History Series / ILoveLucy

1st Jun '17 9:49:18 AM Mikeyfan93
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Since 2013, CBS is apparently undertaking an effort to have all of the most iconic episodes colorized for contemporary audiences. However, the black and white versions remain widely available on home video, and in other channels' reruns.

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Since 2013, CBS is apparently undertaking an effort has begun to have all air some of the most iconic episodes colorized for contemporary audiences.in color, usually around the holidays. However, the black and white versions remain widely available on home video, and in other channels' reruns.



* AnimatedCreditsOpening: In the original US run, where these openings integrated the sponsor's product with stick figures of Lucy and Ricky.
* ApologyGift: Fred tries to play peacemaker between a quarrelling Lucy and Ricky, by having a bouquet of roses and a box of candy delivered to Lucy on Ricky's behalf.

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* AnimatedCreditsOpening: In the original US run, where these openings integrated the sponsor's product with stick figures of Lucy and Ricky.
Ricky. It wasn't until syndication that the famous "heart on satin" opening was used.
* ApologyGift: Fred tries to play peacemaker between a quarrelling quarreling Lucy and Ricky, by having a bouquet of roses and a box of candy delivered to Lucy on Ricky's behalf.
8th May '17 5:21:29 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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After the regular series ended in 1957, the cast carried on with ''[[Series/LucyDesiComedyHour The Lucy Desi Comedy Hour]]'' specials -- essentially double-length "I Love Lucy" episodes with greater emphasis on famous guest stars and exotic locations. These are often considered to be inferior to the original series, and the later episodes particularly suffered from the rapid deterioration of Lucy and Desi's marriage they divorced shortly after the final ''Comedy Hour'' episode wrapped. Over the following decades, Lucy was able to carry on the premise (if not the exact same character) on her own with ''The Lucy Show'', ''Here's Lucy'', and ''Life with Lucy''.

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After the regular series ended in 1957, the cast carried on with ''[[Series/LucyDesiComedyHour The Lucy Desi Comedy Hour]]'' specials -- essentially double-length "I Love Lucy" episodes with greater emphasis on famous guest stars and exotic locations. These are often considered to be inferior to the original series, and the later episodes particularly suffered from the rapid deterioration of Lucy and Desi's marriage they divorced shortly after the final ''Comedy Hour'' episode wrapped. Over the following decades, Lucy was able to carry on the premise (if not the exact same character) on her own with ''The Lucy Show'', ''Series/TheLucyShow'', ''Here's Lucy'', and ''Life with Lucy''.



* SpiritualSuccessor: ''The Lucy Show'', ''Here's Lucy'', ''Life with Lucy''

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* SpiritualSuccessor: ''The Lucy Show'', ''Series/TheLucyShow'', ''Here's Lucy'', ''Life with Lucy''
7th May '17 1:20:33 PM fruitstripegum
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "Lucy...you got some splanin' to do!" was created by parodies long after the end of the show, although Ricky does say "Lucy! Splain!" In the episode "Charm School".
19th Mar '17 7:43:14 PM Gibblejip
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Added DiffLines:

Has a [[Characters/ILoveLucy character page]] that NeedsWikiMagicLove.
21st Feb '17 4:33:18 PM TudorRose
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* AndThenWhat: In "The Adagio", Lucy hires an Apache dance instructor from Paris named Jean Valjean Ramon. The moment he arrives, he starts to come on to her ''very'' strongly and professes his love for her, much to her dismay. In the end, Ricky catches him climbing into the bedroom window to elope with the unwilling Lucy. Jean Valjean and Ricky are to have a duel, but the former backs out and explains to Ricky that he only acted the way he did because he was told that Frenchmen are expected to act romantic. He is really married with five children. So if Lucy had responded positively to his advances and really did want to elope with him, what would he have done?

to:

* AndThenWhat: In "The Adagio", Lucy hires an Apache dance instructor from Paris named Jean Valjean Ramon. The moment he arrives, he starts to come on to her ''very'' strongly and professes his love for her, much to her dismay. In the end, Ricky catches him climbing into the bedroom window to elope with the unwilling Lucy. Jean Valjean and Ricky are to have a duel, but the former backs out and explains to Ricky that he only acted the way he did because he was told that Frenchmen are expected to act romantic.be romantic by American women. He is really married with five children. So if Lucy had responded positively to his advances and really did want to elope with him, what would he have done?
21st Feb '17 4:32:00 PM TudorRose
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* AndThenWhat: In "The Adagio", Lucy hires an Apache dance instructor from Paris named Jean Valjean Ramon. The moment he arrives, he starts to come onto her ''very'' strongly and professes his love for her, much to her dismay. In the end, Ricky catches him climbing into the bedroom window to elope with the unwilling Lucy. They are to have a duel, but Jean Valjean backs out and explains to Ricky that he only acted the way he did because he was told that Frenchmen are expected to act romantic. He is really married with five children. So if Lucy had responded positively to his advances and really did want to elope with him, what would he have done?

to:

* AndThenWhat: In "The Adagio", Lucy hires an Apache dance instructor from Paris named Jean Valjean Ramon. The moment he arrives, he starts to come onto on to her ''very'' strongly and professes his love for her, much to her dismay. In the end, Ricky catches him climbing into the bedroom window to elope with the unwilling Lucy. They Jean Valjean and Ricky are to have a duel, but Jean Valjean the former backs out and explains to Ricky that he only acted the way he did because he was told that Frenchmen are expected to act romantic. He is really married with five children. So if Lucy had responded positively to his advances and really did want to elope with him, what would he have done?
21st Feb '17 4:30:30 PM TudorRose
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Added DiffLines:

