History Series / TheJokersWild

1st Jul '16 8:45:32 AM themisterfree
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** '''1990/91:''' Various prizes (trips, merchandise, and cash from $500-$2,000) were on the displays, and could be frozen after each spin; three of anything won. Jokers couldn't be frozen, however, and had to be converted...but spinning three Jokers won the Joker's Jackpot, which at one point got as high as $36,000.

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** '''1990/91:''' The winner would be read definitions and try to identify the word; guessing correctly would get you a spin on the Joker Machine. Various prizes (trips, merchandise, and cash from $500-$2,000) were on the displays, and could be frozen after each spin; three of anything won. Jokers couldn't be frozen, however, and had to be converted...but spinning three Jokers won the Joker's Jackpot, which at one point got as high as $36,000.
27th Jun '16 8:29:52 AM themisterfree
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** The 1990s version had an audience game, too, albeit only to fill in time when the endgame ended early, and had people picked from the audience playing the standard endgame; two spins to match anything for $100.

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** The 1990s version had an audience game, too, albeit only to fill in time when the endgame ended early, and had people picked from the audience playing the standard endgame; two three spins to match anything for $100.
22nd Jun '16 4:32:36 PM themisterfree
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** '''2006:''' "Face the Devil" returned, but with far more generous dollar amounts- getting to $10,000 would be the threshold. However, the player could choose to risk it for more- a second Devil would be added, but so would three car images, getting those would get the player a luxury car.



** Two more were shot in 2006 for a planned revival, alongside another game show format called ''Combination Lock'' that had been bounced around since the late 1990s. This version had the classic format, but with considerably upped dollar amounts (with first to $5,000 winning). The endgame also had the stakes raised: you won by getting to $10,000 and/or avoiding the Devil, but if they chose to keep going, a second Devil would be added- as would three car symbols, which would get you a luxury car. Both shows were planned for 2007 debuts, but neither series was picked up.

to:

** Two more were shot in 2006 for a planned revival, alongside another game show format called ''Combination Lock'' that had been bounced around since the late 1990s. This version had the classic format, but with considerably upped dollar amounts (with first to $5,000 winning). The endgame also had the stakes raised: you won by getting to $10,000 and/or avoiding the Devil, but if they chose to keep going, a second Devil would be added- as would three car symbols, which would get you a luxury car.raised; see above for that. Both shows were planned for 2007 debuts, but neither series was picked up.
22nd Jun '16 4:30:17 PM themisterfree
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*** The first 2006 pilot was hosted by game show veteran Mark Maxwell-Smith (the creator of Canadian gameshow ''Talk About'', producer on ''Series/SupermarketSweep'' and the Mirror Man on [[Creator/ABCFamiyl The Family Channel]]'s ''Masters of the Maze''); the second one was hosted by future ''GSN Live'' host Alex Cambert.

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*** The first 2006 pilot was hosted by game show veteran Mark Maxwell-Smith (the creator of Canadian gameshow ''Talk About'', producer on ''Series/SupermarketSweep'' and the Mirror Man on [[Creator/ABCFamiyl [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]]'s ''Masters of the Maze''); the second one was hosted by future ''GSN Live'' host Alex Cambert.
22nd Jun '16 4:29:52 PM themisterfree
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** TheAnnouncer: Johnny Jacobs, Jay Stewart, and Charlie O'Donnell the typical B&E trifecta. One notable substitute was [[Series/DoubleDare1986 Marc Summers]], then a CBS page, in his first television role. Ed [=MacKay=] announced the 1990 revival, and Charlie handled announcing duties on the CD-i versions.

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** TheAnnouncer: Johnny Jacobs, Jay Stewart, and Charlie O'Donnell the typical B&E trifecta. One notable substitute was [[Series/DoubleDare1986 Marc Summers]], then a CBS page, in his first television role. Ed [=MacKay=] announced the 1990 revival, and Charlie handled announcing duties on the CD-i versions.versions and the 2006 pilots.



*** The first 2006 pilot was hosted by game show veteran Mark Maxwell-Smith (the creator of Canadian gameshow ''Talk About'', producer on ''Series/SupermarketSweep'' and the Mirror Man on [[Creator/ABCFamiyl The Family Channel]]'s ''Masters of the Maze''); the second one was hosted by future ''GSN Live'' host Alex Cambert.



