their own worlds and never leave the mountain, always refer to their family's bootleg moonshine as "the recipe". They don't even realize ''it's totally illegal.''
** Emily Baldwin is ''constantly'' going on about her star-crossed romance with Ashley Longworth and how they kissed under an old oak tree under a swirl of falling autumn leaves, and how her father effectively killed it by shooing him away for good. She even continues harping on about it long after learning he has up and died and had a son. When we first hear about him, it's 1934. The last time she brings him up, she and her sister have finally been busted and put out of the moonshine business, both of them are rickety old ladies, and it is '''[[BrokenRecord 1963]].'''
** Zeb has a fixation with naming plants (Will Gear was a real-life botanist), especially trailing arbutus flowers, arguably his favorites.
** The Waltons have to keep going to Ike Godsey's store to place phone calls and receive them because they don't have a telephone installed in the house. It isn't until John and Olivia's silver anniversary that they finally get one.
10th Apr '17 10:12:31 PM Maddoxsort
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* AbortedArc: When Jenny Pendleton appears in "The Thanksgiving Story" she mentions that she'll be going to the same college as John-Boy next year, which suggests she was probably planned to appear in Season 3 (when John-Boy starts college) but she's never seen again.

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* AbortedArc: When Jenny Pendleton appears in "The Thanksgiving Story" she mentions that she'll be going to the same college as John-Boy next year, which suggests she was probably planned to appear in Season 3 (when John-Boy starts college) but she's never seen again. Probably just another case of a crush that didn't work out in the long term for John-Boy.



** Four seasons after his first heart attack and running himself ragged waiting for his wife Esther to come home from the hospital, Zebulon Walton has a second heart attack climbing up the mountain to plant flowers. He is implied to have been died instantly and [[DyingAlone by himself]], and was found keeled over dead up there. Even though he and Esther had plans to be buried together, rather than go to the difficult and heartwrenching task of carting down to the burial plot, the family found it more fitting to bury him up on the mountain, because he loved it so much.
** G. W. Haines proposes to Erin, but she turns him down, so he ends up joining the Army to cope with the rejection. In a cruel twist of fate, when Erin begins to reciprocate his feelings, World War II has completely sucked him into the Army, and he ends up taking part in a routine training exercise where the men practice throwing dummy grenades. Unfortunately, it just so happened that someone decided they were ready for live ammo, and a wayward bunny bounded too close to the testing site as G. W. wound up to throw an active grenade. [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth His kindness toward the bunny caused him to redirect his grenade, but cost him the time he should have used to chuck it far enough away that it wouldn't blow up in his face, which it did, and G. W. became Walton's Mountain's first casualty of World War II.]] Instead of seeing their son off to the army with high hopes, they would see his casket off to the grave. Worst of all, he wrote a posthumous letter to Erin telling her that he really loved her, which was enough to make her run out into the field outside his grieving parents' house and bawl her eyes out in the arms of her father.
** Widow Flossie Brimmer died under similar circumstances as Zebulon around the same time, joining her late husband in paradise. Her boarding house was [[{{Irony}} boarded up]] until another recurring character, Zulieka Dunbar, took it over.



