History Series / Columbo

9th Feb '17 6:44:24 PM whateveryousay21
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* PersonaNonGrata: Columbo himself is labeled as such from the Suarian legation in "A Case Of Immunity" due to his murder investigation, which nearly cost him his job thanks to a tense political situation.
26th Jan '17 5:46:42 AM yisfidri
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* AccidentalMurder: The killer in "Death Lends a Hand" punched his victim in the face in a rage, not intending to kill her, but the punch caused her to fall over and die from head trauma.
14th Jan '17 7:21:23 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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''Columbo'' is a long-running MysteryOfTheWeek series starring [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar Nominee]] Creator/PeterFalk as Lieutenant Columbo, a blue-collar beat-down L.A. homicide detective whose [[ObfuscatingStupidity clownish antics and cheap cigars hide an exceptionally sharp wit.]] The series is composed of 69 TV-movies, beginning with every third episode of the '70s ''Series/TheNBCMysteryMovie'' and running through a '90s solo revival.

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''Columbo'' is a long-running [[LongRunners long-running]] MysteryOfTheWeek series starring [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar Nominee]] Creator/PeterFalk as Lieutenant Columbo, a blue-collar beat-down L.A. homicide detective whose [[ObfuscatingStupidity clownish antics and cheap cigars hide an exceptionally sharp wit.]] The series is composed of 69 TV-movies, beginning with every third episode of the '70s ''Series/TheNBCMysteryMovie'' and running through a '90s solo revival.
5th Jan '17 7:13:20 PM whateveryousay21
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** Sir Harry Matthews, the wealthy British businessman from "Columbo Cries Wolf", to real-life British media mogul Rupert Murdoch.

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** From "Columbo Cries Wolf"- Sir Harry Matthews, the wealthy British businessman from "Columbo Cries Wolf", businessman, to real-life British media mogul Rupert Murdoch.Murdoch; Sean Brantley, the owner of an adult magazine publication, seems to mix a younger Hugh Hefner with some of Larry Flynt's scummier qualities.
1st Jan '17 5:51:09 PM Xtifr
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* ComplexityAddiction: In "How to Dial a Murder", behavioral psychologist Dr. Mason murders his colleague Charlie for fooling around with his wife (whom he is implied to also have murdered) by training his dogs to come to run to a specific phone in the house and maul to death anyone who says the word "[[CitizenKane Rosebud]]", which Mason arranges by inviting Charlie round to his house on the day he is getting a physical with his doctor, unplugging the other phone in the house (so Charlie doesn't accidentally pick that one up) and phoning Charlie from his bed (while hooked up to heart monitors) and tricking him into saying "rosebud". Aside from the fact that he fails to properly cover his tracks after the fact (eg. he doesn't re-hook the first phone, he leaves evidence in his house and at the studio lot where he trained the dogs, and since his heart rate was being recorded at the time it was noted as shooting up at the ''exact time'' the murders took place), and that he is caught out lying to Colombo, the fact that the dogs were otherwise friendly and that Charlie left the phone dangling after being attacked (meaning whoever he was talking to must have heard what was happening and never reported it) makes it highly likely that the dogs were trained to kill- and if that was true, then Mason was the obvious and only suspect, because only he had the means, knowledge and opportunity to pull it off, and a simpler scheme would have been much more successful. Colombo even gives him a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech for making so many stupid mistakes and says he was ''disappointed'' that he made it so easy.

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* ComplexityAddiction: In "How to Dial a Murder", behavioral psychologist Dr. Mason murders his colleague Charlie for fooling around with his wife (whom he is implied to also have murdered) by training his dogs to come to run to a specific phone in the house and maul to death anyone who says the word "[[CitizenKane "[[Film/CitizenKane Rosebud]]", which Mason arranges by inviting Charlie round to his house on the day he is getting a physical with his doctor, unplugging the other phone in the house (so Charlie doesn't accidentally pick that one up) and phoning Charlie from his bed (while hooked up to heart monitors) and tricking him into saying "rosebud". Aside from the fact that he fails to properly cover his tracks after the fact (eg. he doesn't re-hook the first phone, he leaves evidence in his house and at the studio lot where he trained the dogs, and since his heart rate was being recorded at the time it was noted as shooting up at the ''exact time'' the murders took place), and that he is caught out lying to Colombo, the fact that the dogs were otherwise friendly and that Charlie left the phone dangling after being attacked (meaning whoever he was talking to must have heard what was happening and never reported it) makes it highly likely that the dogs were trained to kill- and if that was true, then Mason was the obvious and only suspect, because only he had the means, knowledge and opportunity to pull it off, and a simpler scheme would have been much more successful. Colombo even gives him a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech for making so many stupid mistakes and says he was ''disappointed'' that he made it so easy.
9th Dec '16 5:34:23 AM StFan
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->'''Leslie Williams''': You know, Columbo, you're almost likable in a shabby sort of way. Maybe it's the way you come slouching in here with your shopworn bag of tricks.\\
'''Lt. Columbo''': Me? Tricks?\\
'''Leslie Williams''': The humility, the seeming absent-mindedness, the homey anecdotes about the family, the wife, you know?\\
'''Lt. Columbo''': Really?\\
'''Leslie Williams''': Yeah, Lieutenant Columbo, fumbling and stumbling along. But it's always the jugular that he's after. And I imagine that, more often than not, he's successful.