* {{Pilot}}: At least five.

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* {{Pilot}}: At least five.six.



** A fifth pilot was shot in 2006 for a planned revival, alongside another game show format called ''Combination Lock'' that had been bounced around since the late 1990s. Both pilots were planned for 2007 debuts, but neither series was picked up.

to:

** A fifth pilot was Two more were shot in 2006 for a planned revival, alongside another game show format called ''Combination Lock'' that had been bounced around since the late 1990s. This version had the classic format, but with considerably upped dollar amounts (with first to $5,000 winning). The endgame also had the stakes raised: you won by getting to $10,000 and/or avoiding the Devil, but if they chose to keep going, a second Devil would be added- as would three car symbols, which would get you a luxury car. Both pilots shows were planned for 2007 debuts, but neither series was picked up.
7th Jun '16 6:29:52 PM Gimere
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* [[MysteryBox Mystery(?):]] This category (which debuted close to the end of the CBS run, on January 30, 1975) was always played for double normal value ($100/$200/$400).
** A rack of seven "?" cards was mounted on the front of Jack's podium whenever this category was used, and the contestant would call for one of them by number. Jack would then read off the category (a different one for each card, never the same as any of the others in play for that game), ask the question, and put the card out of play after it had been answered.

to:

* [[MysteryBox Mystery(?):]] This category (which debuted close to the end of the CBS run, on January 30, 1975) was always played for double normal value ($100/$200/$400).
**
($100/$200/$400). A rack of seven "?" cards was mounted on the front of Jack's podium whenever this category was used, and the contestant would call for one of them by number. Jack would then read off the category (a different one for each card, never the same as any of the others in play for that game), ask the question, and put the card out of play after it had been answered.
3rd Jun '16 9:58:58 AM Scalondragon
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** "Just One More" was a category where there was a question with multiple answers, and the contestants bid on how many answers they could get right in a row. If the winning bidder couldn't get all the answers then, much like ''Series/FamilyFeud'', the other player only needed to give one more right answer to win the question and the cash.

to:

** "Just One More" was a category where there was a question with multiple answers, and the contestants bid on how many answers they could get right in a row. If the winning bidder couldn't get all the answers then, much like ''Series/FamilyFeud'', the other player only needed to give ''just one more more'' right answer to win the question and the cash.


Added DiffLines:

* PieInTheFace: The first slides for "Comedy Movies" and "TV Comedy Shows" used a man getting hit in the face with a pie.


Added DiffLines:

* TinyGuyHugeGirl: The "Unlikely Pairs" category had this pairing for the category's color slide.
31st May '16 6:04:59 PM themisterfree
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* HomeGame: Milton Bradley made three of the adult series and one of the children's spinoff. Philips also released two video game versions of the show in 1994 (over three years after the show was last seen in first run)--an adult version and a junior version.

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* HomeGame: Milton Bradley made three of the adult series and one of the children's spinoff. Philips also released two video game versions of the show for their [[UsefulNotes/PhilipsCDI [=CDi=] console]] in 1994 (over three years after the show was last seen in first run)--an adult version and a junior version.
28th Apr '16 10:35:08 AM themisterfree
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* RecycledSoundtrack: A 1980 tournament borrowed the theme from another Barry-Enright show, ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1976 Break the Bank]]''.
** Over 2 decades after the 1990 version was canned, Creator/{{Greggo}} reused a (low-pitched, internet-sourced) copy of the 1990 theme for his original game show ''Farkle''.



** A 1980 tournament borrowed the theme from another Barry-Enright show, ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1976 Break the Bank]]''.
22nd Apr '16 1:47:32 PM themisterfree
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** The pilot for the 1990-1991 revival, taped in September 1989, had a less-frightening logo on top of the Joker Machine; per a brief clip shown by Pat Finn when he introduced the pilot for ''Series/ShopTilYouDropp'' on Wink Martindale's YouTube page, the third window of the machine still had Jokers, but held time amounts instead of cash amounts.

to:

** The pilot for the 1990-1991 revival, taped in September 1989, had a less-frightening logo on top of the Joker Machine; per a brief clip shown by Pat Finn when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziAqUdK0tGI he introduced the pilot for ''Series/ShopTilYouDropp'' for]] ''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'' on Wink Martindale's YouTube page, the third window of the machine still had Jokers, but held time amounts instead of cash amounts.
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