History Series / JEOPARDY

19th Jul '16 1:05:29 PM RobFRules
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* HereditaryCurse: Following the passing of inaugural Tournament of Champions winner Jerry Slowik in 1986, no other ''Jeopardy!'' champion named Jerry has ''ever'' competed in the Tournament of Champions. Of the other four Jerrys that won a regular game in their original reign (among those listed on J-Archive), three won 3 games or less (including 2004 2 timer Jerry Harvey, who was dethroned by a debuting Ken Jennings), while 2014 5 timer Jerry Slowik was disqualified from his TOC due to legal issues. More recently, noted quiz bowl champion Jerry Vinokurov was well hyped on fan sites before his debut game in April 2016, but fell to eventual 9 day champion Buzzy Cohen. Maybe it's a good thing that 1992 TOC and 2005 Ultimate TOC finalist Jerome Vered didn't play as Jerry?
9th Jul '16 7:18:06 AM Gimere
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** There's also the fact that the vast majority of contestants pick clues from top to bottom within each category, even in cases where it might be advisable to do otherwise (for example, if Alex has said "Less than a minute" and several high-value clues are still on the board and/or a Daily Double hasn't yet been uncovered the Daily Doubles are almost never in the top two rows).
** 9 times out of 10, the leader going into Final Jeopardy will wager $xx01, so if both he and the second-place player get it right and second place wagers everything, he wins by one measly dollar. For example if second place had $7,000 and first place had $12,400, you can expect the leader to wager $1,601.

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** There's also the fact that the The vast majority of contestants pick clues from top to bottom within each category, even in cases where it might be advisable to do otherwise (for example, if Alex has said "Less than a minute" and several high-value clues are still on the board and/or a Daily Double hasn't yet been uncovered the Daily Doubles are almost never in the top two rows).
** 9 times out of 10, the leader going into Final Jeopardy will wager $xx01, so if both he and the second-place player get it right and second place wagers everything, he wins by one measly dollar. For example a dollar--for example, if second place had has $7,000 and first place had has $12,400, you can expect the leader to wager $1,601.



*** Al later appeared on a celebrity edition of ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!''...and [[SelfFulfillingProphecy lost]]. Guess what song was played over the end credits?

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*** Al later appeared on a celebrity edition of ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!''...and [[SelfFulfillingProphecy and lost]]. Guess what song was played over the end credits?



* AlwaysSecondBest: Despite his immense ''Jeopardy!'' success in his original reign, Ken Jennings has finished in second place in all three of his return events, finishing in second to Brad Rutter in the Ultimate Tournament of Champions and Battle of the Decades, and to Watson in the IBM Challenge. However, Ken did outrank Brad in the latter.

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* AlwaysSecondBest: AlwaysSecondBest:
**
Despite his immense ''Jeopardy!'' success in his original reign, Ken Jennings has finished in second place in all three of his return events, finishing in second to Brad Rutter in the Ultimate Tournament of Champions and Battle of the Decades, and to Watson in the IBM Challenge. However, Ken did outrank Brad in the latter.



* ArtificialStupidity: In the IBM Challenge (February 2011), Watson had a few cases where its imposing intelligence faltered.

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* ArtificialStupidity: In the IBM Challenge (February 2011), Watson had a few cases where its imposing intelligence faltered.faltered:



** 1986 contestant Barbara Lowe, who was said by many eyewitnesses to be a total JerkAss. She quibbled with Trebek on-camera when one of her answers was ruled wrong, and, according to ex-writer Harry Eisenberg, drew irate letters from fans for her behavior. Nonetheless, she retired undefeated. However, she had previously appeared on several game shows, most by using aliases, and had lied to ''Jeopardy!'' about how many she'd been on (at the time, you could only be on two in a five-year span). She was barred from appearing in the Tournament of Champions, and her winnings were withheld until she threatened them with a lawsuit.
** On [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3171 October 12, 2009]], one of the contestants was Jeff Kirby, who originally appeared on the show in December 1999. As stated at GameShowWinningsCap, Trebek-era contestants are not allowed to appear again, but Jeff [[TheyJustDidntCare somehow]] got through the audition process. He didn't get caught until someone on the show's message board pointed out that he was wearing the ''same tie'' he had worn in his 1999 appearance. (Either he has a spectacularly limited wardrobe, or he was thumbing his nose at the powers that be.) What makes him fit into this trope? He finished in third place on both shows (and of course, was denied the $1,000 third-place winnings from his 2009 episode).

