History Series / JEOPARDY

10th Feb '16 10:18:16 PM RobFRules
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** Much of the chatter surrounding the 2014 Tournament of Champions finals revolved around who'd win between 20 day champion Julia Collins and 11 day champion Arthur Chu (far and away the top winners of season 30), but both lost in the finals to 8 day champion Ben Ingram after he opened up a $10,000 lead going into day 2. Ben was the biggest winner of season 29, and the fourth highest earning qualifier in the field, but anyone in that TOC would have been a dark horse against the Julia/Arthur pairing.

** Going into the finals of 1990's ''Super Jeopardy!'' tournament, Bob Verini was the understandable favourite, having won the 1987 Tournament of Champions, and defeating fellow ''Super Jeopardy!'' finalist Dave Traini in the 1987 finals too. However, both were upset by Bruce Seymour, a ''4'' day champion who didn't make it out of the 1988 TOC quarterfinals, and who hasn't been invited to any "best-of" reunion tournaments since.
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** Going into the finals of 1990's ''Super Jeopardy!'' tournament, Bob Verini was the understandable favourite, having won the 1987 Tournament of Champions, and defeating having defeated fellow ''Super Jeopardy!'' finalist Dave Traini in the 1987 finals too. However, both were upset by Bruce Seymour, a ''4'' day champion who didn't make it out of the 1988 TOC quarterfinals, and who hasn't been invited to any "best-of" reunion tournaments since.

** Going into Much of the finals of 1990's ''Super Jeopardy!'' tournament, Bob Verini was chatter surrounding the understandable favourite, having won the 1987 2014 Tournament of Champions, and defeating fellow ''Super Jeopardy!'' finalist Dave Traini in the 1987 Champions finals too. However, both were upset by Bruce Seymour, a ''4'' revolved around who'd win between 20 day champion who didn't make it out of Julia Collins and 11 day champion Arthur Chu (far and away the 1988 top winners of season 30), but both lost in the finals to 8 day champion Ben Ingram after he opened up a $10,000 lead going into day 2. Ben was the biggest winner of season 29, and the fourth highest earning qualifier in the field, but anyone in that TOC quarterfinals, and who hasn't would have been invited to any "best-of" reunion tournaments since.a dark horse against the Julia/Arthur pairing.

** In a tournament wide variant, the 2003 Tournament of Champions saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish with no money (six wagered everything in Final Jeopardy! and were incorrect, while two finished Double Jeopardy! in the red.) As four wild cards are needed for the semifinals, the six-way tie at $0 was broken by which two contestants had the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games, with Eric Floyd (an eventual finalist that year) and Max Levaren advancing as a result. This was unlucky for Mark Lee, whose score after Double Jeopardy! was just ''$200'' less than Max's score. As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind only Floyd and Levaren.
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** In a tournament wide variant, the 2003 Tournament of Champions saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish with no money (six wagered everything in Final Jeopardy! and were incorrect, while two finished Double Jeopardy! in the red.) As four wild cards are needed for the semifinals, the six-way tie at $0 was broken by which two contestants had the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games, with Eric Floyd (an eventual finalist that year) and Max Levaren advancing as a result. This was especially unlucky for Mark Lee, whose score after Double Jeopardy! was just ''$200'' less than Max's score. As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind only Floyd and Levaren.

** Two of the modern show's one-week tournaments deviated from the usual format of three semifinal games and a two-day final. The 1996 Olympic Games Tournament (the first of three International tournaments) featured a one-day final, leading to the shortest ever ''Jeopardy!'' tournament at just four games long. Two years later, the show's Teen Reunion Tournament featured ''four'' semifinal games and a one day final, with the lowest earning semifinal winner missing the finals (but receiving an extra cash bonus.) Though unique to this tournament on ''Jeopardy!'', it is similar to ''Wheel of Fortune'''s then Friday Finals format.
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** Two of the modern show's one-week tournaments deviated from the usual format of three semifinal games and a two-day final. The 1996 Olympic Games Tournament (the first of three International tournaments) featured a one-day final, leading to the shortest ever ''Jeopardy!'' tournament at just four games long. Two years later, the show's Only this event, ''Super Jeopardy!'', and 1998's Teen Reunion Tournament featured ''four'' semifinal games and used a one day final, with the lowest earning semifinal winner missing the finals (but receiving an extra cash bonus.) Though unique to this tournament on ''Jeopardy!'', it is similar to ''Wheel of Fortune'''s then Friday Finals format.one-day final among modern-era tournaments.