* BarBrawl: John-Boy and John get into one in one episode.
* BarefootPoverty

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* BarBrawl: John-Boy and John get into one in one episode.
episode. Ben and Jason also end up caught up in a lot of these because the former has a HairTriggerTemper that detonates when his pride gets insulted, and Jason actually worked at a bar to make ends meet and was witness and bouncer to many drunken disputes.
** Jason got into a brawl personally when he got flak for signing up to be a conscientious objector in front of a very loose-lipped recruiter who didn't have the sense to talk to him in private about how people got blasted as cowards for this, thinking it would have been enough to talk him out of it right from the front desk.
* BarefootPovertyBarefootLoon: Cassie, who appears in "The Grandchild", a shoeless hill person and a mother-to-be who takes the stillbirth of her child very badly. She begins acting ''really'' off, believes a curse has fallen on her and expectant Mary Ellen, chants a MadnessMantra so potent that Mary Ellen freaks out and runs off into a raging thunderstorm in hysterics, stalks Mary Ellen until she gives birth, then snatches her baby without warning and finally holes herself up in a rotting cabin in the woods, having borrowed newborn John Curtis Willard to play pretend mother. Bizarrely, there is absolutely zero malice behind her actions.
* BarefootPoverty: A few of the hill folk went around barefoot in the later seasons, including a recurring patient of Mary Ellen's who lost some her children to sickness. The Walton children ''seemed'' like this in the earlier seasons, but it's actually a case of DoesNotLikeShoes.
** Mary Ellen dumbfounded a snooty rich girl who came onto the mountain in "The Spoilers" by tromping into her house barefoot straight from school. She grabbed a pair of spare dress shoes from her collection and eagerly slammed them on her dresser as if pitying the fact she had no shoes, and then gifted them to her along with a fancy ballroom dress and turban. When Mary Ellen got home that day, she turned some heads, both in good ways and bad.
* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: After Bob is given a chivaree in "The Chivaree", he's so angry about his kidnapping against his will (which the locals think is all in good fun) that he shouts, "I WANNA ''KILL!''" Come next season in "The Loss" we learn ''he'' got killed instead when he [[TooDumbToLive hurried out onto an open road in the pitch dark back home to his wife after getting off work and a passing car ran him down.]]



** Zeb was even scarier than his son in this respect. As soon as he heard his kinfolk were being threatened off their property by a highway developer, he took up a gun and was ready to fight to death if need be!
** In an early episode, John took John-Boy out on his first real father-son hunt to christen him, but John-Boy got cold feet at the idea of killing creatures for sport. As for ''self-defense'', the line was crossed between fight or flight and John-Boy made a stand when [[BearsAreBadNews a wounded bear on its last legs]] stumbled upon John during a later outing. It was desperate to survive to the point it attacked anything in its way and had been foreshadowed the whole episode. As soon as John encountered it, the bear got the drop on him. It nearly killed him but John-Boy emptied his shotgun into the bear and felled it, and he would brag about his first kill for years to come because he effectively saved his father's life!



* BittersweetEnding: Several episodes end this way.

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* BirthDeathJuxtaposition: Used thematically with Calico in "The Loss". Calico was a very pregnant stray cat that Elizabeth discovered wandering onto the property, but was far too old to give birth without killing herself in the process. It didn't help that the entire episode was dedicated to the fact that one of the Walton's relatives had just lost her husband after he got hit by a car in the dark and temporarily went mad from the grief of losing him.
* BittersweetEnding: Several episodes end this way. Most of the time it's because the Waltons can't get involved with people who have to move on while they have to stay put. Or they have to move on while those people want them to stay put at their own expense.



* CartwrightCurse: Many of the guys Erin has shown interest in end up dead not long after (of the ones that survive, they turn to be of poor character).

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* CartwrightCurse: Many of the guys Erin has shown interest in end up dead not long after (of the ones that survive, they turn to be of poor character). Even when she got married, her husband already had an infamous reputation as a Northridge and ended up being unfaithful, so she had her marriage annulled, only to run into ''another'' unfaithful suitor who was already in the process of cheating on his own spouse to avoid an unhappy marriage.
** Ashley Longworth Jr. consistently tried to court Erin, but he rejected religion and also pulled a DearJoan on her. Ironically, it backfired on him when his lover suddenly died (perhaps as karmic punishment for spurning Erin and the heathen lifestyle he had chosen) and ''he'' was on the receiving end of the curse instead of Erin.



** Jim-Bob sometimes peppers his sentences with the word "swell", usually as a snide retort.



** In her first appearances, Corabeth was a very timid and withdrawn woman because she had lived a sheltered life and was forced to come out of it now that her mother had died. After getting married to Ike, she gained a sense of confidence, and subsequentlly changed. Her inner desires begin to emerge as she becomes constantly fed up with the unappetizing and sometimes boorish nature of country life, and she explodes into [[ThePrimaDonna a needy]] [[KeepingUpWithTheJones trend-keeper]] with a love of fine culture.



** She did, however, come back for the Thanksgiving reunion movie in 1969, where it was revealed she had eloped with a Marine and that Corabeth disapproved of the match, which may have somewhat accounted for her lack of mention.