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->'''Leslie Williams''': Williams:''' You know, Columbo, you're almost likable in a shabby sort of way. Maybe it's the way you come slouching in here with your shopworn bag of tricks.\\
'''Lt. Columbo''': Columbo:''' Me? Tricks?\\
'''Leslie Williams''': Williams:''' The humility, the seeming absent-mindedness, the homey anecdotes about the family, the wife, you know?\\
'''Lt. Columbo''': Columbo:''' Really?\\
'''Leslie Williams''': Williams:''' Yeah, Lieutenant Columbo, fumbling and stumbling along. But it's always the jugular that he's after. And I imagine that, more often than not, he's successful.



!!''Columbo'' provides examples of the following tropes:

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!!''Columbo'' provides examples of the following tropes:of:



** His wife's car finally makes an appearance in "Columbo Goes To College" when he sets it up for bait for the killers to plant evidence.

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** His wife's car finally makes an appearance in "Columbo Goes To to College" when he sets it up for bait for the killers to plant evidence.



** Fake fireplaces with a heater, fan and cheap orange plastic ribbons, as mentioned in "Dead Weight"- yeah, those actually existed. They've long been replaced by far more sophisticated heating units that better mimic the appearance of a fireplace.

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** Fake fireplaces with a heater, fan and cheap orange plastic ribbons, as mentioned in "Dead Weight"- Weight" -- yeah, those actually existed. They've long been replaced by far more sophisticated heating units that better mimic the appearance of a fireplace.



** "Columbo Goes To College" has Columbo demonstrating the murder using a pistol loaded with live ammo in the college parking garage. Is he nuts?

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** "Columbo Goes To to College" has Columbo demonstrating the murder using a pistol loaded with live ammo in the college parking garage. Is he nuts?



* AsianSpeekeeEngrish: The series as a whole generally avoided negative racial stereotypes, but this one did happen with Pat Morita's brief appearance as a butler in "Etude In Black". He seems to almost ham up the idea of being poor at English in a span of about a minute.

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* AsianSpeekeeEngrish: The series as a whole generally avoided negative racial stereotypes, but this one did happen with Pat Morita's brief appearance as a butler in "Etude In "Étude in Black". He seems to almost ham up the idea of being poor at English in a span of about a minute.



** Worse than that, in "A Matter Of Honor" his plan to reveal Luis Montoya as a coward involved trapping him in a ring with a very angry bull, risking either Montoya, a ranch hand or a bystander getting killed if the bull ran wild.
** "Blueprint For Murder" sees Columbo dig up a large chunk of a construction site, at the urging of the killer, knowing he's not likely to find anything and at massive expense on the part of the city. Elliot Markham's goal was to make Columbo dig up the site, find nothing, and then bury the body there after the fact, so this was his own gambit. [[spoiler:But Columbo figured this was the case and had actually gone along, knowing that Elliot would show up to dump the body and was waiting for him with several officers.]]

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** Worse than that, in "A Matter Of of Honor" his plan to reveal Luis Montoya as a coward involved trapping him in a ring with a very angry bull, risking either Montoya, a ranch hand or a bystander getting killed if the bull ran wild.
** "Blueprint For for Murder" sees Columbo dig up a large chunk of a construction site, at the urging of the killer, knowing he's not likely to find anything and at massive expense on the part of the city. Elliot Markham's goal was to make Columbo dig up the site, find nothing, and then bury the body there after the fact, so this was his own gambit. [[spoiler:But Columbo figured this was the case and had actually gone along, knowing that Elliot would show up to dump the body and was waiting for him with several officers.]]



