History Quotes / AlanMoore

11th Feb '16 9:23:59 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''
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\n\n---- -> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in " With the hands benefit of writers who hindsight and a greater understanding of anthropoid behavior patterns, science fiction author Creator/PhilipJoseFarmer was able to demonstrate quite credibly that the young ''Franchise/{{Tarzan}}'' would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is almost certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do have indulged in sexual experimentation with them. It's an audience largely chimpanzees and that he would just surely have had none of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going the aversion to eating human flesh that Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs attributed to him. As our political and social consciousness continues to evolve, ''[[Literature/KingSolomonsMines Allan Quartermain]]'' stands revealed as just another [[MightyWhitey white imperialist]] out to exploit the natives and we begin to see Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie that the overriding factor in ''Franchise/JamesBond's'' psychological makeup is his utter hatred and delighting in concepts contempt for women. Whether most of us would prefer to enjoy the above-mentioned gentlemen's adventures without spoiling things by considering the social implications is beside the point. The fact remains that [[SocietyMarchesOn we have changed, along with our society]], and that were such characters meant created today [[ValuesDissonance they would be subject to entertain the 12-year-old boys most]] extreme [[BaseBreaker suspicion]] and [[UnfortunateImplications criticism]]." -->-- '''Creator/AlanMoore''' ''The Mark of Batman'' Introduction to Creator/FrankMiller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' anticipating many of the 1950s.'' themes he would tackle in the League. ----
3rd Dec '15 7:01:55 AM JulianLapostat
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-->-- ''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]''
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-->-- ''On '''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]'' artists]]'''
3rd Dec '15 7:01:39 AM JulianLapostat
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->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.
to:
->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.''
3rd Dec '15 7:01:23 AM JulianLapostat
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->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.
to:
->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ...ComicBook/{{Promethea}} ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible.
3rd Dec '15 7:00:39 AM JulianLapostat
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to:
->''The majority of comics artists – some of the best ones, [[Creator/ECComics Harvey Kurtzman]], artist-writer, Creator/WillEisner, artist-writer, Creator/FrankMiller ... Creator/ArtSpiegelman, who I believe has been very vocal about – at least in the past – how the mainstream industry, mainstream comics could produce nothing of worth, because it was not the work of one individual, it was a conveyor-belt process, and thus soulless. I've got a great deal of respect for Art Spiegelman as an intellect, but I think he's wrong on that one. I mean, it depends how you use the collaboration process, I'm sure it can be soulless, I'm sure it can be a conveyor belt, but conveyor belt does not begin to describe the collaboration between me, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins on ''ComicBook{{Watchmen}}'', it doesn't really describe the collaboration between me, John Williams, Mick Gray, Jeremy Higgins and Todd Klein on ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'' ... There's nothing soulless about the way that I approach collaboration – the exact opposite, I try to involve everybody so we've got everybody's energies pouring wholeheartedly into the book, because it is what they most want to do. And then you've got all of those energies in one harness, harnessed to one project, and you can take the story to lengths you would not have imagined possible. -->-- ''On [[http://www.comicscube.com/2012/07/the-craft-interview-with-alan-moore-by.html how he collaborates with artists]]''

