History ScienceMarchesOn / WalkingWithDinosaurs

7th Jan '17 4:49:49 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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** Furthermore, the North American ''Brachiousaurus'' has been relegated to another genus. The Brachiosaur genus still exists, but the one seen in this show is now called ''Giraffotitan''.
7th Jan '17 3:43:43 PM whunt
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Added DiffLines:

** Furthermore, the North American ''Brachiousaurus'' has been relegated to another genus. The Brachiosaur genus still exists, but the one seen in this show is now called ''Giraffotitan''.
10th Dec '16 6:48:11 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WINGS just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]''...
** This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.

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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WINGS just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]''...
**
Archaeopteryx]]'' This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.
10th Dec '16 1:55:56 AM Michal
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* ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals Andrewsarchus]]'', known only from the skull and a few fragments of bone, was assumed at the time the series was produced to be closely related to [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals mesonychids]], and modeled after them. However, [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/08/mesonychians_part_iii_andrewsa.php later]] [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0007062 phylogenetic studies]] indicate that it might have actually been a close relative of [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals entelodonts]].

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* ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals Andrewsarchus]]'', known only from the skull and a few fragments of bone, was assumed at the time the series was produced to be closely related to [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals mesonychids]], and modeled after them. However, [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/08/mesonychians_part_iii_andrewsa.php com/tetrapodzoology/2009/08/13/mesonychians-part-iii-andrewsa/ later]] [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0007062 phylogenetic studies]] indicate that it might have actually been a close relative of [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals entelodonts]].
9th Dec '16 6:11:17 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descenants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.

to:

** This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descenants, descendants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.
6th Dec '16 7:44:42 PM ElSquibbonator
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* This special portrayed the largest land animal of all time, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', being hunted by the largest land predator, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]''. Both have been supplanted since then: New evidence found that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' was the biggest land predator, while ''Argentinosaurus'' has been surpassed slightly in length by 2006-described ''Turiasaurus'' (''Argentinosaurus'' is still heavier, though).[[note]]Even before ''Argentinosaurus'' was described its estimated size and weight was surpassed by those attributed to ''Amphicoelias'' and ''Bruhathkayosaurus''. However, the record size of ''Amphicoelias'' was based on a single partial vertebra that was lost shortly after it was described by Cope in 1878, and the estimated dimensions of ''Bruhathkayosaurus'' were never peer-reviewed and published (and since the type fossil was later lost in a moonsoon flood, no further study can be made on it). The accuracy of both original descriptions has been questioned.[[/note]]
* Subsequent stratigraphic studies have shown that ''Giganotosaurus'' did not live at the same time as ''Argentinosaurus'', although a close relative, ''Mapusaurus'', did.

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* This special portrayed the largest land animal of all time, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', being hunted by the largest land predator, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]''. Both have been supplanted since then: New evidence found that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' was the biggest land predator, predator (though it was partially aquatic), while ''Argentinosaurus'' has been surpassed slightly in length by 2006-described ''Turiasaurus'' (''Argentinosaurus'' is still heavier, though).[[note]]Even before ''Argentinosaurus'' was described its estimated size and weight was surpassed by those attributed to ''Amphicoelias'' and ''Bruhathkayosaurus''. However, the record size of ''Amphicoelias'' was based on a single partial vertebra that was lost shortly after it was described by Cope in 1878, and the estimated dimensions of ''Bruhathkayosaurus'' were never peer-reviewed and published (and since the type fossil was later lost in a moonsoon flood, no further study can be made on it). The accuracy of both original descriptions has been questioned.[[/note]]
* Subsequent stratigraphic studies have shown that ''Giganotosaurus'' did not live at quite the same time as ''Argentinosaurus'', although a close relative, ''Mapusaurus'', did.did. That said, they did still live close enough together in time that some overlap could still be possible.



* The show was made in 2003, and as a result missed out on the discovery of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livyatan_melvillei Livyatan melvillei]]''. Its fossil was discovered in the same area as the ''C. megalodon'' episode, and had they set it just a bit earlier, both of these monsters would have appeared. Also of note is the fact that period had even more marine carnivores than the Cretaceous.

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* The show was made in 2003, and as a result missed out on the discovery of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livyatan_melvillei Livyatan melvillei]]''. Its fossil was discovered in the same area as the ''C. megalodon'' episode, and had they set it just a bit earlier, both of these monsters would have appeared. Also of note is the fact that period had even more large marine carnivores than the Cretaceous.
23rd Nov '16 9:27:43 AM CJCroen1393
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** Additionally, pterosaurs were probably ''not'' "on the decline" at the end of the Cretaceous. Indeed, Azhdarchids like ''Quetzalcoatlus'' were among the most successful animals at the time.

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** Additionally, pterosaurs were probably ''not'' "on the decline" at the end of the Cretaceous. Indeed, Azhdarchids like ''Quetzalcoatlus'' were among the most successful animals at the time. And in 2016, it was discovered that there were other pterosaurs aside from azhdarchids likely made it to the end of the Cretaceous (pteranodontids and nyctosaurids specifically) and that not all late Cretaceous pterosaurs were giants (an as of late unnamed azhdarchid was discovered from this time, and it was only the size of a cat).
2nd Sep '16 8:41:27 PM schoi30
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* Evidence suggests that ''Stegosaurus'' lived in herds and would have preferred the open savanna regions of the Morrison formation to the more forested areas.

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* Evidence suggests that ''Stegosaurus'' lived in herds and would have preferred the open savanna regions of the Morrison formation to the more forested areas.
areas. Also, [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/01/10/stegosaur-skin-plates-sex/ a study on stegosaur skin impression]] suggests the plates were covered in horn rather than skin, making the scene where the ''Stegosaurus'' reddens its plates by flushing blood into them unlikely.
17th Aug '16 10:10:49 PM CJCroen1393
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* Biomechanical studies have shown that skim feeding (as ''Rhamphorhynchus'' is shown doing) was not possible in known pterosaurs.

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* Biomechanical studies have shown that skim feeding (as ''Rhamphorhynchus'' is shown doing) was not possible in known pterosaurs. ''Rhamphorhynchus'' itself is more likely to have hunted fish while swimming and diving.
26th Jul '16 11:11:06 AM MrMediaGuy2
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* ''Ambulocetus'' most likely [[https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160725105228.htm couldn't support itself on land]].
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