** In "Negative Reaction" Columbo deliberately makes a mistake involving a camera that was used in the murder, prompting the murderer to angrily grab the camera to show Columbo what he had done wrong. Unfortunately ,the camera is on the shelf in the police evidence room along with several other cameras, so the murderer incriminates himself by identifying the correct camera.
** In "A Friend In Deed", Columbo suspects his boss, a deputy commissioner, of murdering the boss's wife and trying to blame it on a burglar who has been robbing houses in his neighborhood. Columbo gives his boss the file of a man he suspects in the burglaries, knowing his boss will attempt to plant evidence in the burglar's apartment to frame the burglar. When the police search the apartment and find the planted evidence, Columbo reveals that he had changed the address in the file to an apartment that Columbo had just rented himself so the evidence must be planted.

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** In "Negative Reaction" Columbo deliberately makes a mistake involving a camera that was used in the murder, prompting the murderer to angrily grab the camera to show Columbo what he had done wrong. Unfortunately ,the Unfortunately, the camera is on the shelf in the police evidence room along with several other cameras, so the murderer incriminates himself by identifying the correct camera.
** In "A Friend In in Deed", Columbo suspects his boss, a deputy commissioner, of murdering the boss's wife and trying to blame it on a burglar who has been robbing houses in his neighborhood. Columbo gives his boss the file of a man he suspects in the burglaries, knowing his boss will attempt to plant evidence in the burglar's apartment to frame the burglar. When the police search the apartment and find the planted evidence, Columbo reveals that he had changed the address in the file to an apartment that Columbo had just rented himself so the evidence must be planted.



* BilingualBonus: None of the Spanish dialog in "A Matter Of Honor" is subtitled even though some of it does seem to be relevant plot dialog.

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* BilingualBonus: None of the Spanish dialog in "A Matter Of of Honor" is subtitled even though some of it does seem to be relevant plot dialog.



* BullyingADragon: Trying to shake down or blackmail someone that you know for a fact is a cold-blooded murderer seems to be one of the leading causes of death in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. This happens in, among other episodes, "Dagger of the Mind", "Short Fuse", and "Lovely But Lethal". "Columbo and the Murder of a Rock Star" subverts this with Trish Fairbanks, the associate Hugh Creighton uses to supply his alibi while he's out to murder Marcy Edwards. She's smart enough to form a contingency plan in case of her sudden death, and tells Creighton as much, so that he'll not be able to back out of her blackmailing him. She survives the episode.

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* BullyingADragon: Trying to shake down or blackmail someone that you know for a fact is a cold-blooded murderer seems to be one of the leading causes of death in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. This happens in, among other episodes, "Dagger of the Mind", "Short Fuse", and "Lovely But but Lethal". "Columbo and the Murder of a Rock Star" subverts this with Trish Fairbanks, the associate Hugh Creighton uses to supply his alibi while he's out to murder Marcy Edwards. She's smart enough to form a contingency plan in case of her sudden death, and tells Creighton as much, so that he'll not be able to back out of her blackmailing him. She survives the episode.



* ComplexityAddiction: In "How To Dial A Murder", behavioural psychologist Dr Mason murders his colleague Charlie for fooling around with his wife (whom he is implied to also have murdered) by training his dogs to come to run to a specific phone in the house and maul to death anyone who says the word "[[CitizenKane Rosebud]]", which Mason arranges by inviting Charlie round to his house on the day he is getting a physical with his doctor, unplugging the other phone in the house (so Charlie doesn't accidentally pick that one up) and phoning Charlie from his bed (while hooked up to heart monitors) and tricking him into saying "rosebud". Aside from the fact that he fails to properly cover his tracks after the fact (eg. he doesn't re-hook the first phone, he leaves evidence in his house and at the studio lot where he trained the dogs, and since his heart rate was being recorded at the time it was noted as shooting up at the ''exact time'' the murders took place), and that he is caught out lying to Colombo, the fact that the dogs were otherwise friendly and that Charlie left the phone dangling after being attacked (meaning whoever he was talking to must have heard what was happening and never reported it) makes it highly likely that the dogs were trained to kill- and if that was true, then Mason was the obvious and only suspect, because only he had the means, knowledge and opportunity to pull it off, and a simpler scheme would have been much more successful. Colombo even gives him a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech for making so many stupid mistakes and says he was ''disappointed'' that he made it so easy.

