History ScienceMarchesOn / WalkingWithDinosaurs

17th Sep '17 2:14:42 PM Flameal15k
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* Evidence of pliosaurs as large as the one in the episode has now been discredited. The largest known pliosaurs were probably "only" around 15 metres or so at the most. The fragmentary remains initially identified as that of ''Liopleurodon'' are now regarded as an unknown and yet unnamed genus. ''Liopleurodon'' itself was only about 21 feet long.

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* Evidence of pliosaurs as large as the one in the episode has now been discredited. The largest known pliosaurs were probably "only" around 15 metres or so at the most. The fragmentary remains initially identified as that of ''Liopleurodon'' are now regarded as an unknown and yet unnamed genus. ''Liopleurodon'' itself was only about 21 feet long. Additionally, it should have a fluke on it's tail, as should the ''Cryptoclidus''.
17th Sep '17 1:42:51 PM nombretomado
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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WINGS just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]'' This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.

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* Most [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs [[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs coelurosaurs]] certainly had feathers. The several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs [[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs dromaeosaurid species]] surely had them, but in the franchise they are all shown featherless, see further): this, rather than ScienceMarchesOn, might be interpreted more as RuleOfCool, or rather, ArtisticLicensePaleontology, since feathered raptors would have appeared "too cute"? In RealLife dromeosaurids had WINGS just like their famous relative, the "ur-bird" ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]'' This might be nothing compared to what is seeming to come: ''most small-sized dinosaurs'' may well have had some sort of covering. This is a very recent theory led by the discover of the primitive herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Tianyulong]]'' in China: the theory is that some kind of covering was present in the last common ancestor of ''all'' dinosaurs and pterosaurs, and then it was partially lost by its largest descendants, possibly because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface-area-to-volume_ratio#Biology surface area to volume ratio]]. Some think the "spikes" on ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' have the same common origin of feathers, as well as the quill of the small herbivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Psittacosaurus]]'' and even the horny bumps lined on the back of several [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs [[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs hadrosaur mummies]]. See UsefulNotes/{{Dinosaurs}} for more infos about that. Whatever the case, the old "gigantic lizards" seem to have their days numbered now.



* What was thought to be evidence for "cannibalistic ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]''" has been discredited.

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* What was thought to be evidence for "cannibalistic ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]''" has been discredited.



* The early long-necked dinosaur ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'' could not walk on four legs.

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* The early long-necked dinosaur ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'' could not walk on four legs.



* Post-WWD studies indicate that [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs sauropod dinosaurs]] probably didn't grow to adult size within more or less ten years as shown in the series, although exactly how fast they grew is still debated (current estimates range from [[http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-185X.2010.00137.x less than four decades]] to [[http://paleobiol.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/34/2/264 up to 70 years of growth]] necessary to reach maximum adult size).
* The idea that sauropods could only hold their necks horizontally - which influenced the WWD reconstructions of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'', ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Apatosaurus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', which in turn probably popularized the concept - [[http://app.pan.pl/archive/published/app54/app54-213.pdf is questioned nowadays as well]].

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* Post-WWD studies indicate that [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs [[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs sauropod dinosaurs]] probably didn't grow to adult size within more or less ten years as shown in the series, although exactly how fast they grew is still debated (current estimates range from [[http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-185X.2010.00137.x less than four decades]] to [[http://paleobiol.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/34/2/264 up to 70 years of growth]] necessary to reach maximum adult size).
* The idea that sauropods could only hold their necks horizontally - which influenced the WWD reconstructions of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'', ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Apatosaurus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', which in turn probably popularized the concept - [[http://app.pan.pl/archive/published/app54/app54-213.pdf is questioned nowadays as well]].



* [[http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101083150.htm Footprints from a baby bipedal sauropod]] have been recently found: Perhaps [[WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime Littlefoot]] and the WWD sauropodlets ''walked on two legs'' and become quadrupedal only when they grew larger (an ancient heritage from their ancestors, the "prosauropods" such as the aforementioned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'')! However, most paleontologists are skeptical of this interpretation. Even the trackways of adult sauropods often leave just the prints from just one pair of feet, thus is even more likely about the younger ones.

