History Series / TheHollywoodSquares

3rd Feb '18 10:05:21 PM mlsmithca
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** The first two seasons of the Davidson version had an endgame similar to the ABC era of ''Series/SplitSecond'' (though it was actually recycled wholesale from a previous Rick Rosner/Orion game show, the short-lived ''Just Men!'', which aired on NBC in 1983 and was hosted by Creator/BettyWhite). The winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.
*** The final season of the Davidson version used a similar bonus round, but all nine celebrities had a key instead, and the contestant would pick the celebrity rather than the key. No cars would be eliminated, champions would remain until winning a car or defeated.

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** The first two seasons of the Davidson version had an endgame similar to the ABC era of ''Series/SplitSecond'' (though it was actually recycled wholesale from a previous Rick Rosner/Orion game show, the short-lived ''Just Men!'', which aired on NBC in 1983 and was hosted by Creator/BettyWhite). The winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.
***
ones. The final season of the Davidson version used a similar bonus round, but all nine celebrities had a key instead, and the contestant would pick the celebrity rather than the key. No cars would be eliminated, champions would remain until winning a car or defeated.



* HomeGame:
** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem. A video game, based on the later-era Bergeron format, was released for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 on October 5, 2010.

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* HomeGame:
**
HomeGame: Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem. A video game, based on the later-era Bergeron format, was released for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 on October 5, 2010.



* TransatlanticEquivalent: Multiple ones, but he best-known one would be Britain's ''Celebrity Squares'', on Creator/{{ITV}}. Running first from 1975 to 1979 with British legend Creator/BobMonkhouse at the helm, it was closely modeled after Marshall's version- it even had most of the tapes wiped. When the show returned from 1993 to 1997 (again with Monkhouse), it was now heavily influenced by the Davidson era, complete with the five cars in-studio, though there wasn't a key-related endgame to earn one. An unsold pilot was pitched to Creator/Channel5 in the early 2000s (with Joan Rivers (!) as center square), but wasn't picked up. The show returned again in 2014, now with [[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi Warwick]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter Davis]] as the ringleader; this version took its own sense of style and direction, and also stretched out the show to run for an hour (at least for the first series). This version had dismal ratings and was canned in 2015.
** Should be noted that the UK version predated the US version with having a bonus round. The player had to get nine answers to a question. The 70's version had a top prize of a score augmentation to £1000 though with a risk of losing the front game money; they had a second option of an additional £100. The 90's run had a random choice of five cars for a win, while the Davis run awarded £1000 per right answer with all nine winning £20,000 (£25,000 in that version's second series).

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* TransatlanticEquivalent: Multiple ones, but he best-known one would be Britain's ''Celebrity Squares'', on Creator/{{ITV}}. Running first from 1975 to 1979 with British legend Creator/BobMonkhouse at the helm, it was closely modeled after Marshall's version- it even had most of the tapes wiped. When the show returned from 1993 to 1997 (again with Monkhouse), it was now heavily influenced by the Davidson era, complete with the five cars in-studio, though there wasn't a key-related endgame to earn one. An unsold pilot was pitched to Creator/Channel5 in the early 2000s (with Joan Rivers (!) as center square), but wasn't picked up. The show returned again in 2014, now with [[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi Warwick]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter Davis]] as the ringleader; this version took its own sense of style and direction, and also stretched out the show to run for an hour (at least for the first series). This version had dismal ratings and was canned in 2015.
**
2015. Should be noted that the UK version predated the US version with having a bonus round. The player had to get nine answers to a question. The 70's version had a top prize of a score augmentation to £1000 though with a risk of losing the front game money; they had a second option of an additional £100. The 90's run had a random choice of five cars for a win, while the Davis run awarded £1000 per right answer with all nine winning £20,000 (£25,000 in that version's second series).



* AffectionateNickname: Tom would often call Whoopi "Whoopster", and the off-screen judge "Skippy Trebek" (allegedly Creator/AlexTrebek's long-lost brother; [[http://www.mystica401.50webs.com/hollywoodsquares/facts.htm in reality]], he was producer/writer Stephen Radosh- more known as the creator of ''Series/CatchPhrase'').