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* ComplexityAddiction: In "How To to Dial A a Murder", behavioural behavioral psychologist Dr Dr. Mason murders his colleague Charlie for fooling around with his wife (whom he is implied to also have murdered) by training his dogs to come to run to a specific phone in the house and maul to death anyone who says the word "[[CitizenKane Rosebud]]", which Mason arranges by inviting Charlie round to his house on the day he is getting a physical with his doctor, unplugging the other phone in the house (so Charlie doesn't accidentally pick that one up) and phoning Charlie from his bed (while hooked up to heart monitors) and tricking him into saying "rosebud". Aside from the fact that he fails to properly cover his tracks after the fact (eg. he doesn't re-hook the first phone, he leaves evidence in his house and at the studio lot where he trained the dogs, and since his heart rate was being recorded at the time it was noted as shooting up at the ''exact time'' the murders took place), and that he is caught out lying to Colombo, the fact that the dogs were otherwise friendly and that Charlie left the phone dangling after being attacked (meaning whoever he was talking to must have heard what was happening and never reported it) makes it highly likely that the dogs were trained to kill- and if that was true, then Mason was the obvious and only suspect, because only he had the means, knowledge and opportunity to pull it off, and a simpler scheme would have been much more successful. Colombo even gives him a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech for making so many stupid mistakes and says he was ''disappointed'' that he made it so easy.



** Lenore Kennicut in "Death Lends A Hand" dies from head trauma at the beginning, after being punched in rage by Brimmer. Brimmer panics because he doesn't want to be a killer; he dumps her lifeless body at an industrial lot to disguise the death as a robbery.
** Alex Benedict in "Etude in Black" hopes that it appears his victim fell out of a bar stool and hit her head on a kitchen range, but the real murder happened from blunt-force trauma to her head from behind.

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** Lenore Kennicut in "Death Lends A a Hand" dies from head trauma at the beginning, after being punched in rage by Brimmer. Brimmer panics because he doesn't want to be a killer; he dumps her lifeless body at an industrial lot to disguise the death as a robbery.
** Alex Benedict in "Etude "Étude in Black" hopes that it appears his victim fell out of a bar stool and hit her head on a kitchen range, but the real murder happened from blunt-force trauma to her head from behind.



** "Death Lends A Hand" features a still shot of Robert Culp's face with his cleanup of the crime scene reflected in his glasses.
** "Etude in Black" features a zoom-in view of the flower on the floor in the killer's sunglasses.

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** "Death Lends A a Hand" features a still shot of Robert Culp's face with his cleanup of the crime scene reflected in his glasses.
** "Etude "Étude in Black" features a zoom-in view of the flower on the floor in the killer's sunglasses.



* FreshClue: {{Invoked}} in both "Suitable for Framing" and "It's All In The Game", where the culprit puts an electric blanket over the body in an alibi trick, so that the body would still be warm when the police arrived.
* FreudianExcuse: Rudy Strasse of "No Time To Die" had this in a bad way- noteworthy as he was the only killer of all 69 episodes to have this.

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* FreshClue: {{Invoked}} in both "Suitable for Framing" and "It's All In The in the Game", where the culprit puts an electric blanket over the body in an alibi trick, so that the body would still be warm when the police arrived.
* FreudianExcuse: Rudy Strasse of "No Time To to Die" had this in a bad way- noteworthy as he was the only killer of all 69 episodes to have this.



** The earliest is "Lovely But Lethal" - both the killer and Columbo contracted poison ivy from the crime scene. That strain of poison ivy didn't grow in Los Angeles, but was present at the crime scene because the victim was doing scientific research on plants. A sample had been on the microscope slide when it was shattered. This, coupled with the eyebrow pencil scribbles was enough solid proof that the killer had been at the scene at the time of the murder.

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** The earliest is "Lovely But but Lethal" - both the killer and Columbo contracted poison ivy from the crime scene. That strain of poison ivy didn't grow in Los Angeles, but was present at the crime scene because the victim was doing scientific research on plants. A sample had been on the microscope slide when it was shattered. This, coupled with the eyebrow pencil scribbles was enough solid proof that the killer had been at the scene at the time of the murder.



** In "Etude in Black", after his wife contradicts the murderer's alibi, the killer takes a quick moment to apologize to his wife before confessing to Columbo so he isn't too humiliated by being caught.

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** In "Etude "Étude in Black", after his wife contradicts the murderer's alibi, the killer takes a quick moment to apologize to his wife before confessing to Columbo so he isn't too humiliated by being caught.



** Aside from his wife, Columbo also has several siblings and cousins who are often mentioned, his wife also has several brothers and sisters, and he has a few children- the exact number of each are never specified. In fact, despite many clues that he has a large family on both sides, the only relatives we ever see are his nephew, Det. Andrew Parma from "No Time To Die", as well as a photo of a sister-in-law from "Rest In Peace, Mrs. Columbo".

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** Aside from his wife, Columbo also has several siblings and cousins who are often mentioned, his wife also has several brothers and sisters, and he has a few children- the exact number of each are never specified. In fact, despite many clues that he has a large family on both sides, the only relatives we ever see are his nephew, Det. Andrew Parma from "No Time To to Die", as well as a photo of a sister-in-law from "Rest In in Peace, Mrs. Columbo".



