History Quotes / AlanMoore

7th Apr '16 12:38:16 PM JulianLapostat
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->''"Alan Moore is simply stating a fact when he says that today’s popular superheroes were not created for today’s audiences. Virtually all the mainstay DC heroes were created around 75 years ago, Marvel’s are 50 years old. The DC characters we’d think of as ‘newer’, like ComicBook/{{Lobo}}, ComicBook/{{Nightwing}}, and [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] are pushing thirty. Even Image and Dark Horse’s are over 20 years old at this point. You can see the glass half-full or half-empty here: at one level, it’s impressive that characters like Franchise/{{Batman}} have endured. And this isn’t something unique to comics: Franchise/SherlockHolmes, Franchise/JamesBond, and Franchise/DoctorWho were all created for previous generations. We’re also seeing confirmation bias at play: these are the characters who survived, and plenty of their contemporaries who were once household names have all but vanished."''
-->-- '''Lance Parkin''', [[http://sequart.org/magazine/41028/superhero-accessories-part-two-truth-justice-all-that-stuff/ Superhero Accessories]].
11th Feb '16 9:23:59 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''



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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in " With the hands benefit of writers who hindsight and a greater understanding of anthropoid behavior patterns, science fiction author Creator/PhilipJoseFarmer was able to demonstrate quite credibly that the young ''Franchise/{{Tarzan}}'' would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is almost certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do have indulged in sexual experimentation with them. It's an audience largely chimpanzees and that he would just surely have had none of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going the aversion to eating human flesh that Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs attributed to him. As our political and social consciousness continues to evolve, ''[[Literature/KingSolomonsMines Allan Quartermain]]'' stands revealed as just another [[MightyWhitey white imperialist]] out to exploit the natives and we begin to see Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie that the overriding factor in ''Franchise/JamesBond's'' psychological makeup is his utter hatred and delighting in concepts contempt for women. Whether most of us would prefer to enjoy the above-mentioned gentlemen's adventures without spoiling things by considering the social implications is beside the point. The fact remains that [[SocietyMarchesOn we have changed, along with our society]], and that were such characters meant created today [[ValuesDissonance they would be subject to entertain the 12-year-old boys most]] extreme [[BaseBreaker suspicion]] and [[UnfortunateImplications criticism]]."
-->-- '''Creator/AlanMoore''' ''The Mark of Batman'' Introduction to Creator/FrankMiller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' anticipating many
of the 1950s.''


themes he would tackle in the League.
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3rd Dec '15 7:01:55 AM JulianLapostat
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-->-- ''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]''

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-->-- ''On '''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]''
artists]]'''
3rd Dec '15 7:01:39 AM JulianLapostat
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->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.

to:

->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.''
3rd Dec '15 7:01:23 AM JulianLapostat
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->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.

to:

->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ...ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.
3rd Dec '15 7:00:39 AM JulianLapostat
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to:

->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.
-->-- ''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]''


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30th Nov '15 8:35:32 AM Polkaface99
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''


to:

-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''

30th Nov '15 8:35:06 AM Polkaface99
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''


to:

-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''

29th Nov '15 10:28:54 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''You see, somewhere along the line, one of the newer breed of Marvel editors ... had come up with one of those incredibly snappy sounding and utterly stupid little pieces of folk-wisdom that some editors seem to like pulling out of the hat from time to time... 'Readers don’t want change. Readers only want the illusion of change.' Like I said, [[ItSeemedLikeAGoodIdeaAtTheTime it sounds perceptive and well-reasoned on first listening]]. It is also, in my opinion, one of the most specious and retarded theories that it has ever been my misfortune to come across ... [[ViewersAreMorons If readers are that averse to change]] then [[ArmorPiercingQuestion how come Marvel ever got to be so popular in the first place]], [[TheSixties back when]] [[Creator/JackKirby constant change]] and [[Creator/SteveDitko innovation]] was [[GloryDays the order of the day]] ... Perhaps I could have a little more sympathy for pronouncements like this if there was some solid commercial reasoning behind them. If, for example, Marvel’s books suddenly started selling significantly more during the period when this “Let’s-Not-Rock-The-Boat” policy was introduced...This is not the case. Marvel’s best selling title ... sells something like 300,000 copies, and it is regarded as a staggering success. Listen, in a country the size of America, 300,000 copies is absolutely pathetic. Back in [[TheFifties the early fifties]] it was not unknown for even a comparatively minor-league publication ... to clear six million copies every month. Even in the early days of the Marvel empire, any comic that was selling only 300,000 copies would have probably been cause for grave concern amongst those in charge of it’s production, and indeed it would have most likely been cancelled. These days, it’s the best we’ve got.''
-->-- '''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination''', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.

29th Nov '15 10:27:45 PM JulianLapostat
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-->-- ''The Mindscape of Alan Moore''


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-->-- ''The '''The Mindscape of Alan Moore''

Moore'''




-->-- ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpajFQECzAk Interview with John Higgs]]'', Author of ''Stranger Than We Can Imagine: Making Sense of the Twentieth Century'', discussing the controversy of the third volume of ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''.

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-->-- ''[[https://www.'''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpajFQECzAk Interview with John Higgs]]'', Higgs]]''', Author of ''Stranger Than We Can Imagine: Making Sense of the Twentieth Century'', discussing the controversy of the third volume of ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''.



-->-- ''Alan Moore's Letter'', [[https://slovobooks.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/last-alan-moore-interview/ one of many excerpts from the 16,000 Word epistle]].


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-->-- ''Alan Moore's Letter'', '''[[NonIndicativeName Last Alan Moore Interview]]''', [[https://slovobooks.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/last-alan-moore-interview/ one of many excerpts from the 16,000 Word epistle]].




-->-- ''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination'', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.


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-->-- ''Blinded '''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination'', Assassination''', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.

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