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* [[http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101083150.htm Footprints from a baby bipedal sauropod]] have been recently found: Perhaps [[WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime Littlefoot]] and the WWD sauropodlets ''walked on two legs'' and become quadrupedal only when they grew larger (an ancient heritage from their ancestors, the "prosauropods" such as the aforementioned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Plateosaurus]]'')! However, most paleontologists are skeptical of this interpretation. Even the trackways of adult sauropods often leave just the prints from just one pair of feet, thus is even more likely about the younger ones.



* The "American ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]''" from the fourth episode would probably be placed in the genus ''[[http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2007.04.009 Dakotadon]]'' today.

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* The "American ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]''" from the fourth episode would probably be placed in the genus ''[[http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2007.04.009 Dakotadon]]'' today.



* The evidence for female ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Tyrannosaurus]]'' being larger than males is inconclusive at best, although considering that this pattern of dimorphism is seen in most large carnivorous birds as well as the most primitive birds today, it isn't exactly improbable.

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* The evidence for female ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Tyrannosaurus]]'' being larger than males is inconclusive at best, although considering that this pattern of dimorphism is seen in most large carnivorous birds as well as the most primitive birds today, it isn't exactly improbable.



* It's [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727713.500-morphosaurs-how-shapeshifting-dinosaurs-deceived-us.html been theorized]] that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (which were featured in ''Death of a Dynasty'' as seperate genera) are actually the same animal in different growth stages. However, research on this is still ongoing and has been doubted by some [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0032623 recent studies.]]
* The accompanying book briefly mentions the possibility that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Anatotitan]]'' is synonymous with ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]''. As of September 2011, this is the majority view.

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* It's [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727713.500-morphosaurs-how-shapeshifting-dinosaurs-deceived-us.html been theorized]] that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (which were featured in ''Death of a Dynasty'' as seperate genera) are actually the same animal in different growth stages. However, research on this is still ongoing and has been doubted by some [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0032623 recent studies.]]
* The accompanying book briefly mentions the possibility that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Anatotitan]]'' is synonymous with ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]''. As of September 2011, this is the majority view.



* This special portrayed the largest land animal of all time, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', being hunted by the largest land predator, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]''. Both have been supplanted since then: New evidence found that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' was the biggest land predator (though it was partially aquatic), while ''Argentinosaurus'' has been surpassed slightly in length by 2006-described ''Turiasaurus'' (''Argentinosaurus'' is still heavier, though).[[note]]Even before ''Argentinosaurus'' was described its estimated size and weight was surpassed by those attributed to ''Amphicoelias'' and ''Bruhathkayosaurus''. However, the record size of ''Amphicoelias'' was based on a single partial vertebra that was lost shortly after it was described by Cope in 1878, and the estimated dimensions of ''Bruhathkayosaurus'' were never peer-reviewed and published (and since the type fossil was later lost in a moonsoon flood, no further study can be made on it). The accuracy of both original descriptions has been questioned.[[/note]]

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* This special portrayed the largest land animal of all time, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'', being hunted by the largest land predator, ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]''. Both have been supplanted since then: New evidence found that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' was the biggest land predator (though it was partially aquatic), while ''Argentinosaurus'' has been surpassed slightly in length by 2006-described ''Turiasaurus'' (''Argentinosaurus'' is still heavier, though).[[note]]Even before ''Argentinosaurus'' was described its estimated size and weight was surpassed by those attributed to ''Amphicoelias'' and ''Bruhathkayosaurus''. However, the record size of ''Amphicoelias'' was based on a single partial vertebra that was lost shortly after it was described by Cope in 1878, and the estimated dimensions of ''Bruhathkayosaurus'' were never peer-reviewed and published (and since the type fossil was later lost in a moonsoon flood, no further study can be made on it). The accuracy of both original descriptions has been questioned.[[/note]]



* ''Mere days'' before the movie premiered, it was discovered that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' had a small fleshy crest on its head. Or at least one species, ''E. regalis'', did.

to:

* ''Mere days'' before the movie premiered, it was discovered that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' had a small fleshy crest on its head. Or at least one species, ''E. regalis'', did.
4th Sep '17 12:43:05 PM schoi30
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* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon'').

to:

* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon''). The ''Troodon'' in the film would have been better termed as ''Stenonychosaurus'' instead.
29th Aug '17 3:30:12 PM TrollMan
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* Any and all shots of pterosaurs taking off bipedally became inaccurate after it was discovered that they launched quadrupedally.

