History Series / JEOPARDY

19th Jan '17 7:09:47 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES (an Atari 2600 version was planned shortly before [[UsefulNotes/TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983 the market crashed]]), and several PC versions as well. {{THQ}} released Wii versions of ''Jeopardy!'' and ''Wheel of Fortune'' in 2010, and again for multiple systems in 2012. There's also a school version that uses a dedicated console and allows custom answers and images to be used. Modified scoring calculators are also sold which allow playing along with the actual show.

to:

** Several board games, video game versions as early as the NES (an Atari 2600 version was planned shortly before [[UsefulNotes/TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983 the market crashed]]), and several PC versions as well. {{THQ}} Creator/{{THQ}} released Wii versions of ''Jeopardy!'' and ''Wheel of Fortune'' in 2010, and again for multiple systems in 2012. There's also a school version that uses a dedicated console and allows custom answers and images to be used. Modified scoring calculators are also sold which allow playing along with the actual show.
10th Jan '17 7:01:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The College Championship quarterfinal game on [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3305 February 4, 2010]], featured the category "Internet Favorites" with clues about The Evolution of Dance, Keyboard Cat, [[TheLonelyIsland "I'm On A Boat"]], and CharlieTheUnicorn.

to:

** The College Championship quarterfinal game on [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3305 February 4, 2010]], featured the category "Internet Favorites" with clues about The Evolution of Dance, Keyboard Cat, [[TheLonelyIsland [[Music/TheLonelyIsland "I'm On A Boat"]], and CharlieTheUnicorn.
7th Jan '17 3:09:43 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[WebVideo/LeeroyJenkinsVideo Leeroy Jenkins]]!

to:

** [[WebVideo/LeeroyJenkinsVideo [[Machinima/LeeroyJenkinsVideo Leeroy Jenkins]]!
23rd Dec '16 4:13:04 PM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions was littered with upsets and dark horse victories in the early rounds. Of the "Nifty Nine" champions that were byed to the second round following their record setting and accomplished prior runs on the show, ''seven'' of them lost their opening game, with only Brad Rutter and Frank Spangenberg advancing to the quarterfinals (and only one other TOC winner, Dan Melia, joining them there.) On the flip side, the UTOC was a great showcase for John Cuthbertson, Chris Miller, and Pam Mueller, who won their own share of upsets on their route to the semifinals, after ending their previous ''Jeopardy!'' runs as semifinalists in their regular [=TOCs=].

to:

** The 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions was littered with upsets and dark horse victories in the early rounds. Of the "Nifty Nine" champions that were byed to the second round following their record setting and accomplished prior runs on the show, ''seven'' of them lost their opening game, with only Brad Rutter and Frank Spangenberg advancing to the quarterfinals (and only one other TOC winner, Dan Melia, joining them there.) On the flip side, the UTOC was a great showcase for John Cuthbertson, Chris Miller, and Pam Mueller, who won their own share of upsets on their route to the semifinals, after ending their previous ''Jeopardy!'' runs as semifinalists in their regular [=TOCs=]. Cuthbertson, in particular, impressed many by knocking off TOC winners Bob Verini & Bob Blake, plus TOC finalist Tad Carithers in the first two rounds alone.
23rd Dec '16 8:46:27 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** As 2001 College Champion Vinita Kailasanath was unable to attend the next Tournament of Champions in 2003, her spot instead went to 4 day champion Kathy Cassity, making her the first ever TOC qualifier from Hawaii (Vinita would eventually compete in the 2004 TOC, making the semifinals.)

to:

** As 2001 College Champion Vinita Kailasanath was unable to attend the next Tournament of Champions in 2003, 2003 due to final exams occurring during tapings, her spot instead went to 4 day champion Kathy Cassity, making her the first ever TOC qualifier from Hawaii (Vinita would eventually compete in the 2004 TOC, making the semifinals.)



** Similarly to Vinita Kailasanath a few years prior, 2008 College Champion Joey Beachum couldn't attend 2009's TOC, with his spot going to 4 day champion Deborah Fitzgerald in what would be the first Tournament of Champions with ''no'' regular annual tournament winners since the show introduced them in 1987. Joey would compete in 2010's TOC, which uniquely featured ''three'' College Champions.

to:

** Similarly to Vinita Kailasanath a few years prior, 2008 College Champion Joey Beachum couldn't attend 2009's TOC, TOC due to military obligations, with his spot going to 4 day champion Deborah Fitzgerald in what would be the first Tournament of Champions with ''no'' regular annual tournament winners since the show introduced them in 1987. Joey would compete in 2010's TOC, which uniquely featured ''three'' College Champions.



** ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' games originally saw each contestant guaranteed $10,000 for their charity, unless they won more during the game, with the week's biggest winner having their cash total doubled. As a result, if a low-scoring game resulted in no one surpassing $10,000 after Final Jeopardy!, everyone left with the same amount of money no matter who won. After ''three'' of the five Celebrity games from November 1996 resulted in sub-$10,000 scores for winning contestants (including a triple zero finish when all three contestants went all-in on Final), the first place minimum was increased to $15,000 for future installments, later jumping to $50,000 after clue values were doubled in 2002, and the doubled cash bonus was also eliminated after 1996. As well, after the triple-zero game, the rules were changed so that the leader after Double Jeopardy! would be named the winner if everyone went all-in and lost on Final, as seen with the 1998 "Ladies Night" celebrity game. This rule was changed at some point between May 2009 and April 2003, initially giving celebrities in the red a flat $500 for ''Final''

to:

** ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' games originally saw each contestant guaranteed $10,000 for their charity, unless they won more during the game, with the week's biggest winner having their cash total doubled. As a result, if a low-scoring game resulted in no one surpassing $10,000 after Final Jeopardy!, everyone left with the same amount of money no matter who won. After ''three'' of the five Celebrity games from November 1996 resulted in sub-$10,000 scores for winning contestants (including a triple zero finish when all three contestants went all-in on Final), the first place minimum was increased to $15,000 for future installments, later jumping to $50,000 after clue values were doubled in 2002, and the doubled cash bonus was also eliminated after 1996. As well, after the triple-zero game, the rules were changed so that the leader after Double Jeopardy! would be named the winner if everyone went all-in and lost on Final, as seen with the 1998 "Ladies Night" celebrity game. This rule was changed at some point between May 2009 and April 2003, initially giving celebrities in the red a flat $500 for ''Final''



** According to 2002 1 day champion (and future Hollywood actor) Dileep Rao, he was told by ''Jeopardy!'' producers that if he had to miss a scheduled taping due to his then-illness, he'd be retired as champion (he made the taping as a result, and finished Double Jeopardy! in the red.) Since then, the show's stance has mellowed, allowing then-champions Priscilla Ball (due to illness) and Claudia Corriere (due to work conflicts) to miss their next taping day and come back for a later taping when ready and able.



** If a contestant hits a Daily Double, Alex will sometimes remind them of their score in comparison to their opponents for instance, "You have exactly half of X's total", which pretty much translates to "you really should make it a true Daily Double". He sometimes gives similar score-related nudges going into Final Jeopardy!

to:

** If a contestant hits a Daily Double, Alex will sometimes remind them of their score in comparison to their opponents for instance, "You have exactly half of X's total", which pretty much translates to "you "I really should hope you make it a true Daily Double". He sometimes gives similar score-related nudges going into Final Jeopardy!



** The College Tournament Quarterfinal game on [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3305 February 4, 2010]], featured the category "Internet Favorites" with clues about The Evolution of Dance, Keyboard Cat, [[TheLonelyIsland "I'm On A Boat"]], and CharlieTheUnicorn.

to:

** The College Tournament Quarterfinal Championship quarterfinal game on [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3305 February 4, 2010]], featured the category "Internet Favorites" with clues about The Evolution of Dance, Keyboard Cat, [[TheLonelyIsland "I'm On A Boat"]], and CharlieTheUnicorn.



* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston and a 2004 Kids Week in Washington, all of the road trip shows were tied with celebrity games and/or a tournament (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 and 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, ''Jeopardy'' has hosted road games on a quadrennial basis since 2004, all at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. during election years, and always including a Power Players Week and at least one week of tournament play.

to:

* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston and a 2004 Kids Week in Washington, all of the road trip shows were tied with celebrity games and/or a tournament (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 and 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, ''Jeopardy'' has hosted road games on a quadrennial basis since 2004, all at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. during the 2004, 2012, and 2016 election years, and always including a Power Players Week and at least one week of tournament play.
22nd Dec '16 11:15:27 PM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ReadTheFreakingManual: 1988 Seniors Tournament competitor D.J. Smith was abruptly disqualified from the event prior to the semifinals, after ''Jeopardy!'' producers discovered that he'd competed on ''WheelOfFortune'' a few months prior, a violation of the show's eligibility requirements. Though D.J. had mentioned his ''Wheel'' appearance in his application forms, it somehow got by the show's staff until he'd already played in the quarterfinals, forcing producers to withhold his guaranteed $5,000 semifinal purse and replace him with the next-highest earning quarterfinal loser. Had he known about the rules regarding prior game show appearances, who knows how he'd have done as a contestant later on.
** Barbara Lowe may count here as well, but given her reputation as a professional contestant who competed under aliases, it's more likely that she ''disregarded'' the manual.
22nd Dec '16 11:44:45 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Though his massive ''Jeopardy!'' successes and winnings speak for themselves, even Brad Rutter needed some big escapes en route to winning his $4 million plus over the years. Were it not for Leslie Frates gambling on a $0 wager in the Million Dollar Masters semifinals, Michael Rooney missing Final and not accounting for Brad's wagering savvy in the Ultimate TOC quarterfinals, and Ken Jennings missing Final in game 2 of the Battle of the Decades finals, Brad's career winnings would ''only'' be $230,102.

