History RuleOfCool / WalkingWithDinosaurs

20th Sep '17 7:39:50 AM Clare
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** [[TheWoobie As if he hadn't suffered enough already]], the male ''Ornithocheirus'' from "Giant of the Skies" gets physically attacked everytime he tries to land on the mating grounds; he's bitten by the other males, pecked at until his head starts bleeding and has his wings ''torn to shreds'' before dying of his injuries a while later. In the episode, the other males just yell at him until he leaves and he dies of exhaustion, heat stress and starvation.

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** [[TheWoobie As if he hadn't suffered enough already]], the male ''Ornithocheirus'' from "Giant of the Skies" gets physically attacked everytime every time he tries to land on the mating grounds; he's bitten by the other males, pecked at until his head starts bleeding and has his wings ''torn to shreds'' before dying of his injuries a while later. In the episode, the other males just yell clack their beaks at him until he leaves is forced to land outside the main display area, where he attempts to display to the females, only to be ignored in favour of the males nearer the centre. But his instincts force him to keep trying and he eventually dies of from exhaustion, heat stress and starvation.
17th Sep '17 1:42:12 PM nombretomado
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*** Another possible example of RuleOfCool is the pack of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]'' being capable of ripping off the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Postosuchus]]'''s tough skin with their weak jaws.
** '''Time Of The Titans''': We're unsure about [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs stegosaurs]] using their plates to frighten predators (though their plates didn't flush red from blood, being covered in horn and all), but it's cooler showing them this way; the same thing about the symbiotic behaviour in the tiny pterosaur called ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Anurognathus]]''.
*** Also note that this episode (placed in Late Jurassic North America) is the most StockDinosaurs-filled of the six of WWD: we can see the largest/most striking animals of each subgroup, but not their smaller relatives just because aren't spectacular enough (with the notable exception of an unnamed small bipedal herbivore similar to ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Othnielia]]''). We can see ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Allosaurus]]'' but not the smaller, horned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Ceratosaurus]]'' (very common in old films but very rare in modern TV); ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Brachiosaurus]]'' but not ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeSauropods Camarasaurus]]'' [[note]]''Camarasaurus'' was the most common dinosaur of that habitat and was huge like its relatives, but since it didn't bear any record in length, height or weight, it was probably judged as "not cool enough"[[/note]]; the iconic ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Stegosaurus]]'' shows up while ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'''s relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Camptosaurus]]'' is absent being not so impressive-looking (never mind ''Camptosaurus'' was probably the main prey of ''Allosaurus''), and the robustly built ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Ornitholestes]]'' instead of the slenderer ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Coelurus]]'' (although the latter appears in the book).
*** The "Ballad of Big Al" (also placed in the same habitat) had the possibility to add more non-stock animals as well, but producers decided instead to add only one dino, a stock one (and how!): ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Apatosaurus]]'' aka ''Brontosaurus''.

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*** Another possible example of RuleOfCool is the pack of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]'' being capable of ripping off the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Postosuchus]]'''s tough skin with their weak jaws.
** '''Time Of The Titans''': We're unsure about [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs [[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs stegosaurs]] using their plates to frighten predators (though their plates didn't flush red from blood, being covered in horn and all), but it's cooler showing them this way; the same thing about the symbiotic behaviour in the tiny pterosaur called ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Anurognathus]]''.
*** Also note that this episode (placed in Late Jurassic North America) is the most StockDinosaurs-filled of the six of WWD: we can see the largest/most striking animals of each subgroup, but not their smaller relatives just because aren't spectacular enough (with the notable exception of an unnamed small bipedal herbivore similar to ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Othnielia]]''). We can see ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Allosaurus]]'' but not the smaller, horned ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Ceratosaurus]]'' (very common in old films but very rare in modern TV); ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Brachiosaurus]]'' but not ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeSauropods Camarasaurus]]'' [[note]]''Camarasaurus'' was the most common dinosaur of that habitat and was huge like its relatives, but since it didn't bear any record in length, height or weight, it was probably judged as "not cool enough"[[/note]]; the iconic ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Stegosaurus]]'' shows up while ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'''s relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Camptosaurus]]'' is absent being not so impressive-looking (never mind ''Camptosaurus'' was probably the main prey of ''Allosaurus''), and the robustly built ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Ornitholestes]]'' instead of the slenderer ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Coelurus]]'' (although the latter appears in the book).
*** The "Ballad of Big Al" (also placed in the same habitat) had the possibility to add more non-stock animals as well, but producers decided instead to add only one dino, a stock one (and how!): ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Apatosaurus]]'' aka ''Brontosaurus''.