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** It was later mentioned that at some point, Corabeth got Aimee in private school; thus she was PutOnABus. She did, however, come back for the Easter post-series special, having finished private school. She made a brief reappearance in the Thanksgiving reunion movie in 1969, 1963, where it was revealed she had eloped with a Marine and that Corabeth disapproved of the match, which may have somewhat accounted for her lack of mention.mention because Aimee tended to be rebellious and follow the daring trends instead of the prim and proper ones, so naturally, it strained their relationship. However, when Aimee comes back bearing a grandchild, Corabeth's iced up heart thaws.



* DeadpanSnarker: Curt Willard is one of these.

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* DeadGuyJunior: Ben was named after John's brother Ben, who died in World War I.
* DeadpanSnarker: Curt Willard is one of these. Jim-Bob and Elizabeth also fall into this category when they become teenagers and develop attitudes.
* DistinguishedGentlemanPipe: Both John and John-Boy smoked pipes earlier on in the show. John eventually kicked the habit because he stopped enjoying it, and John-Boy, even though he was old enough to smoke, always did so in private until he had a horrific experience in "The Burn Out" when the Walton House caught on fire and he was led to believe his pipe was the cause (though it's implied Zeb's unattended space heater was the true culprit). Feeling guilty, he resolved to never smoke again.



* DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale: Played for laughs whenever Esther hits Zebulon with her broom.
* DownerEnding: A few episodes have an unhappy ending.
** 'The Hiding Place' suggests that Hilary and her husband may have be destined to be killed by Nazis.
** 'The Empty Nest' ends with the family sitting around and talking to Zebulon's grave.
** 'The Parting' ends with Olivia having to move to a sanitarium due to illness.
* EveryEpisodeEnding: The family members all telling one another good night.

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* DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale: Played DoesNotLikeShoes: Absolutely all of the Walton children preferred to go barefoot around the mountain when they were young and the weather allowed, and also went barefoot to school, as well as some of their friends, like Marsha Woolery. When Olivia joked in "The Boy From the C.C.C." about using a 50 dollar bill to buy them all shoes for laughs whenever the winter so they wouldn't be running around barefooted, the kids whined and moaned at the thought of wearing shoes, especially Mary Ellen, who at that point was a full-blown tomboy who loved being barefoot (and who got her dirty feet pushed off the table by her mother in "The Star" while churning butter with them propped up rather thoughtlessly), and Jim-Bob, who groaned, "Shoes?! ...''SHOES...!''" Their father replied, "It's mighty cold". Come season 5, the show underwent CerebusSyndrome, only worsened when Esther hits Zebulon was hospitalized and the kids could no longer afford to enjoy barefoot and carefree lives. All of them had to pitch in with her broom.
* DownerEnding:
work, and all of them dropped the habit completely because their society was creeping into World War II and it marked their loss of innocence. A few episodes have an unhappy ending.
** 'The Hiding Place' suggests that Hilary
of them already did drop this habit by then, because they had taken on jobs and her husband may have be destined educational responsibilities. Each time a Walton child permanently shoes their feet, you can take it as a mark of their maturity and their shift from child to be killed by Nazis.
young adult.
** 'The Empty Nest' ends Taken UpToEleven in "The Stray" with the family sitting around introduction of Josh. He preferred to be totally barefoot at all times, and talking to Zebulon's grave.
** 'The Parting' ends with
for that reason, had no shoes ''at all''. His presence in the story was revealed when because of this choice, he [[AgonyOfTheFeet got his foot mangled from stepping on a fishhook and left a nasty blood trail]], exposing him as a stowaway on the Walton's property. Even when Olivia having donated some old shoes to move him, Josh kept going barefoot, defending his reason for keeping them off as, "My feet aren't free." It wasn't until he went out to a sanitarium due meet Verdie Foster (who then adopted him as Josh Foster) that he was convinced to illness.
start using his new shoes.
** John-Boy suggested to Bob in "The Chivaree", a CityMouse who kept obsessively shining his NiceShoes, that he should try going barefoot because it was fun. Bob scoffed at this. True to form, he got chivareed after his marriage and ended up stumbling through the would in his PJs with bare feet.
* EveryEpisodeEnding: The family members all telling one another good night. There are a few exceptions, such as "The Marathon", where the ending takes place in the ''[[InvertedTrope morning]]'' and Elizabeth wishes John-Boy a "good morning", "The Long Night", where the ending extends to Zeb outside Esther's hospital window, and, "The Medal", where the good night takes place at the Godseys because the plot centered around Corabeth's loyalty to her husband Ike.
** Most episodes will end with the Waltons turning off the lights in their house as they go to bed, but a lot of the time John-Boy will keep his light on as he stays up writing and/or journaling. However, sometimes the lights of the house will come on instead when something stirs the family back to life, be it arguing, all getting in the mood for ice cream, a crying John Curtis, or the stunning announcement that John-Boy's love interest Janet said yes to his wedding proposal.
** It got a DarkReprise at the end of the season 9 opener, which featured the Waltons standing outside their house in the night instead of going to sleep. They were listening to the sound of a train going over the nearby trestle... the funeral procession for Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who just signed a pardon for their friend Harvey Foster, one of the last things he did before he succumbed to polio. They, along with practically everyone else in the state of Virginia, had arisen that night to pay last respects to their fallen leader as his casket crossed the nation.