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** Two of the modern show's one-week tournaments deviated from the usual format of three semifinal games and a two-day final. The 1996 Olympic Games Tournament (the first of three International tournaments) featured a one-day final, leading to the shortest ever In November 1998, ''Jeopardy!'' tournament at just four taped two weeks of shows in Boston, Massachusetts, starting with 5 regular games, the only time (to date) that they've taped regular games long. Two years later, the show's outside of Sony Pictures Studios. The second week played host to their Teen Reunion Tournament Tournament, featuring twelve contestants who competed in the inaugural Teen Tournaments from 1987-1989 competing for $50,000, which was won by 1989 champion Eric Newhouse. This event uniquely featured ''four'' semifinal games and a one day final, with the lowest earning semifinal winner missing the finals (but receiving an extra cash bonus.) Though unique to this tournament on ''Jeopardy!'', it is similar to ''Wheel of Fortune'''s then Friday Finals format. As well, this is the only ''Jeopardy!'' tournament to ever invite back losing contestants from prior annual tournaments, as the only prior Teen Tournament winner in the field was Eric Newhouse.
10th Feb '16 9:02:51 PM RobFRules
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* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston, all of the road trip shows were tied with either a tournament or celebrity games (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the most recent Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.
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* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston, Boston and a 2004 Kids Week in Washington, all of the road trip shows were tied with either a tournament or celebrity games (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the most recent Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.
10th Feb '16 9:01:07 PM RobFRules
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* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston, all of the road trip shows were tied with either a tournament or celebrity games (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 being held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the most recent Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.
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* VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston, all of the road trip shows were tied with either a tournament or celebrity games (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 being was held on the road, typically at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the most recent Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.
10th Feb '16 9:00:03 PM RobFRules
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* CelebrityEdition: One of the most famous in the game show industry. The concept is well-known through ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s "Celebrity Jeopardy!" sketches, with Creator/WillFerrell as Trebek. Variants featuring politicians and newsmakers have also been held under the "Power Players Week" branding. ** ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!'' had a number of celebrity games as well, typically featuring popular musicians, though episodes also took place featuring recent ''Survivor'' castmates, as Jeff Probst hosted both shows. Similarly, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' featured a celebrity edition in 2015 with "The Danettes", on-air personalities from host Dan Patrick's radio show.
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* CelebrityEdition: One of the most famous in the game show industry. The concept is well-known through ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s "Celebrity Jeopardy!" sketches, with Creator/WillFerrell as Trebek. Variants Three variants featuring politicians and newsmakers have also been held under the "Power Players Week" branding. branding, all as taped at D.A.R. Constiturion Hall in Washington, D.C.. ** ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!'' had a number of celebrity games as well, typically featuring popular musicians, though episodes also took place featuring recent ''Survivor'' castmates, as Jeff Probst hosted both shows. Similarly, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' featured a two celebrity edition editions in 2015 it's second season, including one with "The Danettes", on-air Danettes" (on-air personalities from host Dan Patrick's radio show.show) and an Super Bowl-week episode featuring NFL Network personalities