*** The large Mid-Jurassic carnivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Eustreptospondylus]]'' shown surviving in [[AnachronismStew Late Jurassic]] islets (the stock ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Compsognathus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]'' did inhabit these islands at that epoch, but they were probably not spectacular enough).

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*** The large Mid-Jurassic carnivore ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Eustreptospondylus]]'' shown surviving in [[AnachronismStew Late Jurassic]] islets (the stock ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Compsognathus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Archaeopteryx]]'' did inhabit these islands at that epoch, but they were probably not spectacular enough).



*** And then, among Early Cretaceous dromaeosaurids, the 18ft long ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Utahraptor]]'' was preferred to the much smaller ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Deinonychus]]'', despite the former is far less-known scientifically than the latter. It's interesting though, that WWD Utahraptors are portrayed with the body and skull design ''Deinonychus'' was thought to have: thus ''Deinonychus'' ''was'' represented in the show in an indirect way (much like the ''Film/JurassicPark'' "velociraptors"), but this time is justified, since we don't know how ''Utahraptor'''s head looked since its skull has never been discovered except for the very end of its snout).

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*** And then, among Early Cretaceous dromaeosaurids, the 18ft long ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Utahraptor]]'' was preferred to the much smaller ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Deinonychus]]'', despite the former is far less-known scientifically than the latter. It's interesting though, that WWD Utahraptors are portrayed with the body and skull design ''Deinonychus'' was thought to have: thus ''Deinonychus'' ''was'' represented in the show in an indirect way (much like the ''Film/JurassicPark'' "velociraptors"), but this time is justified, since we don't know how ''Utahraptor'''s head looked since its skull has never been discovered except for the very end of its snout).



*** The ''[[STockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'' relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Muttaburrasaurus]]'' with air sacs for making loud sounds: this one is a classic (but not demonstrated) theory regarding some iguanodontians and hadrosaurs like ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurs Saurolophus]]'' because of the shape of their skull.

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*** The ''[[STockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'' relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors Muttaburrasaurus]]'' with air sacs for making loud sounds: this one is a classic (but not demonstrated) theory regarding some iguanodontians and hadrosaurs like ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurs Edmontosaurus]]'' and ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurs Saurolophus]]'' because of the shape of their skull.



** '''Death Of A Dynasty''': [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Dromaeosaurus]] living alongside ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''. It may be considered an example of RuleOfCool since dromaeosaurid remains coming from that period are very scanty, while those of the better-known but less dramatic relative ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Troodon]]'' are much more complete (however Prehistoric Park averted it showing the latter in the small predator role).

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** '''Death Of A Dynasty''': [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Dromaeosaurus]] living alongside ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''. It may be considered an example of RuleOfCool since dromaeosaurid remains coming from that period are very scanty, while those of the better-known but less dramatic relative ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Troodon]]'' are much more complete (however Prehistoric Park averted it showing the latter in the small predator role).



*** However in the companion book, a ''Tyrannosaurus'' does bring down a wounded ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (in the series, it survives and the ''rex'' is shown eating a ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'').

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*** However in the companion book, a ''Tyrannosaurus'' does bring down a wounded ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeCeratopsids Torosaurus]]'' (in the series, it survives and the ''rex'' is shown eating a ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Triceratops]]'').



