History Series / JEOPARDY

30th Sep '16 10:11:10 PM RobFRules
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** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in September 2016, becoming a 2 day champion, winning both games in runaways, and thankfully not wagering everything on his Daily Doubles.

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** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in September the fall of 2016, becoming a 2 3 day champion, winning both games in runaways, and thankfully not wagering everything on his surviving an all-in Daily Doubles.Double miss in this third game with a major comeback.



** If no contestant on Jeopardy! finishes with a positive total, three new contestants compete on the next show. Overall, this has happened in the Trebek era at least eight times (most recently in January 2016.) It's uncertain how many times this occurred in the Fleming era but on one episode he hosted, all three contestants were ''disqualified'' before Final Jeopardy! There was no Final Jeopardy! clue so Fleming spent the rest of the show chatting with the contestants.

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** If no contestant on Jeopardy! finishes with a positive total, three new contestants compete on the next show. Overall, this has happened in the Trebek era at least eight times (most recently in January 2016.) It's uncertain how many times this occurred in the Fleming era era, but on one episode he hosted, all three contestants were ''disqualified'' before Final Jeopardy! There was finished ''Double Jeopardy!'' with no Final Jeopardy! clue money, so Fleming spent the rest of the show chatting with the contestants.contestants. If this scenario were to happen today, the show's website implied that they may play the Final Jeopardy! clue just for fun.



** It happened for the first time in a tournament setting during the 1991 Seniors Tournament. During the second quarterfinal game, all 3 players were incorrect in Final Jeopardy!, with all 3 wagering everything. As a result, a fifth wild card position was added to round out the semifinals, the only time to date that there were only 4 automatic semifinalists in a ''Jeopardy!'' tournament.

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** It This happened for the first time in a tournament setting during the 1991 Seniors Tournament. During the second quarterfinal game, all 3 players were incorrect in Final Jeopardy!, with all 3 wagering everything. As a result, a fifth wild card position was added to round out the semifinals, the only time to date that there were only 4 automatic semifinalists in a ''Jeopardy!'' tournament.



** Though only in its second season, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' differed in its first season by not having returning champions. As a result, the chase to get into the season-ending two day championships saw contestants making high and risky wagers to rack up points in order to try and qualify. Now, returning champions are in full effect, with victories gaining precedence over accumulated points.

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** Though only in its second third season, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' differed in its first season by not having returning champions. As a result, the chase to get into the season-ending two day championships saw contestants making high and risky wagers to rack up points in order to try and qualify. Now, returning champions are in full effect, with victories gaining precedence over accumulated points.



* InSeriesNickname: Occasionally, ''Jeopardy!'' contestants will play under a nickname rather than their first name, even if they're billed under their first name in the introductions. Notable examples include 1995 Tournament of Champions winner Ryan Holznagel (who played under his long-time nickname Fritz in 2014's Battle of the Decades), 2004 4 day champion Scott Renzoni (who played as "Renzo" for his appearances), and 2008 Teen Tournament finalist Rachel Cooke, who played as "Steve" for the whole tournament, luckily so when she faced Rachel Horn in the finals.

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* InSeriesNickname: Occasionally, ''Jeopardy!'' contestants will play under a nickname rather than their first name, even if they're billed under their first name in the introductions. Notable examples include 1995 Tournament of Champions winner Ryan Holznagel (who played under his long-time nickname Fritz in 2014's Battle of the Decades), 2004 4 day champion Scott Renzoni (who played as "Renzo" for his appearances), and 2008 Teen Tournament finalist Rachel Cooke, who played as "Steve" for the whole tournament, luckily so when she faced Rachel Horn in the finals. Averted with 1988 Teen Tournament finalist David Javerbaum, who only played as "DJ" in the finals out of necessity (as another finalist was named David.)
26th Sep '16 6:08:20 AM RobFRules
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** Similarly, some ''Jeopardy!'' champions have made return appearances under a different variation of the first name they originally played under. Some examples include Dan Green (Danny in the 1986 TOC), Sandra Gore (Sandy in ''Super Jeopardy!''), Mike Day (Michael in the 1985 & Ultimate TOCs), Michael Dupee (Mike in the 1996 TOC and Battle of the Decades), Michael Thayer (Mike in the Ultimate TOC), Dave Traini (David in the Ultimate TOC), and Andy Westney (Andrew in the Ultimate TOC & Battle of the Decades.)