** In "Agenda For Murder," Columbo visits attorney Oscar Finch in his office. While waiting in the office for Finch to come in, Columbo takes a piece of gum out of the wastebasket. Later he shows it to Finch, as well as the piece of bitten cheese from the crime scene.[[note]]Finch has a very uniquely shaped canine. The impression shows up on both[[/note]] Problem: the wastebasket is in the office, and does not come under the 'garbage is public property' ruling; the trash would have to be out at the curb, in a dumpster, etc. Also, any real forensic detective would have fits at Columbo hauling around a vital piece of evidence like that cheese like that, in a plastic bag, without even an evidence label. Evidence seized without a warrant + broken custody chain of evidence = darn near impossible to use in court.

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** In "Agenda For for Murder," Columbo visits attorney Oscar Finch in his office. While waiting in the office for Finch to come in, Columbo takes a piece of gum out of the wastebasket. Later he shows it to Finch, as well as the piece of bitten cheese from the crime scene.[[note]]Finch has a very uniquely shaped canine. The impression shows up on both[[/note]] Problem: the wastebasket is in the office, and does not come under the 'garbage is public property' ruling; the trash would have to be out at the curb, in a dumpster, etc. Also, any real forensic detective would have fits at Columbo hauling around a vital piece of evidence like that cheese like that, in a plastic bag, without even an evidence label. Evidence seized without a warrant + broken custody chain of evidence = darn near impossible to use in court.



** "Any Old Port In A Storm" has Adrian Carsini, a wine connoisseur, murdering his younger brother Rick (a millionaire playboy) over their shared inheritance. In the argument leading up to it Adrian accuses Rick of wasting their money on fast cars and foolish women, but Rick points out that Adrian spends large sums of money on bottles of wine so old and expensive he'd rather have them sit in a cellar instead of drinking them ("At least I know how to have fun with our money!"). Proving Rick right, after committing the deed, Adrian flies to New York City to set up his alibi, and buys a high-priced bottle at auction in spite of his secretary advising him against it and he himself stating he couldn't bring himself to drink it.
** Hassan Salah, the killer from "A Case Of Immunity", has bashed a man's skull in, clubbed another and ran his car off the road, stolen $600,000, tried to frame protestors for a terrorist attack and may have been involved in a plot to overthrow his king. His response when realizing he's about to be extradited to his home country for execution?

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** "Any Old Port In A in a Storm" has Adrian Carsini, a wine connoisseur, murdering his younger brother Rick (a millionaire playboy) over their shared inheritance. In the argument leading up to it Adrian accuses Rick of wasting their money on fast cars and foolish women, but Rick points out that Adrian spends large sums of money on bottles of wine so old and expensive he'd rather have them sit in a cellar instead of drinking them ("At least I know how to have fun with our money!"). Proving Rick right, after committing the deed, Adrian flies to New York City to set up his alibi, and buys a high-priced bottle at auction in spite of his secretary advising him against it and he himself stating he couldn't bring himself to drink it.
** Hassan Salah, the killer from "A Case Of of Immunity", has bashed a man's skull in, clubbed another and ran his car off the road, stolen $600,000, tried to frame protestors for a terrorist attack and may have been involved in a plot to overthrow his king. His response when realizing he's about to be extradited to his home country for execution?



** Columbo holds the ball in "Etude In Black" where he leaves his new Basset Hound dog in his car (at night) with the windows up. A girl with her own dog [[WhatTheHellHero chews him out for his ignorance]], but Columbo is at least thankful for the advice for his first dog.

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** Columbo holds the ball in "Etude In "Étude in Black" where he leaves his new Basset Hound dog in his car (at night) with the windows up. A girl with her own dog [[WhatTheHellHero chews him out for his ignorance]], but Columbo is at least thankful for the advice for his first dog.



** Also PlayedStraight in "Murder, A Self Portrait". Max Barsini murders his ex-wife at a beach, using paint-cleaner on a rag. He forces her to breath it in. She is later found on the beach, appearing to have drowned after Mr. Barsini threw her unconscious body into the water.
** Subverted in "A Matter Of Honor"; Luis Montoya shoots his victim with a TranquillizerDart but only uses a small dosage of the drug to make his victim woozy enough to keep him awake, because a sleeping victim wouldn't anger a vicious bull.