* {{Expy}}: The addition of pretentious and gossipy cousin Corabeth as Ike's new wife seemed to serve no other purpose than to make her and Ike the Walton's Mountain versions of Harriet and Nels Oleson of ''LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' (which had premiered a year before Corabeth's introduction).

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* {{Expy}}: The addition of pretentious and gossipy cousin Corabeth as Ike's new wife seemed to serve no other purpose than to make her and Ike the Walton's Mountain versions of Harriet and Nels Oleson of ''LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' (which had premiered a year before Corabeth's introduction). The show's producers saw this and tried to avoid making her tyrannical like Harriet, and rationalized her behavior as a pained desire to enjoy the finer things in life and high society while stuck in the humdrum boonies.



* FantasyForbiddingFather: Averted with John Walton; in the very first story, his christmas present to John-Boy is writing material saying that while he might not understand his son's dream of being a writer as opposed to being a laborer, he expects his son to apply himself with real diligence to succeed.
* FieryRedhead: Ben and Elizabeth both have their moments.

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* FantasyForbiddingFather: Averted with John Walton; in the very first story, his christmas Christmas present to John-Boy is writing material saying that while he might not understand his son's dream of being a writer as opposed to being a laborer, he expects his son to apply himself with real diligence to succeed.
* FieryRedhead: Ben and Elizabeth both have their moments.moments, as does Olivia, who was originally a redhead whose hair faded in season 2 to a straw color.



* TheForties

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* TheFortiesTheForties: The show starts in TheThirties, but most of its most integral events take place during this time period. The reunion specials cover TheSixties.



** Zeb is the life of the party and a perpetual jokester, often annoying his [[TheComicallySerious Wife]].



* LongRunners: Nine seasons, and this for a series not expected to last '''''one'''''.

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* LongRunners: Nine seasons, seasons and six post-series specials, and this for a series not expected to last '''''one'''''.'''''one'''''.
* LookBothWays: Both Bob Hill and Boone Walton make the mistake of walking onto unlit sections of highway roads in the middle of the night as shortcuts instead of taking streets like normal, reasonable people should, and both are summarily killed by oncoming cars. The former was stubborn as they come and a thoughtless person by nature who did things his way or the highway, and the highway did him one in return. The latter is an even worse case, as the narrator version of John-Boy feeds us an epilogue that he was 85 years old, and implied to be possibly drunk at the time, as he was found with two full helpings of moonshine, and he once survived a flood that took away his wife and child. At least they're back together now...



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: No pun intended, but in season 5 "The Firestorm," [[spoiler:the anti-German Rev Fordwick, in response to Hitler burning the Holy Bible, plans on burning ''Mein Kampf'' and any other German literature they could get his hands on in protest. John-boy stands up to them, trying to get them to see how wrong it was and spots one black book in the pile and picks it up. Mrs. Brimmer comes forward to read the German words and then the English. Rev Forwick and those assembled were nearly in tears as they realized she was reading the Holy Bible.[[note]]You'd think they would have spotted this, as the German for "Bible" is "Bibel".[[/note]]]]
* NoEnding: Season 9's final episode 'The Revel' was not written as a final episode for the show, nor was the final special 'A Walton Easter'; and so, sadly, ''The Waltons'' does not have a proper ending.
* NostalgicNarrator: Series creator Earl Hamner Jr., as the voice of the older John-Boy Walton.

