History Series / TheHollywoodSquares

30th Nov '16 3:31:45 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** Center Square and regulars: Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor, Emma Samms, [[Franchise/{{DCAU}} Arleen Sorkin]] and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season; Garrett and Gottfried were held over (while Tambor served as announcer initially). ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.

to:

** Center Square and regulars: regulars:
***
Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland (best known for voicing WesternAnimation/MrMagoo and as [[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned- returned -- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named (actually a persona of Cliff Arquette), Arquette) and George Gobels. Gobel.
***
The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor, Emma Samms, [[Franchise/{{DCAU}} Arleen Sorkin]] and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square.
***
The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea.
***
The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season; Garrett and Gottfried were held over (while Tambor served as announcer initially). initially).
***
''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.
29th Nov '16 7:38:54 AM Briguy52748
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** The NBC version began at about $1,000 (in 1966); the base amount increased to approximately $1,500 and then $2,000 by the late 1960s and early 1970s, and increased by $1,000-2,000 until claimed. During the late 1960s, the top jackpot was just over $11,000 [[note]](Art Fleming was that episode's Secret Square, and a naive contestant who believed that the ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' host could not be wrong about anything correctly agreed with an answer he admitted he had no clue to)[[/note]]; during this era, a five-time champion won the Secret Square if it had not yet been won [[note]](as part of his winnings, which also included a car and additional cash)[[/note]]. By the mid-1970s, new Secret Squares generally started in the $3,000 range, and the show's final couple of years (1978-1980) started at around $3,500 to $4,500, with the value increasing by as much as $6,000 for each show it wasn't won; it was common for Secret Square jackpots to reach $20,000, and at least one reached $35,000 before being won.

to:

** The NBC version began at about $1,000 (in 1966); the base amount increased to approximately $1,500 and then $2,000 by the late 1960s and early 1970s, and increased by $1,000-2,000 until claimed. During the late 1960s, the top jackpot was just over $11,000 [[note]](Art Fleming was that episode's Secret Square, and a naive contestant who believed that the ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' host could not be wrong about anything correctly agreed with an answer he admitted he had no clue to)[[/note]]; during this era, a five-time champion champion, upon winning his fifth match, won the Secret Square if it had not yet been won [[note]](as as part of his winnings, which also included winnings [[note]](also a car and additional cash)[[/note]]. By the mid-1970s, new Secret Squares generally started in the $3,000 range, and the show's final couple of years (1978-1980) started at around $3,500 to $4,500, with the value increasing by as much as $6,000 for each show it wasn't won; it was common for Secret Square jackpots to reach $20,000, and at least one reached $35,000 before being won.won; unwon Secret Square jackpots, by this time, were no longer part of an undefeated champion's guaranteed take.
29th Nov '16 7:36:13 AM Briguy52748
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* ProgressiveJackpot: The Secret Square, on the NBC daytime and the second through fifth seasons of the Bergeron version. The NBC version began at about $1,000 (later $2,000) and increased by about $1,000 until claimed; the top jackpot ever was just over $11,000. The Bergeron version saw the "Secret Square Stash" usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued Stash was worth more than $50,000.

to:

* ProgressiveJackpot: The Secret Square, on the NBC daytime and the second through fifth seasons of the Bergeron version. To wit:
**
The NBC version began at about $1,000 (later $2,000) (in 1966); the base amount increased to approximately $1,500 and then $2,000 by the late 1960s and early 1970s, and increased by about $1,000 $1,000-2,000 until claimed; claimed. During the late 1960s, the top jackpot ever was just over $11,000. $11,000 [[note]](Art Fleming was that episode's Secret Square, and a naive contestant who believed that the ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' host could not be wrong about anything correctly agreed with an answer he admitted he had no clue to)[[/note]]; during this era, a five-time champion won the Secret Square if it had not yet been won [[note]](as part of his winnings, which also included a car and additional cash)[[/note]]. By the mid-1970s, new Secret Squares generally started in the $3,000 range, and the show's final couple of years (1978-1980) started at around $3,500 to $4,500, with the value increasing by as much as $6,000 for each show it wasn't won; it was common for Secret Square jackpots to reach $20,000, and at least one reached $35,000 before being won.
**
The Bergeron version saw the "Secret Square Stash" usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued Stash during the Bergeron era was worth more than $50,000.
3rd Nov '16 6:17:08 AM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

