History Series / JEOPARDY

26th Jul '17 4:22:12 PM fruitstripegum
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* PersonAsVerb: In the ''Cheers'' episode "What Is... Cliff Clavin?", postman Cliff Clavin appears on the show and racks up an insurmountable lead, but loses after he gets Final Jeopardy! wrong and wagers everything. Making such a wager is often called "pulling a Clavin".



* PersonAsVerb: In the ''Cheers'' episode "What Is... Cliff Clavin?", postman Cliff Clavin appears on the show and racks up an insurmountable lead, but loses after he gets Final Jeopardy! wrong and wagers everything. Making such a wager is often called "pulling a Clavin".
26th Jul '17 4:19:51 PM fruitstripegum
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* EarnYourHappyEnding: On February 4, 1994, Tom Nichols was in his 5th game, but lost due to an incorrect Final Jeopardy answer. Several months later, it was determined that there was a "clue discrepancy" and he was correct after all, and he was invited back on October 10, 1994 to try again for his 5th victory. He got it, qualifying in time for the Tournament of Champions that took place the following month.


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* EarnYourHappyEnding: On February 4, 1994, Tom Nichols was in his 5th game, but lost due to an incorrect Final Jeopardy answer. Several months later, it was determined that there was a "clue discrepancy" and he was correct after all, and he was invited back on October 10, 1994 to try again for his 5th victory. He got it, qualifying in time for the Tournament of Champions that took place the following month.
16th Jul '17 11:17:20 AM mbclev
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** November 23, 1995: In game one of the Tournament of Champions finals, Los Angeles paralegal David Siegel forgot to phrase a correct Daily Double response worth $800 in the form of a question. This mistake would later prove costly, because Siegel lost to tournament champion Ryan Holznagel by $1301, less than the $1600 turnaround that would have occurred had Siegel not made that mistake.
7th Jul '17 8:59:29 PM jameygamer
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** Season 17 of ''Jeopardy!'' in 2000/2001 had a RunningGag in the form of a season-exclusive category called "''Jeopardy! Place''", where the clues were written in a soap opera style. Later "episodes" of the category had Johnny narrate the clues like a soap opera. The last episode with the category had it worded as "''Jeopardy! Place: The Final Episode''".
4th Jul '17 9:00:04 AM KoopaKid17
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** One Double Jeopardy! round had categories that all referred to the Celebrity Jeopardy! sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', including "Creator/SeanConnery", "Surprise Me, Trebek", "Therapists"[[labelnote:Alex's aside]]Not "The Rapists"[[/labelnote]], "The Number After 2", and "Rhymes With 'Dog'". Other categories from the sketch (including "Japan-U.S. Relations" and "Things You Shouldn't Put in Your Mouth" (a category about poisons)) have made appearances on the show as well.