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* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: No pun intended, but in season 5 "The Firestorm," [[spoiler:the anti-German Rev Fordwick, in response to Hitler burning the Holy Bible, Bible (a passage in Revelation warns of punishment to all those who seek to destroy the Bible), plans on burning ''Mein Kampf'' and any other German literature they could get his hands on in protest. John-boy stands up to them, trying to get them to see how wrong it was and spots one black book in the pile and picks it up. Mrs. Brimmer comes forward to read the German words and then the English. Rev Forwick and those assembled were nearly in tears as they realized she was reading the Holy Bible.[[note]]You'd think they would have spotted this, as the German for "Bible" is "Bibel".[[/note]]]]
* NoEnding: Season 9's final episode 'The Revel' was not written as a final episode for the show, nor was the final special 'A Walton Easter'; and so, sadly, ''The Waltons'' does not have a proper ending.
ending. Keep in mind, though, that the show is based on real life, and LifeGoesOn, so we can assume it's not necessarily meant to.
* NostalgicNarrator: Series creator Earl Hamner Jr., as the voice of the older John-Boy Walton. In the finale of season 7, he notably gives a very touching monologue that almost seems like he's setting the stage for the show to end, [[SeriesFauxnale but it doesn't]].



* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are two Johns, two Bens, two Esthers and two Sarahs.

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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. This was a time when people often used the names of their parentage as components of their children's names. There are two Johns, Johns (John-Boy's real name is John Walton, Jr., but he affectionately goes by John-Boy to differentiate himself from his father, sometimes getting laughed at for his nickname by the snooty), two Bens, two Esthers and two Sarahs.Sarahs. There is also a second Olivia who comes from a very unfortunate side of the family that is pockmarked with death. Mary Ellen's second name is Esther's middle name, Erin has Esther for her middle name, and John Curtis is named after his father Curtis.



* PrettyBoy: John-Boy.

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* PrettyBoy: John-Boy.PosthumousCharacter: Ben Walton, who was killed in action in France during World War I and reported buried there in some place (likely a mass grave) that none of his loved ones know about. He is only mentioned in passing, but his family eventually erects a memorial for him on the mountain in lieu of having a burial site to go to.



* PutOnABus: In the second to last episode of Season 6, John-Boy literally leaves on a bus (though he had already been 'put on a bus' a season before when he moved to New York), but the season still followed his exploits in [[BigApplesauce The Big Apple]].
** Olivia contracts tuberculosis and has to leave for a sanatorium midway through Season 8. She [[TheBusCameBack comes back]] for the first half of Season 9.

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* PromotedToOpeningCredits: The show used to only credit the integral Walton Elders at the beginning, but ironically, the setup flipped after John-Boy stopped being center stage midway through and the younger Walton children took over, and starting with season 7, they were given opening credit billing instead of the end credits. In season 9, Joe Conley and Ronnie Claire Edwards (Ike and Corabeth Godsey) get this treament, having become [[AscendedExtra breakout characters]] and filling in the space that the Walton adults had left behind.
* PutOnABus: In the second to last episode of Season 6, John-Boy literally leaves on a bus (though he had already been 'put on a bus' a season before when he moved to New York), but the season still followed his exploits in [[BigApplesauce The Big Apple]].
Apple]]. TheBusCameBack in Season 8, but with a [[TheOtherDarrin new actor]] until the fourth reunion movie, when his old actor reprised the role.
** Esther, in a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot, was out of the story for the latter half of Season 5 all the way to the tail end of Season 6 because Ellen Corby had a very debilitating stroke. Although she came back for Season 7, she was CommutingOnABus because Corby's health was precarious and her stroke rendered her nearly incapable of speaking, and by Season 8, she was reduced to a single guest appearance at the end of the season and did not come back until the reunion movies, all of which featured her.
** Olivia contracts tuberculosis and has to leave for a sanatorium midway through Season 8. She [[TheBusCameBack comes back]] for the first half of Season 9.9 and is back for the reunion movies.
** John follows Olivia midway through season 9 when her tuberculosis relapses and he needs to be with her in the hospital to comfort her for the long term.
** Aimee is sent to private school sometime off-screen in Season 7, but comes back in the second reunion movie.



