History Series / TheHollywoodSquares

15th Jun '16 12:53:53 AM Green_lantern40
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** "(X/Circle) gets the square."

to:

** "(X/Circle) gets the square." Alternatively, from the Marshall version, "We put (an X/a circle) there."
8th Jun '16 5:00:50 PM themisterfree
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** The first two seasons of the Davidson version saw the winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio (no, seriously) the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.

to:

** The first two seasons of the Davidson version saw had an endgame similar to the ABC era of ''Series/SplitSecond''. The winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio (no, seriously) the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.



### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, $5,000-$15,000 cash, and a luxury car. Later amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.

to:

### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, other prizes like a jukebox, $5,000-$15,000 cash, and a luxury car. Later It was quickly amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.



### An updated version of the Davidson version's bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel, getting all nine right won automatically. The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.

to:

### An updated version of the Davidson version's Davidson-era bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel, getting all nine right won automatically. The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.



** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999, and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.

to:

** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999, 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.



** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow''; he had already been a semi-regular during the Whoopi & Friends era) announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) is the announcer on ''Hip Hop Squares''.
** GameShowHost: Peter Marshall from 1966 to 1981, John Davidson from 1986 to 1989, Tom Bergeron from 1998 to 2004, and Peter Rosenberg for ''Hip Hop Squares''.

to:

** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow''; he had already been a semi-regular during the Whoopi & Friends era) announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man) man and [[Franchise/{{Transformers}} Blurr]]) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) is the announcer on ''Hip Hop Squares''.
** GameShowHost: Bert Parks hosted the 1965 pilot, Peter Marshall from 1966 to 1981, John Davidson from 1986 to 1989, Tom Bergeron from 1998 to 2004, and Peter Rosenberg for ''Hip Hop Squares''.



** While there isn't technically a trope for it, the Center Square obviously needs its own entry- it was crucial to the show. Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season. ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.
* ProgressiveJackpot: The Secret Square, on the NBC daytime and the second through fifth seasons of the Bergeron syndicated version. The NBC version began at about $1,000 (later $2,000) and increased by about $1,000 until claimed; the top jackpot ever was just over $11,000. The Bergeron syndicated version saw the jackpot usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued "Secret Square" was worth more than $50,000.

to:

** While there isn't technically a trope for it, the Center Square obviously needs its own entry- it was crucial to the show. Square: Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up.up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season.season; Garrett and Gottfried were held over (while Tambor served as announcer). ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.
* ProgressiveJackpot: The Secret Square, on the NBC daytime and the second through fifth seasons of the Bergeron syndicated version. The NBC version began at about $1,000 (later $2,000) and increased by about $1,000 until claimed; the top jackpot ever was just over $11,000. The Bergeron syndicated version saw the jackpot "Secret Square Stash" usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued "Secret Square" Stash was worth more than $50,000.



* TransatlanticEquivalent: Multiple ones, but he best-known one would be Britain's ''Celebrity Squares'', on Creator/{{ITV}}. Running first from 1975 to 1979 with British legend Creator/BobMonkhouse at the helm, it was closely modeled after Marshall's version- it even had most of the tapes wiped. When the show returned from 1993 to 1997 (again with Monkhouse), it was now heavily influenced by the Davidson era, complete with the five cars in-studio, though there wasn't a key-related endgame to earn one. The show returned again in 2014, now with [[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi Warwick]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter Davis]] as the ringleader; this version took its' own sense of style and direction, and also stretched out the show to run for an hour. This version had dismal rating and was canned in 2015.

to:

* TransatlanticEquivalent: Multiple ones, but he best-known one would be Britain's ''Celebrity Squares'', on Creator/{{ITV}}. Running first from 1975 to 1979 with British legend Creator/BobMonkhouse at the helm, it was closely modeled after Marshall's version- it even had most of the tapes wiped. When the show returned from 1993 to 1997 (again with Monkhouse), it was now heavily influenced by the Davidson era, complete with the five cars in-studio, though there wasn't a key-related endgame to earn one. An unsold pilot was pitched to Creator/Channel5 in the early 2000s (with Joan Rivers (!) as center square), but wasn't picked up. The show returned again in 2014, now with [[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi Warwick]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter Davis]] as the ringleader; this version took its' own sense of style and direction, and also stretched out the show to run for an hour. This version had dismal rating ratings and was canned in 2015.



*** To a lasser extent, there was a special "It Just Ain't Right" week during ''H2'', where viewers could win prizes based on how many (deliberate) mistakes they could spot. The mistakes ranged from the contestants swapping positions to [[ContinuityNod having "I Love Hollywood" as the theme]] (which was oddly surreal when combined with the "H2"-era graphics).



