History OlderThanTheyThink / ComicBooks

13th May '17 10:46:53 AM nombretomado
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** Ming the Merciless (1934) has been referred to as "a cheap Ra's al Ghul clone" as well. Ra's and Ming are knockoffs of FuManchu, who wasn't the first YellowPeril villain either.

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** Ming the Merciless (1934) has been referred to as "a cheap Ra's al Ghul clone" as well. Ra's and Ming are knockoffs of FuManchu, Literature/FuManchu, who wasn't the first YellowPeril villain either.
25th Apr '17 6:45:08 PM nombretomado
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* [[RetCanon Synergy]] between comics and their adaptations. The practice really came to prominence (and controversy) in TheNewTens, when Marvel began aggressively trying to sync their comics up with the movies and shows of the [[MarvelCinematicUniverse MCU]], but it was already around way before that. Not only was it already a thing with ''previous'' Marvel movies [[note]]Among MANY other examples, Comicbook/{{Blade}}'s enhanced strength comes from the [[Film/BladeTrilogy Wesley Snipes movies]], while both Mystique and Toad got redesigned to resemble their counterparts from the [[Film/XMen1 first X-Men film]], with Toad's prehensile tongue also coming from the flick[[/note]], but it has arguably been going on as long as adaptations of comic books have. Superman's flight came from the [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheatricalCartoons Fleischer cartoons]], while both Comicbook/JimmyOlsen and Kryptonite originated in the [[Radio/TheAdventuresOfSuperman radio show]].

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* [[RetCanon Synergy]] between comics and their adaptations. The practice really came to prominence (and controversy) in TheNewTens, when Marvel began aggressively trying to sync their comics up with the movies and shows of the [[MarvelCinematicUniverse [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse MCU]], but it was already around way before that. Not only was it already a thing with ''previous'' Marvel movies [[note]]Among MANY other examples, Comicbook/{{Blade}}'s enhanced strength comes from the [[Film/BladeTrilogy Wesley Snipes movies]], while both Mystique and Toad got redesigned to resemble their counterparts from the [[Film/XMen1 first X-Men film]], with Toad's prehensile tongue also coming from the flick[[/note]], but it has arguably been going on as long as adaptations of comic books have. Superman's flight came from the [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheatricalCartoons Fleischer cartoons]], while both Comicbook/JimmyOlsen and Kryptonite originated in the [[Radio/TheAdventuresOfSuperman radio show]].
20th Apr '17 12:57:32 PM comicwriter
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* Speaking of Kamala, she's also not the first teen hero to follow Carol Danvers' footsteps. Ultragirl filled a similar role in ''Comicbook/AvengersTheInitiative'' and was even given Carol's old Comicbook/MsMarvel costume, before ''Comicbook/DarkReign'' cut that plot thread short.
15th Apr '17 8:17:57 AM SuperBeatle83
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* Many people think, incorrectly, that WonderWoman was the first female superhero. Actually, there were dozens of female superheroes prior to Wonder Woman. One of the earliest is [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Ritty Ritty]], who debuted in late 1939, two years before Wonder Woman. In fact, Wonder Woman isn't even the first female ''patriotic'' superhero. She was preceded by [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/USA USA]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_Victory Miss Victory]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_America Miss America]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_Patriot Miss Patriot]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Pat_Patriot Pat Patriot]] and [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/War_Nurse War Nurse]].

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* Many people think, incorrectly, that WonderWoman was the first female superhero. Actually, there were dozens of female superheroes prior to Wonder Woman. One of the earliest is [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Ritty Ritty]], who debuted in late 1939, two years before Wonder Woman. In fact, Wonder Woman isn't even the first female ''patriotic'' superhero. She was preceded by [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/USA USA]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_Victory Miss Victory]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_America Miss America]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Miss_Patriot Miss Patriot]], [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/Pat_Patriot Pat Patriot]] and [[http://pdsh.wikia.com/wiki/War_Nurse War Nurse]]. Most notably [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawkgirl Hawkgirl]] was introduced prior to Wonder Woman, first as Shiera Sanders, Hawkman's love interest, in ''Flash Comics'' #1, then as Hawkgirl in ''All Star Comics'' #5 June, 1941. Wonder Woman first appeared in ''All Star Comics'' #8, 1941.
31st Mar '17 3:27:59 AM Doug86
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** In fact, WordOfGod has it that virtually ''all'' of the characters Moore created for ''Watchmen'' were originally to have been CharltonComics superheroes that DC had recently purchased the rights to; when he couldn't get permission to use them (i.e. the Question), he created pastiche versions.

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** In fact, WordOfGod has it that virtually ''all'' of the characters Moore created for ''Watchmen'' were originally to have been CharltonComics Creator/CharltonComics superheroes that DC had recently purchased the rights to; when he couldn't get permission to use them (i.e. the Question), he created pastiche versions.
16th Mar '17 9:03:20 AM comicwriter
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* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more "politically correct," 21st century sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel}}, [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]] and the aforementioned Cassandra Cain. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.

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* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more "politically correct," correct" 21st century sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel}}, [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]] and the aforementioned Cassandra Cain. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.
16th Mar '17 9:01:57 AM comicwriter
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* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more "politically correct," 21st century sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel]], [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]] and the aforementioned Cassandra Cain. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.

to:

* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more "politically correct," 21st century sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel]], Comicbook/{{Steel}}, [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]] and the aforementioned Cassandra Cain. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.
16th Mar '17 9:01:30 AM comicwriter
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* ''Comicbook/BlackPanther'' is often said to be the first black superhero, but that honor actually belongs to Lion Man, an obscure Golden Age hero who appeared in the sole issue of ''All-Negro Comics'' back in 1947. And while he didn't have powers, the gunslinger ''Lobo'' was the first black character to have his own comic book series, while Waku, Prince of the Bantu had his own feature in Atlas Comics' ''Jungle Tales'' anthology series.

to:

* ''Comicbook/BlackPanther'' is often said to be the first black superhero, but that honor actually belongs to Lion Man, an obscure Golden Age hero who appeared in the sole issue of ''All-Negro Comics'' back in 1947. And while he didn't have powers, if we're not explicitly talking about superheroes, the gunslinger ''Lobo'' was the first black character to have his own comic book series, while Waku, Prince of the Bantu had his own feature in Atlas Comics' ''Jungle Tales'' anthology series.series back in 1954.



* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more progressive, 21st century political sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel}} and [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]]. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.

to:

* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more progressive, "politically correct," 21st century political sensibilities. At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel}} and Comicbook/{{Steel]], [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]].Hawke]] and the aforementioned Cassandra Cain. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.
8th Feb '17 11:57:43 AM comicwriter
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* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more progressive, 21st century political sensibilities. The first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.

to:

* Many people think the AffirmativeActionLegacy trope is a modern concept that was designed to appeal to more progressive, 21st century political sensibilities. The At the earliest, they tend to think it started in TheNineties with characters like Comicbook/{{Steel}} and [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]]. In reality, the first major instance of this trope at Marvel or DC was John Stewart, the black Comicbook/GreenLantern, who debuted all the way back in 1971.
8th Feb '17 11:55:50 AM comicwriter
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* ''Comicbook/BlackPanther'' is often said to be the first black superhero, but that honor actually belongs to Lion Man, an obscure Golden Age hero who appeared in the sole issue of ''All-Negro Comics'' back in 1947. And while he didn't have powers, the gunslinger ''Lobo'' was the first black character to have his own comic book series, while Waku, Prince of the Bantu had his own feature in AtlasComics' ''Jungle Tales'' anthology series.

to:

* ''Comicbook/BlackPanther'' is often said to be the first black superhero, but that honor actually belongs to Lion Man, an obscure Golden Age hero who appeared in the sole issue of ''All-Negro Comics'' back in 1947. And while he didn't have powers, the gunslinger ''Lobo'' was the first black character to have his own comic book series, while Waku, Prince of the Bantu had his own feature in AtlasComics' Atlas Comics' ''Jungle Tales'' anthology series.
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