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* CelebrityEdition: One VacationEpisode: From seasons 13-25, ''Jeopardy!'' held at least one week of shows a year on the road, starting with the 1997 International Tournament in Sweden, though all later road tapings were within the United States. With the exception of a 1998 week of regular shows from Boston, all of the most famous in the game show industry. The concept is well-known through ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'''s "Celebrity Jeopardy!" sketches, road trip shows were tied with Creator/WillFerrell as Trebek. Variants featuring politicians and newsmakers have also been held under the "Power Players Week" branding. ** ''Rock & Roll Jeopardy!'' had either a number of tournament or celebrity games as well, (including the Million Dollar Masters and the 2000 & 2009 Tournaments of Champions), while all but one College Championship from 1998-2008 being held on the road, typically featuring popular musicians, though episodes also took place featuring at college campuses. Though no longer an annual occurrence, select events have since been taped on the road, like 2011's IBM Challenge in New York, and the most recent ''Survivor'' castmates, as Jeff Probst hosted both shows. Similarly, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' featured a celebrity edition Power Players Week games, which have all been held at D.A.R. Constitution Hall in 2015 with "The Danettes", on-air personalities from host Dan Patrick's radio show.Washington, D.C.
9th Feb '16 9:50:23 AM Gimere
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GameShow created by Creator/MervGriffin in 1963 when his wife, Julann, suggested (in a reaction to [[Series/TwentyOne the quiz show scandals]] still in recent memory) that he reverse the trivia format give the contestants the answers and have them provide the questions. Merv pitched it to Creator/{{NBC}} as ''What's the Question?'', but was told that the game needed "[[EurekaMoment more jeopardies]]" [[note]](which was resolved with the Daily Double)[[/note]]. ''Jeopardy!'' debuted on NBC in 1964 with Art Fleming as host and [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Don Pardo]] as announcer. It ran until January 1975, with a brief revival in 1978/79 (also hosted by Fleming, but announced by John Harlan) that had somewhat different rules.
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GameShow created by Creator/MervGriffin in 1963 when his wife, Julann, suggested (in a reaction to [[Series/TwentyOne the quiz quiz]] [[Series/{{Dotto}} show scandals]] still in recent memory) that he reverse the trivia format give the contestants the answers and have them provide the questions. Merv pitched it to Creator/{{NBC}} as ''What's the Question?'', but was told that the game needed "[[EurekaMoment more jeopardies]]" [[note]](which was resolved with the Daily Double)[[/note]]. ''Jeopardy!'' debuted on NBC in 1964 with Art Fleming as host and [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Don Pardo]] as announcer. It ran until January 1975, with a brief revival in 1978/79 (also hosted by Fleming, but announced by John Harlan) that had somewhat different rules.

*** In the first day Final Jeopardy round, the category was U.S. Cities. The clue was a city with an airport named after a famous World War II battle and combatant. Watson guessed Toronto ([[spoiler:The answer was Chicago[[note]]Midway International Airport is the one named for the battle; O'Hare International Airport is named for a pilot[[/note]]]]). However, the programmers suggested that there were so many contextual ambiguities that Watson simply was confused, as there are cities in the US named Toronto, and Toronto in Canada has a US Baseball team (The Blue Jays). In light of this, Trebek (a Canadian native) jokingly remarked that he learned that Toronto is now a U.S. city and one of the producers wore a Blue Jays jersey.
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*** In the first day Final Jeopardy round, the category was U.S. Cities. The clue was a city with an airport named after a famous World War II battle and combatant. Watson guessed Toronto ([[spoiler:The answer was Chicago[[note]]Midway Chicago, Midway International Airport is the one named for the battle; O'Hare International Airport is named for a pilot[[/note]]]]).pilot]]). However, the programmers suggested that there were so many contextual ambiguities that Watson simply was confused, as there are cities in the US named Toronto, and Toronto in Canada has a US Baseball team (The Blue Jays). In light of this, Trebek (a Canadian native) jokingly remarked that he learned that Toronto is now a U.S. city and one of the producers wore a Blue Jays jersey.