* AffectionateNickname: Tom would often call Whoopi "Whoopster", and the off-screen judge "Skippy Trebek" (allegedly Creator/AlexTrebek's long-lost brother; [[http://www.mystica401.50webs.com/hollywoodsquares/facts.htm in reality]], he was producer/writer Stephen Radosh- more known as the creator of ''Series/CatchPhrase'')
28th Oct '16 12:01:41 PM Gimere
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** ''Hip Hop Squares'' had one that was vaguely similar to how ''Series/BreakTheBank1976'' ([[Creator/JackBarry Barry & Enright's]] attempte to copy this show) played its' game: the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks which celebrity they think is right; if they are correct, they won $2,500.

to:

** ''Hip Hop Squares'' had one that was vaguely similar to how ''Series/BreakTheBank1976'' ([[Creator/JackBarry Barry & Enright's]] attempte attempt to copy this show) played its' its game: the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks picked which celebrity they think is thought was right; if they are the pick was correct, they won $2,500.



** "I would have gone for _________ for the win/block, but this might work out for you."

to:

** "I would have gone for _________ [name of celebrity] for the win/block, but this might work out for you."



* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the very first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.

to:

* ContinuityNod: For the ContinuityNod:
** On
''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the very first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.



* INeedAFreakingDrink: After the infamous "YOU FOOL!" incident, Tom promised that if they ran out of time playing that game, "we're all going out for drinks."

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* INeedAFreakingDrink: After During the infamous "YOU FOOL!" incident, episode, Tom promised that if they ran out of time playing that game, "we're all going out for drinks."
24th Oct '16 9:04:01 PM Green_lantern40
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* CampGay: Paul Lynde. Jm J. Bullock filled this role on Davidson's version. Martin Mull, however, [[SubvertedTrope subverted it]].

to:

* CampGay: Paul Lynde. Jm Jim J. Bullock filled this role on Davidson's version. Martin Mull, Bruce Vilanch, however, [[SubvertedTrope subverted it]].it -- he was gay, but he certainly wasn't camp.



* DoItYourselfThemeTune: Whoopi (allegedly) sang the theme song herself for the first three seasons of her run.

to:

* DoItYourselfThemeTune: Whoopi (allegedly) Goldberg sang the theme song herself for the first three seasons of her run.the Bergeron version.
24th Oct '16 7:09:58 PM themisterfree
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** ''Hip Hop Squares'' has the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks which celebrity they think is right; if they are correct, they won $2,500.

to:

** ''Hip Hop Squares'' has had one that was vaguely similar to how ''Series/BreakTheBank1976'' ([[Creator/JackBarry Barry & Enright's]] attempte to copy this show) played its' game: the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks which celebrity they think is right; if they are correct, they won $2,500.



** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.

to:

** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.



** Center Square: Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season; Garrett and Gottfried were held over (while Tambor served as announcer). ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.

to:

** Center Square: Square and regulars: Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned.returned- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor Gabor, Emma Samms, [[Franchise/{{DCAU}} Arleen Sorkin]] and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season; Garrett and Gottfried were held over (while Tambor served as announcer).announcer initially). ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.



** During the "H2" days, it would be, "And our center square, (insert name here)", as there wasn't a permanent center square until the next season, when Martin Mull took over (oddly, despite Henry Winkler co-producing this version like Whoopi did, he didn't take over as center square).

to:

** During the "H2" days, it would be, "And our center square, (insert name here)", as there wasn't a permanent center square until the next season, when Martin Mull took over (oddly, despite Henry Winkler co-producing this version like Whoopi did, he didn't take over as center square).over.



** Another Davidson April Fools' ep had Joan Rivers hosting instead, with John taking the center square.



* CampGay: Paul Lynde. Jim J. Bullock filled this role on Davidson's version.

to:

* CampGay: Paul Lynde. Jim Jm J. Bullock filled this role on Davidson's version. Martin Mull, however, [[SubvertedTrope subverted it]].



* CoolOldGuy: Charley Weaver.

to:

* CoolOldGuy: Charley Weaver. Martin Mull in the Bergeron era- he even called himself Charley Weaver during the first Game Show Week.