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* AffectionateNickname: Tom would often call Whoopi "Whoopster", and the off-screen judge "Skippy Trebek" (allegedly Creator/AlexTrebek's long-lost brother; [[http://www.mystica401.50webs.com/hollywoodsquares/facts.htm in reality]], he was producer/writer Stephen Radosh- Radosh - more known as the creator of ''Series/CatchPhrase'').
21st Jan '18 5:15:07 PM Green_lantern40
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Marshall referred to the female contestant's mark as a "circle", although technically it appeared on that version's board as an ellipse. The most famous center square, Creator/PaulLynde, didn't join the panel on a permanent basis until 1968. More information [[http://www.classicsquares.com/ here.]][[note]]dead link[[/note]]
21st Jan '18 6:02:26 AM smittykins
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Marshall referred to the female contestant's mark as a "circle", although technically it appeared on that version's board as an ellipse. The most famous center square, Creator/PaulLynde, didn't join the panel on a permanent basis until 1968. More information [[http://www.classicsquares.com/ here.]]

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Marshall referred to the female contestant's mark as a "circle", although technically it appeared on that version's board as an ellipse. The most famous center square, Creator/PaulLynde, didn't join the panel on a permanent basis until 1968. More information [[http://www.classicsquares.com/ here.]]]][[note]]dead link[[/note]]
14th Jan '18 12:12:28 PM Green_lantern40
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* CouchGag: During the ''H2'' era, there was a scrolling electronic marquee mounted below the host/contestant area, and often when coming back from or going to a commercial break, it would display all sorts of funny stuff, ranging from puns and references to the celebs to weird messages; one notable one was "Help, I'm trapped under the podium!" Occasionally, they'd run backwards on the marquee and scroll by the right way superimposed on the screen.

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* CouchGag: During the ''H2'' era, there was a scrolling electronic marquee mounted below the host/contestant area, and often when coming back from or going to a commercial break, it would display all sorts of funny stuff, ranging from puns and references to the celebs to weird messages; one notable one was "Help, I'm trapped under the podium!" Occasionally, they'd run backwards on the marquee and scroll by the right way superimposed on the screen.screen, and just before every second commercial break (mostly during the 2002-03 season), the ticker would display something like "Let's go behind the Squares" and the video square underneath would zoom into the camera to feature a short behind-the-scenes funny moment.
14th Jan '18 7:18:37 AM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

* CouchGag: During the ''H2'' era, there was a scrolling electronic marquee mounted below the host/contestant area, and often when coming back from or going to a commercial break, it would display all sorts of funny stuff, ranging from puns and references to the celebs to weird messages; one notable one was "Help, I'm trapped under the podium!" Occasionally, they'd run backwards on the marquee and scroll by the right way superimposed on the screen.
23rd Dec '17 10:49:35 AM themisterfree
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Orion brought the show back again as ''[[TheNewAdventures The New Hollywood Squares]]'' for syndication in 1986; John Davidson, who had substituted for Paul Lynde on the daytime panel, emceed; this run came to an end in 1989. Shortly afterwards, Orion went bankrupt and sodl the format to [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} King]] [[Series/WheelOfFortune World]] in 1991.

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Orion brought the show back again as ''[[TheNewAdventures The New Hollywood Squares]]'' for syndication in 1986; John Davidson, who had substituted for Paul Lynde on the daytime panel, emceed; this run came to an end in 1989. Shortly afterwards, Orion went bankrupt and sodl sold the format to [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} King]] [[Series/WheelOfFortune World]] in 1991.



** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem.
** A video game, based on the later-era Bergeron format, was released for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} on October 5, 2010.

to:

** Watkins-Strathmore made two in 1967 and 1968. Ideal made one in 1974, with Peter Marshall pictured on the box; this was reissued under the ''Celebrity Squares'' name in Britain, with the only real changes being the name and Peter Marshall's photo on the box being swapped out for Bob Monkhouse's. Creator/MiltonBradley made two in 1980 and 1986. Parker Brothers made one in 1999 (cited as being the best of the bunch), and Tiger made an LCD handheld game that same year. [=GameTek=] made computer versions for MS-DOS and the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem.
**
UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem. A video game, based on the later-era Bergeron format, was released for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 on October 5, 2010.



** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow''; he had already been a semi-regular during the Whoopi & Friends era) announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man and [[Franchise/{{Transformers}} Blurr]]) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) was the announcer on the original version of ''Hip Hop Squares''; Creator/IceCube is the announcer on the current revival.

