History Series / Columbo

2nd Feb '16 11:58:55 AM WillBGood
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** Hassan Salah, the killer from "A Case Of Immunity", has bashed a man's skull in, clubbed another and ran his car off the road, stolen $600,000, tried to frame protestors for a terrorist attack and may have been involved in a plot to overthrow his king. His response when realizing he's about to be extradited to his come country for execution?
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** Hassan Salah, the killer from "A Case Of Immunity", has bashed a man's skull in, clubbed another and ran his car off the road, stolen $600,000, tried to frame protestors for a terrorist attack and may have been involved in a plot to overthrow his king. His response when realizing he's about to be extradited to his come home country for execution?
21st Jan '16 1:58:23 AM StFan
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* AssholeVictim: A trademark. Subverted with a notable few, though.

* AssholeVictim: WhoMurderedTheAsshole: A trademark. Subverted with a notable few, though.

* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: It's hard to feel total hatred for Rudy Strasse, the villain of "No Time To Die". When he was a child [[spoiler:his father, a famous surgeon, was an abusive monster at home. One night he took the abuse too far and sliced Rudy's mother's neck open, killing her while Rudy watched. Realizing what he's done, the man kills himself in grief, again while Rudy watches.]] Yes, Rudy may be insane, yes he may have kidnapped a woman, yes he may even be planning to rape and kill her and himself... but he's got some serious and perfectly valid reasons to be as messed up as he is. * WorthyOpponent: "The Bye-Bye Sky-High IQ Murder Case" is set at a UsefulNotes/{{Mensa}}-style club, with the killer, Oliver Brandt, being an InsufferableGenius who considers the victim, Bertie Hastings, and the other members of the club, to be inferior to his own intellect. When dealing with Columbo, he occasionally gets glimpses through Columbo's façade, and by the time of his arrest, is relieved to have been caught by someone now considered a peer, intellectually -- since Columbo solved the intellectual puzzle Brandt suggested to him with a very logical solution.
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* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: It's hard to feel total hatred for Rudy Strasse, the villain of "No Time To to Die". When he was a child [[spoiler:his father, a famous surgeon, was an abusive monster at home. One night he took the abuse too far and sliced Rudy's mother's neck open, killing her while Rudy watched. Realizing what he's done, the man kills himself in grief, again while Rudy watches.]] Yes, Rudy may be insane, yes he may have kidnapped a woman, yes he may even be planning to rape and kill her and himself... but he's got some serious and perfectly valid reasons to be as messed up as he is. * WorthyOpponent: WorthyOpponent: ** "The Bye-Bye Sky-High IQ Murder Case" is set at a UsefulNotes/{{Mensa}}-style club, with the killer, Oliver Brandt, being an InsufferableGenius who considers the victim, Bertie Hastings, and the other members of the club, to be inferior to his own intellect. When dealing with Columbo, he occasionally gets glimpses through Columbo's façade, and by the time of his arrest, is relieved to have been caught by someone now considered a peer, intellectually -- since Columbo solved the intellectual puzzle Brandt suggested to him with a very logical solution.