** The Bergeron version originally had the same cash-per-game values used on the Davidson version, with the fourth game and beyond played for $2000; they quickly doubled after that. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season.
* EndOfSeriesAwareness: Toward the end of the ''H2'' run, whenever Martin Mull was seen in the intro, he was seen doing things like browsing the classifieds, making a "gravestone" for the center square (featuring his name, Paul Lynde's and Whoopi Goldberg's), and for the final week, he held up a sign saying "[[IncrediblyLamePun It's A King World After All]]" (King World was the producer/distributor of that version, they acquired the format rights from Orion in 1991).

to:

** The Bergeron version originally had the front-game payouts the same cash-per-game values used on as they were for the Davidson version, with version for the fourth game first four months[[note]]$500 for the first two games, $1000 for the third, and $2000 for anything beyond played that, plus $250 for $2000; each captured square when time was called[[/note]]; they quickly were doubled after that. that[[note]]at rates of $1000, $2000, $4000 and $500[[/note]]. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season.
season (they'd simply move it to another star); some sound effects were different, and the endgame was a bit different (see above).
* EndOfSeriesAwareness: Toward the end of the ''H2'' run, whenever Martin Mull was seen in the intro, he was seen doing things like browsing the classifieds, making a "gravestone" for the center square (featuring his name, Paul Lynde's and Whoopi Goldberg's), and for the final week, he held up a sign saying "[[IncrediblyLamePun It's A King World After All]]" (King All]]"[[note]]King World was the producer/distributor of that version, they acquired the format rights from Orion in 1991).1991[[/note]].



** On the John Davidson version, Shadoe Stevens and Series/{{ALF}} both got to do this. The former had Creator/HowardStern take Shadoe's usual spot as bottom center square/announcer, and on the latter, John sat on the panel.

to:

** On the John Davidson version, Shadoe Stevens Stevens, Jm. J Bullock, Joan Rivers, and Series/{{ALF}} both all got to do this. The former had Creator/HowardStern take Shadoe's usual spot as bottom center square/announcer, and on the latter, John sat on the panel.
24th Oct '16 6:44:39 PM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

[[caption-width-right:350:Which star do ''you'' think is in the Secret Square?]]
24th Oct '16 6:42:36 PM themisterfree
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* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.

to:

* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the very first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.


Added DiffLines:

* DoItYourselfThemeTune: Whoopi (allegedly) sang the theme song herself for the first three seasons of her run.
16th Oct '16 6:43:22 PM goldenroad
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** The final season of the Davidson version used a similar bonus round, but all nine celebrities had a key instead, and the contestant would pick the celebrity rather than the key. No cars would be eliminated, champions would remain until winning a car or defeated

to:

** The final season of the Davidson version used a similar bonus round, but all nine celebrities had a key instead, and the contestant would pick the celebrity rather than the key. No cars would be eliminated, champions would remain until winning a car or defeateddefeated.



### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, other prizes like a jukebox, $5,000-$15,000 cash, and a car. It was quickly amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.

to:

### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, other prizes like a jukebox, $5,000-$15,000 cash, $5,000-$15,000, and a car. It was quickly amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.



** ''Hip Hop Squares'' has the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks which celebrity they think is right; if they are correct, they win $2,500 cash.

to:

** ''Hip Hop Squares'' has the contestant pick from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picks which celebrity they think is right; if they are correct, they win $2,500 cash.won $2,500.



** The Bergeron version originally had the same cash-per-game values used on the Davidson version; they quickly upped it to $1000 for the first and Secret Square games, $2000 for the third, and $4000 for any game after that. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season.

to:

** The Bergeron version originally had the same cash-per-game values used on the Davidson version; version, with the fourth game and beyond played for $2000; they quickly upped it to $1000 for the first and Secret Square games, $2000 for the third, and $4000 for any game doubled after that. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season.



** The infamous "YouFool" episode, where the poor contestants guessed incorrectly with Gilbert Gottfried nine consecutive times (in a block-and-win situation) before finally someone was correct. Amusingly, Gottfried kept bluffing and the contestants kept agreeing. It only ended when Gottfried finally provided a correct answer which the contestant obediently agreed to; who knows how long it would have gone on otherwise?

to:

** The infamous "YouFool" episode, where the poor contestants guessed incorrectly with Gilbert Gottfried nine consecutive times (in a block-and-win situation) before finally someone was correct. Amusingly, Gottfried kept bluffing and the contestants kept agreeing. It only ended when Gottfried finally provided a correct answer which the contestant obediently agreed to; who knows how long it would have gone on otherwise?to, if he hadn't, the game would've ended with a tie as the times up bell sounded afterwards.
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