* Related to the ''Sea Monsters'' example above, the ''Land of Giants'' special also details Nigel Marven's efforts to track down the largest of all the dinosaurs and the biggest land predator ever: ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]'', respectively. We get to see a whole pack of ''Giganotosaurus'' bring down a small ''Argentinosaurus'', but if this wasn't cool enough for the viewers, they included a scene of Nigel's plane flying alongside a (still oversized) ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Ornithocheirus]]'', and as the icing on the cake, included the gigantic crocodilian ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Sarcosuchus]]''. Naturally, recent studies indicate ''Giganotosaurus'' wasn't the largest carnivorous dinosaur, and there may have been bigger dinosaurs than ''Argentinosaurus'', but at the time it was made, they were considered record-holders.
** The special was a two-parter, the other episode being ''The Giant Claw''. Not ''that'' Film/TheGiantClaw, but it also centers around a freaky-looking animal, the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Therizinosaurus]]'', the famed [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy Krueger]]-Film/EdwardScissorhands-{{Wolverine}}-osaurus. It turns out it was actually a gentle herbivore, but not before slapping a ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Tarbosaurus]]'' (the Asian "twin" of ''T. rex'') right in the face with those (arguably fragile) claws. Actual (albeit naked) ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Velociraptor]]''s are also included, though they are easily scared away by the film crew.

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* Related to the ''Sea Monsters'' example above, the ''Land of Giants'' special also details Nigel Marven's efforts to track down the largest of all the dinosaurs and the biggest land predator ever: ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Argentinosaurus]]'' and ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Giganotosaurus]]'', respectively. We get to see a whole pack of ''Giganotosaurus'' bring down a small ''Argentinosaurus'', but if this wasn't cool enough for the viewers, they included a scene of Nigel's plane flying alongside a (still oversized) ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Ornithocheirus]]'', and as the icing on the cake, included the gigantic crocodilian ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Sarcosuchus]]''. Naturally, recent studies indicate ''Giganotosaurus'' wasn't the largest carnivorous dinosaur, and there may have been bigger dinosaurs than ''Argentinosaurus'', but at the time it was made, they were considered record-holders.
** The special was a two-parter, the other episode being ''The Giant Claw''. Not ''that'' Film/TheGiantClaw, but it also centers around a freaky-looking animal, the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Therizinosaurus]]'', the famed [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy Krueger]]-Film/EdwardScissorhands-{{Wolverine}}-osaurus. It turns out it was actually a gentle herbivore, but not before slapping a ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Tarbosaurus]]'' (the Asian "twin" of ''T. rex'') right in the face with those (arguably fragile) claws. Actual (albeit naked) ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Velociraptor]]''s are also included, though they are easily scared away by the film crew.



*** Talking about the "largest theropod" argument: if a complete ''Therizinosaurus'' skeleton is discovered in the future it could become the ''real'' largest theropod: thanks to its bulky body, it was perhaps ''heavier'' than the modern "biggest one", the sail-backed ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' (made famous by ''Film/JurassicParkIII''). But don't forget the equally impressive giant ornithomimid ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Deinocheirus]]'': if its forelimbs were proportionate to the body, it might result as long as ''Spinosaurus'' and perhaps even taller than it. Let's see the awesome concurrence: both ''Deinocheirus'' and ''Therizinosaurus'' were large herbivorous (at least omnivorous in the case of ''Deinocheirus'') theropods which dispute the record of the "longest forelimbs" among bipedal dinos; both are rather mysterious, since they are mainly known just from their forelimbs which once lead to the belief that they were predators even more powerful than ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''; and both lived in the same habitat, were described in the same country (Mongolia) and entered the dinosaur list in the same period (the 1970's)! It will be awesome to see a ''Therizinosaurus'' vs ''Deinocheirus'' fight; or, alternatively, ''Deinocheirus'' vs ''Tarbosaurus''.