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30th Nov '15 8:35:32 AM Polkaface99
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''
to:
-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} Film/{{The Avengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''
30th Nov '15 8:35:06 AM Polkaface99
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-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''
to:
-> ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers Film/{{TheAvengers|2012}} movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.''
29th Nov '15 10:28:54 PM JulianLapostat
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Moving this to Marvel Comics page...
-> ''You see, somewhere along the line, one of the newer breed of Marvel editors ... had come up with one of those incredibly snappy sounding and utterly stupid little pieces of folk-wisdom that some editors seem to like pulling out of the hat from time to time... 'Readers don’t want change. Readers only want the illusion of change.' Like I said, [[ItSeemedLikeAGoodIdeaAtTheTime it sounds perceptive and well-reasoned on first listening]]. It is also, in my opinion, one of the most specious and retarded theories that it has ever been my misfortune to come across ... [[ViewersAreMorons If readers are that averse to change]] then [[ArmorPiercingQuestion how come Marvel ever got to be so popular in the first place]], [[TheSixties back when]] [[Creator/JackKirby constant change]] and [[Creator/SteveDitko innovation]] was [[GloryDays the order of the day]] ... Perhaps I could have a little more sympathy for pronouncements like this if there was some solid commercial reasoning behind them. If, for example, Marvel’s books suddenly started selling significantly more during the period when this “Let’s-Not-Rock-The-Boat” policy was introduced...This is not the case. Marvel’s best selling title ... sells something like 300,000 copies, and it is regarded as a staggering success. Listen, in a country the size of America, 300,000 copies is absolutely pathetic. Back in [[TheFifties the early fifties]] it was not unknown for even a comparatively minor-league publication ... to clear six million copies every month. Even in the early days of the Marvel empire, any comic that was selling only 300,000 copies would have probably been cause for grave concern amongst those in charge of it’s production, and indeed it would have most likely been cancelled. These days, it’s the best we’ve got.'' -->-- '''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination''', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.
29th Nov '15 10:27:45 PM JulianLapostat
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-->-- ''The Mindscape of Alan Moore''
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-->-- ''The '''The Mindscape of Alan Moore'' Moore'''

-->-- ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpajFQECzAk Interview with John Higgs]]'', Author of ''Stranger Than We Can Imagine: Making Sense of the Twentieth Century'', discussing the controversy of the third volume of ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''.
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-->-- ''[[https://www.'''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpajFQECzAk Interview with John Higgs]]'', Higgs]]''', Author of ''Stranger Than We Can Imagine: Making Sense of the Twentieth Century'', discussing the controversy of the third volume of ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''.

-->-- ''Alan Moore's Letter'', [[https://slovobooks.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/last-alan-moore-interview/ one of many excerpts from the 16,000 Word epistle]].
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-->-- ''Alan Moore's Letter'', '''[[NonIndicativeName Last Alan Moore Interview]]''', [[https://slovobooks.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/last-alan-moore-interview/ one of many excerpts from the 16,000 Word epistle]].

-->-- ''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination'', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.
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-->-- ''Blinded '''Blinded By The Hype: An Affectionate Character Assassination'', Assassination''', [[http://geektyrant.com/news/2012/9/25/alan-moores-lost-stan-lee-essay.html 1983 Essay]] on what Moore percieved to be the NetworkDecay of Marvel Comics and comics in general.
29th Nov '15 10:26:36 PM JulianLapostat
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->"On my fortieth birthday, rather than merely bore my friends by having anything as mundane as a midlife crisis I decided it might be more interesting to actually terrify them by going completely mad and declaring myself to be a magician."
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->"On ->''On my fortieth birthday, rather than merely bore my friends by having anything as mundane as a midlife crisis I decided it might be more interesting to actually terrify them by going completely mad and declaring myself to be a magician."''