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** Also PlayedStraight in "Murder, A a Self Portrait". Max Barsini murders his ex-wife at a beach, using paint-cleaner on a rag. He forces her to breath it in. She is later found on the beach, appearing to have drowned after Mr. Barsini threw her unconscious body into the water.
** Subverted in "A Matter Of of Honor"; Luis Montoya shoots his victim with a TranquillizerDart but only uses a small dosage of the drug to make his victim woozy enough to keep him awake, because a sleeping victim wouldn't anger a vicious bull.



** The most self-referential example is that Ward Fowler in "Fade In To Murder" is based on ... Peter Falk. Ward Fowler stars in a popular TV detective series as Detective Lucerne, and who is causing trouble with the network because he is asking for so much money. This was the first episode of season 3 of Columbo, and renewal of the series had been in doubt because Peter Falk was making such high salary demands.

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** The most self-referential example is that Ward Fowler in "Fade In To in to Murder" is based on ... Peter Falk. Ward Fowler stars in a popular TV detective series as Detective Lucerne, and who is causing trouble with the network because he is asking for so much money. This was the first episode of season 3 of Columbo, and renewal of the series had been in doubt because Peter Falk was making such high salary demands.



* NoWarrantNoProblem: Columbo is a perfect example of this: He continuously pesters the suspects by appearing anywhere they are (work, home, middle of the street, wherever) and claiming he is just going to "ask some questions"-that start as random nit-picking and become PerpSweating by annoyance as the episode continues. He has also grabbed evidence and kept it to himself ([[HollywoodLaw disregarding the chain of evidence completely]]) to confront a suspect with it later on. At least in one episode he ''explicitly'' said that the suspect's hostile response to this modus operandi was leading him on the right path, because he "struck a nerve".

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* NoWarrantNoProblem: Columbo is a perfect example of this: He continuously pesters the suspects by appearing anywhere they are (work, home, middle of the street, wherever) and claiming he is just going to "ask some questions"-that questions" -- that start as random nit-picking and become PerpSweating by annoyance as the episode continues. He has also grabbed evidence and kept it to himself ([[HollywoodLaw disregarding the chain of evidence completely]]) to confront a suspect with it later on. At least in one episode he ''explicitly'' said that the suspect's hostile response to this modus operandi was leading him on the right path, because he "struck a nerve".



** Best example would be Hassan Salah in the ending of "A Case Of Immunity" when, after spilling the entire story to Columbo- whom he believed couldn't do a damn thing because of diplomatic immunity anyway- the king of Suari walks out from behind the curtains. His plane trip home had been staged, the king having returned to the legation immediately after merely to fool Salah. Salah realizes that he's just confessed to the king of his country and will be executed if he's returned home, and promptly waives his immunity and signs a confession so that Columbo may arrest him.
* OlderThanTheyLook: Milo Janus of "An Exercise In Fatality" looks to be in his 30s(Robert Conrad was in his 30s at time time) thanks to lots of exercise and proper meals, but is actually 53.

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** Best example would be Hassan Salah in the ending of "A Case Of of Immunity" when, after spilling the entire story to Columbo- whom he believed couldn't do a damn thing because of diplomatic immunity anyway- the king of Suari walks out from behind the curtains. His plane trip home had been staged, the king having returned to the legation immediately after merely to fool Salah. Salah realizes that he's just confessed to the king of his country and will be executed if he's returned home, and promptly waives his immunity and signs a confession so that Columbo may arrest him.
* OlderThanTheyLook: Milo Janus of "An Exercise In in Fatality" looks to be in his 30s(Robert Conrad was in his 30s at time time) thanks to lots of exercise and proper meals, but is actually 53.



** "Mind Over Mayhem" takes a brief detour into ScienceFiction, with a TeenGenius who has invented a robot (played by Robbie the Robot of ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'' fame) so sophisticated that it seems to have artifical intelligence (not only does it play chess, but it gets angry when it loses).

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** "Mind Over over Mayhem" takes a brief detour into ScienceFiction, with a TeenGenius who has invented a robot (played by Robbie the Robot of ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'' fame) so sophisticated that it seems to have artifical intelligence (not only does it play chess, but it gets angry when it loses).



* PublicExposure: The episode "Suitable for Framing" has the lieutenant visiting a painter working with a nude model (despite painting a different subject), to Columbo's embarrassment. (Of course we don't see anything, she's hidden by the painting's frame.)



** Prior to Janet Leigh's appearance, Vera Miles, who played Lila Crane alongside her in "Psycho" played the killer in "Lovely But Lethal". At one point she indicates she couldn't be the killer because she "wouldn't hurt a fly"- which was the same thing that "mother" said about herself at the end of "Psycho".
** Psycho again gets a mention in "Murder With Too Many Notes" along with ''Jaws'' when samples of their scores are played by the orchestra. ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' was also mentioned in "Fade in to Murder" when Columbo sees a prop shark at the TV studio lot and asks if it was the shark from the film.