* ReplacementGoldfish: Near the end of season 2, the Walton's prized milk cow, Chance, got sick and died of old age. By the next season, John has purchased a new milk cow, who they also name Chance.
** Somewhat the case regarding Jeffery's relationship with the family hound Reckless. Although Reckless wasn't actually his dog, he loved her like she was his. By the time he met her, though, she was an old dog who had sired a single pup with Tiger, Yancy Tucker's dog (which, being the only pup of the litter, he claimed for himself as owner of the sire while remarking Reckless went for quality over quality). Unfortunately, as Jeffery bonded with Reckless on a walk through the woods, Reckless's time came and she went to the big doghouse in the sky, breaking Jeffery's heart. A few episodes later, Jeffery met a half-German war refugee/POW who gifted him with a puppy. Since it was Christmastime, Jeffery named the puppy [[MeaningfulName Nick]] after St. Nick. Jeffery then forgot to let Nick out to do his business and the puppy [[MoodWhiplash widdled in his bed.]]



* RunningGag: In the early seasons, Mary Ellen was a raging tomboy who was always getting into trouble, and Olivia's go-to punishment was to make her go read ten Bible verses until she memorized them. The other children were not exempt to this punishment, either, and any backtalk would net them more verses on top of the first volley.



* SeriesFinale: "The Revel" was retooled into this when it became clear the show would not be picked up for a tenth season. It features the Baldwins reflecting back on the past, and as most last episodes do, this can be a corollary to looking back at the long journey the characters have gone through up to this point. It also features a closing narration with older John-Boy. However, breaking pattern from all the other episodes, instead of his words reflecting on just the events of the episode and the characters of the show telling each other good night, old John-Boy directly addresses the audience. He essentially thanks the viewers for watching the show and tells them that he hopes that they will remember the peaceful image of the Walton household just as he does, with a light in the window and the blue-ridged mountains surrounding it. ''he'' tells ''us'' "good night". Fortunately, the show netted six reunion specials and this just closes out the syndicated run.



* ShirtlessScene: John, John-Boy, Ben, Ike and even Zebulon have had them.

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* ShirtlessScene: John, John-Boy, Ben, Ike and even Zebulon have had them. Curt also gets one in his final appearance after getting ripped from chopping wood (played by a different actor, however).



* ThanksgivingEpisode: Season 2's "The Thanksgiving Story", as well as ''two'' reunion movies centered around the holiday.
* TheThirties
* TitleDrop: In one episode John-Boy mentions that, if he made a TV show, it'd be called ''The Waltons''.

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* SmokingIsNotCool: One episode has Ben sneaking around rolling up his own cigarettes and lighting up in the barn trying not to get caught. Inevitably, this task proves impossible in a big family and the cat gets out of the bag sooner rather than later. Zeb had a veteran tactic for this kind of thing and had it down-pat by now to make his grandkids smoke 'em all if they got caught huffing and puffing. When he caught wind of Ben's little hobby, he decided to pull the old reverse psychology tactic on him by making him think OfCourseISmoke and brought him out to Druscilla's Pond to go out and smoke a whole pack together, [[ScareEmStraight and Ben promptly got too sick to ever think about smoking cigarettes again]], while seasoned Zeb masterfully and dominantly takes his smokes without batting an eyelash. Jason even warned Ben what would happen, because he was subjected to this torture himself.
** A later episode, "The Furlough" (the first episode with John-Boy out of his coma played by a new actor) reveals that this was the bog standard punishment Zeb used to wean every one of the boys off smoking at one point or another. Ironically, when this conversation comes up, all of the boys are [[ForgottenAesop drinking beer in the house in private]], a thing which would ''certainly'' have put their female elders in arms had any of them been at the house to scold them and Zeb still been alive. The only one who isn't drinking is underage Jim-Bob, who is given a root beer.
* ThanksgivingEpisode: Season 2's "The Thanksgiving Story", as well as ''two'' reunion movies centered around the holiday.
holiday (well, it ''is'' a holiday all about family gatherings!).
* TheThirties
TheThirties: The first few seasons of the show covered the Depression era and the years the Walton family was forced to pinch pennies to make a living.
* TitleDrop: In one episode John-Boy mentions that, if he made a TV show, it'd be called ''The Waltons''. This is right after televisions have started to become commercial products in their time.



