History OlderThanTheyThink / VideoGames

18th Jun '18 12:52:31 AM Kadorhal
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* Valve highlighted the "virtual camera" in their Source Engine tech demo, where a "screen" can show actual real-time 3D footage from some "camera" (as opposed to a movie on texture or something). Cool, but ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' did this in 2001 where the radar map can showcase, in real-time 3D, what the enemy is doing when in the Alert or Evasion phases.
* ''VideoGame/TimeKillers'' introduced the concept of four punch and kick buttons being those of respective left and right limbs, which have been popularized by ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''.
* Speaking of ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', while Eddy Gordo was a revolutionary character and is definitely the most popular example of a UsefulNotes/{{capoeira}} fighter in video games, he wasn't the first. Elena from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' beat him to the punch by a few months, while Richard Meyer and Bob Wilson from ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' predate them both by several years. And if we're talking more general {{Dance Battler}}s, you also had characters like Duck King, also from ''Fatal Fury'', and Dee Jay from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''.

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* Valve highlighted the "virtual camera" in their Source Engine tech demo, where a "screen" can show actual real-time 3D footage from some "camera" (as opposed to a movie on an animated texture or something). Cool, but ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' did this in 2001 where the radar map can showcase, in real-time 3D, what the enemy is doing when in the Alert or Evasion phases.
phases. The original ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'' engine from 1998 was also proven to be able to handle it, as in 2000 a mod for ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' came out that, when you equipped the [[{{Teleportation}} Translocator]] and sent out its beacon, would place a small screen on your HUD that showed what a "camera" on that beacon could see, even allowing you to rotate it to scout the area out before teleporting yourself to it.
* ''VideoGame/TimeKillers'' introduced the concept of four punch and kick buttons being those of respective left and right limbs, which have has been popularized by ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''.
* Speaking of ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', ''Tekken'', while Eddy Gordo was a revolutionary character and is definitely the most popular example of a UsefulNotes/{{capoeira}} fighter in video games, he wasn't the first. Elena from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' beat him to the punch by a few months, while Richard Meyer and Bob Wilson from ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' predate them both by several years. And if we're talking more general {{Dance Battler}}s, you also had characters like Duck King, also from ''Fatal Fury'', and Dee Jay from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''.
14th Jun '18 8:05:19 PM nombretomado
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* WebVideo/GameTheoryWebShow has popularized many theories however many were in existence prior to the videos. For example the idea Cloud, from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', [[spoiler:accidentally drowned Aerith]] has been a [[EpilepticTrees theory]] that's floated around for years.

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* WebVideo/GameTheoryWebShow ''WebVideo/GameTheory'' has popularized many theories however many were in existence prior to the videos. For example the idea Cloud, from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', [[spoiler:accidentally drowned Aerith]] has been a [[EpilepticTrees theory]] that's floated around for years.
19th May '18 3:45:03 PM Cenourinha
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* Despite what [[MemeticMutation the Internet]] seems to think, the line "Hey you, get off [of] my cloud!" did not originate from ''VideoGame/HotelMario''. It is the title of a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Get_Off_of_My_Cloud Rolling Stones song]] from 1965, before video games as we know them even existed.

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* Despite what [[MemeticMutation the Internet]] seems to think, the line "Hey you, get off [of] my cloud!" did not originate from ''VideoGame/HotelMario''. [[ShoutOut It is the title title]] of a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Get_Off_of_My_Cloud Rolling Stones song]] from 1965, before video games as we know them even existed.
13th May '18 6:13:36 PM klausbaudelaire
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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and SNES had online multiplayer, through a commercially failed device known as the UsefulNotes/{{XBAND}}. It was mostly ExecutiveMeddling that killed it since nobody wanted to host the service. For portables, Nintendo had a cellphone-based service that [[NoExportForYou remained in Japan]], predating anything practical by two generations.
** Before that, there was the XBAND's predecessor for the NES, the [=TelePlay=] Modem, made by the same company. ExecutiveMeddling prevented it from ever getting released.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and SNES had online multiplayer, through a commercially failed device known as the UsefulNotes/{{XBAND}}. It was mostly ExecutiveMeddling that killed it since nobody wanted to host the service. Not to mention that practically no developer took an interest in adding XBAND support for their games, save for ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'', which necessitated reverse-engineering the games to add multiplayer support. For portables, Nintendo had a cellphone-based service that [[NoExportForYou remained in Japan]], predating anything practical by two generations.
** Before that, there was the XBAND's predecessor for the NES, the [=TelePlay=] Modem, made by the same company.Keith Rupp and Nolan Bushnell of Creator/{{Atari}} fame. ExecutiveMeddling prevented it from ever getting released.
13th May '18 3:56:14 AM jormis29
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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and SNES had online multiplayer, through a commercially failed device known as the XBAND. It was mostly ExecutiveMeddling that killed it since nobody wanted to host the service. For portables, Nintendo had a cellphone-based service that [[NoExportForYou remained in Japan]], predating anything practical by two generations.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and SNES had online multiplayer, through a commercially failed device known as the XBAND.UsefulNotes/{{XBAND}}. It was mostly ExecutiveMeddling that killed it since nobody wanted to host the service. For portables, Nintendo had a cellphone-based service that [[NoExportForYou remained in Japan]], predating anything practical by two generations.
4th May '18 12:34:21 AM X2X
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* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''Franchise/BlazBlue'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Likewise, the widely praised idea of a single narrative with constantly alternating characters/perspectives seen in the [[Creator/NetherrealmStudios NRS]] fighters began with the installment before the 2011 reboot of ''Franchise/MortalKombat'', ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' (2008). Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.

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* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' [[note]]all of which date back to [[TheNineties the mid-to-late 90s]][[/note]] have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', series (20022008), ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'' (2002), and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game (1998 [[note]]1999 for ''[[UpdatedRerelease Heritage for the Future]]''[[/note]]) to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''Franchise/BlazBlue'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Likewise, the widely praised idea of a single narrative with constantly alternating characters/perspectives seen in the [[Creator/NetherrealmStudios NRS]] fighters began with the installment before the 2011 reboot of ''Franchise/MortalKombat'', ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' (2008). Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.
23rd Apr '18 12:14:56 PM X2X
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* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''Franchise/BlazBlue'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.

to:

* As far as {{fighting game}}s go, [[ExcusePlot while the plot is usually an afterthought]] [[CompetitiveBalance to the gameplay]], many gaming publications and websites will state that story wasn't given a strong focus until titles like ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger'' (2009), ''VideoGame/{{Mortal Kombat|9}}'' (2011), ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' (2012), and ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' (2013) came along. This is largely untrue. Among others, ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', the ''VideoGame/{{Soul|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', and ''VideoGame/RivalSchools'' have narratives that are both elaborate and apparent within the confines of the actual game, though some [[ContinuityCreep were not like this initially]] and a few went off the rails with certain installments. It was also extremely common for titles based on licensed properties like the ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' series, ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'', and Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture JoJo's Bizarre Adventure]]'' game to have strong story elements in the single player modes. Even ''VideoGame/{{Weaponlord}}'' (1995) made an attempt at immersive storytelling in spite of mostly catering to hardcore players, and the original ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' (1992) also had a fairly heavy emphasis on story for the era it was created in. In fact, features such as branching story routes and multiple endings that earned ''Franchise/BlazBlue'' laudation were taken from previous Creator/ArcSystemWorks title ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' (particularly the console version of ''XX'', which predates its SpiritualSuccessor's home release by about six and a half years), and the Tales of Souls in ''Soulcalibur III'' (2005) operated similarly. Likewise, the widely praised idea of a single narrative with constantly alternating characters/perspectives seen in the [[Creator/NetherrealmStudios NRS]] fighters began with the installment before the 2011 reboot of ''Franchise/MortalKombat'', ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' (2008). Several of these titles lack the same kind of mainstream appeal that the largely bare-bones ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series has and [[UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity many fans of the genre]] are known to [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory ignore the story elements anyway]], which likely account for the misconception.
3rd Apr '18 3:12:24 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''G-VideoGame/{{Darius}}'' (1997) is well-known for its BeamOWar mechanic where the player has to mash the fire button to overtake the enemy's beam. However, Taito's own ''VideoGame/MetalBlack'' (1991) features the same mechanic and predates ''G-Darius'' by six years.
16th Mar '18 6:20:31 AM Koveras
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* ''VideoGame/WarCraft III'' was not the first strategy game to use RPG elements, as many of its fans believe. The concept first appeared in New World Computing's ''King's Bounty'' in 1990 and featured more prominently in the same company's ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic'' series, starting in 1995. That's also the source for the concept of ''W3'''s heroes. Nor was ''Warcraft 3'' the first ''Real Time'' Strategy game with RPG elements. ''VideoGame/WarlordsBattlecry'' got there before it[[note]]''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun'' also preceded both, but its RPG elements were far more minimal[[/note]].

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* ''VideoGame/WarCraft III'' was not the first strategy game to use RPG elements, as many of its fans believe. The concept first appeared in New World Computing's Creator/NewWorldComputing's ''King's Bounty'' in 1990 and featured more prominently in the same company's ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic'' series, starting in 1995. That's also the source for the concept of ''W3'''s heroes. Nor was ''Warcraft 3'' the first ''Real Time'' Strategy game with RPG elements. ''VideoGame/WarlordsBattlecry'' got there before it[[note]]''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun'' also preceded both, but its RPG elements were far more minimal[[/note]].
16th Mar '18 5:13:52 AM WoodyAlien3rd
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* The trope "SamusIsAGirl" is named after Samus Aran from ''VideoGame/Metroid'' (1986), the most famous example of gender reveal in video games. She removes her space suit in the ending credits, if you complete the game under a certain time. However, Namco's ''VideoGame/{{Baraduke}}'' came out one year before and had the exact same twist delivered in the same way, i.e. the player character is someone in a yellow space suit who takes off the helmet in the ending credits and reveals that she's a woman.

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* The trope "SamusIsAGirl" is named after Samus Aran from ''VideoGame/Metroid'' ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'' (1986), the most famous example of gender reveal in video games. She removes her space suit in the ending credits, if you complete the game under a certain time. However, Namco's ''VideoGame/{{Baraduke}}'' came out one year before and had the exact same twist delivered in the same way, i.e. the player character is someone in a yellow space suit who takes off the helmet in the ending credits and reveals that she's a woman.
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