->"I tend to think that what [[FamedInStory fame]] has done is to replace the sea as the element of choice of [[InHarmsWay adventure]] for young people. If you were a dashing young man in the 19th century you would probably have wanted to run away to sea, just as in the 20th century you might decide that you want to run away and form a pop band. The difference is that in the 19th century, before running away to sea, you would have had at least some understanding of the element that you were dealing with and would have perhaps, say, learned to swim." ->The thing is that there is no manual for how to cope with fame. So you'll get some, otherwise likeable young person, who has done one good comic book, one good film, one good record, suddenly told that they are a genius, who believes it and who runs out laughing and splashing into the billows of celebrity, and whose heroin-sodden corpse is washed up a few weeks later in the shallows of the tabloids." -> "I got quite [[BrokenBase a bit of criticism for that]]. I know that people were saying after reading the third book, that it was my equivalent of saying,"[[NostalgiaFilter It were old fields around here once]]" which it wasn't, that wasn't what I was saying. What I was saying was that I don't think it was unfair to choose ''[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera]'' as representing a big important cultural event of 1910. I don't think it was unfair choosing ''[[Film/{{Performance}} Donald Cammell's Performance]]'' as representing a big important cultural event in 1969 and I don't think it was unfair choosing Creator/JKRowling's ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' as representing a big cultural event in the early 21st Century. I would say that it you were to plot those things along the graph -- the line isn't going up. I think that it's a fair comment that our approach to culture -- in the mainstream -- has degenerated ... I wasn't saying that all culture in the late 21st Century was rubbish or I wasn't saying that culture was doomed. I was saying that mainstream culture [[FollowTheLeader was becoming repititive]], was not having original ideas, would no longer be capable of coming up with a ''Film/{{Performance}}'', leave alone a ''[[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera Threepenny Opera]]''."
to:
->"I ->''I tend to think that what [[FamedInStory fame]] has done is to replace the sea as the element of choice of [[InHarmsWay adventure]] for young people. If you were a dashing young man in the 19th century you would probably have wanted to run away to sea, just as in the 20th century you might decide that you want to run away and form a pop band. The difference is that in the 19th century, before running away to sea, you would have had at least some understanding of the element that you were dealing with and would have perhaps, say, learned to swim." ->The swim ... The thing is that there is no manual for how to cope with fame. So you'll get some, otherwise likeable young person, who has done one good comic book, one good film, one good record, suddenly told that they are a genius, who believes it and who runs out laughing and splashing into the billows of celebrity, and whose heroin-sodden corpse is washed up a few weeks later in the shallows of the tabloids." '' -> "I ''I got quite [[BrokenBase a bit of criticism for that]]. I know that people were saying after reading the third book, that it was my equivalent of saying,"[[NostalgiaFilter It were old fields around here once]]" which it wasn't, that wasn't what I was saying. What I was saying was that I don't think it was unfair to choose ''[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera]'' '''[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera]''' as representing a big important cultural event of 1910. I don't think it was unfair choosing ''[[Film/{{Performance}} [[Film/{{Performance}} Donald Cammell's Performance]]'' Performance]] as representing a big important cultural event in 1969 and I don't think it was unfair choosing Creator/JKRowling's ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' '''Franchise/HarryPotter''' as representing a big cultural event in the early 21st Century. I would say that it you were to plot those things along the graph -- the line isn't going up. I think that it's a fair comment that our approach to culture -- in the mainstream -- has degenerated ... I wasn't saying that all culture in the late 21st Century was rubbish or I wasn't saying that culture was doomed. I was saying that mainstream culture [[FollowTheLeader was becoming repititive]], was not having original ideas, would no longer be capable of coming up with a ''Film/{{Performance}}'', '''Film/{{Performance}}''', leave alone a ''[[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera '''[[Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera Threepenny Opera]]''." Opera]]'''.''

-> "Returning to the question, as to whether it is [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad ‘permissible’ for people of one kind to depict people or another]] ... I submit that if this restriction were universally adopted, we would have had no authors from middle-class backgrounds who were able to write about the situation of the lower classes, which would have effectively ruled out almost all authors since Creator/WilliamShakespeare (whose rarity as an example of a writer from an apparently [[SelfMadeMan working class background]] is attested by [[TakeThat the number of theoreticians from more elevated social groups]] who would have it [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question that his work could only possibly have been composed by a member of the aristocracy]]). While I might have winced on many occasions as a middle-class author such as Creator/MartinAmis presents his (at least to my mind) [[TakeThat lazy and offensive studies of a vulnerable underclass]], I would certainly hesitate before proposing any imposition of an ideology that would also exclude the works of Creator/CharlesDickens, Gerald Kersh or any of several hundred other fine writers. I understand that it may not be considered good form to suggest that class issues are as important as issues of race, gender or sexuality, despite the fact that from my own perspective they seem perhaps even more fundamental and crucially relevant. After all, while in the West after many years of arduous struggle we are now allowed to elect women, non-white people and even, surely at least in theory, people of openly alternative sexualities, [[WorkingClassHero I am relatively certain that we will never be allowed to elect a man or woman of any race or persuasion who is poor]]."
to:
-> "Returning ''Returning to the question, as to whether it is [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad ‘permissible’ for people of one kind to depict people or another]] ... I submit that if this restriction were universally adopted, we would have had no authors from middle-class backgrounds who were able to write about the situation of the lower classes, which would have effectively ruled out almost all authors since Creator/WilliamShakespeare (whose rarity as an example of a writer from an apparently [[SelfMadeMan working class background]] is attested by [[TakeThat the number of theoreticians from more elevated social groups]] who would have it [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question that his work could only possibly have been composed by a member of the aristocracy]]). While I might have winced on many occasions as a middle-class author such as Creator/MartinAmis presents his (at least to my mind) [[TakeThat lazy and offensive studies of a vulnerable underclass]], I would certainly hesitate before proposing any imposition of an ideology that would also exclude the works of Creator/CharlesDickens, Gerald Kersh or any of several hundred other fine writers. I understand that it may not be considered good form to suggest that class issues are as important as issues of race, gender or sexuality, despite the fact that from my own perspective they seem perhaps even more fundamental and crucially relevant. After all, while in the West after many years of arduous struggle we are now allowed to elect women, non-white people and even, surely at least in theory, people of openly alternative sexualities, [[WorkingClassHero I am relatively certain that we will never be allowed to elect a man or woman of any race or persuasion who is poor]]."''

-> "You see, somewhere along the line, one of the newer breed of Marvel editors ... had come up with one of those incredibly snappy sounding and utterly stupid little pieces of folk-wisdom that some editors seem to like pulling out of the hat from time to time... 'Readers don’t want change. Readers only want the illusion of change.' Like I said, [[ItSeemedLikeAGoodIdeaAtTheTime it sounds perceptive and well-reasoned on first listening]]. It is also, in my opinion, one of the most specious and retarded theories that it has ever been my misfortune to come across ... [[ViewersAreMorons If readers are that averse to change]] then [[ArmorPiercingQuestion how come Marvel ever got to be so popular in the first place]], [[TheSixties back when]] [[Creator/JackKirby constant change]] and [[Creator/SteveDitko innovation]] was [[GloryDays the order of the day]] ... Perhaps I could have a little more sympathy for pronouncements like this if there was some solid commercial reasoning behind them. If, for example, Marvel’s books suddenly started selling significantly more during the period when this “Let’s-Not-Rock-The-Boat” policy was introduced...This is not the case. Marvel’s best selling title ... sells something like 300,000 copies, and it is regarded as a staggering success. Listen, in a country the size of America, 300,000 copies is absolutely pathetic. Back in [[TheFifties the early fifties]] it was not unknown for even a comparatively minor-league publication ... to clear six million copies every month. Even in the early days of the Marvel empire, any comic that was selling only 300,000 copies would have probably been cause for grave concern amongst those in charge of it’s production, and indeed it would have most likely been cancelled. These days, it’s the best we’ve got."
to:
-> "You ''You see, somewhere along the line, one of the newer breed of Marvel editors ... had come up with one of those incredibly snappy sounding and utterly stupid little pieces of folk-wisdom that some editors seem to like pulling out of the hat from time to time... 'Readers don’t want change. Readers only want the illusion of change.' Like I said, [[ItSeemedLikeAGoodIdeaAtTheTime it sounds perceptive and well-reasoned on first listening]]. It is also, in my opinion, one of the most specious and retarded theories that it has ever been my misfortune to come across ... [[ViewersAreMorons If readers are that averse to change]] then [[ArmorPiercingQuestion how come Marvel ever got to be so popular in the first place]], [[TheSixties back when]] [[Creator/JackKirby constant change]] and [[Creator/SteveDitko innovation]] was [[GloryDays the order of the day]] ... Perhaps I could have a little more sympathy for pronouncements like this if there was some solid commercial reasoning behind them. If, for example, Marvel’s books suddenly started selling significantly more during the period when this “Let’s-Not-Rock-The-Boat” policy was introduced...This is not the case. Marvel’s best selling title ... sells something like 300,000 copies, and it is regarded as a staggering success. Listen, in a country the size of America, 300,000 copies is absolutely pathetic. Back in [[TheFifties the early fifties]] it was not unknown for even a comparatively minor-league publication ... to clear six million copies every month. Even in the early days of the Marvel empire, any comic that was selling only 300,000 copies would have probably been cause for grave concern amongst those in charge of it’s production, and indeed it would have most likely been cancelled. These days, it’s the best we’ve got."''

-> "I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s."
to:
-> "I ''I hate superheroes. I think they're abominations. They don't mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it's nothing to do with them. It's an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men...I think it's a rather alarming sign if we've got audiences of adults going to see Film/TheAvengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s." ''
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