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** TheAnnouncer: Kenny Williams handled the entirety of the Marshall era. Shadoe Stevens (best known as Creator/CaseyKasem's replacement on ''Radio/AmericanTop40'') did both the Davidson version on which he often pulled double duty as a panelist and the first four seasons of the Bergeron version. After Shadoe left the latter, Jeffrey Tambor (''Series/TheLarrySandersShow''; he had already been a semi-regular during the Whoopi & Friends era) announced Season 5, and John Moschitta (aka the Micro Machines man and [[Franchise/{{Transformers}} Blurr]]) announced Season 6. Fill-ins included Shadoe's brother Richard and Creator/HowardStern (!) on the Davidson version, while Henry Winkler Creator/HenryWinkler (also executive producer at the time) sometimes filled in for Tambor. "[[TotallyRadical DJ Ms. Nix]]" (real name: Nicole Lyn Hill) was the announcer on the original version of ''Hip Hop Squares''; Creator/IceCube is the announcer on the current revival.



*** Jim Backus (best known for voicing WesternAnimation/MrMagoo and as [[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, while Ernest Borgnine (last of Series/McHalesNavy) was the first-ever center square when the show went to permanent series. Various center squares rotated until 1968, when Creator/PaulLynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned -- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (actually a persona of Cliff Arquette) and George Gobel. Later on in the 1970s, regulars included John Davidson, Wayland Flowers (and his rotating cast of ventriloquist dummies), Florence Henderson, Tom Poston, Joan Rivers and Leslie Uggams.

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*** Jim Backus (best known for voicing WesternAnimation/MrMagoo and as [[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, while Ernest Borgnine (last of Series/McHalesNavy) (''Series/McHalesNavy'') was the first-ever center square when the show went to permanent series. Various center squares rotated until 1968, when Creator/PaulLynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned -- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (actually a persona of Cliff Arquette) and George Gobel. Later on in the 1970s, regulars included John Davidson, Wayland Flowers (and his rotating cast of ventriloquist dummies), Florence Henderson, Tom Poston, Joan Rivers and Leslie Uggams.



*** The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea.

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*** The Bergeron version had Whoopi Goldberg Creator/WhoopiGoldberg as the center square, with the 2001 College Tournament featuring a rotation because Whoopi was out sick. Regulars during that era included Martin Mull, Jeffrey Tambor, Brad Garrett, Gilbert Gottfried, and Caroline Rhea.



** The Bergeron version saw the "Secret Square Stash" usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) or a gift card and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued Stash during the Bergeron era was worth more than $50,000.

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** The Bergeron version saw the "Secret Square Stash" usually begin with a trip (of about $2,000-$4,000) or a gift card and added prizes until claimed; the highest-valued Stash during the Bergeron era was worth more than $50,000.$50,700. For whatever reason, the final Bergeron season modified it to be a singular prize that varied per game, that didn't carry over (much like the Davidson run).



* AffectionateNickname: Tom would often call Whoopi "Whoopster", and the off-screen judge "Skippy Trebek" (allegedly Creator/AlexTrebek's long-lost brother; [[http://www.mystica401.50webs.com/hollywoodsquares/facts.htm in reality]], he was producer/writer Stephen Radosh- more known as the creator of ''Series/CatchPhrase'')

to:

* AffectionateNickname: Tom would often call Whoopi "Whoopster", and the off-screen judge "Skippy Trebek" (allegedly Creator/AlexTrebek's long-lost brother; [[http://www.mystica401.50webs.com/hollywoodsquares/facts.htm in reality]], he was producer/writer Stephen Radosh- more known as the creator of ''Series/CatchPhrase'')''Series/CatchPhrase'').



** In July of 1975, Bob Monkhouse popped up.

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** In July of 1975, Bob Monkhouse popped up.up on the Marshall version.



** The Bergeron version originally had front-game payouts similar to the Davidson version for the first four months[[note]]$500 for the first two games, $1000 for the third, and $2000 for anything beyond that, plus $250 for each captured square when time was called; they were doubled after that[[/note]]. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season (they'd simply move it to another star); some sound effects were different, and the endgame was a bit different (see above).

to:

** The Bergeron version originally had front-game payouts similar to the Davidson version for the first four months[[note]]$500 for the first two games, $1000 for the third, and $2000 for anything beyond that, plus $250 for each captured square when time was called; called[[/note]]; they were doubled after that[[/note]].that. In addition, the Secret Square Stash didn't come until the next season (they'd simply move it to another star); some sound effects were different, and the endgame was a bit different (see above).