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** 1986 contestant Barbara Lowe, who Lowe was said by many eyewitnesses to be a total JerkAss. She {{Jerkass}}--she quibbled with Trebek on-camera when one of her answers was ruled wrong, and, according to ex-writer Harry Eisenberg, drew irate letters from fans for her behavior. Nonetheless, she retired undefeated. However, she had previously appeared on several game shows, most by using aliases, and had lied to ''Jeopardy!'' about how many she'd been on (at the time, you could only be on two in a five-year span). She was barred from appearing in the Tournament of Champions, and her winnings were withheld until she threatened them with a lawsuit.
** On [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3171 October 12, 2009]], one of the contestants was Jeff Kirby, who originally appeared on the show in December 1999. As stated at GameShowWinningsCap, Trebek-era contestants are not allowed to appear again, but Jeff [[TheyJustDidntCare somehow]] got through the audition process. He didn't get caught until someone on the show's message board pointed out that he was wearing the ''same ''the same tie'' he had worn in his 1999 appearance. (Either he has a spectacularly limited wardrobe, or he was thumbing his nose at the powers that be.) What makes him fit into this trope? He finished in third place on both shows (and of course, was denied the $1,000 third-place winnings from his 2009 episode).



** A contestant who obviously doesn't know the right Final Jeopardy! sometimes draws a picture, makes {{Shout Out}}s, or openly writes "I don't know." Sometimes a contestant knows the answer, but just because the game has become a ForegoneConclusion in their favor (or, in some cases, it's to their advantage to bet $0 [[ViolationOfCommonSense even though they're not in the lead]]), just puts down something silly like "Hot Pastrami Sandwiches" or "Woo Hoo Yee Haw Yeah Baby".

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** A contestant who obviously doesn't know the right Final Jeopardy! sometimes draws a picture, makes {{Shout Out}}s, or openly writes "I don't know." Sometimes On other occasions, a contestant knows the answer, but just because the game has become a ForegoneConclusion in their favor (or, in some cases, it's to their advantage to bet $0 [[ViolationOfCommonSense even though they're not in the lead]]), just puts down something silly like "Hot Pastrami Sandwiches" or "Woo Hoo Yee Haw Yeah Baby".
5th Jul '16 7:11:06 PM Twentington
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** An excellent one on June 18, 1987 that happened entirely by accident. The clue in "South Africa" for $500 read, "Of go in or go elsewhere, what to do when you see a restroom marked 'Here'." Marty rings in and says "What is go elsewhere?" which is ruled wrong. Kathleen then rings in and says "What is go in?", which is also ruled wrong. A confused Bob Verini doesn't ring in, at which point Alex reveals that "Here" means "men", so either Bob or Marty would've been ruled right for saying "go in", and Kathleen right for "go elsewhere". Former clue-writer Carlo Panno later [[http://ken-jennings.com/blog/archives/776 revealed]] in an interview with Ken Jennings that this was one of his favorite clues.
21st Jun '16 3:38:03 PM RobFRules
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** Occasionally, a Celebrity Jeopardy! player in first place will bet it all in Final Jeopardy!, which would obviously net them more money for their charities, and put them at $0 if they're wrong, but you could justify the unsafe wager as they'll still get at least $10,000 for their charity. Andy Richter and Jon Stewart both gambled their whole $11,000 winnings in 1999 (on consecutive days, no less) despite each having locks. The same didn't work out for author Tom Clancy, who only needed a $1,401 wager or an incorrect reply from Catherine Crier to win his Power Players Week game in 1997, and while she was wrong, he wagered everything, handing the game to Tim Russert (who had been in a distant third place.)