* BootstrappedTheme: This show has quite possibly the most well-known game show theme ever, the "Think!" music was originally just used for the Final Jeopardy question rather than the opening of the show itself. (In a lesser example of this trope, the 1978-79 version's opening theme was used as a prize cue on ''WheelOfFortune'' for several seasons.) * BowChickaWowWow: Used to set the mood for "The Sexiest Potpourri Category Ever".
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* BootstrappedTheme: This show has quite possibly the most well-known game show theme ever, the "Think!" music was originally just used for the Final Jeopardy question rather than the opening of the show itself. (In a lesser example of this trope, the 1978-79 version's opening theme was used as a prize cue on ''WheelOfFortune'' ''Wheel'' for several seasons.) * BowChickaWowWow: Used This was used to set the mood for "The Sexiest Potpourri Category Ever".

* CatchPhrase: "Let's make this a true Daily Double" and "I'll take [category] for [dollar amount], Alex".
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* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase: ** "Let's make this a true Daily Double" and Double" ** "I'll take [category] for [dollar amount], Alex".

*** Also seen with Dan Patrick and 2015-16 superchamp Vinny Varadarajan, who increasingly bantered during the interview portion, joked about how long Vinny's been on, held a staring contest, and by his thirteenth win, traded places so Vinny could ask Dan questions. Dan's opening monologues also saw gentle ribbing of Vinny for his shirts and his replies cutting into Dan's airtime.
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*** ** Also seen with Dan Patrick and 2015-16 superchamp Vinny Varadarajan, who increasingly bantered during the interview portion, joked about how long Vinny's been on, held a staring contest, and by his thirteenth win, traded places so Vinny could ask Dan questions. Dan's opening monologues also saw gentle ribbing of Vinny for his shirts and his replies cutting into Dan's airtime.
8th Feb '16 10:40:11 PM RobFRules
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** Alex Trebek had one of these until 2001. [[WordOfGod He later said]] that he shaved it off on a whim, and decided to leave it off because nobody noticed. But possibly because it's so iconic and recognizable, most modern depictions in the media (such as a ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'' arc in late 2010, where one of the crocs plays ''Jeopardy!'') still show him with the 'stache. On yet another whim, he [[http://mashable.com/2014/09/10/alex-trebek-mustache/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link grew back the 'stache]] for season 31, to a mixed reception. Many fans welcomed it back wholeheartedly, but many commented that his 'stache made Trebek look a ''lot'' older than he should've. He kept it for 20 episodes (among them, 2015 TOC semifinalist Catherine Hardee's 4 day reign) before shaving it again.
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** Alex Trebek had one of these until 2001. [[WordOfGod He later said]] that he shaved it off on a whim, and decided to leave it off because nobody noticed. But possibly because it's so iconic and recognizable, most modern depictions in the media (such as a ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'' arc in late 2010, where one of the crocs plays ''Jeopardy!'') still show him with the 'stache. On yet another whim, he [[http://mashable.com/2014/09/10/alex-trebek-mustache/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link grew back the 'stache]] for season 31, to a mixed reception. Many fans welcomed it back wholeheartedly, but many others commented that his 'stache made Trebek look a ''lot'' older than he should've. He kept it for 20 episodes (among them, 2015 TOC semifinalist Catherine Hardee's 4 day reign) before shaving it again.

** Trebek's second episode. All three players ended Final Jeopardy! with scores of $0 after giving the same incorrect day the 20th Century began all three responded with "January 1, 1900"... but the correct response was January 1, 190''1''.

** Trebek's second episode. All In the inaugural season of the current version, all three players ended Final Jeopardy! Jeopady! with scores of $0 in ''two'' different games after giving an incorrect answer and wagering everything. The first time was on the Trebek version's ''second episode'', with all three giving the same incorrect day the 20th Century began all three responded with "January 1, 1900"... but the correct response was January 1, 190''1''. It happened again in January 1985 when all three contestants missed a ''Final'' response on the date that college football bowl games took place.

*** More famously, during the second semifinal game of the 2013 Teen Tournament, all 3 players had the same incorrect response on all-in wagers in Final, thus no player won. As tournament finalists are semifinal winners, the third spot went to the highest scoring runner-up in the semifinals (Leonard Cooper, who ended up winning the tournament.)
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*** More famously, during the second semifinal game of the 2013 Teen Tournament, all 3 players had the same incorrect response on all-in wagers in Final, thus no player won. As the tournament finalists are semifinal winners, finals needed three contestants, the third spot went to the highest scoring runner-up in the semifinals (Leonard Cooper, who ended up winning the tournament.)tournament), though that rule has since been changed.

