History Series / ThePeoplesCourt

6th Jan '18 11:06:10 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** As with JudgeJudy, there have also been some instances in which Judge Milian has announced to a litigant who has gotten away with some wrongdoing that she would be referring the case to local law enforcement after the fact.

to:

** As with JudgeJudy, Series/JudgeJudy, there have also been some instances in which Judge Milian has announced to a litigant who has gotten away with some wrongdoing that she would be referring the case to local law enforcement after the fact.



--> '''Plaintiff:''' And then ''JudgeJudy'' came on.

to:

--> '''Plaintiff:''' And then ''JudgeJudy'' ''Series/JudgeJudy'' came on.
5th Dec '17 3:20:33 PM GarrulousTiger
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** While Judge Milian doesn't have nearly as many Berserk Buttons as Judge Judy in regard to the way litigants speak and present themselves, she ''hates'' it when litigants call her "Miss" instead of "Judge" or "Your Honor."
--> '''Judge Milian:''' If I were a male judge, you wouldn't call me "buddy," would you? So please call me "Judge" and not "Miss."
31st Oct '17 5:14:23 PM GarrulousTiger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BerserkButton: While Judge Milian is generally nicer and less abrasive than her rival Judge Judy, it seems to take less to trigger Judge Milian's Berserk Button than it does Judge Judy's. Particularly, she'll get upset when she senses that a litigant is lying, and has said that she is personally offended by liars in court because she feels that they are underestimating her.

to:

* BerserkButton: While Judge Milian is generally nicer and less abrasive than her rival Judge Judy, it seems to take less to [[BewareTheNiceOnes trigger Judge Milian's Berserk Button Button]] than it does Judge Judy's. Particularly, she'll get upset when she senses that a litigant is lying, and has said that she is personally offended by liars in court because she feels that they are underestimating her.
31st Oct '17 5:13:17 PM GarrulousTiger
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** "You need to come to court with more than your flapping gums." - said when litigants come into court without the necessary evidence thinking their verbal testimony will be enough to win
22nd Sep '17 6:38:48 PM GarrulousTiger
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TakeThat: One of Judge Milian's early cases involved an elderly woman suing a hair salon for pain and suffering over a botched hair extension job. In her testimony, the plaintiff described being in pain while hearing JudgeJoeBrown playing on television in the background.
--> '''Plaintiff:''' And then ''JudgeJudy'' came on.
--> '''Judge Milian:''' ''[laughing]'' And did your headache get worse?
10th Aug '17 10:27:49 PM glickmam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** October 15, 2007: A University of Miami law student says her ruling is "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARmmq7JAPbM your opinion]]". Milian goes postal.

to:

** October 15, 2007: A University of Miami law student says her ruling is "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARmmq7JAPbM your opinion]]"."your opinion". Milian goes postal.



** Then there was the lady who called CPS on her neighbor because [[DisproportionateRetribution she wouldn't give back her magazine she loaned to her.]] Milian became downright vicious. Now with video [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbNedA9rjr4 here]]

to:

** Then there was the lady who called CPS on her neighbor because [[DisproportionateRetribution she wouldn't give back her magazine she loaned to her.]] Milian became downright vicious. Now with video [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbNedA9rjr4 here]]
23rd Jul '17 7:02:50 PM glickmam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."

to:

** From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, Doug Llewelyn closing out each episode, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."
23rd Jul '17 7:01:13 PM glickmam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Edwards Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
23rd Jul '17 7:00:52 PM glickmam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
23rd Jul '17 7:00:20 PM glickmam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate companies until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate companies eponymous companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
This list shows the last 10 events of 75. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.ThePeoplesCourt