History Series / ThePeoplesCourt

23rd Jul '17 7:02:50 PM glickmam
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** From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."

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** From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, Doug Llewelyn closing out each episode, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."
23rd Jul '17 7:01:13 PM glickmam
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The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Edwards Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
23rd Jul '17 7:00:52 PM glickmam
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The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate eponymous production companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
23rd Jul '17 7:00:20 PM glickmam
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The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate companies until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.

to:

The UrExample of the judge talk show, ''The People's Court'' had its pilot episode taped in October 1980 and premiered on September 14, 1981 when Judge Joseph Wapner took the court to the TV. The premise is that two parties, a plaintiff and a defendant, that would otherwise take their cases to small claims court would instead agree to have their case settled on television by Judge Wapner. After the verdict was given, each side would be interviewed by host and court reporter Doug Llewelyn, who would often end the show with the CatchPhrase "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court." On the other hand, if a case ended with a verdict for the defendant, Llewelyn would instead end the episode by saying "If someone files a lawsuit against you and yet you're convinced you've done nothing wrong, don't be intimidated. Just be sure to stand up for your rights: go to court." The show's other two regulars were bailiff Rusty Burrell and announcer Jack Harrell. The show was created by John Masterson, who previously created and executive produced ''Series/QueenForADay''. It was executive produced by Ralph Edwards (who previously created and/or produced ''Series/TheCrossWits'', ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'', and ''Series/NameThatTune'') and his production partner partner, Stu Billett. Both men packaged the show under their own separate companies eponymous companies, Ralph Edward Productions and Stu Billett Productions, until 1987, when the companies merged. The show was originally distributed by Telepictures until 1986, when that company merged with Creator/{{Lorimar}}, creating Lorimar-Telepictures. Lorimar-Telepictures continued to distribute until 1989, when it was purchased by Creator/WarnerBros, who continued to distribute until the show's cancellation in 1993.
30th Jun '17 7:37:25 PM GarrulousTiger
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Added DiffLines:

* BerserkButton: While Judge Milian is generally nicer and less abrasive than her rival Judge Judy, it seems to take less to trigger Judge Milian's Berserk Button than it does Judge Judy's. Particularly, she'll get upset when she senses that a litigant is lying, and has said that she is personally offended by liars in court because she feels that they are underestimating her.
--> '''Judge Milian''': ''[in one early case]'' GOD, do I hate being underestimated! It is SO insulting! It is so - he [the defendant] thinks... ''[makes a paper airplane out of defendant's faked evidence and throws it as audience laughs]'' ...that I have absolutely NO brains in my head!
15th Jun '17 10:33:23 PM glickmam
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After ''Series/JudgeJudy'' started the judge show revival in 1996, one of the first shows on the block was a {{revival}} of ''The People's Court'', which premiered in 1997. Once again, the show was produced by Ralph Edwards-Stu Billett Productions and distributed by Creator/WarnerBros. Former New York City mayor Ed Koch initially took the bench for the first two years, then was replaced by Jerry Sheindlin (husband of Judge Judy). He was replaced by Marilyn Milian in 2001, who presides over the court today. The bailiff during the Koch-Sheindlin years was Josephine Ann Longobardi. After Milian took the bench, she was replaced by Davy Jones, who only lasted relatively briefly and was in turn replaced by Douglas [=MacIntosh=]. Curt Chaplin took over the interview duties and became the new announcer, while host Harvey Levin, who worked on the Wapner version as the show's legal consultant, explains the legalese behind the judges' decisions while polling fans gathered outdoors. In 2016, as part of the show's [[MilestoneCelebration 35th Anniversary]], Doug Llewelyn returned as interviewer.

to:

