History Series / AnimalFaceOff

25th Aug '16 4:37:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Animal Face-Off was a DiscoveryChannel & AnimalPlanet documentary where two animals fight to the death in computer simulated battles at the end of the show. Before the actual fight, scientists test out the abilities of the animals. To avoid controversies of animal testing or the danger of trying to capture wild animals, they instead make molds of a skull of the animal and make it into a steel biting machine. There is usually at least one scientist on each side supporting an animal and, like two sports fans, they sometimes {{trash talk}} before the fight begins. The show lasted from March to September 2004 (reruns do occur, but they're ''extremely'' rare).

to:

Animal Face-Off was a DiscoveryChannel Creator/DiscoveryChannel & AnimalPlanet Creator/AnimalPlanet documentary where two animals fight to the death in computer simulated battles at the end of the show. Before the actual fight, scientists test out the abilities of the animals. To avoid controversies of animal testing or the danger of trying to capture wild animals, they instead make molds of a skull of the animal and make it into a steel biting machine. There is usually at least one scientist on each side supporting an animal and, like two sports fans, they sometimes {{trash talk}} before the fight begins. The show lasted from March to September 2004 (reruns do occur, but they're ''extremely'' rare).



* NoAnimalsWereHarmed: Downplayed. Only ''CGI'' animals are hurt. For the most part none of the real animals are not put in the show except for stock footage from DiscoveryChannel's back lot.

to:

* NoAnimalsWereHarmed: Downplayed. Only ''CGI'' animals are hurt. For the most part none of the real animals are not put in the show except for stock footage from DiscoveryChannel's Creator/DiscoveryChannel's back lot.
28th Sep '15 2:36:17 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FragileSpeedster: The colossal squid is very maneuverable but eventually ends swallowed whole by the whale.
* GlassCannon: The big cats move and strike fast and pack good power, but they have low stamina and are relatively fragile. The wolf, quick-moving and powerful-jawed, really can't take it. The bull shark is similar. The black bear is just lucky.



* UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny
* VideogameCharacters: The fighting animals may be classified in one of the following:
** FragileSpeedster: The colossal squid is very maneuverable but eventually ends swallowed whole by the whale.
** GlassCannon: The big cats move and strike fast and pack good power, but they have low stamina and are relatively fragile. The wolf, quick-moving and powerful-jawed, really can't take it. The bull shark is similar. The black bear is just lucky.
%% ** MightyGlacier: The polar & grizzly bears, the crocodilians on land, the anaconda, the hippopotamus, the gorilla, the elephant, the rhinoceros, the walrus and the sperm-whale. When a glacier fight against a speedster, he [[spoiler: almost always defeats the latter]]. When it's one glacier against another (Polar Bear vs Walrus, Elephant vs Rhino), the battle usually comes down to who can out-mighty the other.
** LightningBruiser: The great white shark may qualify as this, being fast ''and'' high in strength/stamina at the same time (though it has some trouble against the crocodile). (Incidentally, the crocodilians in water also qualify.)
** Actually all the twelve duels may be, in last analysis, qualified as MightyGlacier vs FragileSpeedster in a greater or lesser degree, since one animal appears always smaller/faster/weaker/more active than its bigger/slower/stronger/more passive opponent. This distinction is clear with Hippopotamus vs Shark, Bear vs Tiger, Crocodile vs Lion, Anaconda vs Jaguar, Gorilla vs Leopard, and Whale vs Squid; less-evident with Shark vs Crocodile, Elephant vs Rhino, Cougar vs Wolf, Walrus vs Bear, Lion vs Tiger and Alligator vs Bear. Except for the last two examples, [[spoiler:the MightyGlacier]] always wins the fight.

to:

* %%* UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny
* %%* VideogameCharacters: The fighting animals may be classified in one of the following:
** FragileSpeedster: The colossal squid is very maneuverable but eventually ends swallowed whole by the whale.
** GlassCannon: The big cats move and strike fast and pack good power, but they have low stamina and are relatively fragile. The wolf, quick-moving and powerful-jawed, really can't take it. The bull shark is similar. The black bear is just lucky.
%% ** MightyGlacier: The polar & grizzly bears, the crocodilians on land, the anaconda, the hippopotamus, the gorilla, the elephant, the rhinoceros, the walrus and the sperm-whale. When a glacier fight against a speedster, he [[spoiler: almost always defeats the latter]]. When it's one glacier against another (Polar Bear vs Walrus, Elephant vs Rhino), the battle usually comes down to who can out-mighty the other.
** LightningBruiser: The great white shark may qualify as this, being fast ''and'' high in strength/stamina at the same time (though it has some trouble against the crocodile). (Incidentally, the crocodilians in water also qualify.)
** Actually all the twelve duels may be, in last analysis, qualified as MightyGlacier vs FragileSpeedster in a greater or lesser degree, since one animal appears always smaller/faster/weaker/more active than its bigger/slower/stronger/more passive opponent. This distinction is clear with Hippopotamus vs Shark, Bear vs Tiger, Crocodile vs Lion, Anaconda vs Jaguar, Gorilla vs Leopard, and Whale vs Squid; less-evident with Shark vs Crocodile, Elephant vs Rhino, Cougar vs Wolf, Walrus vs Bear, Lion vs Tiger and Alligator vs Bear. Except for the last two examples, [[spoiler:the MightyGlacier]] always wins the fight.
following:
12th Sep '15 5:02:29 PM ading
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArbitrarySkepticism: Some of the scientists who supported the losing animal after the fight STILL argue with the winning one.
** Also, some viewers have complained about the alleged unlikeliness of Bull Shark vs. Hippopotamus, since [[YouFailBiologyForever all people know sharks live only in the sea]], but in RealLife bull-sharks ''do'' swim in African rivers other than in the seas, and some interactions with hippos are documented as well.
25th Jul '15 6:38:49 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SpiritualSuccessor: ''TheTruthAboutKillerDinosaurs'', ''Series/JurassicFightClub'' & ''Series/DeadliestWarrior'' can all be seen as this.

to:

* SpiritualSuccessor: ''TheTruthAboutKillerDinosaurs'', ''Series/TheTruthAboutKillerDinosaurs'', ''Series/JurassicFightClub'' & ''Series/DeadliestWarrior'' can all be seen as this.
11th Nov '14 8:39:19 AM 493251gen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AnimalMotifs: One can note some resemblances in look and attitude between some experts and [[AnimalStereotypes their animals]]....is it a casual thing or not? The big cat expert acts like a young and rather perky showman; the bear trainer is a big guy with a shaggy beard and a calm yet touchy temper; the reptile scientist is a lean, unflappable man with a bit of DeadpanSnarker when arguing with his rivals; finally the primatologist is a pretty girl (remember that apes and girls are ''historically'' associated each other in media).

to:

* AnimalMotifs: One can note some resemblances in look and attitude between some experts and [[AnimalStereotypes their animals]]....is it a casual thing or not? The big cat expert acts like a young and rather perky showman; the bear trainer is a big guy with a shaggy beard and a calm yet touchy temper; the reptile scientist is a lean, unflappable man with a bit of DeadpanSnarker when arguing with his rivals; finally the primatologist is a pretty girl woman (remember that apes and girls ladies are ''historically'' associated with each other in media).



** Also, some viewers have complained about the alleged unlikeliness of Bull Shark vs. Hippopotamus, since [[YouFailBiologyForever all people know sharks live only in the sea]]: but in RealLife bull-sharks ''do'' swim in African rivers other than in the seas, and some interactions with hippos are documented as well.

to:

** Also, some viewers have complained about the alleged unlikeliness of Bull Shark vs. Hippopotamus, since [[YouFailBiologyForever all people know sharks live only in the sea]]: sea]], but in RealLife bull-sharks ''do'' swim in African rivers other than in the seas, and some interactions with hippos are documented as well.



* BeautyEqualsGoodness: At the end of Leopard Vs. Gorilla, the narrator says "Beauty killed by the Beast", [[WhatMeasureIsANonCute even though the gorilla was only defending itself from the attacking leopard.]] Interstingly, the Gorilla expert was a real hottie, while the leopard expert was a man (a curious example from RealLife of the trope "gorillas always are with pretty girls").

to:

* BeautyEqualsGoodness: At the end of Leopard Vs. Gorilla, the narrator says "Beauty killed by the Beast", [[WhatMeasureIsANonCute even though the gorilla was only defending itself from the attacking leopard.]] Interstingly, Interestingly, the Gorilla expert was a real hottie, while the leopard expert was a man (a curious example from RealLife of the trope "gorillas always are with pretty girls").



* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty weight, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.

to:

* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty weight, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment environment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian its crocodilian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.



%%**Jaguar vs Anaconda qualifies due to the suspicious coincidences surrounding the anaconda's "victory".
%%** Lion vs Croc isn't bad by itself, but placed side-by-side with Bear vs. Gator, it's inexcusable. Why the hell was the bear able to pull off what the lion couldn't, especially when the odds favored the gator much more heavily in that fight than in Croc vs. Lion?

to:

%%**Jaguar vs %%** Jaguar vs. Anaconda qualifies due to the suspicious coincidences surrounding the anaconda's "victory".
%%** Lion vs vs. Croc isn't bad by itself, but placed side-by-side with Bear vs. Gator, it's inexcusable. Why the hell was the bear able to pull off what the lion couldn't, especially when the odds favored the gator much more heavily in that fight than in Croc vs. Lion?



* ThePowerOfFriendship: A wolf fights a cougar [[spoiler:and loses because it was fighting alone instead of with the rest of it's pack like it would have in [[RealLife Real Life]]. Because of this, the wolf is the only loser to be merely knocked out, not killed; the cougar flees upon hearing the approach of the rest of the wolf's pack.]]

to:

* ThePowerOfFriendship: A wolf fights a cougar [[spoiler:and loses because it was fighting alone instead of with the rest of it's its pack like it would have in [[RealLife Real Life]]. Because of this, the wolf is the only loser to be merely knocked out, not killed; the cougar flees upon hearing the approach of the rest of the wolf's pack.]]



** Hell, the Alligator/Bear duel in general is this; the alligator is flipped over easily by the bear and clawed once by the bear, and that kills it. Anyone who knows much about crocodylians can say that the bear would, as insanely strong as it is, not be able to efforlessly bowl the much heftier alligator over; the snapping, thrashing alligator would be a bit harder to get a grip around to even lift than an inanimate boulder. That, and the alligator's bite would be disastrous for the bear's bones, but apparently the crocodylians in this show suffer Turtle Syndrome, in that they are absolutely useless on their backs.

to:

** Hell, the Alligator/Bear duel in general is this; the alligator is flipped over easily by the bear and clawed once by the bear, and that kills it. Anyone who knows much about crocodylians crocodilians can say that the bear would, as insanely strong as it is, not be able to efforlessly effortlessly bowl the much heftier alligator over; the snapping, thrashing alligator would be a bit harder to get a grip around to even lift than an inanimate boulder. That, and the alligator's bite would be disastrous for the bear's bones, but apparently the crocodylians crocodilians in this show suffer Turtle Syndrome, in that they are absolutely useless on their backs.
11th Jul '14 12:26:05 PM hbi2k
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** MightyGlacier: The polar & grizzly bears, the crocodilians on land, the anaconda, the hippopotamus, the gorilla, the elephant, the rhinoceros, the walrus and the sperm-whale. When a glacier fight against a speedster, he [[spoiler: almost always defeats the latter]]. When it's one glacier against another (Polar Bear vs Walrus, Elephant vs Rhino), the battle usually comes down to who can out-mighty the other.

to:

%% ** MightyGlacier: The polar & grizzly bears, the crocodilians on land, the anaconda, the hippopotamus, the gorilla, the elephant, the rhinoceros, the walrus and the sperm-whale. When a glacier fight against a speedster, he [[spoiler: almost always defeats the latter]]. When it's one glacier against another (Polar Bear vs Walrus, Elephant vs Rhino), the battle usually comes down to who can out-mighty the other.
10th Jul '14 10:40:20 AM hbi2k
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** FragileSpeedster: The colossal squid is very maneuverable but not capable to do anything serious to the whale, and eventually ends swallowed whole by the latter.

to:

** FragileSpeedster: The colossal squid is very maneuverable but not capable to do anything serious to the whale, and eventually ends swallowed whole by the latter.whale.
5th Jun '14 3:08:07 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty weight, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.



* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty weight, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.
2nd Jun '14 6:09:17 AM Ultradester306
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty wieght, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.

to:

* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty wieght, weight, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.
2nd Jun '14 6:08:00 AM Ultradester306
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CriticalResearchFailure: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty wieght, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.

to:

* CriticalResearchFailure: CowboyBebopAtHisComputer: ''Bear VS. Gator'' suffers from this a lot; the largest average American black bear is 250 kilograms (551 lbs). Adult American alligators weigh, at most, 453 kilograms (''999'' lbs). Even as strong as the bear is, it's unlikely it'd be able to bowl over the much heavier alligator without the alligator biting back and pulling the bear with it. The bear also has the alligator's stronger bite to worry about, too; alligators have a bite strength of ''9,425 newtons'' (or ''2,125 lbs per square inch''). Alligators are also not extremely vulnerable on land; in fact, they can run at 12-14 km/h for short periods; and Australian freshwater crocodiles have been recorded galloping at 17 km/h. Ambushing saltwater crocodiles can reach ''12 metres a second'' for bursts in an ambush, which is faster than prey a body's length away from the animal can even react to (ironically, ''Lion VS. Crocodile'' got this right, but not this episode). And an alligator would never pursue a bear onto land, even if it was heavier than said bear; alligators, crocodiles and caiman are ambush predators and as such they tend to use surprise attacks and lures to capture prey. If the bear managed to evade the first lunge, the alligator would likely retreat back to the water; and if the bear tried to fight, the jaws and tail would come into play, especially in the swampy enviornment the fight was placed in. The hefty wieght, huge bite and ambush hunting of the alligator are ''very'' deciding factors in an enviornment tailored to both fighters; even if the bear is a good swimmer, the alligator is overall heavier and stronger where it counts for it (the jaws and tail), meaning the bear would not flip the alligator over and tear it open, but be ambushed, dragged underwater and finished off by it's crocodylian foe before the bear could even have time to react if we're in a truly even arena.
This list shows the last 10 events of 56. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.AnimalFaceOff