** In the original 70's {{Mad}} parody "Clodumbo", the BigBad is drawn to resemble frequent Columbo villian Robert Culp.
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** In the original 70's '70s {{Mad}} parody "Clodumbo", the BigBad is drawn to resemble frequent Columbo villian villain Robert Culp.
17th Jan '16 1:42:45 PM AdamC
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* GracefulLoser: Usually. Columbo has the good sense to plan ahead for when this doesn't seem likely. In "Etude in Black", after his wife contradicts the murderer's alibi, the killer takes a quick moment to apologize to his wife before confessing to Columbo so he isn't too humiliated by being caught.
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* GracefulLoser: Usually. Columbo has the good sense to plan ahead for when this doesn't seem likely. In "Etude in Black", after his wife contradicts the murderer's alibi, the killer takes a quick moment to apologize to his wife before confessing to Columbo so he isn't too humiliated by being caught. A rare aversion was in "Lady In Waiting" when the killer attempted to shoot him after being found out... Only for him to casually inform her there was a police car waiting outside and such a thing would do her more harm than good.
17th Jan '16 1:38:20 PM AdamC
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* WhiteDwarfStarlet: The killer of "Forgotten Lady" is an aged Hollywood actress who eventually kills her wealthy husband because he refuses to bankroll a movie that would mean her comeback. [[spoiler: It's eventually revealed at the end that the reason he wouldn't bankroll her is because she's terminally ill and suffering from symptoms similar to dementia. By the end of the episode, Columbo points out it's unlikely she even remembers committing the murder.]]
24th Nov '15 2:24:11 PM AdamC
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* NiceToTheWaiter: Many killers and AssholeVictims establish themselves as such by being cruel to people below them. Columbo uses this to often troll people; since he usually doesn't immediately introduce himself as a police officer (or in any way look like one), he'll allow people to assume he's much less important than he really is... Then flash his badge after they've made idiots of themselves.
24th Nov '15 2:16:08 PM AdamC
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* EurekaMoment: Sometimes. Due to the formatting of the show, Columbo's investigations usually aren't shown, thus we're spared seeing exactly where, when, and how he puts the pieces together. Occasionally Columbo will realize things on-camera, but most of his Eureka Moments take place offscreen. Often, even if the audience doesn't see them personally, Columbo will explain how he had his Eureka Moment to the killer though, usually arising from a discussion with his perpetually-offscreen wife.
22nd Nov '15 2:19:19 PM butterflygrrl
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his health wasn't actually that bad, the problem wasn't so serious
** In "Forgotten Lady", the victim was an old man in very poor health -- but then it is discovered that not only did he borrow several humorous books from a library, he also carefully marked his place in the one he'd been reading before he died.
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** In "Forgotten Lady", the victim was an old man in very poor with health problems -- but then it is discovered that not only did he borrow several humorous books from a library, he also carefully marked his place in the one he'd been reading before he died.
20th Nov '15 2:35:34 PM creepingdeath
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** Abigail Mitchell invokes this when he catches her. She states that if Columbo had been on the case when her niece had been murdered, she wouldn't have needed to kill her nephew-in-law, who killed her niece.
20th Nov '15 1:35:56 PM creepingdeath
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* AbsoluteCleavage: The photographer in ''Identity Crisis'' has a top that is split to her stomach. Naturally, they have her [[{{Fanservice}} bend over a few times]].
3rd Nov '15 3:00:19 PM dmcreif
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* HollywoodLaw: Columbo basically disguises his surveillance of a suspect by pretending to simply question the person as a witness— nonstop throughout the episode. In this manner he thus badgers, harasses and tricks the suspect into revealing evidence that eventually convicts them. This is also breaching many various civil and ethical protections against police abuse and harassment; however, even when suspects complain about Columbo's nonstop harassment in order to end it, this proves no avail, as Columbo will simply claim that it "proves" that the person is guilty, and that "he's touching a nerve." This makes Columbo into more of a VigilanteMan than an officer of the law, since he is always right, and never incorrectly harasses an innocent person. In reality, the law is not made to presume that the police are always right, but to protect the citizen's presumption of innocence. For evidence of why this is necessary, you need to just look at people wrongly convicted of murder, often due at least in part to overzealous police and prosecutors who are completely sure of their guilt. **Not only that, but Columbo has a bad habit of tampering with forensic evidence. The way he handles evidence, there's no chain of custody and most of what he might try to admit wouldn't be permissible in a real court because he would just walk around, pick something up, put it in his pocket, and keep it there until he was ready to share it with the murderer. **In "Agenda For Murder," Columbo visits attorney Oscar Finch in his office. While waiting in the office for Finch to come in, Columbo takes a piece of gum out of the wastebasket. Later he shows it to Finch, as well as the piece of bitten cheese from the crime scene.[[note]]Finch has a very uniquely shaped canine. The impression shows up on both[[/note]] Problem: the wastebasket is in the office, and does not come under the 'garbage is public property' ruling; the trash would have to be out at the curb, in a dumpster, etc. Also, any real forensic detective would have fits at Columbo hauling around a vital piece of evidence like that cheese like that, in a plastic bag, without even an evidence label. Evidence seized without a warrant + broken custody chain of evidence = darn near impossible to use in court.
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