After ''Series/JudgeJudy'' started the judge show revival in 1996, one of the first shows on the block was a {{revival}} of ''The People's Court'', which premiered in 1997. Once again, the show was produced by Ralph Edwards-Stu Billett Productions and distributed by Creator/WarnerBros. Former New York City mayor Ed Koch initially took the bench for the first two years, then was replaced by Jerry Sheindlin (husband of Judge Judy). He was replaced by Marilyn Milian in 2001, who presides over the court today. The bailiff during the Koch-Sheindlin years was Josephine Ann Longobardi. After Milian took the bench, she was replaced by Davy Jones, who only lasted relatively briefly and was in turn replaced by Douglas [=MacIntosh=]. Curt Chaplin took over the interview duties and became the new announcer, while host Harvey Levin, who worked on the Wapner version as the show's legal consultant, explains the legalese behind the judges' decisions while polling fans gathered outdoors. In 2016, as part of the show's [[MilestoneCelebration 35th Anniversary]], Doug Llewelyn returned as interviewer.
interviewer. Curt Chaplin, however, is still remaining with the program as the show's announcer.
14th Jun '17 9:53:03 PM glickmam
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* CantGetAwayWithNothing: As mentioned below, whenever litigants forget that Judge Milian is fluent in Spanish and try to curse her out or make snide comments thinking she can't understand. In addition, on one occasion, a defendant's witness openly threatened the plaintiff in court in Spanish, yelling that she was going to bust the plaintiff's face in. Of course, Her Honor caught this and admonished the witness right away.

to:

* CantGetAwayWithNothing: CantGetAwayWithNuthin: As mentioned below, whenever litigants forget that Judge Milian is fluent in Spanish and try to curse her out or make snide comments thinking she can't understand. In addition, on one occasion, a defendant's witness openly threatened the plaintiff in court in Spanish, yelling that she was going to bust the plaintiff's face in. Of course, Her Honor caught this and admonished the witness right away.
9th Jun '17 6:00:47 PM GarrulousTiger
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* CantGetAwayWithNothin: As mentioned below, whenever litigants forget that Judge Milian is fluent in Spanish and try to curse her out or make snide comments thinking she can't understand. In addition, on one occasion, a defendant's witness openly threatened the plaintiff in court in Spanish, yelling that she was going to bust the plaintiff's face in. Of course, Her Honor caught this and admonished the witness right away.

to:

* CantGetAwayWithNothin: CantGetAwayWithNothing: As mentioned below, whenever litigants forget that Judge Milian is fluent in Spanish and try to curse her out or make snide comments thinking she can't understand. In addition, on one occasion, a defendant's witness openly threatened the plaintiff in court in Spanish, yelling that she was going to bust the plaintiff's face in. Of course, Her Honor caught this and admonished the witness right away.
9th Jun '17 6:00:22 PM GarrulousTiger
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Added DiffLines:

* CantGetAwayWithNothin: As mentioned below, whenever litigants forget that Judge Milian is fluent in Spanish and try to curse her out or make snide comments thinking she can't understand. In addition, on one occasion, a defendant's witness openly threatened the plaintiff in court in Spanish, yelling that she was going to bust the plaintiff's face in. Of course, Her Honor caught this and admonished the witness right away.
** As with JudgeJudy, there have also been some instances in which Judge Milian has announced to a litigant who has gotten away with some wrongdoing that she would be referring the case to local law enforcement after the fact.
*** Also as with Judge Judy, one of said cases involved an Ebay scammer - the twist being that the scammer was a 16-year-old boy. The judge told him just before ruling against him, "If I were you I'd be waiting for the knock on the door, pal, because you are going to GET IT." The boy's mother subsequently fled the courtroom in tears, refusing to stop to talk to the court reporter (Curt Chaplin).
30th Jan '17 2:44:20 AM glickmam
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* CatchPhrase: From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."

to:

* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase:
**
From the first episodes from the original series (in the fall of 1981) onward, it has always been, "Don't take the law into your own hands. Take them to court."
** Judge Wapner, when greeting the litigants: "I know you've all been sworn and I have read your complaint.
"
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.ThePeoplesCourt