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*** Talking about the "largest theropod" argument: if a complete ''Therizinosaurus'' skeleton is discovered in the future it could become the ''real'' largest theropod: thanks to its bulky body, it was perhaps ''heavier'' than the modern "biggest one", the sail-backed ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Spinosaurus]]'' (made famous by ''Film/JurassicParkIII''). But don't forget the equally impressive giant ornithomimid ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Deinocheirus]]'': if its forelimbs were proportionate to the body, it might result as long as ''Spinosaurus'' and perhaps even taller than it. Let's see the awesome concurrence: both ''Deinocheirus'' and ''Therizinosaurus'' were large herbivorous (at least omnivorous in the case of ''Deinocheirus'') theropods which dispute the record of the "longest forelimbs" among bipedal dinos; both are rather mysterious, since they are mainly known just from their forelimbs which once lead to the belief that they were predators even more powerful than ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''; and both lived in the same habitat, were described in the same country (Mongolia) and entered the dinosaur list in the same period (the 1970's)! It will be awesome to see a ''Therizinosaurus'' vs ''Deinocheirus'' fight; or, alternatively, ''Deinocheirus'' vs ''Tarbosaurus''.



** The wounded ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Postosuchus]]'' puts up a real fight, and manages to snatch a ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]'' before they overwhelm it.
** A herd of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' mowing down a group of small predatory ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Coelurus]]'' with their spiky necks.
** The ''[[STockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Allosaurus]]''-scene in the small canyon involves more predators (although the ''Allosaurus'' attack from the end is missing).

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** The wounded ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Postosuchus]]'' puts up a real fight, and manages to snatch a ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Coelophysis]]'' before they overwhelm it.
** A herd of ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Diplodocus]]'' mowing down a group of small predatory ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherSmallTheropods Coelurus]]'' with their spiky necks.
** The ''[[STockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Allosaurus]]''-scene in the small canyon involves more predators (although the ''Allosaurus'' attack from the end is missing).



** While in the series, the giant pterosaur ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Quetzalcoatlus]]'' just catches a fish, eats it, and then flies away, in the book, the poor thing is mangled and pulled into the lake by a bunch of giant crocs ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Deinosuchus]]''.
** And perhaps the most violent scene of all: [[spoiler:the ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Ankylosaurus]]'' (who is a mother this time) isn't satisfied with "just" breaking the leg and messing up the internal organs of the ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''... it brings her down to the ground, and continues to bash the ''T. rex'''s head with its clubbed-tail into a bloody mess... in front of their kids. The ''Tyrannosaurus'' chicks later drink the blood of their mother.]]

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** While in the series, the giant pterosaur ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Quetzalcoatlus]]'' just catches a fish, eats it, and then flies away, in the book, the poor thing is mangled and pulled into the lake by a bunch of giant crocs ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Deinosuchus]]''.
** And perhaps the most violent scene of all: [[spoiler:the ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Ankylosaurus]]'' (who is a mother this time) isn't satisfied with "just" breaking the leg and messing up the internal organs of the ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs T. rex]]''... it brings her down to the ground, and continues to bash the ''T. rex'''s head with its clubbed-tail into a bloody mess... in front of their kids. The ''Tyrannosaurus'' chicks later drink the blood of their mother.]]
16th Aug '17 3:44:31 PM schoi30
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** '''Time Of The Titans''': We're unsure about [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs stegosaurs]] using their plates to frighten predators, but it's cooler showing them this way; the same thing about the symbiotic behaviour in the tiny pterosaur called ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Anurognathus]]''.

to:

** '''Time Of The Titans''': We're unsure about [[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs stegosaurs]] using their plates to frighten predators, predators (though their plates didn't flush red from blood, being covered in horn and all), but it's cooler showing them this way; the same thing about the symbiotic behaviour in the tiny pterosaur called ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Anurognathus]]''.
21st Jul '17 8:31:05 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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** '''Giant Of The Skies''': ''[[UsefulNotes/PRehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Ornithocheirus]]'' wasn't the largest pterosaur ever, and like ''Liopleurodon'' it wasn't ''that'' big anyway as shown in the program (best estimates say a wingspan of 20 ft, while other pterosaurs reached 39 ft). We can also add the ZergRush -like full bird attack against the old gigantic pterosaur.

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** '''Giant Of The Skies''': ''[[UsefulNotes/PRehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Ornithocheirus]]'' wasn't the largest pterosaur ever, and like ''Liopleurodon'' it wasn't ''that'' big anyway as shown in the program (best estimates say a wingspan of 20 ft, while other pterosaurs reached 39 ft). We can also add the ZergRush -like full bird attack against the old gigantic pterosaur.
15th Jan '16 11:46:14 PM Anddrix
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*** Though it was mentioned in the narration as a "13-meter giant", so it's possible that the writers simply felt that having to add onto that the explicit statement that it was the largest flying vertebrate ever would just be [[ViewersAreMorons insulting the viewer's intelligence]].