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* Any and all shots of pterosaurs taking off bipedally became inaccurate after it was discovered that they launched quadrupedally. The documentary also avoids showing the large pterosaurs taking off almost entirely, because at the time it was uncertain how such large flying animals could lift up from the ground. It's now known that like probably pushed off their front limbs to vault themselves into the air.



* It's [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727713.500-morphosaurs-how-shapeshifting-dinosaurs-deceived-us.html been theorized]] that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (which were featured in ''Death of a Dynasty'' as seperate genera) are actually the same animal in different growth stages. However, research on this is still ongoing and has been doubted by some [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0032623 recent studies.]]

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* The body shape of the ''Quetzalcoatlus'' is more akin to the [[http://dinodata.de/images/pterosaurs/ptero_q/~quetzalcoatlus/quetzalcoatlus-shiraishi.jpg old reconstructions]] of the species with a short neck, sprawled posture, and ''Pteranodon''-like crest, very different from the [[http://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/scifindr/articles/image3s/000/002/736/large/quetz.jpg?1481380203 modern view]], with a much flatter and frontal crest, erect stance, and massive head mounted on a long neck.
* It's [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727713.500-morphosaurs-how-shapeshifting-dinosaurs-deceived-us.html been theorized]] that that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (which were featured in ''Death of a Dynasty'' as seperate genera) are actually the same animal in different growth stages. However, research on this is still ongoing and has been doubted by some [[http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0032623 recent studies.]]


Added DiffLines:

* The generic raptor is simply identified as a "dromaeosaur", because at the time, there wasn't a named dromaeosaur species that was known to have existed alongside ''Tyrannosaurus''; now there are known to be at least three (''Dakotaraptor'', ''Acheroraptor'', and one unnamed species from New Mexico).
10th Aug '17 3:02:39 PM schoi30
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* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon''). This may mean it would be more accurate to re-identify the film's ''Troodon'' as ''Stenonychosaurus''.

to:

* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon''). This may mean it would be more accurate to re-identify the film's ''Troodon'' as ''Stenonychosaurus''.
10th Aug '17 1:45:58 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon'').

to:

* A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' to be a dubious taxon due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as a valid genus again, due to being known from better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon''). This may mean it would be more accurate to re-identify the film's ''Troodon'' as ''Stenonychosaurus''.
10th Aug '17 1:44:13 PM schoi30
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* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon while ''Stenonychosaurus'' is now valid again. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically ''Stenonychosaurus'' as they are based from its remains.

to:

* In 2017, A study in 2017 has established ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon while ''Stenonychosaurus'' is now valid again. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically due to being only known from a tooth, a similar case with such dubious taxa as ''Trachodon'' or ''Monoclonius''. The same study also re-established ''Stenonychosaurus'' as they are based a valid genus again, due to being known from its remains.better remains (which were formerly assigned to ''Troodon'').
10th Aug '17 1:25:44 PM schoi30
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* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon while ''Stenonychosaurus'' is now valid again. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically ''Stenonychosaurus'', which is better known from remains.

to:

* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon while ''Stenonychosaurus'' is now valid again. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically ''Stenonychosaurus'', which is better known ''Stenonychosaurus'' as they are based from its remains.
10th Aug '17 1:20:59 PM schoi30
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* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon and ''Stenonychosaurus'' has been once more established as valid. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically ''Stenonychosaurus'', which is better known from remains.

to:

* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon and while ''Stenonychosaurus'' has been once more established as valid.is now valid again. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the film's are actually technically ''Stenonychosaurus'', which is better known from remains.
10th Aug '17 1:20:10 PM schoi30
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* ''Mere days'' before the movie premiered, it was discovered that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' had a small fleshy crest on its head.
* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon and ''Stenonychosaurus'' has been once more established as valid. Many restorations including the one in the film are actually based on ''Stenonychosaurus'' which is better-known from remains.

to:

* ''Mere days'' before the movie premiered, it was discovered that ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' had a small fleshy crest on its head.
head. Or at least one species, ''E. regalis'', did.
* In 2017, ''Troodon'' has been established to be a dubious taxon and ''Stenonychosaurus'' has been once more established as valid. Many restorations of ''Troodon'' including the one in the film film's are actually based on ''Stenonychosaurus'' technically ''Stenonychosaurus'', which is better-known better known from remains.
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