** In a tournament wide variant, the 2003 Tournament of Champions saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish either Double Jeopardy! or Final Jeopardy! with no money. As four wild cards are needed for the semifinals, Eric Floyd and Max Levaren advanced after winning $0 in the quarterfinals, by virtue of having the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games. (In the end, Eric ended up advancing to the finals.) As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind only Floyd and Levaren.
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** In a tournament wide variant, the 2003 Tournament of Champions saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish either with no money (six wagered everything in Final Jeopardy! and were incorrect, while two finished Double Jeopardy! or Final Jeopardy! with no money. in the red.) As four wild cards are needed for the semifinals, Eric Floyd and Max Levaren advanced after winning $0 in the quarterfinals, six-way tie at $0 was broken by virtue of having which two contestants had the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games. (In the end, games, with Eric ended up Floyd (an eventual finalist that year) and Max Levaren advancing to the finals.) as a result. This was unlucky for Mark Lee, whose score after Double Jeopardy! was just ''$200'' less than Max's score. As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind only Floyd and Levaren.

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** In a tournament wide variant, [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=1361 May 16, 2003]]: The second day of the 2003 Tournament of Champions finals saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish either Double Jeopardy! or all three finalists answer Final Jeopardy! with no money. As four wild cards are correctly. Brian Weikle (who led going into Final) wagered $19,601 to cover Mark Dawson's score if he doubled up (which Mark did.) The problem? Brian needed for the semifinals, Eric Floyd to wager $19,''801'' to cover Mark, a $200 math error that cost him first place and Max Levaren advanced after winning $0 in the quarterfinals, by virtue of having the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games. (In the end, Eric ended up advancing to the finals.) As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind only Floyd and Levaren.over $193,000.

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** In ***Averted if a tournament wide variant, the 2003 Tournament of Champions saw ''eight'' of the ten losing quarterfinalists finish either Double Jeopardy! or Final Jeopardy! with no money. As four wild cards are needed for the semifinals, Eric Floyd and Max Levaren advanced contestant is brought back after winning $0 in the quarterfinals, by virtue of having the highest post-Double Jeopardy! scores in their games. (In the end, Eric ended up advancing to the finals.) As well, Travis Troyer's quarterfinal score of $2,599 was good for the third lowest by a wild card semifinalist in TOC history if adjusted for inflation, behind an aforementioned error, only Floyd and Levaren.to lose worse than they did originally. For example, October 2002 4 day champion Phillip Steele was brought back for a second shot at his 5th win the following April after a technical error in his original 5th game, with a berth in that year's TOC on the line... only for his return game to be the day that Brian Weikle won a then-record ''$52,000'' in an absolute runaway.
6th Feb '16 10:22:47 PM mlsmithca
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After two pilots, ''Jeopardy!'' came back in 1984d with host Creator/AlexTrebek, announcer Johnny Gilbert (both LongRunners on the show) and much higher cash awards. This version has far outlasted the original, starting its 32nd season in September 2015. Other than a few cosmetic changes, the doubling of dollar amounts, and the five-day championship limit becoming a "sky's the limit" policy, the format is almost entirely unchanged.
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After two pilots, ''Jeopardy!'' came back in 1984d 1984 with host Creator/AlexTrebek, announcer Johnny Gilbert (both LongRunners on the show) and much higher cash awards. This version has far outlasted the original, starting its 32nd season in September 2015. Other than a few cosmetic changes, the doubling of dollar amounts, and the five-day championship limit becoming a "sky's the limit" policy, the format is almost entirely unchanged.
6th Feb '16 10:22:25 PM mlsmithca
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Here we go again. Unless it's part of a quote or a title, do NOT use an ampersand instead of the word "and". It's three letters. Using a symbol instead of a three-letter word looks lazy.
** Ken Jennings & Brad Rutter have competed against each other in a record eight episodes of ''Jeopardy!'', with Brad defeating Ken in the finals of both the Ultimate Tournament of Champions and the Battle of the Decades, while both lost to the Watson supercomputer in The IBM Challenge. However, as both are elite level ''Jeopardy! contestants, their own knowledge bases and buzzer skills are arguably more to blame than fate.
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** Ken Jennings & and Brad Rutter have competed against each other in a record eight episodes of ''Jeopardy!'', with Brad defeating Ken in the finals of both the Ultimate Tournament of Champions and the Battle of the Decades, while both lost to the Watson supercomputer in The IBM Challenge. However, as both are elite level ''Jeopardy! contestants, their own knowledge bases and buzzer skills are arguably more to blame than fate.