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*** Though it was mentioned in the narration as a "13-meter giant", so it's possible that the writers simply felt that having to add onto that the explicit statement that it was the largest flying vertebrate ever would just be [[ViewersAreMorons insulting the viewer's intelligence]].intelligence.
1st Jan '16 7:31:09 PM Naram-Sin
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*** ''Dinofelis'' as a specialized australopitecine killer, being [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome later driven back]] by a [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming concerted effort]] of the [[CowardlyLion australopitecine group]]. This is a showcase of Bob Brain's book ''The Hunters or the Hunted?'', where he argued that ''Dinofelis'' preyed mainly on primates and that its extinction happened when hominids got too smart and turned the tables on it. However, there are no australopithecine fossils with ''Dinofelis'' bites - there are with leopard bites, but leopards are considerably smaller and they are still around, and also a later hominid species with bites of ''Megantereon'', a sabertoothed cat smaller than ''Dinofelis''.[[note]]A study of calcium isotopes, though far less conclusive, found that their sample of ''Dinofelis'' had the results expected for an animal that fed solely on grass-eaters like ungulates, while the ones for ''Megantereon'', leopard and hyena were compatible with predation of omnivores like primates.[[/note]]
*** The early scene with the male ''Australopithecus'' knuckle-walking and waddling, for no real reason than to dramatically get up when the narrator says "this ape walks upright".

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*** ''Dinofelis'' as a specialized australopitecine killer, being [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome later driven back]] by a [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming concerted effort]] of the [[CowardlyLion australopitecine group]]. This is a showcase of Bob Brain's book ''The Hunters or the Hunted?'', where he argued that ''Dinofelis'' preyed mainly on primates and that its extinction happened when hominids got too smart and turned the tables on it. However, there are no australopithecine fossils with ''Dinofelis'' bites - there bites. There are australopithecines with leopard bites, but leopards are considerably smaller and they are still around, and also a later hominid species with bites of ''Megantereon'', a sabertoothed cat smaller than ''Dinofelis''.[[note]]A ''Dinofelis''. A study of using calcium isotopes, though far less not completely conclusive, found that their sample of ''Dinofelis'' had the results expected for of an animal that fed solely on grass-eaters like ungulates, while the ones for of ''Megantereon'', leopard and hyena fossils were compatible with predation of omnivores like primates.[[/note]]
primates.
*** It is also unlikely that ''Dinofelis'', being the largest predator around, would climb trees carrying its prey like a leopard, given that leopards do this to keep their meal safe from larger predators like lions (who have ''Dinofelis''' size, and don't climb trees).
*** The early scene with the male ''Australopithecus'' knuckle-walking and waddling, for no real reason other than to dramatically get up rise when the narrator says "this ape walks upright".''upright''".



*** The pack's younger females testing their hunting abilities on a ''Doedicurus'', a car-sized glyptodont with a flail-like tail. Surely there wasn't a less dangerous candidate?

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*** The pack's younger females testing their hunting abilities on a ''Doedicurus'', a car-sized glyptodont with a flail-like tail. Surely there wasn't [[BullyingADragon a less dangerous candidate?candidate]]?
29th Jun '15 7:19:20 AM Morgenthaler
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**** To be fair, the narration makes a point of mentioning that, because ''Postosuchus'''s hide was so tough, the ''Coelophysis'' used their narrow snouts to pick at the meat ''underneath'' the hide (which was accessible through the gaps in the armor), essentially eating ''Postosuchus'' from the inside out.



*** To be fair, there is fragmentary evidence of very large Liopleurodons or similar giant Pliosaurs implying they may have grown up to 70 ft.