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** Prior to Janet Leigh's appearance, Vera Miles, who played Lila Crane alongside her in "Psycho" played the killer in "Lovely But but Lethal". At one point she indicates she couldn't be the killer because she "wouldn't hurt a fly"- fly" -- which was the same thing that "mother" said about herself at the end of "Psycho".
** Psycho again gets a mention in "Murder With with Too Many Notes" along with ''Jaws'' when samples of their scores are played by the orchestra. ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' was also mentioned in "Fade in to Murder" when Columbo sees a prop shark at the TV studio lot and asks if it was the shark from the film.



** "How To Dial A Murder" is built on this as the murderer is a film buff collector. He owns both the large gate and the sled from ''Citizen Kane'' (even making "Rosebud" be the attack command for his dogs) as well as the famous pool table and curved pool cue once used by by W.C. Fields.

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** "How To to Dial A a Murder" is built on this as the murderer is a film buff collector. He owns both the large gate and the sled from ''Citizen Kane'' (even making "Rosebud" be the attack command for his dogs) as well as the famous pool table and curved pool cue once used by by W.C. Fields.



** In "Lady In Waiting" the killer, Beth Chadwick attempted to shoot Columbo after being found out... Only for him to casually inform her there was a police car waiting outside and such a thing would do her more harm than good. Columbo almost jokingly declares that Beth has more class than that.

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** In "Lady In in Waiting" the killer, Beth Chadwick attempted to shoot Columbo after being found out... Only for him to casually inform her there was a police car waiting outside and such a thing would do her more harm than good. Columbo almost jokingly declares that Beth has more class than that.



** "How To Dial A Murder" involves a psychologist who trains his pet dogs to kill a man upon command and uses a phone call as an excuse to say the command to make it look as if the dogs merely became vicious for no reason.

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** "How To to Dial A a Murder" involves a psychologist who trains his pet dogs to kill a man upon command and uses a phone call as an excuse to say the command to make it look as if the dogs merely became vicious for no reason.



** This happens a few times, notably "Make Me A Perfect Murder".

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** This happens a few times, notably "Make Me A a Perfect Murder".



** Played with in "Murder By The Book", where the key is that the first murder Ken Franklin commits is intricate, well-thought out and almost flawless, but his second is sloppy and rushed. This gives Columbo the idea that the murderer, the less-talented half a murder-mystery writing team, actually stole the idea for the first murder from one of the ideas his partner Jim Ferris came up for their books, but the second was all his own. [[spoiler:Ironically, the first murder ''was'' his idea, the only one that he ever came up with for them, but it was never used.]]

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** Played with in "Murder By The by the Book", where the key is that the first murder Ken Franklin commits is intricate, well-thought out and almost flawless, but his second is sloppy and rushed. This gives Columbo the idea that the murderer, the less-talented half a murder-mystery writing team, actually stole the idea for the first murder from one of the ideas his partner Jim Ferris came up for their books, but the second was all his own. [[spoiler:Ironically, the first murder ''was'' his idea, the only one that he ever came up with for them, but it was never used.]]



** Dr. Eric Mason in "How to Dial a Murder" makes so many mistakes, that Columbo expresses disappointment in how simple the case was to solve. For one, Dr. Mason was having his heart-rate recorded when he tricked Dr. Hunter to saying "Rosebud" twice, and the heart-rate increased when Dr. Mason heard his trained Dobermans killing Dr. Hunter. Second, Columbo noted that a 911 call was not placed by the person who heard Dr. Hunter dying. Third, Dr. Mason unplugged another phone to force Dr. Hunter to use the "murder phone" and failed to plug it back in.\\
\\

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** Dr. Eric Mason in "How to Dial a Murder" makes so many mistakes, that Columbo expresses disappointment in how simple the case was to solve. For one, Dr. Mason was having his heart-rate recorded when he tricked Dr. Hunter to saying "Rosebud" twice, and the heart-rate increased when Dr. Mason heard his trained Dobermans killing Dr. Hunter. Second, Columbo noted that a 911 call was not placed by the person who heard Dr. Hunter dying. Third, Dr. Mason unplugged another phone to force Dr. Hunter to use the "murder phone" and failed to plug it back in.\\
\\
\\\



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Early in "Publish Or Perish", Riley Greenleaf has an attorney that not only bails him out on the drunk charge, but aids him on the sudden murder investigation. Once the insurance company provides Riley with an alibi for the time of the murder, the attorney has a brief discussion with Columbo, and is never seen again despite the ongoing investigation.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Early in "Publish Or or Perish", Riley Greenleaf has an attorney that not only bails him out on the drunk charge, but aids him on the sudden murder investigation. Once the insurance company provides Riley with an alibi for the time of the murder, the attorney has a brief discussion with Columbo, and is never seen again despite the ongoing investigation.



** Columbo gets one in "Etude In Black" where he leaves his new Basset Hound dog in his car with the windows up (it's night in this scene). A girl with her own dog chews him out for his ignorance, but Columbo is thankful for the advice on his first dog. HarsherInHindsight with the rise of children and pets dying of hyperthermia in vehicles.

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** Columbo gets one in "Etude In "Étude in Black" where he leaves his new Basset Hound dog in his car with the windows up (it's night in this scene). A girl with her own dog chews him out for his ignorance, but Columbo is thankful for the advice on his first dog. HarsherInHindsight with the rise of children and pets dying of hyperthermia in vehicles.



* YouKeepUsingThatWord: Suspects would often claim Columbo was "harassing" them when he was just politely asking them questions.

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* YouKeepUsingThatWord: Suspects would often claim Columbo was is "harassing" them when he was is just politely asking them questions.
4th Dec '16 11:55:39 AM Cindylover1969
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** Rudy Strasse in "No Time to Die" wasn't technically caught either, as he was shot dead by police officers.

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** Rudy Strasse in "No Time to Die" wasn't technically caught either, as he was shot dead by police officers. (Making this a case of DeathByAdaptation, since in the novel it's based on, Klaus[[note]]his name in the novel[[/note]] is shot, but survives.)
26th Nov '16 12:30:13 PM LarryMullen
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* RecycledScript: 1990's "Uneasy Lies the Crown" was originally written for Columbo by Steven Bochco in 1973. Falk rejected the script due to the villain not being interesting enough. The script was used in 1977 for McMillanAndWife. In 1990, Falk had changed his mind and the script was used for Columbo with villain changed from a news anchor to an actor. A slight nod to the trope is present in Dick Sargent guest starring. Bewitched used a lot of recycled scripts by the end of its run. And Nancy Walker also guests, referring to "The Rock Hudson Show". She, of course, was on McMillan and Wife
21st Nov '16 4:30:32 PM CumbersomeTercel
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Viewers who missed the first fifteen minutes could [[NarrowedItDownToTheGuyIRecognize pick out the murderer pretty quickly anyway]]; it was usually either Creator/RobertCulp, Creator/JackCassidy or [[Series/ThePrisoner Patrick McGoohan]] (a close friend of Falk's, who also directed an episode). Barring that, it was the wealthy and/or brilliant character being the most smug about it. Notable one-offs included Creator/RichardKiley, Creator/RobertConrad, Creator/RobertVaughn, Creator/DonaldPleasance, Creator/RuthGordon, Creator/JanetLeigh and Creator/LeonardNimoy... Oh, and the first ''Mystery Movie'' episode ("Murder by the Book") was penned by then-fledgling screenwriter [[Creator/StephenBochco Stephen Bochco]] and directed by some random ''wunderkind'' named [[Creator/StevenSpielberg Spielberg]].

to:

Viewers who missed the first fifteen minutes could [[NarrowedItDownToTheGuyIRecognize pick out the murderer pretty quickly anyway]]; it was usually either Creator/RobertCulp, Creator/JackCassidy or [[Series/ThePrisoner Patrick McGoohan]] (a close friend of Falk's, who also directed an episode). Barring that, it was the wealthy and/or brilliant character being the most smug about it. Notable one-offs included Creator/RichardKiley, Creator/RobertConrad, Creator/RobertVaughn, Creator/DonaldPleasance, Creator/DonaldPleasence, Creator/RuthGordon, Creator/JanetLeigh and Creator/LeonardNimoy... Oh, and the first ''Mystery Movie'' episode ("Murder by the Book") was penned by then-fledgling screenwriter [[Creator/StephenBochco Stephen Bochco]] and directed by some random ''wunderkind'' named [[Creator/StevenSpielberg Spielberg]].
15th Nov '16 8:58:48 PM captainpat
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* WomanInBlack: In "Sex and the Married Detective", Dr. Joan Allenby disguises herself as one to kill her lover David Kincaid after she catches him cheating on her with her assistant Cindy Galt. She accomplishes this with a wig, lots of dark black and sexy clothing, and a man's fedora hat. [[spoiler:This leads to a bit of a split personality, however- Joan even argues with "Lisa" at one point.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.Columbo