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** One Double Jeopardy! round had categories that all referred to the Celebrity Jeopardy! sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', including "Creator/SeanConnery", "Surprise Me, Trebek", "Therapists"[[labelnote:Alex's aside]]Not "The Rapists"[[/labelnote]], "The Number After 2", and "Rhymes With 'Dog'". Another Double Jeopardy! round had "States That Begin with Californ", "Is This a Hat", "Catch These Men", "A Petite Dejeuner", "'S' Words" and "SNL Cracks Us Up" as its categories. Other categories from the sketch (including "Japan-U.S. Relations" and "Things You Shouldn't Put in Your Mouth" (a category about poisons)) have made appearances on the show as well.
3rd Jul '17 10:19:23 PM jameygamer
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** "In Other Words". This category takes a notable saying or title and the displayed clue is a reworded version of that saying/title, with the contestant needing to provide the original. One notable example from a fake Disney memo regarding ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective'': ''The Girl With The See-Through Shoes''. Correct response: [[spoiler:What is ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}''?]]
3rd Jul '17 12:44:51 PM Premonition45
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* HufflepuffHouse: Sometimes, one or two players CantCatchUp or otherwise have so much trouble keeping pace that they almost become irrelevant in the game. This was especially apparent in Ken Jennings' shows, particularly towards the end when he'd have upwards of 40+ total responses per show.
23rd Jun '17 9:31:15 AM KoopaKid17
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** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish champion Fredrik Gildea wagered all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Fredrik didn't find the other.
** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager at least $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.
** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in the fall of 2016, becoming a 3 day champion, and surviving an all-in Daily Double miss in this third game with a major comeback.
** Though overshadowed by his Final response ("What is someone in Normandy, but I just won $75,000!"), 2013 Teen Tournament champion Leonard Cooper employed this in the deciding second game of the finals, wagering ''$18,000'' of his then-$18,200 on the last Daily Double to take a huge (though, despite his Final response, not insurmountable) lead.
** 2016 3 day champion Philip Tiu relied on this during his reign, especially as he visibly struggled with the buzzer and was often slow to ring in and respond. Bold Daily Double wagers, including a non-inflated ''Jeopardy!'' record bet of ''$19,000'' in his second game, helped net Philip over $96,000 in just three days, but a wrong response on an all-in wager in his fourth game helped end his run.
** A death-or-glory attack may also appear in Final Jeopardy!, particularly if a contestant with a comfortable or runaway lead wagers an excessively large amount, which would net them a huge score if they're right, and cost them the win if they're wrong. 2015 5 day champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel (who often wagered all but $1 if he led going into Final without a lock) is a notable recent example, but other examples include 2012 Teen Tournament winner Elyse Mancuso and 2013 Kids Week standout Skyler Hornbeck, who each wagered almost everything in Final despite having first place locked up, and would have needlessly gave the victory away had they missed.
** Occasionally, a Celebrity Jeopardy! player in first place will bet it all in Final Jeopardy!, which would obviously net them more money for their charities, and put them at $0 if they're wrong, but you could justify the unsafe wager as they'll still get at least $10,000 for their charity. Andy Richter and Jon Stewart both gambled their whole $11,000+ winnings in 1999 (on consecutive days, no less) despite each having locks. The same didn't work out for author Tom Clancy, who only needed a $1,401 wager or an incorrect reply from Catherine Crier to win his Power Players Week game in 1997, and while she was wrong, he wagered everything, handing the game to Tim Russert (who had been in a distant third place.)


