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History Series / JEOPARDY

20th May '16 11:21:29 PM RobFRules
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* CelebrityEdition: One of the most famous in the game show industry. The concept is well-known through ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s "Celebrity Jeopardy!" sketches, with Creator/WillFerrell as Trebek. Three variants featuring politicians and newsmakers have also been held under the "Power Players Week" branding, all as taped at D.A.R. Constiturion Hall in Washington, D.C. during U.S. election years, while a Million Dollar Celebrity Invitational tournament was held from 2010-2011.

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* CelebrityEdition: One of the most famous in the game show industry. The concept is well-known through ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s "Celebrity Jeopardy!" sketches, with Creator/WillFerrell as Trebek. Three Four variants featuring politicians and newsmakers have also been held under the "Power Players Week" branding, all as taped at D.A.R. Constiturion Hall in Washington, D.C. during U.S. election years, while a Million Dollar Celebrity Invitational tournament was held from 2010-2011.



** One Celebrity edition, featuring Al Franken, had a category entitled "[[Series/SaturdayNightLive SNL]] Presidential Players". Needless to say, Al swept the category. Then he apologized to his opponents (Keith Olbermann and Gretchen Carlson), saying he wrote ''four of the five sketches featured in the category.''

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** One Celebrity edition, A 2004 Power Players Week game featuring Al Franken, Franken had a category entitled "[[Series/SaturdayNightLive SNL]] Presidential Players". Needless to say, Al swept the category. Then he apologized to his opponents (Keith Olbermann and Gretchen Carlson), saying he wrote ''four of the five sketches featured in the category.''



** A handful of politicians have competed on ''Jeopardy!'' during their three Power Players Weeks, including former New Jersey Governor Christie Whitman, future Minnesota Senator Al Franken, and multiple Congress members & White House Press Secretaries. As well, then-Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings competed during a regular Celebrity Jeopardy! week in 2006.

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** A handful of politicians have competed on ''Jeopardy!'' during their three four Power Players Weeks, including former New Jersey Governor Christie Whitman, future Minnesota Senator Al Franken, former RNC chairman Michael Steele, and multiple Congress members & White House Press Secretaries. As well, then-Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings competed during a regular Celebrity Jeopardy! week in 2006.2006.
** During the Washington, D.C. tapings in season 32, ''Jeopardy!'' had two political figures read Final Jeopardy! clues live in studio: Dr. Jill Biden (wife of Vice President Joe Biden) in the first Teachers Tournament semifinal, and Washington, D.C. mayor Muriel Bowser in the last Power Players Week game.
12th May '16 10:12:39 PM RobFRules
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** The last games of a ''Jeopardy!'' season are usually regular games, but from 1989-1995, the season always ended with the annual Seniors Tournament, before being moved to December for its last installment. Since then, the only season-ending special events have been two Teen Tournaments (a third will come in July 2016), two Kids Weeks, and 1996's Olympic Games Tournament (though its four episode run time meant that season 12 ended with a regular Friday episode.)

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** The last games of a ''Jeopardy!'' season are usually regular games, but from 1989-1995, the season always ended with the annual Seniors Tournament, before being moved to December for its last installment. Since then, the only season-ending special events have been two Teen Tournaments (a third will come in July 2016), Tournaments, two Kids Weeks, and 1996's Olympic Games Tournament (though its four episode run time meant that season 12 ended with a regular Friday episode.)



** In a reverse example from the deciding game of the 2007 Teen Tournament, finalist Ben Schenkel noted in his Final Jeopardy! response "Who is ATLAS (congrats, David!!)", essentially conceding the tournament to David Walter, who gave the same response and won the tournament. However, Ben actually ''led'' going into Final after finishing with $40,000 the previous game, and would still have won the tournament had David missed Final.



* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston and a 2004 Kids Week in Washington, all of the road trip shows were tied with celebrity games and/or a tournament (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.

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* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston and a 2004 Kids Week in Washington, all of the road trip shows were tied with celebrity games and/or a tournament (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have ''Jeopardy'' has hosted road games on a quadrennial basis since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the Power Players Week games, which have 2004, all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. during election years, and always including a Power Players Week and at least one week of tournament play.
2nd May '16 7:10:17 PM RobFRules
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** When tie games were allowed in regular play, a handful of contestants in the lead after ''Double Jeopardy!'' were known to play to tie games on purpose. Some would do so out of kindness, but others like Arthur Chu used it as strategy, to allow a trailing contestant (that was perceived to be weaker) to tie them, come back the next day, and be outperformed again.

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** When tie games were allowed in regular play, a handful of contestants in the lead after ''Double Jeopardy!'' were known to play to tie games on purpose. Some would do so out of kindness, kindness (such as to allow a challenger to come back after the reigning champion's 5th & final win), but others like Arthur Chu used it as strategy, to allow a trailing contestant (that was perceived to be weaker) to tie them, come back the next day, and be outperformed again.
28th Apr '16 11:06:59 AM RobFRules
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Added DiffLines:

** Averted with the 3004 addition of extra rehearsal time before games taped in season 21. The change came following Ken Jennings' then-38 game winning streak to end season 20, as producers realized that new challengers might not have as much rehearsal time to effectively compete, but Jennings still won an additional 36 games to start the new season.
17th Apr '16 9:04:13 PM Nohbody
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** Ken Jennings. To some, he's a shy, nerdy Mormon who just happened to know ''every''thing (including quite a bit about alcohol). Well, everything except [[spoiler:H&R Block]]. Others, however, see him as a BoringInvincibleHero.