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** Occasionally, a Celebrity Jeopardy! player in first place will bet it all in Final Jeopardy!, which would obviously net them more money for their charities, and put them at $0 if they're wrong, but you could justify the unsafe wager as they'll still get at least $10,000 for their charity. Andy Richter and Jon Stewart both gambled their whole $11,000 $11,000+ winnings in 1999 (on consecutive days, no less) despite each having locks. The same didn't work out for author Tom Clancy, who only needed a $1,401 wager or an incorrect reply from Catherine Crier to win his Power Players Week game in 1997, and while she was wrong, he wagered everything, handing the game to Tim Russert (who had been in a distant third place.)
21st Jun '16 3:37:32 PM RobFRules
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** 2015 5 day champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel attracted some attention for pulling this in ''Final Jeopardy!'', tending to gamble all but $1 if he was leading without being in a runaway situation. Luckily, he didn't miss on Final until his loss in his 6th game, having won over $127,000.

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** 2015 5 day Though overshadowed by his Final response ("What is someone in Normandy, but I just won $75,000!"), 2013 Teen Tournament champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel attracted some attention for pulling Leonard Cooper employed this in ''Final Jeopardy!'', tending the deciding second game of the finals, wagering ''$18,000'' of his then-$18,200 on the last Daily Double to gamble all but $1 if he was leading without being in take a runaway situation. Luckily, he didn't miss on huge (though, despite his Final until his loss in his 6th game, having won over $127,000.response, not insurmountable) lead.


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** A death-or-glory attack may also appear in Final Jeopardy!, particularly if a contestant with a comfortable or runaway lead wagers an excessively large amount, which would net them a huge score if they're right, and cost them the win if they're wrong. 2015 5 day champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel (who often wagered all but $1 if he led going into Final without a lock) is a notable recent example, but other examples include 2012 Teen Tournament winner Elyse Mancuso and 2013 Kids Week standout Skyler Hornbeck, who each wagered almost everything in Final despite having first place locked up, and would have needlessly gave the victory away had they missed.
** Occasionally, a Celebrity Jeopardy! player in first place will bet it all in Final Jeopardy!, which would obviously net them more money for their charities, and put them at $0 if they're wrong, but you could justify the unsafe wager as they'll still get at least $10,000 for their charity. Andy Richter and Jon Stewart both gambled their whole $11,000 winnings in 1999 (on consecutive days, no less) despite each having locks. The same didn't work out for author Tom Clancy, who only needed a $1,401 wager or an incorrect reply from Catherine Crier to win his Power Players Week game in 1997, and while she was wrong, he wagered everything, handing the game to Tim Russert (who had been in a distant third place.)
20th Jun '16 11:12:25 PM RobFRules
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** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish champion Fredrik Gildea wagered all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Fredrik didn't find the other.
** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager at least $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.



** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish champion Frederik Gildea wagered all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Frederik didn't find the other.

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** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish 2015 5 day champion Frederik Gildea wagered and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel attracted some attention for pulling this in ''Final Jeopardy!'', tending to gamble all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, but $1 if he was leading without being in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, a runaway situation. Luckily, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Frederik didn't find the other.miss on Final until his loss in his 6th game, having won over $127,000.



** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager at least $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.
** 2015 5 day champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel attracted some attention for pulling this in ''Final Jeopardy!'', tending to gamble all but $1 if he was leading without being in a runaway situation. Luckily, he didn't miss on Final until his loss in his 6th game, having won over $127,000.
20th Jun '16 7:11:49 PM RobFRules
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** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish champion Frederik Gildea wagered all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Frederik didn't find the other.



** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.

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** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager at least $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.
20th Jun '16 7:00:48 PM RobFRules
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** 1988 3 day champion Bob Beers wagered $6,000 on the first Daily Double in his first game, then followed up six clues later with a a whopping ''$10,000'' wager, which remains a ''Jeopardy!'' record when adjusted for inflation. A miss on either would have likely cost him the game, especially as he missed ''Final''.