to:

** Though his massive ''Jeopardy!'' successes and winnings speak for themselves, even Brad Rutter needed some big escapes en route to winning his $4 million plus over the years. Were it not for Leslie Frates gambling on a $0 wager in the Million Dollar Masters semifinals, Michael Rooney missing Final and not accounting for Brad's wagering savvy in the Ultimate TOC quarterfinals, and Ken Jennings missing Final in game 2 of the Battle of the Decades finals, Brad's career winnings would ''only'' be $230,102.$330,102.
22nd Dec '16 11:42:51 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Though his massive ''Jeopardy!'' successes and winnings speak for themselves, even Brad Rutter needed some big escapes en route to winning his $4 million plus over the years. Were it not for Leslie Frates gambling on a $0 wager in the Million Dollar Masters semifinals, Michael Rooney missing Final and not accounting for Brad's wagering savvy in the Ultimate TOC quarterfinals, and Ken Jennings missing Final in game 2 of the Battle of the Decades finals, Brad's career winnings would ''only'' be $230,102.



** Though his massive ''Jeopardy!'' successes and winnings speak for themselves, even Brad Rutter needed some big escapes to win his $4 million plus over the years. Were it not for Leslie Frates gambling on a $0 wager in the Million Dollar Masters semifinals, Michael Rooney missing Final and not accounting for Brad's wagering savvy in the Ultimate TOC quarterfinals, and Ken Jennings missing Final in game 2 of the Battle of the Decades finals, Brad's career winnings would ''only'' be $230,102.
22nd Dec '16 11:38:12 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Though his massive ''Jeopardy!'' successes and winnings speak for themselves, even Brad Rutter needed some big escapes to win his $4 million plus over the years. Were it not for Leslie Frates gambling on a $0 wager in the Million Dollar Masters semifinals, Michael Rooney missing Final and not accounting for Brad's wagering savvy in the Ultimate TOC quarterfinals, and Ken Jennings missing Final in game 2 of the Battle of the Decades finals, Brad's career winnings would ''only'' be $230,102.
21st Dec '16 11:13:12 PM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* EscapeArtist: Often cited for ''Jeopardy!'' champions who frequently win games despite trailing going into Final Jeopardy!, where they're not in control of their destiny and likely need the leading contestant to be incorrect or do the wagering math wrong to have a shot at victory.
** September 2001 5 day champion Mark Dawson used some skill and luck to force some big escapes in Final. In his very first game (where he trailed $7,600-$7,000), he won after wagering all but $1 in Final, as the leader just wagered $1,400, rather than the $6,401 lockout wager. A $0 wager on a triple stumper won him his fourth game, while a $200 math error from leading finalist Brian Weikle handed Mark the Tournament of Champions victory in May 2003. More recently, a light wager from second helped Mark win his opening game of 2014's Battle of the Decades tournament, allowing him to lock out Claudia Perry and allow him to steal the win when Dave Abbott missed Final.
** June 2006 5 day champion Celeste [=DiNucci=] definitely knew how to wager from behind during her games, winning her second & final regular games with Final comebacks when her opponents missed and she wagered to stay above them if she did the same. She pulled it off again in the 2007 Tournament of Champions, surging past Jeff Spoeri to force a tiebreaker with Christian Haines in the semifinals (which she won), before one final savvy wager helped her steal the championship from Doug Hicton in the finals, despite his own impressive performance in the second game.
** May 2012 6 day champion Joel Pool needed an escape from second place to win four of his six games, only leading going into Final for his second and fourth games. In each case, the leader missed, with Joel wagering almost everything in 3 of 4 occasions.
** Eventual 2015 TOC finalist Kerry Greene won her third-fifth games that April after betting basically everything while the leader missed in each case. She pulled one more escape in the Tournament of Champions under similar circumstances that November, rallying past Dan Feitel to make the finals.
** May 2015 5 day champion Andrew Haringer made a habit out of this in his championship reign, winning ''his first four games'' after the leading challenger missed Final, including a savvy game 3 wager where he won by $1. However, his final win was a runaway. Coincidentally, Andrew faced Kerry in the TOC quarterfinals (in this case, Kerry led going into Final and won the game, though Andrew secured a wild card.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 600. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.JEOPARDY