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** Happened in two of 4 day champion Barbara Walker's games in January 1996:
*** Barbara herself did this in her second game. She found the second Daily Double at the end of Double Jeopardy! and wagered $4,500 of her $4,900. She got it right, putting her in second place with only $1,200 separating her from the then-first place player.
*** Done by one of her opponents in her fourth. Nick Lamelza had $4,800 when he hit the second Daily Double at the end of Double Jeopardy!, with Barbara at $10,400 and the other player John Zappacosta at $9,100. He risked $4,000 but got it wrong, leaving him with only $800 for Final.
** Karl Coryat was victimized by one of his opponents doing this on his third game. Don Sloan found the second Daily Double on the second to last clue of Double Jeopardy! and got it right after wagering $4,800 of his $5,200. Karl lost his lock going into Final and eventually the game.
** During a semifinal in 2001's last International Tournament, Swedish champion Fredrik Gildea wagered all of his $9,500 on the last Daily Double, in what is the biggest ''true'' Daily Double in recorded ''Jeopardy!'' history when adjusted for inflation. However, he couldn't repeat the same magic in the finals, as eventual winner Robin Carroll landed ''five'' of the Daily Doubles in the two day affair, and Fredrik didn't find the other.
** 2011 7 day champion Joon Pahk made expert use of this during his run, becoming the only recorded ''Jeopardy!'' contestant to wager at least $14,000 on Daily Doubles ''twice''. Both of the wagers were in math categories, and Joon is a college physics teacher, hence his eagerness to go big when the opportunity arose.
** In arguably the costliest true Daily Double in ''Jeopardy!'' history, June 2012 contestant Terry Kent (who was in second place by $400) wagered ''all'' of his then-$13,600 in an attempt to take the lead in Double Jeopardy. However, he misunderstood the clue (which asked for a Mohs scale-listed element that ''ended'' in Z; he responded with "zirconia"), dropping him to $0 and knocking him out of Final. He made up for it though as a ''Sports Jeopardy!'' contestant in the fall of 2016, becoming a 3 day champion, and surviving an all-in Daily Double miss in this third game with a major comeback.
** Though overshadowed by his Final response ("What is someone in Normandy, but I just won $75,000!"), 2013 Teen Tournament champion Leonard Cooper employed this in the deciding second game of the finals, wagering ''$18,000'' of his then-$18,200 on the last Daily Double to take a huge (though, despite his Final response, not insurmountable) lead.
** 2016 3 day champion Philip Tiu relied on this during his reign, especially as he visibly struggled with the buzzer and was often slow to ring in and respond. Bold Daily Double wagers, including a non-inflated ''Jeopardy!'' record bet of ''$19,000'' in his second game, helped net Philip over $96,000 in just three days, but a wrong response on an all-in wager in his fourth game helped end his run.
** A death-or-glory attack may also appear in Final Jeopardy!, particularly if a contestant with a comfortable or runaway lead wagers an excessively large amount, which would net them a huge score if they're right, and cost them the win if they're wrong. 2015 5 day champion and TOC semifinalist Dan Feitel (who often wagered all but $1 if he led going into Final without a lock) is a notable recent example, but other examples include 2012 Teen Tournament winner Elyse Mancuso and 2013 Kids Week standout Skyler Hornbeck, who each wagered almost everything in Final despite having first place locked up, and would have needlessly gave the victory away had they missed.
** Occasionally, a Celebrity Jeopardy! player in first place will bet it all in Final Jeopardy!, which would obviously net them more money for their charities, and put them at $0 if they're wrong, but you could justify the unsafe wager as they'll still get at least $10,000 for their charity. Andy Richter and Jon Stewart both gambled their whole $11,000+ winnings in 1999 (on consecutive days, no less) despite each having locks. The same didn't work out for author Tom Clancy, who only needed a $1,401 wager or an incorrect reply from Catherine Crier to win his Power Players Week game in 1997, and while she was wrong, he wagered everything, handing the game to Tim Russert (who had been in a distant third place.)
16th Jun '17 4:37:17 PM jormis29
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** Super Jeopardy!: Not to be confused with the 1990 tournament, this was used for the 1978-79 version. It was basically J! Bingo; five categories, must make a line across/up and down/diagonally before getting three wrong. $100/pop, a win earns a ProgressiveJackpot.[[note]]Similar bonus games would later be used on ''Series/CatchPhrase'' and on ''Trump Card'', an adaptation of the UK game show ''[[Creator/BobMonkhouse Bob's Full House]]'' (a revival of that format in the UK, ''Lucky Numbers'', would reuse that bonus round)[[/note]]

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** Super Jeopardy!: Not to be confused with the 1990 tournament, this was used for the 1978-79 version. It was basically J! Bingo; five categories, must make a line across/up and down/diagonally before getting three wrong. $100/pop, a win earns a ProgressiveJackpot.[[note]]Similar bonus games would later be used on ''Series/CatchPhrase'' and on ''Trump Card'', ''Series/TrumpCard'', an adaptation of the UK game show ''[[Creator/BobMonkhouse Bob's Full House]]'' ''Series/BobsFullHouse'' (a revival of that format in the UK, ''Lucky Numbers'', would reuse that bonus round)[[/note]]
13th Jun '17 7:13:09 PM jameygamer
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** "Rhyme Time", a category where the correct response has two words that rhyme. Wheel adopted this category eventually.

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** "Rhyme Time", a category where the correct response has two words that rhyme. Wheel ''Wheel'' adopted this category eventually.
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