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** Ken Jennings. To some, he's a shy, nerdy Mormon who just happened to know ''every''thing (including quite a bit about alcohol). Well, everything except [[spoiler:H&R Block]]. Others, however, see him as a BoringInvincibleHero.



* InvincibleHero:
** Brad Rutter, though he may be an InvincibleVillain if you found him to be cocky in later tournaments. Through 25 official Jeopardy! appearances comprising of 19 different games (including 2 and 3 day finals, and not counting the exhibition IBM Challenge), he has ''never'' lost a game, not even when he could afford it in a wild card situation, Rutter has won over $4,000,000 through his four tournament wins, and defeated a who's who of Jeopardy! greats along the way, including ''27'' Tournament of Champions or all-time tournament qualifiers (11 of which being TOC finalists), as well as Ken Jennings ''twice'' in tournament finals.
** Ken Jennings seemed like this for much of 2004, before Nancy Zerg broke his 74 day championship reign that November. Even if you believe that Ken willingly ended his reign then, Brad Rutter proved that Ken is human during their head-to-head matchups.
** Some Tournament of Champions winners before Jeopardy! abolished the 5 day limit could be seen like this. If you don't count ''Super Jeopardy!'' as canon, 1986 TOC winner Chuck Forrest remained undefeated on ''Jeopardy!'' until his Million Dollar Masters semifinal loss to 1987 TOC winner Bob Verini, who himself was undefeated until losing to Brad Rutter in the finals.
** Only one TOC winner in the no-winning-limits era did so without a loss: 2013 champion Colby Burnett, who qualified for the event as a Teachers Tournament winner, taking no losses in either tournament. Colby kept things going with a 2000s week win in the Battle of the Decades, but Chuck Forrest finally handed him his first defeat in the quarterfinals. However, as he often came across as cocky in his games, he may be an InvincibleVillain too.
13th Apr '16 6:23:48 PM Twentington
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*** However, it should be noted that the "British Art & Artists", "Give the Order", "CIA Directors", "[=McWriters=]", and "Canadian Cities" categories each included a Daily Double, so one of the other two contestants could have given a correct response in either case. Still...

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*** April 13, 2016: "Central American Capitals". Again, ''no one even rang in'' for the entire category!
*** However, it should be noted that the "British Art & Artists", "Give the Order", "CIA Directors", "[=McWriters=]", and "Canadian Cities" Cities", and "Central American Capitals" categories each included a Daily Double, so one of the other two contestants could have given a correct response in either any case. Still...
11th Apr '16 2:26:42 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** '''Even better''': As soon as a contestant named Arthur Chu avoided this, the media called him out despite his strategy still following the rules of the game.
6th Apr '16 2:05:17 PM VenomLancerHae
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* JustForFun: Celebrity Jeopardy! games are often treated like this, especially given that their charities are guaranteed $10,000 no matter what, and that they're more prone to mug for the camera and not take the game as seriously. This was especially true in the pre-1997 celebrity games, where the minimum guarantee for every contestant (win or lose) was $10,000, so in many games, the winners and losers all won the same prize in the end.
6th Apr '16 12:19:06 AM RobFRules
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** When tie games were allowed in regular play, a handful of contestants in the lead after ''Double Jeopardy!'' were known to play to tie games on purpose. Some would do so out of kindness, but others like Arthur Chu used it as strategy, to allow a trailing contestant (that was perceived to be weaker) to tie them, come back the next day, and be outperformed again.



** In many respects, 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions. With 145 contestants total, the use of byes for notable past contestants, no wild cards, game winners receiving their end-of-game scores, two-day ''semifinal'' games, the use of a ''three day'' final, and a ''$2,000,000'' top prize definitely all set this apart from other special events. It's also the only reunion tournament to date that invited Teen Tournament winners after their 2000 removal from TOC fields.
** The Battle of the Decades, held in 2014, differed from some prior tournaments by grouping contestants by which "decade" (1984-93, 1994-2003, and 2004-13) their runs on the show took place under, with decades separated for the first round, and a contestant from each in all 5 quarterfinal games.

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** In many respects, 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions. With 145 contestants total, the use of byes for notable past contestants, no wild cards, game winners receiving their end-of-game scores, two-day ''semifinal'' games, the use of a ''three day'' final, and a ''$2,000,000'' top prize definitely all set this apart from other special events. It's also the only reunion tournament to date that invited Teen Tournament winners after their 2000 removal from TOC fields.
fields, and the only ''Jeopardy!'' tournament of any kind to move contestants to different podiums after the first game of a 2 or 3 day (semi)final.
** The Battle of the Decades, held in 2014, differed from some prior tournaments by grouping contestants by which "decade" (1984-93, 1994-2003, and 2004-13) their runs on the show took place under, with decades separated for the first round, and a contestant from each in all 5 quarterfinal games. It also uniquely featured fan voting to select three competitors in the field as "fan favourites".
6th Apr '16 12:00:29 AM RobFRules
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Added DiffLines:

** In the season 25 finale from July 2009, contestant John Munson wrote his first name on the podium in the shape of a penis, which somehow escaped producers until the episode aired. The gag attracted viral attention, but Munson was stuck in third place for the whole game, losing to eventual 2010 Tournament of Champions finalist Stefan Goodreau in his 5th & final victory.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.JEOPARDY