**** Actually, skip that bit. It turns out ''Basilosaurus'' was actually a shallow-water specialist and the real error is the fact it was driven there by starvation, rather than living there its entire life. In fact its fossils have been found in El Fayum. The nonexistent inability to hunt in shallow water was put to make the situation more desperate for the protagonist, but in RealLife the shallows would have been where it had its greatest advantage.
29th Jun '15 7:18:43 AM Morgenthaler
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** The special was a two-parter, the other episode being ''The Giant Claw''. Not ''that'' TheGiantClaw, but it also centers around a freaky-looking animal, the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Therizinosaurus]]'', the famed [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy Krueger]]-Film/EdwardScissorhands-{{Wolverine}}-osaurus. It turns out it was actually a gentle herbivore, but not before slapping a ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Tarbosaurus]]'' (the Asian "twin" of ''T. rex'') right in the face with those (arguably fragile) claws. Actual (albeit naked) ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Velociraptor]]''s are also included, though they are easily scared away by the film crew.

to:

** The special was a two-parter, the other episode being ''The Giant Claw''. Not ''that'' TheGiantClaw, Film/TheGiantClaw, but it also centers around a freaky-looking animal, the ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirdlikeTheropods Therizinosaurus]]'', the famed [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddy Krueger]]-Film/EdwardScissorhands-{{Wolverine}}-osaurus. It turns out it was actually a gentle herbivore, but not before slapping a ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeLargeTheropods Tarbosaurus]]'' (the Asian "twin" of ''T. rex'') right in the face with those (arguably fragile) claws. Actual (albeit naked) ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Velociraptor]]''s are also included, though they are easily scared away by the film crew.
8th Mar '15 2:45:38 PM Pickly
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** Inverted with the fact they did not show the other giant marine predator from Megalodon't ocean (and boy there are A LOT of giant marine predators in that time, much more than the Cretaceous)


Added DiffLines:

** Inverted with the fact they did not show the other large marine predators from Megalodon't ocean (and boy there are A LOT of giant marine predators in that time, much more than the Cretaceous)
9th Feb '15 8:21:42 PM Bk-notburgerking
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*** Setting the [[StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs obligatory]] ''Smilodon''-centric episode not in the La Brea Tar Pits like [[SmallReferencePools every other documentary]], but in South America just after the Great American Interchange. This allowed them to feature the biggest sabertoothed cat ever (''S. populator'', rather than the stock ''S. fatalis''), the biggest ground sloth (''Megatherium''), the biggest and best defended glyptodont (''Doedicurus'') and the weirdest ungulate in the Western hemisphere at that time (''Macrauchenia''). Note that ''Smilodon'' is the only northern immigrant featured while every other taxon originates in South America. If the episode was set before Panama the closest looking thing to ''Smilodon'' would be the less impressive ''[[http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20110925202917/dinosaurs/images/5/51/Thylacosmilus_lentis.jpg Thylacosmilus]]''. And RealLife ''S. populator'' probably hunted more often other immigrants like horses, llamas and young mastodonts, and worried more about defending its kills from hyena-like dire wolves and the giant bear ''Arctotherium'' than about terror birds and ground sloths.

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*** Setting the [[StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs obligatory]] ''Smilodon''-centric episode not in the La Brea Tar Pits like [[SmallReferencePools every other documentary]], but in South America just after the Great American Interchange.Interchange (stated, but all of the species in the episode except the birds had not even evolved yet when the episode was set, they are modern animals). This allowed them to feature the biggest sabertoothed cat ever (''S. populator'', rather than the stock ''S. fatalis''), the biggest ground sloth (''Megatherium''), the biggest and best defended glyptodont (''Doedicurus'') and the weirdest ungulate in the Western hemisphere at that time (''Macrauchenia''). Note that ''Smilodon'' is the only northern immigrant featured while every other taxon originates in South America. If the episode was set before Panama the closest looking thing to ''Smilodon'' would be the less impressive ''[[http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20110925202917/dinosaurs/images/5/51/Thylacosmilus_lentis.jpg Thylacosmilus]]''. And RealLife ''S. populator'' probably hunted more often other immigrants like horses, llamas and young mastodonts, and worried more about defending its kills from hyena-like dire wolves and the giant bear ''Arctotherium'' than about terror birds and ground sloths.
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