* ParodyAssistance: Given the show's comedic bent, the cast and crew have helped a few times with parody skits. Peter Marshall, Creator/PaulLynde and Rose Marie appeared in "The Towering Squares", a mash up of this and ''Film/TheToweringInferno'' where the game board (the actual thing) catches on fire (really just some smoke) and the celebs try to evacuate ([[WeirdnessCensor despite Marshall trying to]] [[TheShowMustGoOn keep the game going]]); this was from a mid 70s Rich Little special. Much later, Marshall hosted the ''[[Series/InLivingColor East Hollywood Squares]]'', where the panel was made up of entirely black celebrities. And ''Series/MadTV'' had a skit during the H2 era where it was "Desperate Gimmicks Week", with "Couple's Day", including Bruce Vilanch and a teenage runaway; Bergeron played himself hosting.
* {{Pilot}}: A 1965 [[http://www.usgameshows.net/x.php?show=HollywoodSquares1965&sort=0 pilot for the original version]] was hosted by Bert Parks for Creator/{{CBS}}, but it was passed up. Creator/{{NBC}} only took on the show a year later on the condition that Parks be replaced by Peter Marshall and the rest is history. The 1985 version [[http://www.usgameshows.net/x.php?show=HollywoodSquares1985&sort=0 also had a pilot]]

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* ParodyAssistance: Given the show's comedic bent, the cast and crew have helped a few times with parody skits. Peter Marshall, Creator/PaulLynde and Rose Marie appeared in "The Towering Squares", a mash up of this and ''Film/TheToweringInferno'' where the game board (the actual thing) catches on fire (really just some smoke) and the celebs try to evacuate ([[WeirdnessCensor despite Marshall trying to]] [[TheShowMustGoOn keep the game going]]); this was from a mid 70s Rich Little special. Much later, Marshall hosted the ''[[Series/InLivingColor East Hollywood Squares]]'', where the panel was made up of entirely black celebrities. And ''Series/MadTV'' had a skit few skits during the H2 ''H2'' era where it was "Desperate Gimmicks Week", with "Couple's Day", including Bruce Vilanch and a teenage runaway; Bergeron played himself hosting.
* {{Pilot}}: A 1965 [[http://www.usgameshows.net/x.php?show=HollywoodSquares1965&sort=0 pilot for the original version]] was hosted by Bert Parks for Creator/{{CBS}}, but it was passed up. Creator/{{NBC}} only took on the show a year later on the condition that Parks be replaced by Peter Marshall and the rest is history. The 1985 version [[http://www.usgameshows.net/x.php?show=HollywoodSquares1985&sort=0 also had a pilot]]pilot]].
23rd Dec '17 10:43:12 AM themisterfree
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Infamous for featuring stars that were past their prime. The 198081 syndicated season taped in Las Vegas. Syndicated revivals starred John Davidson, who had substituted for Paul Lynde on the daytime panel, in 198689 and Tom Bergeron from 1998 to 2004. There was also a mashup with ''Series/MatchGame'' called ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'', which lasted from 1983 to 1984 on NBC.

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Infamous for featuring stars that were past their prime. The daytime run ended in 1980 due to the machinations of NBC's [[PointyHairedBoss Fred Silverman]], who hated the show (partially because he loathed game shows, but mainly because he'd passed up the Squares when they were in development at Creator/{{CBS}}) and [[ScrewedByTheNetwork ultimately succeeded in killing it]] (mainly by switching the timeslot around a lot). The 198081 syndicated season season, which became a daily show, taped in Las Vegas. Syndicated revivals starred John Davidson, who Vegas (at the now-defunct Rivera), and was ultimately the death knell for the Marshall era due to various issues. Shortly afterwards, Creator/{{Filmways}} (which had substituted for Paul Lynde on acquired Heatter-Quigley in the daytime panel, late 60s) merged with Creator/OrionPictures, resulting in 198689 and Tom Bergeron from 1998 to 2004. There their stewardship over the franchise ofr the rest of the decade.

The show
was also brought back multiple times after, first as a mashup with ''Series/MatchGame'' called ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'', which lasted from 1983 to 1984 on NBC.
NBC; it didn't last long due to various reasons, including not having Peter Marshall as host of the ''Squares'' portion (being replaced by Jon Bauman, Bowzer of Sha Na Na) and formatting issues on the part of Creator/MarkGoodson (who didn't understand how ''Squares'' worked).