*** On a far bigger scale, 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions featured ''nine'' players that played as Michael during prior runs on the show, with only 1990 College Champion Michael Thayer opting to play as Mike this time around. Of the nine, both Michael Daunt & Michael Rooney advanced to the quarterfinals. Also, had Michael Block accepted his invite, there would have been ''ten'' Michaels in the field.
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*** On a far bigger scale, 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions featured ''nine'' players that played as Michael during prior runs on the show, with only 1990 College Champion Michael Thayer opting to play as Mike this time around. Of the nine, both Michael Daunt & and Michael Rooney advanced to the quarterfinals. Also, had Michael Block accepted his invite, there would have been ''ten'' Michaels in the field.
5th Feb '16 10:50:35 PM Twentington
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** Though only in it's second season, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' differed in it's first season by not having returning champions. As a result, the chase to get into the season-ending two day championships saw contestants making high and risky wagers to rack up points in order to try and qualify. Now, returning champions are in full effect, with victories gaining precedence over accumulated points.
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** Though only in it's its second season, ''Sports Jeopardy!'' differed in it's its first season by not having returning champions. As a result, the chase to get into the season-ending two day championships saw contestants making high and risky wagers to rack up points in order to try and qualify. Now, returning champions are in full effect, with victories gaining precedence over accumulated points.
4th Feb '16 9:48:34 AM RobFRules
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** Celebrity Jeopardy (played for charity) is much more forgiving of the "must be in the form of a question" rule. ** Money equal to their score used to be awarded to all contestants, but "winner-take-all" promotes more risk taking for a more exciting show, and prevents contestants from ending participation if they've reached some needed goal amount. ** After the above-mentioned EpicFail in the 2013 Teen Tournament semifinals where all three contestants finished with no money, the the tiebreaker rules in tournament play were changed so that every game would have a declared winner, as the previous method was unfair to other semifinalists who wouldn't know about an extra wild card spot. If a triple zero finish happens again in a tournament, the leader after Double Jeopardy! will be named the winner, a'la in celebrity games.
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** After a triple zero finish in a 1996 Celebrity Jeopardy (played Jeopardy! game (with all three contestants winning the runner-up prize for charity) is much more forgiving of their charities), the "must be in rules were changed so that the form of a question" rule. leader after Double Jeopardy! would be named the winner if everyone went all-in and lost on Final (as seen with the 1998 "Ladies Night" celebrity game.) ** Money equal to their score used to be was awarded to all contestants, contestants in the Art Fleming era, but that changed to a "winner-take-all" format for the Trebek version, which promotes more risk taking for a more exciting show, and prevents contestants from ending participation if they've reached some needed goal amount. ** After the above-mentioned EpicFail in the 2013 Teen Tournament semifinals where all three contestants finished with no money, the the tiebreaker rules in tournament play were changed so that every game would have a declared winner, as the previous method was unfair to other semifinalists who wouldn't know about an extra wild card spot. If a triple zero finish happens again in a tournament, the leader after Double Jeopardy! will be named the winner, a'la in similarly to the mid-1990s rule change for celebrity games.
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