* AndThenWhat: In "The Adagio", Lucy hires an Apache dance instructor from Paris named Jean Valjean Ramon. The moment he arrives, he starts to come onto her ''very'' strongly and professes his love for her, much to her dismay. In the end, Ricky catches him climbing into the bedroom window to elope with the unwilling Lucy. They are to have a duel, but Jean Valjean backs out and explains to Ricky that he only acted the way he did because he was told that Frenchmen are expected to act romantic. He is really married with five children. So if Lucy had responded positively to his advances and really did want to elope with him, what would he have done?
22nd Jan '17 1:33:42 PM Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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* BedsheetLadder: In "Fred and Ethel Fight", Lucy uses one to escape from a fake fire that Ricky and Fred set up. Unfortunately, she fails to tie it to anything and falls out the window.
21st Jan '17 5:10:54 PM TudorRose
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The show was filmed, which was a big deal in 1951. At the time, most TV shows were archived via [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinescope kinescope]], which is simply a movie camera taking footage of a TV displaying the show's live broadcast. Obviously, this produces really crummy-looking video; that's why most shows from [[TheFifties the early 50's]] have either been lost or are of very little interest for reuse (videotape didn't become available until 1956). ''I Love Lucy'', by contrast, was able to use not being broadcast live to its full advantage Desi Arnaz invented the live studio ThreeCameras technique, which is still standard in sitcoms to this day. This show also invented the {{Rerun}}: when Lucille Ball became pregnant and needed a reduction in her workload, Desi came up with the idea of showing a previously-aired-but-much-loved episode instead of something new which was only possible because Desilu had taken the trouble to film the original broadcast in the first place. "Reruns?" CBS scoffed, "ItWillNeverCatchOn." Well, the laugh's on them; ''I Love Lucy'' has been on the air literally non-stop since it was first produced television historians have determined that since its original airing, the show has ''always'' been in syndication ''somewhere'' in the world (not coincidentally, because CBS in their shortsightedness signed all rebroadcast rights over to Desi, this has made Ball's and Arnaz's estates filthy stinking rich).

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The show was filmed, which was a big deal in 1951. At the time, most TV shows were archived via [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinescope kinescope]], which is simply a movie camera taking footage of a TV displaying the show's live broadcast. Obviously, this produces really crummy-looking video; that's why most shows from [[TheFifties the early 50's]] have either been lost or are of very little interest for reuse (videotape didn't become available until 1956). ''I Love Lucy'', by contrast, was able to use not being broadcast live to its full advantage Desi Arnaz invented the live studio ThreeCameras technique, which is still standard in sitcoms to this day. This show also invented the {{Rerun}}: when Lucille Ball became pregnant and needed a reduction in her workload, Desi came up with the idea of showing a previously-aired-but-much-loved episode instead of something new which was only possible because Desilu had taken the trouble to film the original broadcast in the first place. "Reruns?" CBS scoffed, "ItWillNeverCatchOn." Well, the laugh's on them; ''I Love Lucy'' has been on the air literally non-stop since it was first produced television historians have determined that since its original airing, the show has ''always'' been in syndication ''somewhere'' in the world (not coincidentally, because CBS in their shortsightedness signed all rebroadcast rights over to Desi, this has made Ball's and Arnaz's estates filthy stinking rich).



* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In "Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment", the Ricardos and Mertzes are in the middle of [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin doing just that]]. They've just finished painting, and have moved on to reupholstering the furniture. Fred says he can't stand the smell of paint, and Ethel suggests he bring a fan in... while she is helping Lucy remove feathers from a chair. Naturally, when the fan is turned on, feathers fly all over the place. Then on top of it all, the Mertzes have the nerve to [[NeverMyFault blame Lucy]] for their mistake, one that should have been obvious to them!

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* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In "Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment", the Ricardos and Mertzes are in the middle of [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin doing just that]]. They've just finished painting, and have moved on to reupholstering the furniture. Fred says he can't stand the smell of paint, and Ethel suggests he bring a fan in... while she is helping Lucy remove feathers the feather stuffing from a chair. Naturally, when the fan is turned on, feathers fly all over the place. Then on top of it all, the Mertzes have the nerve to [[NeverMyFault blame Lucy]] for their mistake, one that should have been obvious to them!
21st Jan '17 5:09:10 PM TudorRose
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* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In "Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment", the Ricardos and Mertzes are in the middle of [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin doing just that]]. They've just finished painting, and have moved on to reupholstering the furniture. Fred says he can't stand the smell of paint, and Ethel suggests he bring a fan in... while she is helping Lucy remove feathers from a chair. Naturally, when the fan is turned on, feathers fly all over the place. Then on top of it all, the Mertzes have the nerve to blame Lucy for their mistake, one that should have been obvious to them!

to:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In "Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment", the Ricardos and Mertzes are in the middle of [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin doing just that]]. They've just finished painting, and have moved on to reupholstering the furniture. Fred says he can't stand the smell of paint, and Ethel suggests he bring a fan in... while she is helping Lucy remove feathers from a chair. Naturally, when the fan is turned on, feathers fly all over the place. Then on top of it all, the Mertzes have the nerve to [[NeverMyFault blame Lucy Lucy]] for their mistake, one that should have been obvious to them!
This list shows the last 10 events of 285. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.ILoveLucy