History NonIndicativeName / ComicBooks

29th Nov '17 4:22:09 PM Mareon
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* ComicStrip/ThePhantom, An InUniverse example: The Skull Cave has The Small Treasure Room, an enourmous cavern filled with gold and jewels amassed by 21 generations of Phantoms that are freely given away to people in need and The Big Treasure Room, a relatively snug room filled with bookcases and display cases filled with yes, priceless artifacts, but also relatively useless trivia (say a 16th century Swedish snuff box) from generations of adventures.



* On a meta level, this often applies to comic titles themselves. In the 20th century, publishers frequently had good reasons to maintain the continuity of a particular title even as its contents changed. This happened a lot at DC in the Golden Age; Superman appeared in Action Comics; Batman started in Detective Comics. Marvel took its turn in the Silver Age, debuting a lot of classic heroes under non-indicative names: Tales to Astonish = Ant-Man, Tales of Suspense = Iron Man, etc.
* ComicStrip/ThePhantom, An InUniverse example: The Skull Cave has The Small Treasure Room, an enourmous cavern filled with gold and jewels amassed by 21 generations of Phantoms that are freely given away to people in need and The Big Treasure Room, a relatively snug room filled with bookcases and display cases filled with yes, priceless artifacts, but also relatively useless trivia (say a 16th century Swedish snuff box) from generations of adventures.

to:

* On a meta level, this often applies to comic titles themselves. In the 20th century, publishers frequently had good reasons to maintain the continuity of a particular title even as its contents changed. This happened a lot at DC in the Golden Age; Superman appeared in Action Comics; Batman started in Detective Comics. Marvel took its turn in the Silver Age, debuting a lot of classic heroes under non-indicative names: Tales to Astonish = Ant-Man, Tales of Suspense = Iron Man, etc.
* ComicStrip/ThePhantom, An InUniverse example: The Skull Cave has The Small Treasure Room, an enourmous cavern filled with gold and jewels amassed by 21 generations of Phantoms that are freely given away to people in need and The Big Treasure Room, a relatively snug room filled with bookcases and display cases filled with yes, priceless artifacts, but also relatively useless trivia (say a 16th century Swedish snuff box) from generations of adventures.
etc.
29th Nov '17 1:39:43 AM Mareon
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* On a meta level, this often applies to comic titles themselves. In the 20th century, publishers frequently had good reasons to maintain the continuity of a particular title even as its contents changed. This happened a lot at DC in the Golden Age; Superman appeared in Action Comics; Batman started in Detective Comics. Marvel took its turn in the Silver Age, debuting a lot of classic heroes under non-indicative names: Tales to Astonish = Ant-Man, Tales of Suspense = Iron Man, etc.

to:

* On a meta level, this often applies to comic titles themselves. In the 20th century, publishers frequently had good reasons to maintain the continuity of a particular title even as its contents changed. This happened a lot at DC in the Golden Age; Superman appeared in Action Comics; Batman started in Detective Comics. Marvel took its turn in the Silver Age, debuting a lot of classic heroes under non-indicative names: Tales to Astonish = Ant-Man, Tales of Suspense = Iron Man, etc.etc.
* ComicStrip/ThePhantom, An InUniverse example: The Skull Cave has The Small Treasure Room, an enourmous cavern filled with gold and jewels amassed by 21 generations of Phantoms that are freely given away to people in need and The Big Treasure Room, a relatively snug room filled with bookcases and display cases filled with yes, priceless artifacts, but also relatively useless trivia (say a 16th century Swedish snuff box) from generations of adventures.
10th Oct '17 6:18:34 PM Thranx
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* When the character Gwenpool was introduced, Marvel fans were disappointed to find out that she wasn't Gwen Stacy as Deadpool but rather a person named Gwen Poole

to:

* When the character Gwenpool was introduced, Marvel fans were disappointed to find out that she wasn't Gwen Stacy as Deadpool but rather a person named Gwen PoolePoole.
* On a meta level, this often applies to comic titles themselves. In the 20th century, publishers frequently had good reasons to maintain the continuity of a particular title even as its contents changed. This happened a lot at DC in the Golden Age; Superman appeared in Action Comics; Batman started in Detective Comics. Marvel took its turn in the Silver Age, debuting a lot of classic heroes under non-indicative names: Tales to Astonish = Ant-Man, Tales of Suspense = Iron Man, etc.
19th Sep '17 3:20:35 AM Doug86
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* The Silver Sorceress, a Creator/DCComics character introduced in 1971 as a deliberate CaptainErsatz of Marvel's ComicBook/ScarletWitch, wore a costume that of course... consisted entirely of gold, brown, and red shades. When she became part of the [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] over a decade later, she did have silver ''hair'' at least, though it was completely covered by her elaborate headgear and a {{Retcon}} in any event -- in her first appearance, she was depicted with brown hair.

to:

* The Silver Sorceress, a Creator/DCComics character introduced in 1971 as a deliberate CaptainErsatz of Marvel's ComicBook/ScarletWitch, wore a costume that of course... consisted entirely of gold, brown, and red shades. When she became part of the [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] over a decade later, she did have silver ''hair'' at least, though it was completely covered by her elaborate headgear and a {{Retcon}} in any event -- in her first appearance, she was depicted with brown hair.
25th Aug '17 6:53:42 AM CosmicFerret
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* One [[TheFlash Flash]] story arc is called "The Dastardly Death of the Rogues". There's only one death, and it's not a Rogue.

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* One [[TheFlash [[Franchise/TheFlash Flash]] story arc is called "The Dastardly Death of the Rogues". There's only one death, and it's not a Rogue.
22nd Jun '17 10:43:08 AM JoeMerl
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--> '''Oracle:''' ...One does.

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--> '''Oracle:''' ...One [[Comicbook/BlackCanary One]] does.
24th Apr '17 9:35:43 PM Zeke
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* While ComicBook/IronMan's prototype suit was originally iron, the material of other versions has varied confused.
depending on continuity. In most of the comics, the suits have had iron in some form in the outer shell, usually enhanced in some way with [[DeflectorShield forcefields]]. In some continuities, it's explained that Tony was inspired by the Black Sabbath song, though ironically the lyrics describe a FallenHero (and the comics hero himself predated the song by seven years).

to:

* While ComicBook/IronMan's prototype suit was originally iron, the material of other versions has varied confused.
depending on continuity. In most of the comics, the suits have had iron in some form in the outer shell, usually enhanced in some way with [[DeflectorShield forcefields]]. In some continuities, it's explained that Tony was inspired by the Black Sabbath song, though ironically the lyrics describe a FallenHero (and the comics hero himself predated the song by seven years).
24th Apr '17 9:34:21 PM Zeke
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* In Creator/MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and get

to:

* In Creator/MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and getget confused.
4th Mar '17 12:14:41 PM nombretomado
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* In MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and get

to:

* In MarvelComics, Creator/MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and get



* Also in MarvelComics, {{Spider-Man}} fought a villain called "The Living Brain". It was a robotic computer.

to:

* Also in MarvelComics, Creator/MarvelComics, {{Spider-Man}} fought a villain called "The Living Brain". It was a robotic computer.



* MarvelComics' "Night Nurse" secretly treats wounded superheroes. As [[http://www.comicpow.com/2013/09/06/the-night-nurse-doctor-to-superheroes/ she reveals to us]] in ''ComicBook/DoctorStrange: The Oath'', she's actually a doctor, but "Night General Practitioner" isn't as catchy.

to:

* MarvelComics' Creator/MarvelComics' "Night Nurse" secretly treats wounded superheroes. As [[http://www.comicpow.com/2013/09/06/the-night-nurse-doctor-to-superheroes/ she reveals to us]] in ''ComicBook/DoctorStrange: The Oath'', she's actually a doctor, but "Night General Practitioner" isn't as catchy.



* MarvelComics' Hulkling has nothing to do with the Hulk, except that his combat form is also big and green. He's actually [[NonhumanHumanoidHybrid half-Kree and half-Skrull]] in fact, his father was the original [[ComicBook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]].

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* MarvelComics' Creator/MarvelComics' Hulkling has nothing to do with the Hulk, except that his combat form is also big and green. He's actually [[NonhumanHumanoidHybrid half-Kree and half-Skrull]] in fact, his father was the original [[ComicBook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]].
1st Mar '17 10:05:25 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* In MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and get ** In Universe-X there were Human Torches. They were torches but they weren't human.

to:

* In MarvelComics, the original Human Torch was neither a human nor a torch but an android that burned on contact with air. The reason for his odd name is that at the time, "human torches" (performers who lit themselves on fire) were a well-known circus act. Since they're rarely seen today, modern readers parse the words separately and get get
** In Universe-X there were Human Torches. They were torches but they weren't human.
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