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** Similarly, some ''Jeopardy!'' champions have made return appearances under a different variation of the first name they originally played under. Some examples include Dan Green (Danny in the 1986 TOC), Sandra Gore (Sandy in ''Super Jeopardy!''), Mike Day (Michael in the 1985 & Ultimate TOCs), [=TOCs=]), Michael Dupee (Mike in the 1996 TOC and Battle of the Decades), Michael Thayer (Mike in the Ultimate TOC), Dave Traini (David in the Ultimate TOC), and Andy Westney (Andrew in the Ultimate TOC & Battle of the Decades.)
26th Sep '16 6:07:23 AM RobFRules
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** Similarly, some ''Jeopardy!'' champions have made return appearances under a different variation of the first name they originally played under. Some examples include Dan Green (Danny in the 1986 TOC), Sandra Gore (Sandy in ''Super Jeopardy!''), Mike Day (Michael in the 1985 & Ultimate TOCs), Michael Dupee (Mike in the 1996 TOC and Battle of the Decades), Michael Thayer (Mike in the Ultimate TOC), Dave Traini (David in the Ultimate TOC), and Andy Westney (Andrew in the Ultimate TOC & Battle of the Decades.)



** In the 2006 Teen Tournament semifinals, high school sophomore Papa Chakravarthy (who is of Indian descent) lost $1,000 on the first Daily Double in a clue about an Asian 2 word capital constructed in the 1910s and 1920s. He guessed Phnom Penh, Cambodia, but the correct question was "What is ''New Dehli''?" Despite the ironic miss, he only lost $1,000, and still won both the game, and the tournament.

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** In the 2006 Teen Tournament semifinals, high school sophomore Papa Chakravarthy (who is of Indian descent) lost $1,000 on the first Daily Double in a clue about an Asian 2 word capital constructed in the 1910s and 1920s. He guessed Phnom Penh, Cambodia, but the correct question was "What is ''New Dehli''?" Despite the ironic miss, he only lost $1,000, and still won both the game, and game & the tournament.
21st Sep '16 12:24:52 PM RobFRules
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** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in September 2016, winning his first game in a runaway, and thankfully not wagering everything on his Daily Double.

to:

** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in September 2016, becoming a 2 day champion, winning his first game both games in a runaway, runaways, and thankfully not wagering everything on his Daily Double.Doubles.
20th Sep '16 4:15:16 PM Twentington
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** For the first season of the Trebek era, contestants could ring in as soon as the clue was revealed. This often led to more than one podium lighting up at the same time, or contestants buzzing in so quickly that their time limit expired before Alex finished reading the clue. In addition, Alex himself said that he found the original buzzer system annoying and distracting to home viewers. From season 2 onward, the buzzers activate after the clue is finished, and premature ring-ins are locked out for 1/8 of a second.

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** For the first season of the Trebek era, contestants could ring in as soon as the clue was revealed.revealed, which was also true of the Fleming era. This often led to more than one podium lighting up at the same time, or contestants buzzing in so quickly that their time limit expired before Alex finished reading the clue. In addition, Alex himself said that he found the original buzzer system annoying and distracting to home viewers. From season 2 onward, the buzzers activate after the clue is finished, and premature ring-ins are locked out for 1/8 of a second.



** ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' games originally saw each contestant guaranteed $10,000 for their charity, unless they won more during the game, with the week's biggest winner having their cash total doubled. As a result, if a low-scoring game resulted in no one surpassing $10,000 after Final Jeopardy!, everyone left with the same amount of money no matter who won. After ''three'' of the five Celebrity games from November 1996 resulted in sub-$10,000 scores for winning contestants (including a triple zero finish when all three contestants went all-in on Final), the first place minimum was increased to $15,000 for future installments, later jumping to $50,000 after clue values were doubled in 2002, and the doubled cash bonus was also eliminated after 1996. As well, after the triple-zero game, the rules were changed so that the leader after Double Jeopardy! would be named the winner if everyone went all-in and lost on Final, as seen with the 1998 "Ladies Night" celebrity game.
This rule was changed at some point between May 2009 and April 2003, initially giving celebrities in the red a flat $500 for ''Final''