* UnreliableNarrator: Not an intentional trope, in this case, but he does contradict himself; for example, one time saying that Zebulon outlived Esther, when the opposite was true, and another saying that AJ Covington never returned to the mountain (he was back a few years later).

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* UnreliableNarrator: Not an intentional trope, in this case, but he does contradict himself; for example, one time saying that Zebulon outlived Esther, when the opposite was true, true (though this was due in part to the untimely death of Will Geer, which forced the written-in, unplanned death of his character), and another saying that AJ Covington never returned to the mountain (he was back a few years later).later).
* TheUnseen: Zeb and Esther's third child, who is only mentioned in passing, and never even named.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: What happened to Bullet the calf? Elizabeth and Jim-Bob try so hard to save him, but then he's never seen again.
* WorldWarII

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: What happened to Bullet the calf? Elizabeth and Jim-Bob try so hard to save him, but then he's never seen again.
again. The only logical explanations are that the calf died or it ran away, or the children gave it away to someone who would care for it without slaughtering it.
** For that matter, Rover the peacock disappears after season 7.
* WorldWarIIWorldWarII: Begins creeping into the story as early as season 4, takes off with "The Cloudburst", worsens after "The Inferno", and consumes the story at the start of season 6. Seasons 7 and 8 directly deal with its impact on Walton's Mountain, and season 9 sees it come to an end.
5th Feb '17 11:47:32 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Waltons_9799.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:320:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Waltons_9799.jpg]]
17th Nov '16 8:11:45 PM BradyLady
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Added DiffLines:

** Called back in a later episode, with Jeffrey repeating the line. Rose promptly sends him to his room.
16th Nov '16 12:02:59 PM mikey300
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** Jim-Bob's VagueAge becomes another issue. After attempting to enlist following the attack on Pearl Harbor; Jim-Bob is told he is too young. Where this becomes an issue is depending on which birth date is correct.[[note]]The Season 3 episode "The Runaway" has his birth date as June 13, 1924, during which the recruiter would be correct about his being too young. However, the following season's "The Secret" lists his date of birth as January 13, 1923 (which would make Jim-Bob 18 going on 19). Finally; Jim-Bob is shown as high-school valedictorian for the Class of 1944 in the Season 8 episode "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The Valedictorian]]"[[/note]]

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** Jim-Bob's VagueAge becomes another issue. After attempting to enlist following the attack on Pearl Harbor; Jim-Bob is told he is too young. Where this becomes an issue is depending on which birth date is correct.[[note]]The Season 3 episode "The Runaway" has his birth date as June 13, 1924, during which the recruiter would be correct about his being too young. However, the following season's "The Secret" lists his date of birth as January 13, 1923 (which would make Jim-Bob 18 going on 19). Finally; Jim-Bob is shown as high-school valedictorian for the Class of 1944 in the Season 8 episode "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The Valedictorian]]"[[/note]]Valedictorian]]". Assuming that Jim-Bob was the "standard" 18 years of age at high school graduation, a 1944 graduation would have placed his birthday sometime in 1926. [[/note]]
9th Nov '16 9:56:40 AM nombretomado
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* ReplacedTheThemeTune: JerryGoldsmith scored ''The Homecoming: A Christmas Story'' and he returned when it became a series (he did six episodes in the first season), so you'd think the producers would have retained his quiet, rustic theme music. You'd be wrong:

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* ReplacedTheThemeTune: JerryGoldsmith Music/JerryGoldsmith scored ''The Homecoming: A Christmas Story'' and he returned when it became a series (he did six episodes in the first season), so you'd think the producers would have retained his quiet, rustic theme music. You'd be wrong:
This list shows the last 10 events of 139. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheWaltons