History ScienceMarchesOn / WalkingWithDinosaurs

23rd Apr '16 11:57:24 AM TVRulezAgain
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* [[http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101083150.htm Footprints from a baby bipedal sauropod]] have been recently found: Perhaps [[LandBeforeTime Littlefoot]] and the WWD sauropodlets ''walked on two legs'' and become quadrupedal only when they grew larger (an ancient heritage from their ancestors, the "prosauropods" such as the aforementioned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'')! However, most paleontologists are skeptical of this interpretation. Even the trackways of adult sauropods often leave just the prints from just one pair of feet, thus is even more likely about the younger ones.

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* [[http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101083150.htm Footprints from a baby bipedal sauropod]] have been recently found: Perhaps [[LandBeforeTime [[WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime Littlefoot]] and the WWD sauropodlets ''walked on two legs'' and become quadrupedal only when they grew larger (an ancient heritage from their ancestors, the "prosauropods" such as the aforementioned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'')! However, most paleontologists are skeptical of this interpretation. Even the trackways of adult sauropods often leave just the prints from just one pair of feet, thus is even more likely about the younger ones.
2nd Apr '16 3:13:47 PM MrMediaGuy2
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* ''Utahraptor's'' anatomy was extremely different from what we saw on the program. It (like most other dromaeosaurids) had much shorter legs, making it an average runner, a shorter tail (closer to an oviraptorid than a deinonychosaur) and more outward facing teeth.

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* ''Utahraptor's'' anatomy was extremely different from what we saw on the program. It (like most other dromaeosaurids) had much shorter legs, making it an average runner, a shorter tail (closer to an oviraptorid than a deinonychosaur) and more outward facing teeth.
4th Feb '16 5:25:46 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* The enormously long-necked ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Tanystropheus]]'' was potrayed as capable of losing and regenerating its tail like a lizard. In the past it was indeed suggested by palaeontologist Rupert Wild[[note]]who also thought that ''Tanystropheus'' was closely related to lizards - nowadays it's generally considered to be more closely related to archosaurs than to lizards[[/note]] that this creature was capable of autotomy, but other scientists who studied its fossils didn't find evidence for that. It has also been portrayed as an accomplished swimmer, but [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/11/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-1.html we don't know for sure if it really was such]] - its body-shape was all but hydrodynamic, and some think ''Tanystropheus'' [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/12/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-2.html was a shore animal who used its neck as a fishing rod]], catching small prey a bit like a heron. Interestingly, the very similar ''Dinocephalosaurus'', which probably was a true swimmer, was discovered a year before the special premiered.

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* The enormously long-necked ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Tanystropheus]]'' was potrayed as capable of losing and regenerating its tail like a lizard. In the past it was indeed suggested by palaeontologist Rupert Wild[[note]]who also thought that ''Tanystropheus'' was closely related to lizards - nowadays it's generally considered to be more closely related to archosaurs than to lizards[[/note]] that this creature was capable of autotomy, but other scientists who studied its fossils didn't find evidence for that. It has also been portrayed as an accomplished swimmer, but [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/11/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-1.html we don't know for sure if it really was such]] - its body-shape was all but hydrodynamic, and some think ''Tanystropheus'' [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/12/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-2.html was a shore animal who used its neck as a fishing rod]], catching small prey a bit like a heron. Interestingly, the very similar ''Dinocephalosaurus'', which probably was a true swimmer, was discovered a the same year before the special premiered.
27th Jan '16 9:32:51 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* The enormously long-necked ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Tanystropheus]]'' was potrayed as capable of losing and regenerating its tail like a lizard. In the past it was indeed suggested by palaeontologist Rupert Wild[[note]]who also thought that ''Tanystropheus'' was closely related to lizards - nowadays it's generally considered to be more closely related to archosaurs than to lizards[[/note]] that this creature was capable of autotomy, but other scientists who studied its fossils didn't find evidence for that. It has also been portrayed as an accomplished swimmer, but we don't know for sure if it really was such - its body-shape was all but hydrodynamic, and some think ''Tanystropheus'' was a shore animal who used its neck as a fishing rod, catching small prey a bit like a heron.

to:

* The enormously long-necked ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Tanystropheus]]'' was potrayed as capable of losing and regenerating its tail like a lizard. In the past it was indeed suggested by palaeontologist Rupert Wild[[note]]who also thought that ''Tanystropheus'' was closely related to lizards - nowadays it's generally considered to be more closely related to archosaurs than to lizards[[/note]] that this creature was capable of autotomy, but other scientists who studied its fossils didn't find evidence for that. It has also been portrayed as an accomplished swimmer, but [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/11/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-1.html we don't know for sure if it really was such such]] - its body-shape was all but hydrodynamic, and some think ''Tanystropheus'' [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.ca/2015/12/the-lifestyle-of-tanystropheus-part-2.html was a shore animal who used its neck as a fishing rod, rod]], catching small prey a bit like a heron. Interestingly, the very similar ''Dinocephalosaurus'', which probably was a true swimmer, was discovered a year before the special premiered.
27th Jan '16 5:39:06 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* "Iguana-spike-backed" ''Diplodocus'': Some researchers now argue these spikes were spread across on Diplodocus' back rather than put in a single line as shown in the program.