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** 1988 3 day champion Bob Beers wagered $6,000 on the first Daily Double in Double Jeopardy! from his first game, then followed up six clues later with a a whopping ''$10,000'' wager, which remains a ''Jeopardy!'' record when adjusted for inflation. A miss on either would have likely cost him the game, especially as he missed ''Final''.''Final''.
** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final.
20th Jun '16 4:53:58 PM RobFRules
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* BadassBoast: On the eve of his preliminary match in the Battle of the Decades, Ken Jennings said of his opponents in a commercial, "They actually think they can win." He backed it up with a lock-win.

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* BadassBoast: On the eve of In commercials advertising his preliminary match 2000s Week game in the 2014's Battle of the Decades, Ken Jennings said of his opponents in a commercial, "They actually think they can win." He backed it up with a lock-win.lock-win, helped by wagering over $12,000 on two correct Daily Doubles.



** The 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions was littered with upsets and dark horse victories in the early rounds. Of the "Nifty Nine" champions that were byed to the second round following their record setting and accomplished prior runs on the show, ''seven'' of them lost their opening game, with only Brad Rutter and Frank Spangenberg advancing to the quarterfinals (with only one other TOC winner, Dan Melia, joining them there.) On the flip side, the UTOC was a great showcase for John Cuthbertson, Chris Miller, and Pam Mueller, who won their own share of upsets on their route to the semifinals, after ending their previous ''Jeopardy!'' runs as semifinalists in their regular [=TOCs=].

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** The 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions was littered with upsets and dark horse victories in the early rounds. Of the "Nifty Nine" champions that were byed to the second round following their record setting and accomplished prior runs on the show, ''seven'' of them lost their opening game, with only Brad Rutter and Frank Spangenberg advancing to the quarterfinals (with (and only one other TOC winner, Dan Melia, joining them there.) On the flip side, the UTOC was a great showcase for John Cuthbertson, Chris Miller, and Pam Mueller, who won their own share of upsets on their route to the semifinals, after ending their previous ''Jeopardy!'' runs as semifinalists in their regular [=TOCs=].


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** 1988 3 day champion Bob Beers wagered $6,000 on the first Daily Double in his first game, then followed up six clues later with a a whopping ''$10,000'' wager, which remains a ''Jeopardy!'' record when adjusted for inflation. A miss on either would have likely cost him the game, especially as he missed ''Final''.


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** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.
17th Jun '16 9:04:37 PM KoopaKid17
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* GoldenSnitch: Played with. In theory, Final Jeopardy can result in people doubling their money or losing everything. It is, however, rather common for Double Jeopardy to end with second place having less than half of the leader's score. The leader can simply bet nothing and be guaranteed a victory.

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* GoldenSnitch: Played with. In theory, Final Jeopardy can result in people doubling their money or losing everything. It is, however, rather common for Double Jeopardy Jeopardy! to end with second place having less than half of the leader's score. The leader can simply bet nothing and be guaranteed a victory.



* DeathOrGloryAttack: A True Daily Double (or close to it) in Double Jeopardy, which was Roger Craig's signature strategy. Get it right, and you double your score, potentially securing victory or denying an opponent a lock-win. Miss, and you drop to $0 with little to no time to recover.

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* DeathOrGloryAttack: A True Daily Double (or close to it) in Double Jeopardy, Jeopardy!, which was Roger Craig's signature strategy. Get it right, and you double your score, potentially securing victory or denying an opponent a lock-win. Miss, and you drop to $0 with little to no time to recover.


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** A rare PlayedForLaughs example on June 3, 2002. Four-time champion Jill Bunzendahl Chimka said that if she won five games, she'd give the car she won to her son, Cory. Unfortunately, she finished Double Jeopardy! dead last and didn't know the answer to the Final Jeopardy! clue. She wrote "What is Sorry Cory, No Jag?" to the amusement of Alex and the audience.
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