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History Series / TheAdventuresOfSuperman

13th Mar '16 10:05:53 PM HeroGal2347
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* PreferJailToTheProtagonist: At the end of one episode, one villain tells another he can call the police: "Better a hundred of those guys than Superman!"
11th Mar '16 12:32:22 PM Oddstar6
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The first season is not ''weird'', exactly, but it is very different in tone from the subsequent seasons. Season one, shot in black-and-white, has a lot of FilmNoir influences, such that Clark Kent comes across more as a hard-boiled tough-guy fifties newsman than as the "mild-mannered" reporter he is described as in the opening narration. The later seasons, shot in color, tend to conform much more to what people think of when they think of Superman in the fifties, with a much brighter, more innocent, and sci-fi style.
20th Feb '16 4:27:30 PM HeroGal2347
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* VillainBall: The villains of the series had a tendency to do the "evil thing" regardless of whether it was wise.
** In "Czar of the Underworld", gangster Luigi Dinelli is upset about being seen as a criminal,. His response? Violent attacks on the set of a film being made about him called ''[[TitleDrop Czar of the Underworld.]]''
** In "The Mysterious Cube", not only does Paul Barton not have any reason to order Lois and Jimmy killed after he's declared legally dead, but also it would have gotten in the way of his plan of getting away without prosecution. While the police (and Superman) couldn't legally nab him for any crimes he committed before the seven year period, being responsible for the reporters' deaths would mean he ''could'' be prosecuted for that.
13th Jan '16 7:11:46 PM HeroGal2347
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* MoralDissonance: In "The Stolen Costume", two crooks learn that Superman is really Clark Kent. His response: he abducts them and strands them on top of an isolated mountaintop. When they try to climb down, they fall to their deaths. That constitutes kidnapping and murder. There are never any consequences for this; in fact, the whole incident is never mentioned again.
8th Dec '15 11:32:23 AM tropower
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* CanonImmigrant: Inspector Henderson was brought over from [[Radio/TheAdventuresOfSuperman the radio show]]; he actually showed up in the comics from time to time after this series. Twenty years later, so did Professor Pepperwinkle.

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* CanonImmigrant: Inspector Henderson Henderson[[note]]And Perry White, and The Daily Planet, for that matter.[[/note]] was brought over from [[Radio/TheAdventuresOfSuperman the radio show]]; he actually showed up in the comics from time to time after this series. Twenty years later, so did Professor Pepperwinkle.
21st Nov '15 3:27:30 PM HeroGal2347
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** In "What Goes Up", Superman throws the [[ItMakesSenseInContext anti-gravity-experiment-and-coffee]] at the bad guy. There is a bang, and the guy has torn clothes and an ash-covered face.

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** In "What "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfSupermanS5E13WhateverGoesUp What Goes Up", Up]]", Superman throws the [[ItMakesSenseInContext anti-gravity-experiment-and-coffee]] at the bad guy. There is a bang, and the guy has torn clothes and an ash-covered face.
18th Oct '15 10:45:28 AM MarkLungo
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** IHaveYourWife: Superman [[InvokedTrope invokes this trope]] when he ''pretends'' to marry Sgt. O'Hara as part of a BatmanGambit. Mr. X, the mysterious crime boss of Metropolis, takes Helen hostage--ExactlyAsPlanned, so she can get close enough to his operation to help destroy it from the inside.

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** IHaveYourWife: Superman [[InvokedTrope invokes this trope]] when he ''pretends'' to marry Sgt. O'Hara as part of a BatmanGambit. Mr. X, the mysterious crime boss of Metropolis, takes Helen hostage--ExactlyAsPlanned, hostage--AllAccordingToPlan, so she can get close enough to his operation to help destroy it from the inside.
18th Oct '15 10:42:49 AM MarkLungo
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** The Professor Pepperwinkle episodes depend on this. Any time Pepperwinkle invented something, a gang of crooks would somehow learn of the invention and gain the Professor's trust so they could use it to commit crimes.

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** The Professor Pepperwinkle episodes depend on this. Any time Pepperwinkle invented invents something, a gang of crooks would somehow learn of the invention and gain the Professor's trust so they could can use it to commit crimes.
18th Oct '15 10:41:09 AM MarkLungo
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* AdaptationalBadass: Clark Kent. Budget reasons required that Superman only show up in the last act, so the focus for most of the episode had to be on Clark. As a result, he was made less wimpy and less bumbling than in the comic book and became essentially Superman in street clothes. This interpretation of Clark as "reflecting the real person" was used by JohnByrne in his "ComicBook/PostCrisis" revamp of Superman's origin, ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel''. [[WordOfGod Byrne acknowledged George Reeves' portrayal as his inspiration.]] It subsequently found its way into more recent adaptations like ''Lois and Clark'', ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' and ''Film/ManOfSteel'' where Clark similarly isn't as wimpy.

to:

* AdaptationalBadass: Clark Kent. Budget reasons required that Superman only show up in the last act, so the focus for most of the episode had to be on Clark. As a result, he was made less wimpy and less bumbling than in the comic book and became essentially Superman in street clothes. This interpretation of Clark as "reflecting the real person" was used by JohnByrne Creator/JohnByrne in his "ComicBook/PostCrisis" revamp of Superman's origin, ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel''. [[WordOfGod Byrne acknowledged George Reeves' portrayal as his inspiration.]] It subsequently found its way into more recent adaptations like ''Lois and Clark'', ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Series/LoisAndClark'', ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' and ''Film/ManOfSteel'' where Clark similarly isn't as wimpy.
18th Oct '15 10:06:16 AM nombretomado
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* AdaptationalBadass: Clark Kent. Budget reasons required that Superman only show up in the last act, so the focus for most of the episode had to be on Clark. As a result, he was made less wimpy and less bumbling than in the comic book and became essentially Superman in street clothes. This interpretation of Clark as "reflecting the real person" was used by JohnByrne in his "PostCrisis" revamp of Superman's origin, ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel''. [[WordOfGod Byrne acknowledged George Reeves' portrayal as his inspiration.]] It subsequently found its way into more recent adaptations like ''Lois and Clark'', ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' and ''Film/ManOfSteel'' where Clark similarly isn't as wimpy.

to:

* AdaptationalBadass: Clark Kent. Budget reasons required that Superman only show up in the last act, so the focus for most of the episode had to be on Clark. As a result, he was made less wimpy and less bumbling than in the comic book and became essentially Superman in street clothes. This interpretation of Clark as "reflecting the real person" was used by JohnByrne in his "PostCrisis" "ComicBook/PostCrisis" revamp of Superman's origin, ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel''. [[WordOfGod Byrne acknowledged George Reeves' portrayal as his inspiration.]] It subsequently found its way into more recent adaptations like ''Lois and Clark'', ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' and ''Film/ManOfSteel'' where Clark similarly isn't as wimpy.
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