** During the original run, specifically July of 1975, Bob Monkhouse, host of Creator/{{ITV}}'s adaptation ''Celebrity Squares'' popped up.
* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.

to:

** During the original run, specifically In July of 1975, Bob Monkhouse, host of Creator/{{ITV}}'s adaptation ''Celebrity Squares'' Monkhouse popped up.
* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''. Village''.
** A few times on Bergeron's version, they'd refer to John Davidson; during the Game Show Weeks, this was prevalent as Peter Marshall and Rose Marie were present for the first and second weeks, respectively.



** The Marshall version included ''The Storybook Squares'' for kids and families to play. It included more kid-friendly celebrities such as [[Series/SesameStreet Big Bird]]. (Is that an inversion of SesameStreetCred or what?) Incidentally, the titular character of another Muppet production, ''Series/BearInTheBigBlueHouse'' appeared in the 1998-04 version, including Whoopi's last episode.

to:

** The Marshall version included ''The Storybook Squares'' for kids and families to play. It included more kid-friendly celebrities such as [[Series/SesameStreet Big Bird]]. (Is that an inversion of SesameStreetCred or what?) Incidentally, the titular character of another Muppet production, ''Series/BearInTheBigBlueHouse'' appeared in the 1998-04 version, including Whoopi's last episode.what?)



* NoOSHACompliance: Averted- you might think that giant tic-tac-toe board would be a deathtrap, especially during the original run, but according to [[http://www.classicsquares.com/squarefacts.html this fansite]], the original board (which was mainly scaffolding with a front and small floors and such) managed to survive an earthquake aftershock that struck the NBC Studios in 1971--and according to some accounts, with ''Paul Lynde still in the center square''! The later versions were more solid looking and had backs to the squares (though during the Bergeron years, whenever someone picked the Secret Square that square would turn the show into ''Seizure Squares,'' and halfway through the run they decided to start putting giant neon logos on the floor).

to:

* NoOSHACompliance: Averted- you Averted! You might think that giant tic-tac-toe board would be a deathtrap, especially during the original run, but according to [[http://www.classicsquares.com/squarefacts.html this fansite]], the original board (which was mainly scaffolding with a front and small floors and such) managed to survive an earthquake aftershock that struck the NBC Studios in 1971--and according to some accounts, with ''Paul Lynde still in the center square''! The later versions were more solid looking and had backs to the squares (though during the Bergeron years, whenever someone picked the Secret Square that square would turn the show into ''Seizure Squares,'' and halfway through the run they decided to start putting giant neon logos on the floor).



** Stormy Sacks re-arranged the Davidson theme in that version's third season.

to:

** Stormy Sacks Sachs re-arranged the Davidson theme in that version's third season.
** "I Love Hollywood" was redone for Whoopi's final
season.
8th Jun '16 4:49:14 PM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

* ContinuityNod: For the ''Storybook Squares'', Kenny Williams would reprise his role of town crier from the first Heatter-Quigley series, ''Video Village''.
20th May '16 2:26:40 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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** Repeated and cranked UpToEleven for Tom Bergeron on a show taped to air on April Fool's Day 2003. At one point the male and female contestants were engaged in a heated argument, after which the male contestant made the female contestant ''break down in tears''. Bergeron, who had even more of a deer-in-the-headlights look than Davidson had, comforted the "poor woman" as he sent the show to commercial (of course, unbeknownst to him, [[LeaveTheCameraRunning the camera was still running]]). At the end of the episode, giggling executive producer [[Series/HappyDays Henry Winkler]] (who at the time also served as announcer) announced over the intercom, "Hey Tom... April Fools."

to:

** Repeated and cranked UpToEleven for Tom Bergeron on a show taped to air on April Fool's Day 2003. At one point the male and female contestants were engaged in a heated argument, after which the male contestant made the female contestant ''break down in tears''. Bergeron, who had even more of a deer-in-the-headlights look than Davidson had, comforted the "poor woman" as he sent the show to commercial (of course, unbeknownst to him, [[LeaveTheCameraRunning the camera was still running]]). At the end of the episode, giggling executive producer [[Series/HappyDays Henry Winkler]] (who at the time also served as announcer) announced over the intercom, "Hey Tom... April Fools."