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** ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' games originally saw each contestant guaranteed $10,000 for their charity, unless they won more during the game, with the week's biggest winner having their cash total doubled. As a result, if a low-scoring game resulted in no one surpassing $10,000 after Final Jeopardy!, everyone left with the same amount of money no matter who won. After ''three'' of the five Celebrity games from November 1996 resulted in sub-$10,000 scores for winning contestants (including a triple zero finish when all three contestants went all-in on Final), the first place minimum was increased to $15,000 for future installments, later jumping to $50,000 after clue values were doubled in 2002, and the doubled cash bonus was also eliminated after 1996. As well, after the triple-zero game, the rules were changed so that the leader after Double Jeopardy! would be named the winner if everyone went all-in and lost on Final, as seen with the 1998 "Ladies Night" celebrity game.
game. This rule was changed at some point between May 2009 and April 2003, initially giving celebrities in the red a flat $500 for ''Final''
16th Sep '16 11:06:34 PM RobFRules
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* HereditaryCurse: Following the passing of inaugural Tournament of Champions winner Jerry Slowik in 1986, no other ''Jeopardy!'' champion named Jerry has ''ever'' competed in the Tournament of Champions. Of the other four Jerrys that won a regular game in their original reign (among those listed on J-Archive), three won 3 games or less (including 2004 2 timer Jerry Harvey, who was dethroned by a debuting Ken Jennings), while 2014 5 timer Jerry Slowik was disqualified from his TOC due to legal issues. More recently, noted quiz bowl champion Jerry Vinokurov was well hyped on fan sites before his debut game in April 2016, but fell to eventual 9 day champion Buzzy Cohen. Maybe it's a good thing that 1992 TOC and 2005 Ultimate TOC finalist Jerome Vered didn't play as Jerry?
16th Sep '16 5:19:02 PM tyrekecorrea
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Added DiffLines:

* RuleOfThree: This is used in closed captioning to distinguish between when time runs out to answer a question ("(Beep)") and when time runs out to complete the Jeopardy or Double Jeopardy rounds ("(Beep beep beep)").
14th Sep '16 2:48:41 PM RobFRules
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** An Indian contestant once missed a question about New Delhi. The contestant hung his head in shame and Alex called him out on it.

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** An In the 2006 Teen Tournament semifinals, high school sophomore Papa Chakravarthy (who is of Indian contestant once missed descent) lost $1,000 on the first Daily Double in a clue about an Asian 2 word capital constructed in the 1910s and 1920s. He guessed Phnom Penh, Cambodia, but the correct question about New Delhi. The contestant hung his head in shame was "What is ''New Dehli''?" Despite the ironic miss, he only lost $1,000, and Alex called him out on it.still won both the game, and the tournament.
14th Sep '16 2:25:10 PM RobFRules
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** ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!'' had a number of celebrity games as well, typically featuring popular musicians, though episodes also took place featuring recent ''Survivor'' castmates, as Jeff Probst hosted both shows. Similarly, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' featured two celebrity editions in its second season, including one with "The Danettes" (on-air personalities from host Dan Patrick's radio show) and a Super Bowl-week episode featuring NFL Network personalities

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** ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!'' had a number of celebrity games as well, typically featuring popular musicians, though episodes also took place featuring recent ''Survivor'' castmates, as Jeff Probst hosted both shows. Similarly, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' featured two celebrity editions in its second season, including one with "The Danettes" (on-air personalities from host Dan Patrick's radio show) and a Super Bowl-week episode featuring NFL Network personalitiespersonalities, with a Danettes rematch opening season 3 as well.


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* HalloweenEpisode: Rarely occurs, especially in recent seasons, though it's not uncommon to see a Halloween-themed category or two each year, like "Day of the Dead" in 2015, or the entire Jeopardy! round in 2007. One notable exception: Halloween 1997 (eventual TOC finalist Bob Harris' debut game), where Alex Trebek dressed as the Statue of Liberty.
12th Sep '16 11:57:31 AM RobFRules
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** May 9th, 2002: Going into Final Jeopardy! in the semifinals of the Million Dollar Masters tournament, Leslie Frates held an $800 lead over Brad Rutter, largely after wagering $9,000 of her then-$9,400 on her correct Daily Double. Everyone got Final right, with Brad wagering all of his $19,600, but despite her near-true Daily Double, Leslie wagered ''nothing'', likely gambling that Brad would miss (Leslie immediately lampshaded her wager by asking Alex "Can I change it?") Standing pat cost Leslie at least $25,000 and a second reunion tournament finals slot, while Brad went on to win his first of three million dollar+ reunion tournaments a few days later.

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** May 9th, 2002: Going into Final Jeopardy! in the semifinals of the Million Dollar Masters tournament, Leslie Frates held an $800 lead over Brad Rutter, largely after wagering $9,000 of her then-$9,400 on her correct Daily Double. Everyone got Final right, with Brad wagering all of his $19,600, but despite her near-true Daily Double, Leslie wagered ''nothing'', likely gambling that Brad would miss (Leslie immediately lampshaded her wager by asking Alex "Can I change it?") Standing pat rather than going for the $18,801 lockout wager cost Leslie a shot at least $25,000 the $1,000,000 top prize and a second reunion tournament finals slot, while Brad went on to win his first of three million dollar+ reunion tournaments a few days later.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.JEOPARDY