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* "Iguana-spike-backed" ''Diplodocus'': Some researchers now argue these spikes were spread across on Diplodocus' ''Diplodocus''' back rather than put in a single line as shown in the program.



** However it should be said that this does not mean that the ''Gorgosaurus'' was inaccurate; ''Yutyrannus'' was a more primitive tyrannosaur, and only distantly related to ''Gorgosaurus''.
*** It should ''also'' be noted that phylogenetic bracketing says that ''Gorgosaurus'' and kin were as likely feathered as, say, ''Utahraptor''. And adding ''Tianyulong'' and ''Kulindadromeus'', it's becoming more plausible that ''feathers'' were the original dinosaur skin, and not full-out lizard scales or crocodile scutes.
26th Aug '15 6:00:42 PM UltimateJasper
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Entelodon'' was not as closely related to pigs as was believed. It is now thought to be closer to whales and hippos.
17th Aug '15 4:07:26 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WING-shaped forelimbs just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]''...

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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WING-shaped forelimbs WINGS just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]''...
17th Aug '15 3:54:33 AM Michal
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* ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Leaellynasaura]]'' was recently shown to have had a very long tail, longest in proportion to its body size than any other ornithischian. Some also argue that it needs plumage.

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* Some argue that ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Leaellynasaura]]'' was recently shown to have had a very long tail, longest in proportion to its body size than any other ornithischian. Some also argue that it needs plumage.
16th Aug '15 11:53:03 PM UltimateJasper
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* Evidence suggests that ''Stegosaurus'' lived in herds and would have preferred the open savanna regions of the Morrison formation to the more forested areas.



* Some argue ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Leaellynasaura]]'' needs plumage.

to:

* Some argue ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Leaellynasaura]]'' was recently shown to have had a very long tail, longest in proportion to its body size than any other ornithischian. Some also argue that it needs plumage.



** If the dwarf allosaur was indeed ''Australovenator'' then it may not be an allosaur at all, as some evidence suggests megaraptorans (the group of which ''Australovenator'' belongs) are coelurosaurs.

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** If the dwarf allosaur was indeed ''Australovenator'' then it may not be an allosaur at all, as some evidence suggests megaraptorans (the group of which ''Australovenator'' belongs) are coelurosaurs.
coelurosaurs, even ''tyrannosaurs''.
16th Aug '15 11:44:15 PM UltimateJasper
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** This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' had probably some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendents because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.

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** This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had probably some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendents descenants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.



* All the non-avian dinosaurs have pronated hands, a position that is impossible in reality.

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* All the non-avian dinosaurs theropods have pronated hands, a position that is impossible in reality.



* Evidence of pliosaurs as large as the one in the episode has now been discredited. The largest known pliosaurs were probably "only" around 15 metres or so at the most. The fragmentary remains initially identified as that of ''Liopleurodon'' are now regarded as an unknown and yet unnamed genus.

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* Evidence of pliosaurs as large as the one in the episode has now been discredited. The largest known pliosaurs were probably "only" around 15 metres or so at the most. The fragmentary remains initially identified as that of ''Liopleurodon'' are now regarded as an unknown and yet unnamed genus. ''Liopleurodon'' itself was only about 21 feet long.



* ''Utahraptor's'' anatomy was extremely different from what we saw on the program. It had much shorter legs, making it a poor runner, a shorter tail (closer to an oviraptorid than a deinonychosaur) and more outward facing teeth.

to:

* ''Utahraptor's'' anatomy was extremely different from what we saw on the program. It (like most other dromaeosaurids) had much shorter legs, making it a poor an average runner, a shorter tail (closer to an oviraptorid than a deinonychosaur) and more outward facing teeth.



* The evidence for female ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Tyrannosaurus]]'' being larger than males is inconclusive at best.

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* The evidence for female ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Tyrannosaurus]]'' being larger than males is inconclusive at best.best, although considering that this pattern of dimorphism is seen in most large carnivorous birds as well as the most primitive birds today, it isn't exactly improbable.


Added DiffLines:

** And on that note, mesonychids most likely weren't the true ancestors of whales. Later studies have found whales to still be ungulates, but closer to the ancestors of hippopotamuses than more basal groups like the mesonychids.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Euparkeria'' wasn't anything close to the "dinosaur ancestor" that the program makes it out to be. Not only did it evolve its bipedal gait independently from dinosaurs, it was more related to basal archosaurs, a group containing multiple major groups of reptiles other than dinosaurs. It was equally as related to crocodiles and pterosaurs as it was to dinosaurs.


Added DiffLines:

* There actually isn't any evidence that terror birds like the ''Phorusrhacos'' in the program had meathook claws on their wings. That idea came from an observation that one species, ''Titanis'', had a very rigid wrist, suggesting the presence of some kind of digit. In 2005 it was pointed out that the birds' closest living relatives, seriemas, have the very same wrist, but no claws of any kind. However, seriemas ''do'' have a dromaosaur-like "[[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Seriamanail_%28high_res%29.jpg sickle claw]]" on their second toe, suggesting that terror birds may have had that instead. It should also be noted that [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/06/30/clubs-spurs-spikes-and-claws/ most birds]] do have some kind of claw or spur hidden under their wing feathers, but nothing like the flexing, slashing finger shown in the book's restoration.
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