* NoOSHACompliance: Averted- you might think that giant tic-tac-toe board would be a deathtrap, especially during the original run, but according to [[http://www.classicsquares.com/squarefacts.html this fansite]], the original board (which was mainly scaffolding with a front and small floors and such) managed to survive an earthquake aftershock that struck the NBC Studios in 1971- and according to some accounts, with ''Paul Lynde still in the center square''! The later versions were more solid looking and had backs to the squares (though during the Bergeron years, whenever someone picked the Secret Square that square would turn the show into ''Seizure Squares'', and halfway through the run they decided to start putting giant neon logos on the floor).

to:

* NoOSHACompliance: Averted- you might think that giant tic-tac-toe board would be a deathtrap, especially during the original run, but according to [[http://www.classicsquares.com/squarefacts.html this fansite]], the original board (which was mainly scaffolding with a front and small floors and such) managed to survive an earthquake aftershock that struck the NBC Studios in 1971- and 1971--and according to some accounts, with ''Paul Lynde still in the center square''! The later versions were more solid looking and had backs to the squares (though during the Bergeron years, whenever someone picked the Secret Square that square would turn the show into ''Seizure Squares'', Squares,'' and halfway through the run they decided to start putting giant neon logos on the floor).
16th May '16 3:17:31 PM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

* TransatlanticEquivalent: Multiple ones, but he best-known one would be Britain's ''Celebrity Squares'', on Creator/{{ITV}}. Running first from 1975 to 1979 with British legend Creator/BobMonkhouse at the helm, it was closely modeled after Marshall's version- it even had most of the tapes wiped. When the show returned from 1993 to 1997 (again with Monkhouse), it was now heavily influenced by the Davidson era, complete with the five cars in-studio, though there wasn't a key-related endgame to earn one. The show returned again in 2014, now with [[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi Warwick]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter Davis]] as the ringleader; this version took its' own sense of style and direction, and also stretched out the show to run for an hour. This version had dismal rating and was canned in 2015.
18th Mar '16 7:32:38 PM themisterfree
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** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999, and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.

to:

** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box.box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999, and Tiger made an LCD handheld game in that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the NintendoEntertainmentSystem.
14th Feb '16 3:18:19 PM Gimere
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** While there isn't technically a trope for it, the Center Square obviously needs its' own entry- it was crucial to the show. Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season. ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.

to:

** While there isn't technically a trope for it, the Center Square obviously needs its' its own entry- it was crucial to the show. Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season. ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.
29th Jan '16 6:49:55 PM themisterfree
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** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow'') announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) is the announcer on ''Hip Hop Squares''.

to:

** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow'') (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow''; he had already been a semi-regular during the Whoopi & Friends era) announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) is the announcer on ''Hip Hop Squares''.


Added DiffLines:

** While there isn't technically a trope for it, the Center Square obviously needs its' own entry- it was crucial to the show. Jim Backus ([[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Paul Lynde joined up. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned. Other regulars during that era of course included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (really named Cliff Arquette), and George Gobels. The Davidson version had the rotation too; Joan Rivers, Jim J. Bullock and ALF were some of the most frequent. Regulars during that era included Zsa Zsa Gabor and Shadoe Stevens, who occupied the bottom-center square. The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea. The ''H2'' era initially returned to the rotation, before Martin Mull became the center square for the last season. ''Hip Hop Squares'' also utilized the rotation.
28th Jan '16 3:34:55 PM goldenroad
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** The Marshall version featured a very simple one -- the winning contestant would pick a celebrity, who would open an envelope that contained a prize; whatever was in the envelope was what the contestant would win.

to:

** The Marshall version featured a very simple one one, debuting in 1976 -- the winning contestant would pick a celebrity, who would open an envelope that contained a prize; whatever was in the envelope was what the contestant would win.win. The top prize was $5,000; when this was transferred to the syndicated version in 1978, a new car was added to the envelopes.



### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version. Later amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.

to:

### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version.version, featuring trips, $5,000-$15,000 cash, and a luxury car. Later amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.



### An updated version of the Davidson version's bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel. The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.

to:

### An updated version of the Davidson version's bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel.panel, getting all nine right won automatically. The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.



-->'''Kenny Williams:''' One of these stars is sitting in the Secret Square, and the contestant who picks it first could win a prize package of over $x,000! Which star is it? (The stars are introduced one by one, finishing with the center square, usually...) ...Or Paul Lynde...all in ''The Hollywood Squares!'' And now here's the Master of ''The Hollywood Squares'', Peter Marshall!

to:

-->'''Kenny Williams:''' One of these stars is sitting in the Secret Square, and the contestant who picks it first could win a prize package of worth over $x,000! Which star is it? (The stars are introduced one by one, finishing with the center square, usually...) ...Or or Paul Lynde...all in ''The Hollywood Squares!'' And now here's the Master of ''The Hollywood Squares'', Peter Marshall!
28th Jan '16 4:16:58 AM Gimere
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* BonusRound: Several.

to:

* BonusRound: Several.BonusRound:
This list shows the last 10 events of 52. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheHollywoodSquares