History OlderThanTheyThink / VideoGames

21st Sep '17 12:49:58 PM Pichu-kun
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** Speaking of Nyarlathotep, the [[Creator/HPLovecraft first appearance]] of the Crawling Chaos certainly wasn't in the ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' or ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' games, despite what some people seem to believe.

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** * Speaking of Nyarlathotep, the [[Creator/HPLovecraft first appearance]] of the Crawling Chaos certainly wasn't in the ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' or ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' games, despite what some people seem to believe.



* The CutScene goes at least as far back as ''PacMan'' (1980).

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* The CutScene goes at least as far back as ''PacMan'' ''VideoGame/PacMan'' (1980).



** Many sources cite ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' as the first game (Zelda or otherwise) that had an open world and/or let the player save and resume their game. Which couldn't be further from the truth, as both had been standard features of computer [=RPGs=] since the late 70s. In fact they had an arguably more advanced (and definitely more convenient) save system, letting the player manually save at any point and without having to die or quit. It wasn't until 1993 that Zelda adopted this save system.

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** Many sources cite ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' as the first game (Zelda (''Zelda'' or otherwise) that had an open world and/or let the player save and resume their game. Which couldn't be further from the truth, as both had been standard features of computer [=RPGs=] since the late 70s. In fact they had an arguably more advanced (and definitely more convenient) save system, letting the player manually save at any point and without having to die or quit. It wasn't until 1993 that Zelda adopted this save system.



* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' has a lot of examples mostly caused by NoExportForYou: Many players expressed their bewilderment that Nosferatu was changed from Dark to Light magic in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''. What they don't realize is, Nosferatu (called Rezire in the Japanese version) was actually a light magic spell to begin with, first appearing in the third game, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Mystery of the Emblem]]''. It was, in fact, the GBA games that changed it from Light to Dark, and ''[=PoR=]'' restored it. Unfortunately, since the localizers [[SequelFirst got the GBA games first]], they chose a very dark magic sounding name for it, making the transition pretty strange.
** More examples from the series:
*** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]'' giving Pegasus Knights the option to promote to Wyvern Knights may seem like a bit of FridgeLogic, but that was how the promotion path went for them in the first game. It wasn't until [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral the fourth]] that Pegasus Knights and Wyvern Riders were made separate class groups.
*** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]''' "unique" features (frequently met with TheyChangedItNowItSucks): Monster enemies, a traversable world map, replayable battles and branching promotions? All of them debuted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'', ''6 games earlier''.
*** The Skill system of the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius games]] originated in the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Jugdral games]] on SNES. Many of the skills found there were taken from those games. There's a case of this even among the skills of ''Geneology'' too: the now well-known Sol, Luna and Astra skills actually had their names taken from three [[RandomlyDrops very, VERY hard to find]] Lances from ''Gaiden'', the second game in the series.
*** Similarly, there are some people who think that three-tier classes debuted in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]''. Again, it was done fifteen years earlier by ''Gaiden''.
*** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' is the first modern ''Fire Emblem'' game to abandon the [[BreakableWeapons weapon durability]] system. It is not, however, the very first -- that, once again, was ''Gaiden''.
*** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' was, according to the developers, meant to be a "greatest hits" of game mechanics from the entire series. The one that tends to go over most western fans' heads is the marriage and children system, which originated in the fourth game in the series: ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Geneology of the Holy War]]''.
*** The [[HelloInsertNameHere Avatar]] creation system, Casual Mode (which disables [[FinalDeath permanent death]]), and [[HarderThanHard Lunatic difficulty]] of ''Awakening'' all debuted in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Shadow'', the sequel to ''Shadow Dragon'' that fell victim to NoExportForYou.

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' has a lot of examples mostly caused by NoExportForYou: NoExportForYou:
**
Many players expressed their bewilderment that Nosferatu was changed from Dark to Light magic in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''. What they don't realize is, Nosferatu (called Rezire in the Japanese version) was actually a light magic spell to begin with, first appearing in the third game, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Mystery of the Emblem]]''. It was, in fact, the GBA games that changed it from Light to Dark, and ''[=PoR=]'' restored it. Unfortunately, since the localizers [[SequelFirst got the GBA games first]], they chose a very dark magic sounding name for it, making the transition pretty strange.
** More examples from the series:
***
''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]'' giving Pegasus Knights the option to promote to Wyvern Knights may seem like a bit of FridgeLogic, but that was how the promotion path went for them in the first game. It wasn't until [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral the fourth]] that Pegasus Knights and Wyvern Riders were made separate class groups.
*** ** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]''' "unique" features (frequently met with TheyChangedItNowItSucks): Monster enemies, a traversable world map, replayable battles and branching promotions? All of them debuted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'', ''6 games earlier''.
*** ** The Skill system of the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius games]] originated in the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Jugdral games]] on SNES. Many of the skills found there were taken from those games. There's a case of this even among the skills of ''Geneology'' too: the now well-known Sol, Luna and Astra skills actually had their names taken from three [[RandomlyDrops very, VERY hard to find]] Lances from ''Gaiden'', the second game in the series.
*** ** Similarly, there are some people who think that three-tier classes debuted in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]''. Again, it was done fifteen years earlier by ''Gaiden''.
*** ** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' is the first modern ''Fire Emblem'' game to abandon the [[BreakableWeapons weapon durability]] system. It is not, however, the very first -- that, once again, was ''Gaiden''.
*** ** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' was, according to the developers, meant to be a "greatest hits" of game mechanics from the entire series. The one that tends to go over most western fans' heads is the marriage and children system, which originated in the fourth game in the series: ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Geneology of the Holy War]]''.
*** ** The [[HelloInsertNameHere Avatar]] creation system, Casual Mode (which disables [[FinalDeath permanent death]]), and [[HarderThanHard Lunatic difficulty]] of ''Awakening'' all debuted in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Shadow'', the sequel to ''Shadow Dragon'' that fell victim to NoExportForYou.



* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name, design and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the worldwide use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].

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* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':
**
There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name, design and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the worldwide use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].



** Many people also think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' was the first Sonic game taking place on Earth, with previous games taking place on Mobius instead. The Japanese manual of ''Sonic 1'' says otherwise, as it specifically calls Sonic's world "Earth," and never mentions Mobius. Like the Robotnik name, Mobius was an American invention by the localization team, and it simply got scrapped when Sega of America switched to keeping the games' original Japanese stories.

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** Many people also think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' was the first Sonic ''Sonic'' game taking place on Earth, with previous games taking place on Mobius instead. The Japanese manual of ''Sonic 1'' says otherwise, as it specifically calls Sonic's world "Earth," and never mentions Mobius. Like the Robotnik name, Mobius was an American invention by the localization team, and it simply got scrapped when Sega of America switched to keeping the games' original Japanese stories.



* More casual Sonic fans might think that Team Chaotix debuted in ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'', when in fact they first appeared about 8 years prior in the relatively obscure ''VideoGame/KnucklesChaotix''. ''Knuckles Chaotix'' also had a sort of prototype to the team up theme of ''Sonic Heroes'', though the true origin of that obviously lies with ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''.
* While they received better reviews than its predecessors overall, ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' (2010) got a lot of flak for its space setting being a rip-off of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' (2007), despite "Sonic going to Eggman's space base" being a recurring trend in Sonic since ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' (1992).

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* ** More casual Sonic ''Sonic'' fans might think that Team Chaotix debuted in ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'', when in fact they first appeared about 8 years prior in the relatively obscure ''VideoGame/KnucklesChaotix''. ''Knuckles Chaotix'' also had a sort of prototype to the team up theme of ''Sonic Heroes'', though the true origin of that obviously lies with ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''.
* ** While they received better reviews than its predecessors overall, ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' (2010) got a lot of flak for its space setting being a rip-off of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' (2007), despite "Sonic going to Eggman's space base" being a recurring trend in Sonic since ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' (1992).



* Sonic's appearance in ''VideoGame/LegoDimensions'' was not the first time developer TravellersTales did Sonic: they had previously developed two Sonic games on the Sega Genesis and Saturn - ''VideoGame/Sonic3DBlast'' and ''VideoGame/SonicR''.

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* ** Sonic's appearance in ''VideoGame/LegoDimensions'' was not the first time developer TravellersTales did Sonic: they had previously developed two Sonic games on the Sega Genesis and Saturn - ''VideoGame/Sonic3DBlast'' and ''VideoGame/SonicR''.



* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' did not start with ''VideoGame/{{Harvest Moon 64}}'' and especially not ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife''. It was a [[VideoGame/HarvestMoon1 SNES game]] first, but the title was released too late in the consoles line to get much notice.
** The series first sixth generation game was not ''A Wonderful Life'' but ''Save the Homeland'' on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2. The game was largely obscure to fans until the PSP remake due to being a black sheep, what with being a Playstation title with a mostly Nintendo series and lacking marriage.
*** Similarly ''Friends of Mineral Town'' is considered the first handheld game. It's predated by three (technically two since one is basically a rerelease) Game Boy and Game Boy Color games.
* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' was an arcade game long before it was a NES classic.

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* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'':
**
''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' did not start with ''VideoGame/{{Harvest Moon 64}}'' and especially not ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife''. It was a [[VideoGame/HarvestMoon1 SNES game]] first, but the title was released too late in the consoles line to get much notice.
** The series first sixth generation game was not ''A Wonderful Life'' but ''Save ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonSaveTheHomeland Save the Homeland'' Homeland]]'' on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2. The game was largely obscure to fans until the PSP remake due to being a black sheep, what with being a Playstation title with a mostly Nintendo series and lacking marriage.
*** ** Similarly ''Friends of Mineral Town'' is considered the first handheld game. It's predated by three (technically two since one is basically a rerelease) Game Boy and Game Boy Color games.
* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' ''VideoGame/PunchOut'':
** ''Punch Out!''
was an arcade game long before it was a NES classic.
20th Sep '17 6:03:21 PM Pichu-kun
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* Apparently, casual games, the scourge of gaming, are a new thing with the Nintendo Wii. Even PC gamers are saying this. Obviously they're ignoring the fact that not only have games that fit under the definition of "casual" like ''VideoGame/{{Snood}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bejeweled}}'' have been around for even longer than the Wii.
** For that matter, games that are now considered "casual" due to their simplicity have been around before many gamers were born. Most arcade games are by most hardcore gamers' definition "casual", as are several early games.

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* Apparently, casual games, the scourge of gaming, are a new thing with the Nintendo Wii. Even PC gamers are saying this. Obviously they're ignoring the fact that not only have games that fit under the definition of "casual" like ''VideoGame/{{Snood}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bejeweled}}'' have been around for even longer than the Wii.
**
Wii. For that matter, games that are now considered "casual" due to their simplicity have been around before many gamers were born. Most arcade games are by most hardcore gamers' definition "casual", as are several early games.



** Megami Tensei also involved computers that can access the world of monsters. In a way, Megami Tensei predated both Pokemon and Digimon.

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** Megami Tensei ''Megami Tensei'' also involved computers that can access the world of monsters. In a way, Megami Tensei ''Megami Tensei'' predated both Pokemon ''Pokemon'' and Digimon.''Digimon''.



** In the ''Series/XPlay'' review for the North American release of ''beatmania'', after giving it a poor score, co-host Morgan Webb accused it of being one of many ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' rip-offs (despite the original beatmania coming out in 1997).

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** In the ''Series/XPlay'' review for the North American release of ''beatmania'', after giving it a poor score, co-host Morgan Webb accused it of being one of many ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' rip-offs (despite the original beatmania ''beatmania'' coming out in 1997).



** Actually, "sandbox simulation" games also predate ''VideoGame/SimCity'' by about 20 years. ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamurabi Hamurabi]]'' (1969) might be a good classic example. ''The Sims'', on the other hand, is somewhat similar to ''VideoGame/LittleComputerPeople'' (1985).
*** Hamurabi was a management sim, not a sandbox sim (a sandbox sim is essentially a gamewhere you place all the buildings yourself).



** Likewise, the North American name "Toadstool" was changed to "Peach" not in ''Super Mario 64'', but in ''Yoshi's Safari''.

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** Likewise, the North American name "Toadstool" was changed to "Peach" not in ''Super Mario 64'', but in ''Yoshi's Safari''.''VideoGame/YoshisSafari''.



** Daisy is often mistaken for a CanonForeigner when she first appeared in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand''. Many people didn't realize that wasn't Peach or don't know of the game.
** A lot of people think Luigi as being a CowardlyLion first appeared in ''Series/TheSuperMarioBrosSuperShow'' when there was an UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} commercial for the original ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' game that depicts him as frightened of the monsters and crying for Mario to help him.
*** Speaking of which, while Toad's current raspy voice is said among Mario fans to be in response to him being mistaken for a girl in games like ''Mario Kart 64'', ''The Super Mario Bros. Super Show'' already had Toad sounding like that several years prior.

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** Daisy is often mistaken for a CanonForeigner when CanonForeigner, however she first appeared in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand''. Many people either didn't realize that wasn't Peach or don't know of the game.
** A lot of people think Luigi as being a CowardlyLion first appeared in ''Series/TheSuperMarioBrosSuperShow'' when ''Series/TheSuperMarioBrosSuperShow''. Actually, there was an UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} commercial for the original ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' game that depicts him as frightened of the monsters and crying for Mario to help him.
*** ** Speaking of which, while Toad's current raspy voice is said among Mario ''Mario' fans to be in response to him being mistaken for a girl in games like ''Mario Kart 64'', ''The Super Mario Bros. Super Show'' already had Toad sounding like that several years prior.
9th Sep '17 9:46:45 PM nombretomado
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* IGN said many times that the ''BackyardSports'' series started around the dawn of the [=PS2=] (after when the editors think games died). The series actually released its first game in ''1997'', a few years after the release of the [=PS1=] and long before the [=PS2=]. (In fact, it was released around the same time as IGN's favorite games.)

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* IGN said many times that the ''BackyardSports'' ''VideoGame/BackyardSports'' series started around the dawn of the [=PS2=] (after when the editors think games died). The series actually released its first game in ''1997'', a few years after the release of the [=PS1=] and long before the [=PS2=]. (In fact, it was released around the same time as IGN's favorite games.)
3rd Sep '17 5:47:02 AM Dere
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* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name, design and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik worldwide can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].

to:

* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name, design and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the worldwide use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik worldwide can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].
3rd Sep '17 5:46:15 AM Dere
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** Sonic Adventure wasn't even the first game to have Robotnik go by "Eggman" outside of Japan.
3rd Sep '17 5:45:48 AM Dere
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* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during the development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik worldwide can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].

to:

* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during the development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name name, design and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik worldwide can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone]].



** Speaking of ''Sonic Adventure'' again, there was quite the BrokenBase over the characters [[SuddenlyVoiced having fully-voiced dialogue]]. Except for that this wasn't the first game in which Sonic & co. spoke. That honor belongs to the [[NoExportForYou Japanese-only]] arcade game ''Waku Waku Sonic Patrol Car'', followed by ''VideoGame/SegaSonicTheHedgehog'' and ''[=SegaSonic=] Cosmo Fighter''.

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** Speaking of ''Sonic Adventure'' again, there was quite the BrokenBase over the characters [[SuddenlyVoiced having fully-voiced dialogue]]. Except for that this wasn't the first game in which Sonic & co. spoke. That honor belongs to the [[NoExportForYou Japanese-only]] arcade game ''Waku Waku Sonic Patrol Car'', followed by ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehogCD'', ''VideoGame/SegaSonicTheHedgehog'' and ''[=SegaSonic=] Cosmo Fighter''.
30th Aug '17 5:52:27 PM X2X
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* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' was up to ''[[VideoGame/DragonQuestIII III]]'' by the time ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy|I}}'' was first released. Due to poor planning it took VideoGame/DragonQuest years longer to make it overseas thereby cementing ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' as the beginning of the JRPG to almost everybody outside of Japan. ''Dragon Quest'' often doesn't even get a cursory glance despite codifying and/or making basically every single JRPG trope. [[PunctuatedForEmphasis Every. Single. One.]]

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* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' was up to ''[[VideoGame/DragonQuestIII III]]'' by the time ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy|I}}'' was first released. Due to poor planning planning, it took VideoGame/DragonQuest ''Dragon Quest'' years longer to make it overseas overseas, thereby cementing ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' as the beginning of the JRPG to almost everybody outside of Japan. ''Dragon Quest'' often doesn't even get a cursory glance despite codifying and/or making basically every single JRPG trope. [[PunctuatedForEmphasis Every. Single. One.]]



* The ''Dragon Quest'' series is known for its party chat feature, which made its way into remakes of some of the earlier games. The series also introduced in a similar fashion a bag with unlimited capacity separate from the party members' individual inventories. Both of these features appeared in the ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' Famicom JRPG ''Giga Zombie no Gyakushū'' long before VideoGame/DragonQuest got around to them.

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* The ''Dragon Quest'' ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' series is known for its party chat feature, which made its way into remakes of some of the earlier games. The series also introduced in a similar fashion a bag with unlimited capacity separate from the party members' individual inventories. Both of these features appeared in the ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' Famicom JRPG ''Giga Zombie no Gyakushū'' long before VideoGame/DragonQuest ''Dragon Quest'' got around to them.
30th Aug '17 5:49:41 PM X2X
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* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''[=BlazBlue=]'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.

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* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''[=BlazBlue=]'' ''Franchise/BlazBlue'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.
29th Aug '17 3:11:39 AM Dere
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* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during the development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even so, the use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone.]]

to:

* There are people who think that ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' renamed Dr. Robotnik to Dr. Eggman, making the former name the "original" one and the later a relatively recent change, which couldn't be further from truth. Not only was he always known as Eggman in Japan, but this name came ''before'' Robotnik. While ''Sonic 1'' was released in North America first, the game and its characters were created and developed entirely in Japan, with the villain being known as "Dr. Eggman" during the development. Even early American magazines covering the game when it was still in development used that name. It wasn't until the game was finished that Sega of America decided to make changes to its plot, one of which involved changing the antagonist's name and personality. ''Sonic Adventure'' merely marked the point the games started using the character's original name overseas, like ''Yoshi's Safari'' did with "Peach." Even so, then, it wasn't the first game to identify him as Eggman outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual. And even before ''that'', the use of "Eggman" in reference to Robotnik worldwide can be seen as early as ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='s=] [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/sonic/images/b/b7/WingFortressEggman.jpg Wing Fortress Zone.]]Zone]].



** Sonic Adventure wasn't even the first game to have Robotnik go by "Eggman" outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual.

to:

** Sonic Adventure wasn't even the first game to have Robotnik go by "Eggman" outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual.
28th Aug '17 10:34:29 AM Dere
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** Sonic Adventure wasn't even the first game to have Robotnik go by "Eggman" outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]].

to:

** Sonic Adventure wasn't even the first game to have Robotnik go by "Eggman" outside of Japan. That honor goes to [[VideoGame/SonicDrift Sonic Drift 2]].2]], using the name both in-game and in the English manual.
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