Orion brought the show back again as ''[[TheNewAdventures The New Hollywood Squares]]'' for syndication in 1986; John Davidson, who had substituted for Paul Lynde on the daytime panel, emceed; this run came to an end in 1989. Shortly afterwards, Orion went bankrupt and sodl the format to [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} King]] [[Series/WheelOfFortune World]] in 1991.

After a few false starts during the decade, another syndicated revival premiered in 1998, now produced by Creator/WhoopiGoldberg (who also served as center square) with [[Series/AmericasFunniestHomeVideos Tom Bergeron]] hosting; Whoopi left in 2002, and the show became ''H2: Hollywood Squares'' that year, with Creator/HenryWinkler now onboard as producer; this run ended in 2004.



** The first two seasons of the Davidson version had an endgame similar to the ABC era of ''Series/SplitSecond'' (though it was actually recycled wholesale from a previous Rick Rosner/Orion game show, the short-lived ''Just Men!'', which aired on NBC in 1983 and was hosted by Creator/BettyWhite). The winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio (no, seriously) the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.

to:

** The first two seasons of the Davidson version had an endgame similar to the ABC era of ''Series/SplitSecond'' (though it was actually recycled wholesale from a previous Rick Rosner/Orion game show, the short-lived ''Just Men!'', which aired on NBC in 1983 and was hosted by Creator/BettyWhite). The winner choose one of five keys, then try to find which car out of five displayed in-studio (no, seriously) the key would start. After having chosen a "good-luck celebrity" from the panel to stand by, the contestant would try to start the car; if it started, they won and were retired right there and then. If not, the contestant continued onto another game; if they made it to the bonus round a second time, the car they'd chosen prior would be eliminated. If a champion made it five days, they won the last car remaining. (At which point [also used on occasional Friday shows] all nine celebrities would join in.) New cars are used every week, so the champion's reign carried over to the next week and they won the following game, the lowest valued cars would be removed and the champion would select a new key from the remaining ones.



### The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, other prizes like a jukebox, $5,000-$15,000, and a car. It was quickly amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.
### The contestant would pick a celebrity (revealing a money amount from $1,000-$5,000) to stand beside them while they answered up to 10 rapid-fire questions within a minute, in what was dubbed "The Fastest 60 Seconds on Television." The contestant could confer with the celebrity if needed, but only the contestant could answer. Afterwards, the player could opt to go double-or-nothing on one final question. The maximum payoff was $100,000; the most won was $60,000.
### An updated version of the Davidson-era bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel, getting eight or all nine right won automatically (eight would eliminate that many bad keys, so the math is obvious). The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). If all nine were won, they simply showed which key is the real one. The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.

to:

### *** The "pick a star, win a prize" format from the Marshall version, featuring trips, other prizes like a jukebox, $5,000-$15,000, and a car. It was quickly amended to having to answer one final question to claim the prize.
### *** The contestant would pick a celebrity (revealing a money amount from $1,000-$5,000) to stand beside them while they answered up to 10 rapid-fire questions within a minute, in what was dubbed "The Fastest 60 Seconds on Television." The contestant could confer with the celebrity if needed, but only the contestant could answer. Afterwards, the player could opt to go double-or-nothing on one final question. The maximum payoff was $100,000; the most won was $60,000.
### *** An updated version of the Davidson-era bonus round. One at a time, the contestant picked a celebrity and agreed/disagreed to a statement read about them. However many correct answers (out of nine total) determined how many "bad keys" would be taken off of a nine-key panel, getting eight or all nine right won automatically (eight would eliminate that many bad keys, so the math is obvious). The contestant picked one from the remaining keys and, depending upon how many times they'd been to said bonus round, tried to either start a car, open a safe (representing cash), or open a steamer trunk (representing a trip). If all nine were won, they simply showed which key is the real one. The prize layout changed multiple times throughout each season.



### The [=MTV2=] version's bonus format was vaguely similar to how ''Series/BreakTheBank1976'' ([[Creator/JackBarry Barry & Enright's]] attempt to copy this show) played its game. The contestant picked from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picked which celebrity they thought was right; if the pick was correct, they won $2,500.
### The [=VH1=] revival's bonus format borrows elements from ''Series/PressYourLuck''. A light bounces from square to square, and the winning "celebrity fan" must press a button to make it stop; whichever square it stops on then is marked with the player's symbol (X or O, obviously). If the player can make a tic-tac-toe connection in five spins or less, whatever money they won in the front game is doubled.

