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History Series / SplitSecond

15th Mar '16 5:14:13 AM themisterfree
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After a three-year run on ABC, the show was revived for syndication in 1986 with Monty Hall taking the role of emcee because he was displeased with the strict judging on Kennedy's version. The {{revival}}, which taped in Toronto, had increased cash awards and a different bonus round. Canadian Creator/{{GSN}} equivalent [=GameTV=] recently picked up reruns of this particular version.

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After a three-year run on ABC, the show was revived for syndication in 1986 with Monty Hall taking the role of emcee because he was displeased with the strict judging on Kennedy's version. The {{revival}}, which taped in Toronto, Hamilton, Ontario (at the studios of CHCH-11), had increased cash awards and a different bonus round. Canadian Creator/{{GSN}} equivalent [=GameTV=] recently picked up reruns of this particular version.
12th Feb '16 12:42:51 PM Gimere
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* BonusRound: A couple.

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* BonusRound: A couple.BonusRound:
29th Dec '15 11:36:09 AM Gimere
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GameShow produced by Stefan Hatos-[[LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] Productions for Creator/{{ABC}} from 1972-75. Host Tom Kennedy presented a three-part question to three contestants, and the order in which they rang in determined who answered when. The first player to ring-in got to choose an answer; the two others had to choose from the unclaimed answers. After all three players answered, they were awarded $5 each if all three were right, $10 each if two were right, and $25 if only one was right. The first two rounds consisted of 10 questions each, and [[DoubleTheDollars Round 2 doubled the cash awards]].

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GameShow produced by Stefan Hatos-[[LetsMakeADeal Hatos-[[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] Productions for Creator/{{ABC}} from 1972-75. Host Tom Kennedy presented a three-part question to three contestants, and the order in which they rang in determined who answered when. The first player to ring-in got to choose an answer; the two others had to choose from the unclaimed answers. After all three players answered, they were awarded $5 each if all three were right, $10 each if two were right, and $25 if only one was right. The first two rounds consisted of 10 questions each, and [[DoubleTheDollars Round 2 doubled the cash awards]].



!!GameShow Tropes in use:

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!!GameShow Tropes !!GameShowTropes in use:
7th Jul '14 6:26:01 AM Hallwings
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** '''Syndicated:''' Originally, the champion faced five windows, one of which read "CAR" on the back. Picking that window awarded the car, but otherwise the player won $1,000 and returned on the next show; as with the original format, one window was removed for each additional game that player won (the same windows the champ picked in previous episodes), and winning five times awarded the car automatically.
*** Later in the run, the champion had to find the ''three'' windows that read "CAR" (the other two had prizes); if one of the prize windows was picked, Monty offered the champion the prize and a bribe ($1,000 for each day that player had been on) to leave the show. As before, the fourth try had four "CAR" screens behind them and five wins awarded the car by default.

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** '''Syndicated:''' Originally, the champion faced five windows, one of which read "CAR" on the back. Picking that window awarded the car, but otherwise the player won $1,000 (a "showcase" in early episodes) and returned on the next show; as with the original format, one window was removed for each additional game that player won (the same windows the champ picked in previous episodes), and winning five times awarded the car automatically.
*** Later in the run, the champion had to find the ''three'' windows that read "CAR" (the other two had prizes); if one of the prize windows was picked, Monty offered the champion the prize and a bribe ($1,000 for each day that player had been on) to leave the show. As before, the The fourth try had four "CAR" screens behind them them, and as before, five wins awarded the car by default.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The contestant podiums looked different in the earliest 1986 episodes; with no dollar signs on the scoreboards, the "1" on each podium was blue, the podiums themselves were gray instead of purple, and the contestants' names were written in the same font as the logo. The Countdown Round lacked music, and the graphics were different. The Countdown Round music debuted on the 17th episode, and the more familiar set and graphics were in place on the 19th.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The contestant podiums looked different in the earliest 1986 episodes; with no dollar signs on the scoreboards, the "1" on each podium was blue, the podiums themselves were gray instead of purple, and the contestants' names were written in the same font as the logo. The Countdown Round lacked music, and the graphics were different. The Countdown Round music debuted on the 17th episode, and the more familiar set and graphics were in place on the 19th. In even earlier episodes, a champion that didn't select the correct screen in the bonus round won a prize instead of $1,000 cash.
23rd Jun '14 8:40:19 PM Hallwings
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** '''Syndicated:''' Originally, the champion faced five windows, one of which read "CAR" on the back. Picking that window awarded the car, but otherwise the player won $1,000 and returned on the next show; as with the original format, another "CAR" card was added for each game that player won, and winning five times awarded the car automatically.

to:

** '''Syndicated:''' Originally, the champion faced five windows, one of which read "CAR" on the back. Picking that window awarded the car, but otherwise the player won $1,000 and returned on the next show; as with the original format, another "CAR" card one window was added removed for each additional game that player won, won (the same windows the champ picked in previous episodes), and winning five times awarded the car automatically.
6th Jun '14 10:47:32 AM Hallwings
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** TheAnnouncer: Jack Clark on ABC (Jack also appeared onstage to start the correct car if the champion didn't choose it), Sandy Hoyt in syndication.

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** TheAnnouncer: Jack Clark on ABC (Jack also appeared onstage during certain visual questions and to start the correct car if in the event the champion didn't choose it), Sandy Hoyt in syndication.
9th May '14 6:21:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* GrandFinale: The last show on June 27, 1975 had a champion who failed to start the chosen car; Tom decided to give him the car anyway, then split the $1,000 jackpot between the other two contestants (one of whom was future Creator/{{ABC}} and {{CNN}} correspondent Judd Rose). Monty Hall then came out and thanked Tom for the wonderful run, after which a lot of the staff walked out onstage to wave goodbye as the credits rolled.

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* GrandFinale: The last show on June 27, 1975 had a champion who failed to start the chosen car; Tom decided to give him the car anyway, then split the $1,000 jackpot between the other two contestants (one of whom was future Creator/{{ABC}} and {{CNN}} Creator/{{CNN}} correspondent Judd Rose). Monty Hall then came out and thanked Tom for the wonderful run, after which a lot of the staff walked out onstage to wave goodbye as the credits rolled.
1st May '14 8:01:36 AM Hallwings
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The contestant podiums looked different in the earliest 1986 episodes; the "1" on each podium was blue, the podiums themselves were gray instead of purple, and the contestants' names were written in the same font as the logo. The Countdown Round lacked music, and the graphics were different. The Countdown Round music debuted on the 17th episode, and the more familiar set and graphics were in place on the 19th.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The contestant podiums looked different in the earliest 1986 episodes; with no dollar signs on the scoreboards, the "1" on each podium was blue, the podiums themselves were gray instead of purple, and the contestants' names were written in the same font as the logo. The Countdown Round lacked music, and the graphics were different. The Countdown Round music debuted on the 17th episode, and the more familiar set and graphics were in place on the 19th.
30th Apr '14 12:54:35 PM Hallwings
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** TheAnnouncer: Jack Clark on ABC, Sandy Hoyt in syndication.

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** TheAnnouncer: Jack Clark on ABC, ABC (Jack also appeared onstage to start the correct car if the champion didn't choose it), Sandy Hoyt in syndication.
14th Apr '14 1:10:48 AM supersaver87
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Added DiffLines:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The contestant podiums looked different in the earliest 1986 episodes; the "1" on each podium was blue, the podiums themselves were gray instead of purple, and the contestants' names were written in the same font as the logo. The Countdown Round lacked music, and the graphics were different. The Countdown Round music debuted on the 17th episode, and the more familiar set and graphics were in place on the 19th.
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