History Recap / TheSimpsonsS13E6SheOfLittleFaith

27th Jul '16 7:31:13 PM conankane1
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* AdHominem: The criticisms of Christianity in this episode, including Lisa's crisis of faith and conversion to Buddhism, hinge on this trope. The catalyst and case for them actions of a few Christians; Reverend Lovejoy and the congregation compromising by allowing [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr Burns]] to fund the church and dictate its layout. God's existence, nature, authority, and the merit of His teachings is not touched upon at all, thus making it a very selective criticism.

to:

* AdHominem: The criticisms of Christianity in this episode, including Lisa's crisis of faith and conversion to Buddhism, hinge on this trope. The catalyst and case for them are the actions of a few Christians; Reverend Lovejoy and the congregation compromising by allowing [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr Burns]] to fund the church and dictate its layout. God's existence, nature, authority, and the merit of His teachings is not touched upon at all, thus making it a very selective criticism.
26th Jul '16 5:55:32 PM conankane1
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* SpecialGuest: Richard Gere as himself.
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: The episode missed the opportunity to touch on Ned Flanders reaction to the commercialization of the church. This episode was made during Ned Flanders' fundamentalist phase (since it took place after the episode where Maude died, Ned's fundamentalism is implied to be a coping mechanism for Maude's death and Ned is shown taking Rodd and Todd into a bunker when he hears Lisa shout she's Buddhist) and Ned is far more devout than Lisa, yet his reaction isn't touched on in the episode.

to:

* SpecialGuest: Richard Gere as himself.
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: The episode missed the opportunity to touch on Ned Flanders reaction to the commercialization of the church. This episode was made during Ned Flanders' fundamentalist phase (since it took place after the episode where Maude died, Ned's fundamentalism is implied to be a coping mechanism for Maude's death and Ned is shown taking Rodd and Todd into a bunker when he hears Lisa shout she's Buddhist) and Ned is far more devout than Lisa, yet his reaction isn't touched on in the episode.
himself.
26th Jul '16 5:55:14 PM conankane1
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* SpecialGuest: Richard Gere as himself.

to:

* SpecialGuest: Richard Gere as himself.himself.
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: The episode missed the opportunity to touch on Ned Flanders reaction to the commercialization of the church. This episode was made during Ned Flanders' fundamentalist phase (since it took place after the episode where Maude died, Ned's fundamentalism is implied to be a coping mechanism for Maude's death and Ned is shown taking Rodd and Todd into a bunker when he hears Lisa shout she's Buddhist) and Ned is far more devout than Lisa, yet his reaction isn't touched on in the episode.
26th Jul '16 5:37:30 PM conankane1
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* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Furthermore, Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. This is hypocritical for a number of reasons: 1) Buddhism, just like any organized religion has both good and bad aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is ''very'' one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church, it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as she joins it again without much fuss. 3) She criticized the local Church for being too commercialized, then joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized.

to:

* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Furthermore, Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. This is hypocritical for a number of reasons: 1) Buddhism, just like any organized religion has both good and bad aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is ''very'' one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church, it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as the problems are minor and hinge on the compromise of part of the congregation and she joins it again without much fuss. 3) She criticized the local Church for being too commercialized, then joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized.
26th Jul '16 5:34:07 PM conankane1
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* AdHominem: The criticisms of Christianity in this episode, including Lisa's crisis of faith and conversion to Buddhism, hinge on the actions of a few Christians; Reverend Lovejoy and the congregation compromising by allowing [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr Burns]] to fund the church and dictate its layout. God's existence, authority, and the merit of His teachings is not touched upon at all, thus making it a very selective criticism.

to:

* AdHominem: The criticisms of Christianity in this episode, including Lisa's crisis of faith and conversion to Buddhism, hinge on the this trope. The catalyst and case for them actions of a few Christians; Reverend Lovejoy and the congregation compromising by allowing [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr Burns]] to fund the church and dictate its layout. God's existence, nature, authority, and the merit of His teachings is not touched upon at all, thus making it a very selective criticism.
26th Jul '16 5:27:27 PM conankane1
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* AdHominem: The criticisms of Christianity in this episode, including Lisa's crisis of faith and conversion to Buddhism, hinge on the actions of a few Christians; Reverend Lovejoy and the congregation compromising by allowing [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr Burns]] to fund the church and dictate its layout. God's existence, authority, and the merit of His teachings is not touched upon at all, thus making it a very selective criticism.



* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Furthermore, Lisa critizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. This is hypocritical for a number of reasons: 1) Buddhism, just like any other organized religion, including Christianity, has both good and bad aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is ''very'' one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church, it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as she joins it again without much fuss. 3) She criticized the local Church for being too commercialized, then joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized.

to:

* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Furthermore, Lisa critizes criticizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. This is hypocritical for a number of reasons: 1) Buddhism, just like any other organized religion, including Christianity, religion has both good and bad aspects. aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is ''very'' one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church, it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as she joins it again without much fuss. 3) She criticized the local Church for being too commercialized, then joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized.
11th Jul '16 1:38:45 PM trixus
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* GracefulLoser: Burns tries to disappear in a smoke bomb with the benefit the church made plus his initial gain. When he fails reaching the door in time he just throws all the money at the church committee. No one even tried stopping him he was just disgusted his escape failed.



** Burns also fits this trope; after all he did help rebuild the church, even if the advertisements inside were in bad taste.

to:

** Burns also fits this trope; after all he did help rebuild the church, even if the advertisements inside were in bad taste. Subverted in that he actually wanted to make a run for it with the profit the church made but when he failed he ended up being a GracefulLoser.



* PetTheDog: Even though he opts for commercialism, Mr. Burns does live up to his promise to help rebuild for the church.

to:

* PetTheDog: Even though he opts for commercialism, Mr. Burns does live up to his promise to help rebuild for the church. Granted his plan was to prostitute the church and run with the money it made but he didn't fight hard when his escape failed.
24th Feb '16 6:15:04 AM cwickham
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* {{Bowdlerization}}, WordOfGod, and WhatCouldHaveBeen: Originally, there was supposed to be a scene where an Arab man named Hassan Jay Salam is arrested for shooting the rocket into the church because the rocket has his initials on it (which are actually Homer's initials), but, because of the 9/11 attacks and fear of backlash from Arab viewers, the producers had the scene cut. The DVD commentary talks about the missing scene.

to:

* {{Bowdlerization}}, WordOfGod, and WhatCouldHaveBeen: Originally, there was supposed to be a scene where an Arab man named Hassan Jay Salam is arrested for shooting the rocket into the church because the rocket has his initials on it (which are actually Homer's initials), but, because of the 9/11 attacks and fear of backlash from Arab viewers, the producers had the scene cut. The DVD commentary talks about the missing scene.scene, and it is included on the deleted scenes reel on the DVD.
12th Jun '15 5:30:21 PM noles92
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* KidHasAPoint: Lisa does explains to Bart she's not going for a new way to worship just because it's sounds cool, she rather find one that brings her peace while reminding God that she still respects Him.

to:

* KidHasAPoint: Lisa does explains explain to Bart she's not going for a new way to worship just because it's sounds cool, she rather find one that brings her peace while reminding God that she still respects Him.
3rd Apr '15 12:03:25 PM Wartzanall
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* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Also, Lisa critizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. 1) Buddhism just like any other organized religion, including Christianity, has both good as bad aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is very one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as she joins it again without much cuss. 3) Why did she criticize the local Church for being too commercialized if she joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized?

to:

* BrokenAesop: Christianity is criticized a lot during this episode, while Buddhism is presented in a more positive light, almost as if it is the best possible faith one could have. Also, Furthermore, Lisa critizes her local Christian Church for having become too commercialized and joins another religion, only to return soon afterwards, because she just can't miss her Christmas presents. This is hypocritical for a number of reasons: 1) Buddhism Buddhism, just like any other organized religion, including Christianity, has both good as and bad aspects. Not mentioning or mocking those at all is very ''very'' one-sided. 2) As much as Lisa criticizes her local Christian Church Church, it doesn't seem to be that bad after all, as she joins it again without much cuss. fuss. 3) Why did she criticize She criticized the local Church for being too commercialized if she commercialized, then joins it again out of the same materialistic greed as the other churchgoers she formerly criticized? criticized.



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Kearney, a known bully and petty thug, is right to point out what has to be done about the church, making it a priority. Burns also fits this trope; after all he did help rebuild the church, even if the advertisements inside were in bad taste.

to:

* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Kearney, a known bully and petty thug, is right to point out what has to be done about the church, making it a priority. Burns
**Burns
also fits this trope; after all he did help rebuild the church, even if the advertisements inside were in bad taste.
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