History NeverLiveItDown / LiveActionTV

21st Feb '17 1:59:01 AM TheCuza
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* In-universe example from ''Series/{{Gotham}}'': ProfessionalKiller Patrick "Matches" Malone laments that, despite the many different methods he has used to kill people during his hits, people call him "Matches" because of the one and only time he burned someone to death.

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* In-universe example from ''Series/{{Gotham}}'': ProfessionalKiller Patrick "Matches" Malone laments that, that despite the many countless different methods he has used to kill people during throughout his hits, people call him long career, he got stuck with the nickname "Matches" Malone because of the one and only that ''one'' time he burned someone to death.
17th Feb '17 12:06:08 PM gb00393
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** Several examples in-universe:
*** Jaime Lannister is derogatorily known as "Kingslayer" for his BodyguardBetrayal, even by people who knew said king was insane and whose successful rebellion forced Jaime into that position. Jaime has struggled with ThenLetMeBeEvil ever since.
*** Catelyn never quite forgives or forgets Ned bringing home his infant illegitimate son.
*** The Lannisters and perhaps the Boltons are careful to officially distance themselves from the Red Wedding, since they know such a blatant violation of SacredHospitality will stain them for generations.
--> '''Tyrion:''' Oh, I know. Walder Frey gets all the credit... or the blame, I suppose, depending on your alliegence.
13th Feb '17 8:41:50 PM sayaleviathan
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** The infamous [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sggmx8vysoc "bad pussy"]] line uttered by Tyene Sand to Bronn is forever associated to Dorne arc in Season 5. This line became a FanNickname for Tyene.
25th Jan '17 7:37:14 PM nombretomado
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** Fran will occasionally rub Mr. Sheffield's nose in his decision to pass on producing ''{{Cats}}'' for Broadway.

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** Fran will occasionally rub Mr. Sheffield's nose in his decision to pass on producing ''{{Cats}}'' ''Theatre/{{Cats}}'' for Broadway.
17th Jan '17 1:44:18 PM eowynjedi
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* Say the name "Wesley Crusher" in a room full of nerds and someone is guaranteed to bring up the myth that at least every other episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' he's the one who "saved the ship" or came up with the needed solution despite being only 16 and being in a crew that includes an Android with total recall, not to mention that the ''Enterprise'' is where the best of the best officers are assigned. He probably did "save the day" too often, but still, the number of times he actually did so, in less than four seasons, totals ''six'', which is hardly "every other episode." Not to mention that his almost unnatural brilliance was part of the character. If ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' had attempted something similar with Jake, who was meant to be of average intelligence, it would have been far less appropriate.
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** Harry Kim and his habit of dying and coming back to life. It's been exaggerated by the fans, though, to the point where someone who only knew the show through its fans would think Harry's grave says "Harry Kim: Born: 2351. Died: 2371, 2372, 2373, 2374..."
** An in-universe example is his habit of constantly falling for women he can't get. It gets to the point where every time he starts a relationship, his buddy Tom Paris goes off on a litany of every doomed romance he's started in his time on the ship.



* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'''s James Kirk is well known as a [[BoldlyComing space-traveling playboy]] who has more notches than bedpost. In fact, despite [[GaussianGirl liberal use of soft lens and hey-look-a-pretty-girl music]], Kirk didn't get involved with many of the women he met in his travels, and when he ''did'', it was usually because a) he needed something, or b) alien sex pollen/some sort of mental control. The sole exception to this is Edith Keeler, whom he genuinely did have feelings for. He was even occasionally portrayed as an uptight boy scout, and he ''never'' slept with a member of his crew. And the rest of the male cast seemed to get involved with women at least as often as Kirk did.
** Although let's not forget "Wink of an Eye" in which after the commercial break the leader of the aliens is combing her hair and the good captain is on the bed ''putting on his boots''.
** He does seem to fall pretty hard for android woman Rayna, to the point that when he accidentally causes her death he's sunk into such a pit of depression that Spock ends up [[MindRape Mind Raping]] him into forgetting her. ('Cos, hey, StatusQuoIsGod.)
** Oh, and let's not forget that half the time that seductive smile was directed at ''[[HoYay Spock]].''
** Similarly, we don't actually see Scotty drunk or drinking that often, and the most stand-out example was him trying to put one over on an enemy, but in fanfic he's ''the'' guy you go to for booze. (The fact that the character is Scottish probably adds to this.)
*** The funniest part about this is that more often than not ''Dr [=McCoy=]'' is the one with all the booze.
*** There's also his boisterous appreciation of the bellydancing in "Wolf in the Fold" and his being the only Original Series crewmember to start a barfight ("Trouble with Tribbles"). That probably adds to his interpretation as the party animal of the original Enterprise.
*** Again, the "Wolf in the Fold" example is actually better attributed to Doctor [=McCoy=] -- he prescribed going to see the dancer to Scotty as a ''medical treatment''!
** In a somewhat odd example, Chekov's made-in-Russia bit never became the full-blown running gag it was originally meant to be, but the way the fans go on you wouldn't know better without watching the series yourself.
** An in-universe example in "Spock's Brain"--[=McCoy=] says this about [[ItMakesSenseInContext Spock directing his own brain surgery]].

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* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'''s ''Franchise/StarTrek''
** ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'''
James T. Kirk is well known as a [[BoldlyComing space-traveling playboy]] who has more notches than bedpost. In fact, despite bedpost (including an infamous scene in "Wink of an Eye" which has him putting on his boots as the alien leader lady combs her hair). Despite [[GaussianGirl liberal use of soft lens and hey-look-a-pretty-girl music]], Kirk didn't get usually got involved with many of the these women he met in his travels, and when he ''did'', it was usually because a) he needed something, of mind control or b) alien sex pollen/some sort of mental control. The sole exception to this is Edith Keeler, whom he genuinely did have feelings for. He it was even occasionally portrayed as an uptight boy scout, and he ''never'' slept with a member of (conveniently) part of his crew. And attempt to save the rest of the male cast seemed to get involved with women at least as often as Kirk did.
ship.
** Although let's not forget "Wink of an Eye" in which after the commercial break the leader of the aliens is combing her hair and the good captain is on the bed ''putting on his boots''.
** He does seem to fall pretty hard for android woman Rayna, to the point that when he accidentally causes her death he's sunk into such a pit of depression that Spock ends up [[MindRape Mind Raping]] him into forgetting her. ('Cos, hey, StatusQuoIsGod.)
** Oh, and let's not forget that half the time that seductive smile was directed at ''[[HoYay Spock]].''
** Similarly, we don't
Scotty isn't actually see Scotty shown as drunk or drinking that to excess very often, and but the most stand-out example was scene where he tries to steal an alien's control device by drinking him trying to put one over on an enemy, but in fanfic he's ''the'' under the table is so memorable that fanfiction turns him into the ship's go-to guy you go to for booze. (The fact that the character is (In actuality, you're more likely to find it in Dr. [=McCoy's=] office.) His image as a boozy Scottish probably adds to this.)
*** The funniest part about this is that more often than not ''Dr [=McCoy=]'' is the one with all the booze.
*** There's also his boisterous appreciation of the bellydancing in "Wolf in the Fold" and his being the only Original Series crewmember to start a barfight ("Trouble with Tribbles"). That probably adds to his interpretation as the
party animal is a little at odds with a guy who reads technical manuals for fun.
** Say the name "Wesley Crusher" in a room full of nerds and someone is guaranteed to bring up the myth that at least every other episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' he's the one who "saved the ship" or came up with the needed solution despite being only 16 and being in a crew specifically made up
of the original Enterprise.
*** Again,
best of Starfleet that includes an Android with total recall. He probably did "save the "Wolf in day" too often, but still, the Fold" example is number of times he actually better attributed did so, in less than four seasons, totals ''six'', which is hardly "every other episode." Not to Doctor [=McCoy=] -- he prescribed mention that his almost unnatural brilliance was part of the character. If ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' had attempted something similar with Jake, who was meant to be of average intelligence, it would have been far less appropriate.
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'''s Captain Sisko can never live down the events in "For the Uniform." After Maquis defector Michael Eddington spends half the episode comparing himself to [[Literature/LesMiserables Jean Valjean]], Sisko (who takes Eddington's betrayal [[ItsPersonal very, very personally]]) decides he's
going to see damn well be Javert and fires a bioweapon into the dancer atmosphere of a Maquis planet that renders it uninhabitable to Scotty as a ''medical treatment''!
** In a somewhat odd example, Chekov's made-in-Russia bit never became the full-blown running gag it was originally meant
humans, forcing Eddington to be, but the way the fans go on you wouldn't know better without watching the series yourself.
** An in-universe example in "Spock's Brain"--[=McCoy=] says
surrender. Viewers will frequently call this about [[ItMakesSenseInContext Spock directing his own brain surgery]].decision "genocidal," even though Sisko allowed an evacuation and really just made them swap back with the Cardassians, because ''poisoning planets was Eddington's idea in the first place''.


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** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'''s Harry Kim and his habit of dying and coming back to life. It's been exaggerated by the fans, though, to the point where someone who only knew the show through its fans would think Harry's grave says "Harry Kim: Born: 2351. Died: 2371, 2372, 2373, 2374..." An in-universe example is his habit of constantly falling for women he can't get. It gets to the point where every time he starts a relationship, his buddy Tom Paris goes off on a litany of every doomed romance he's started in his time on the ship.
** You can expect every decision Kathryn Janeway makes to be picked over and ripped apart to within an inch of its life by people who dislike her, but the ones that come up most often are separating "Tuvix" back into Tuvok and Neelix against his will, and her temporary alliance with the Borg.
28th Dec '16 8:28:06 PM Willbyr
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23rd Nov '16 2:04:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* Daenerys in ''Series/GameOfThrones'' actually did more things in season 2 than run around yelling "Where are my dragons?" It didn't even start until the season's second half. But that second half packed in so much of it, while everyone else was doing much more interesting things, that it really sticks in the mind.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
**
Daenerys in ''Series/GameOfThrones'' actually did more things in season 2 than run around yelling "Where are my dragons?" It didn't even start until the season's second half. But that second half packed in so much of it, while everyone else was doing much more interesting things, that it really sticks in the mind. Creator/EmiliaClarke herself even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDPLsIpCCB8 poked fun at it]].
23rd Nov '16 2:01:54 AM Morgenthaler
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* Harry Kim from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and his habit of dying and coming back to life. It's been exaggerated by the fans, though, to the point where someone who only knew the show through its fans would think Harry's grave says "Harry Kim: Born: 2351. Died: 2371, 2372, 2373, 2374..."

to:

* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
**
Harry Kim from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' and his habit of dying and coming back to life. It's been exaggerated by the fans, though, to the point where someone who only knew the show through its fans would think Harry's grave says "Harry Kim: Born: 2351. Died: 2371, 2372, 2373, 2374..."



* ''Series/StargateSG1'': Daniel Jackson's many deaths/resurrection/ascension (although that last one only happened twice). It's lampshaded in the series itself. TheOtherWiki used to list them; [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Daniel_Jackson_(Stargate)&oldid=236270772 it's about 22 times.]] And Samantha Carter [[RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun blew up a sun]].
** Also from ''Series/StargateSG1'': Cameron Mitchel has lost his pants twice. Twice is not always. And yet...
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': Rodney [=McKay=] blew up a solar system (''though he'd like to remind you that it was actually just five sixths of it''). ''Series/StargateUniverse'': Nicholas Rush dialed an untested address into a gate, marooning him and most of his coworkers on an ancient ship. Let's just assume that being hired as a scientist by Stargate Command requires high knowledge of StuffBlowingUp.
** ''Series/StargateUniverse'': Everett Young beat the crap out of Rush and left him to die on a desolate planet. The civilian population on the ship [[TheMutiny didn't take it too kindly.]]
** Can a non-sentient piece of AppliedPhlebotinum undergo this? In the StargateVerse, the Goa'uld sarchophagus is a healing device that can reverse pretty much any injury seen thus far that does not violate the ChunkySalsaRule. Many characters have been brought back from apparent death by it (Poor Daniel has had several turns in it.) However, there was an episode called "Need" in which the guest star of the week asked Daniel, "Have you ever wondered what happens if you use one while healthy?" Turns out the answer to that is it's like a drug. ''If you use it '''repeatedly''' when '''healthy,''''' you become addicted and start to go dark side. But try telling that to fans: ever since "Need," the sarcophagus has been treated as an insta-evil-ifiying ArtifactOfDoom: imagine the [[LordOfTheRings One Ring]] and the [[{{Spider-Man}} Venom Symbiote]], roll 'em together, then make 'em about forty times worse. Never mind that in ''real life'' we have something that promotes healing, but can become quite horrible with overuse, or use when not actually suffering from the condition it's made for; we call itů [[spoiler: ''every medication in the history of ever''.]] The writers fall into the trap once (the Tok'ra don't use sarcophagi for fear of becoming like the Goa'uld. Again, ridiculous when "Need," the episode that introduces the drug effect, also makes it abundantly clear that it's only through misuse that this happens!) but later episodes have again had the sarcophagus used on those who really ''did'' need its healing properties, most memorably to allow Baal to horribly torture O'Neill to death over and over and over and restore him for more; Daniel ''feared'' that the sarcophagus might begin to mess with O'Neill's head but it never happened.

to:

* ''Series/StargateSG1'': ''Series/StargateSG1'':
**
Daniel Jackson's many deaths/resurrection/ascension (although that last one only happened twice). It's lampshaded in the series itself. TheOtherWiki used to list them; [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Daniel_Jackson_(Stargate)&oldid=236270772 it's about 22 times.]] And Samantha Carter [[RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun blew up a sun]].
** Also from ''Series/StargateSG1'': ** Cameron Mitchel has lost his pants twice. Twice is not always. And yet...
** * ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': Rodney [=McKay=] blew up a solar system (''though he'd like to remind you that it was actually just five sixths of it''). ''Series/StargateUniverse'': Nicholas Rush dialed an untested address into a gate, marooning him and most of his coworkers on an ancient ship. Let's just assume that being hired as a scientist by Stargate Command requires high knowledge of StuffBlowingUp.
** * ''Series/StargateUniverse'': Everett Young beat the crap out of Rush and left him to die on a desolate planet. The civilian population on the ship [[TheMutiny didn't take it too kindly.]]
** * Can a non-sentient piece of AppliedPhlebotinum undergo this? In the StargateVerse, Franchise/StargateVerse, the Goa'uld sarchophagus is a healing device that can reverse pretty much any injury seen thus far that does not violate the ChunkySalsaRule. Many characters have been brought back from apparent death by it (Poor Daniel has had several turns in it.) However, there was an episode called "Need" in which the guest star of the week asked Daniel, "Have you ever wondered what happens if you use one while healthy?" Turns out the answer to that is it's like a drug. ''If you use it '''repeatedly''' when '''healthy,''''' you become addicted and start to go dark side. But try telling that to fans: ever since "Need," the sarcophagus has been treated as an insta-evil-ifiying ArtifactOfDoom: imagine the [[LordOfTheRings One Ring]] and the [[{{Spider-Man}} Venom Symbiote]], roll 'em together, then make 'em about forty times worse. Never mind that in ''real life'' we have something that promotes healing, but can become quite horrible with overuse, or use when not actually suffering from the condition it's made for; we call itů [[spoiler: ''every medication in the history of ever''.]] The writers fall into the trap once (the Tok'ra don't use sarcophagi for fear of becoming like the Goa'uld. Again, ridiculous when "Need," the episode that introduces the drug effect, also makes it abundantly clear that it's only through misuse that this happens!) but later episodes have again had the sarcophagus used on those who really ''did'' need its healing properties, most memorably to allow Baal to horribly torture O'Neill to death over and over and over and restore him for more; Daniel ''feared'' that the sarcophagus might begin to mess with O'Neill's head but it never happened.
23rd Nov '16 1:55:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Series/GilligansIsland Gilligan]] is so infamous for "always" accidentally ruining the Castaways' plans to get off the island that JustEatGilligan became a meme and then a trope. But a dedicated fan decided to watch every episode and make note of the number of episodes the castaways tried to get off the island and the number of those episodes where their plans were ruined by Gilligan. It turns out Gilligan bungles their plans in exactly 17 episodes. Which is still a lot, but it's less than half of the number of episodes the Castaways tried to escape, 37. More importantly, there were 98 episode total. So Gilligan botched the Castaways rescue/escape attempts less than half the time they tried and in only a little more than a sixth of all episodes.

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* [[Series/GilligansIsland Gilligan]] ''Series/GilligansIsland'': Gilligan is so infamous for "always" accidentally ruining the Castaways' plans to get off the island that JustEatGilligan became a meme and then a trope. But a dedicated fan decided to watch every episode and make note of the number of episodes the castaways tried to get off the island and the number of those episodes where their plans were ruined by Gilligan. It turns out Gilligan bungles their plans in exactly 17 episodes. Which is still a lot, but it's less than half of the number of episodes the Castaways tried to escape, 37. More importantly, there were 98 episode total. So Gilligan botched the Castaways rescue/escape attempts less than half the time they tried and in only a little more than a sixth of all episodes.
23rd Nov '16 1:55:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* Jessica Brody from ''{{Homeland}}'' going on a racist tirade about how evil Islam is in the season two premiere, capped off by desecrating her husband's Quaran. The idea was apparently that her major concern was him keeping his conversion hidden from her for so long, but it certainly doesn't come off that way.

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* Jessica Brody from ''{{Homeland}}'' ''Series/{{Homeland}}'' going on a racist tirade about how evil Islam is in the season two premiere, capped off by desecrating her husband's Quaran. The idea was apparently that her major concern was him keeping his conversion hidden from her for so long, but it certainly doesn't come off that way.
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