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### *** The [=MTV2=] version's bonus format was vaguely similar to how ''Series/BreakTheBank1976'' ([[Creator/JackBarry Barry & Enright's]] attempt to copy this show) played its game. The contestant picked from any of the three rows on the board. Each celebrity on that row answers a question; one celebrity is right and two are wrong. The contestant picked which celebrity they thought was right; if the pick was correct, they won $2,500.
### *** The [=VH1=] revival's bonus format borrows elements from ''Series/PressYourLuck''. A light bounces from square to square, and the winning "celebrity fan" must press a button to make it stop; whichever square it stops on then is marked with the player's symbol (X or O, obviously). If the player can make a tic-tac-toe connection in five spins or less, whatever money they won in the front game is doubled.
14th Dec '17 12:02:52 PM Briguy52748
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** Redd Foxx (of ''Series/SanfordAndSon'') was also this way to many of his fellow female panelists, and was at times lecherous, especially if they were younger and physically very attractive. Peter Marshall recalled in his autobiography that one time, when actress Totie Fields was on the same panel as Foxx, she saw him getting downright creepy with one of the stars, took note ... and then confronted him during a taping break. Marshall said he never found out what Fields told Foxx, but he never acted up again on the show and left the girls alone from then on.

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** Redd Foxx (of ''Series/SanfordAndSon'') was also this way to many of his fellow female panelists, and was at times lecherous, especially if they were younger and physically very attractive. Peter Marshall recalled in his autobiography that one time, when actress Totie Fields was on the same panel as Foxx, she saw him getting downright creepy with one of the stars, stars (Marshall said it was Sandy Duncan), took note ... and then confronted him during a taping break. Marshall -- who recalled that he had also talked with Duncan backstage during the taping break, found out what was going on, and had the producer switch Duncan's seat with Fields' -- said he never found out what Fields told Foxx, but he never acted up again on the show and left the girls alone from then on.
14th Dec '17 11:57:49 AM Briguy52748
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*** Jim Backus (best known for voicing WesternAnimation/MrMagoo and as [[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various center squares rotated until 1968, when Creator/PaulLynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned -- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (actually a persona of Cliff Arquette) and George Gobel.

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*** Jim Backus (best known for voicing WesternAnimation/MrMagoo and as [[Series/GilligansIsland Thurston Howell III]]) was the center square for the 1965 pilot, and various while Ernest Borgnine (last of Series/McHalesNavy) was the first-ever center square when the show went to permanent series. Various center squares rotated until 1968, when Creator/PaulLynde joined up on a full-time basis. He left in 1979, which resulted in a return to the rotation until the Las Vegas season, when he returned -- and then got kicked out ''again''. Other regulars during that era included Rose Marie, Wally Cox, Charley Weaver (actually a persona of Cliff Arquette) and George Gobel. Later on in the 1970s, regulars included John Davidson, Wayland Flowers (and his rotating cast of ventriloquist dummies), Florence Henderson, Tom Poston, Joan Rivers and Leslie Uggams.
29th Nov '17 8:07:36 AM Briguy52748
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** Redd Foxx (of ''Series/SanfordAndSon'' was also this way to many of his fellow female panelists, and was at times lecherous, especially if they were younger and physically very attractive. Peter Marshall recalled in his autobiography that one time, when actress Totie Fields was on the same panel as Foxx, she saw him getting downright creepy with one of the stars, took note ... and then confronted him during a taping break. Marshall said he never found out what Fields told Foxx, but he never acted up again on the show and left the girls alone from then on.

to:

** Redd Foxx (of ''Series/SanfordAndSon'' ''Series/SanfordAndSon'') was also this way to many of his fellow female panelists, and was at times lecherous, especially if they were younger and physically very attractive. Peter Marshall recalled in his autobiography that one time, when actress Totie Fields was on the same panel as Foxx, she saw him getting downright creepy with one of the stars, took note ... and then confronted him during a taping break. Marshall said he never found out what Fields told Foxx, but he never acted up again on the show and left the girls alone from then on.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheHollywoodSquares