History Music / MerleHaggard

11th May '16 3:38:08 PM CassandraLeo
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** "Rainbow Stew" can be interpreted as one, but is accessible to several interpretations. The song, if read at face value, contains protests against [[GreenAesop environmental degradation]], war, and government corruption, amongst other things.

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** "Rainbow Stew" can be interpreted as one, but one but, like many of his songs, is accessible to several interpretations. The song, if read at face value, contains protests against [[GreenAesop environmental degradation]], war, and government corruption, amongst other things. One other possible interpretation is that Hag is challenging the idea that a utopia is possible, while nevertheless hoping that one will arise. However, there are several other possible interpretations as well.
11th May '16 3:35:37 PM CassandraLeo
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** For a couple of completely straight examples, see MalignedMixedMarriage above.

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** "Rainbow Stew" can be interpreted as one, but is accessible to several interpretations. The song, if read at face value, contains protests against [[GreenAesop environmental degradation]], war, and government corruption, amongst other things.
** For a couple of completely straight examples, see MalignedMixedMarriage above. "If We Make It Through December" has elements of this as well; see AntiChristmasSong above.
11th May '16 3:31:02 PM CassandraLeo
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* AntiChristmasSong: Of a sort. "If We Make It Through December" (1973) has a laid-off factory worker explaining to his daughter that "Daddy can't afford no Christmas here". It's one of his most fondly regarded songs.



* WhatMightHaveBeen: During his 2-1/2 year prison term for burglary, Haggard struck up a close friendship with Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks, who was serving time on unknown charges. According to several published accounts, in 1959, Hendricks was planning to escape and wanted to invite Haggard (who himself had tried to escape several times previously) along and go on a crime spree. However, as they talked about it, Haggard -- who at this point is starting to show promise as a singer and guitarist -- decides he'd rather not; Hendricks reluctantly agrees, acknowledging that Haggard has talent and would be best to try to develop it and not accompany him. Good thing Haggard heeded Hendricks' advice ... because during "Rabbit"'s time on the run, he shot and killed a California Highway Patrol state trooper. Hendricks was eventually tried and convicted for the murder and was sentenced to death, making one think what might have been had Haggard -- he still had a restless streak at this point in his prison term, something that more than once had landed him in solitary confinement -- come along. What ''did'' happen from this incident: one of his earliest best-known hits, the haunting "Sing Me Back Home."
24th Apr '16 4:49:30 PM Briguy52748
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* WhatMightHaveBeen: During his 2-1/2 year prison term for burglary, Haggard struck up a close friendship with Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks, who was serving time on unknown charges. According to several published accounts, in 1959, Hendricks was planning to escape and wanted to invite Haggard (who himself had tried to escape) along and go on a crime spree. However, as they talked about it, Haggard (who at this point is starting to show promise as a singer and guitarist) decides he'd rather not; Hendricks reluctantly agrees, acknowledging that Haggard has talent and would be best to try to develop it and not accompany him. Good thing Haggard heeded Hendricks' advice ... because during "Rabbit"'s time on the run, he shot and killed a California Highway Patrol state trooper. Hendricks was eventually tried and convicted for the murder and was sentenced to death, making one think what might have been had Haggard -- he still had a restless streak at this point in his life -- come along. What ''did'' happen from this incident: one of his earliest best-known hits, the haunting "Sing Me Back Home."

to:

* WhatMightHaveBeen: During his 2-1/2 year prison term for burglary, Haggard struck up a close friendship with Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks, who was serving time on unknown charges. According to several published accounts, in 1959, Hendricks was planning to escape and wanted to invite Haggard (who himself had tried to escape) escape several times previously) along and go on a crime spree. However, as they talked about it, Haggard (who -- who at this point is starting to show promise as a singer and guitarist) guitarist -- decides he'd rather not; Hendricks reluctantly agrees, acknowledging that Haggard has talent and would be best to try to develop it and not accompany him. Good thing Haggard heeded Hendricks' advice ... because during "Rabbit"'s time on the run, he shot and killed a California Highway Patrol state trooper. Hendricks was eventually tried and convicted for the murder and was sentenced to death, making one think what might have been had Haggard -- he still had a restless streak at this point in his life prison term, something that more than once had landed him in solitary confinement -- come along. What ''did'' happen from this incident: one of his earliest best-known hits, the haunting "Sing Me Back Home."
24th Apr '16 6:34:09 AM Briguy52748
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Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks. As recounted in his 1981 autobiography Merle Haggard: Sing Me Back Home, Rabbit devised a brilliant escape and invited Haggard to join him, but they both agreed it would be best that he stay put. Rabbit was captured two weeks later and eventually executed for the murder of a state trooper.
24th Apr '16 6:33:32 AM Briguy52748
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* WhatMightHaveBeen: During his 2-1/2 year prison term for burglary, Haggard struck up a close friendship with Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks, who was serving time on unknown charges. According to several published accounts, in 1959, Hendricks was planning to escape and wanted to invite Haggard (who himself had tried to escape) along and go on a crime spree. However, as they talked about it, Haggard (who at this point is starting to show promise as a singer and guitarist) decides he'd rather not; Hendricks reluctantly agrees, acknowledging that Haggard has talent and would be best to try to develop it and not accompany him. Good thing Haggard heeded Hendricks' advice ... because during "Rabbit"'s time on the run, he shot and killed a California Highway Patrol state trooper. Hendricks was eventually tried and convicted for the murder and was sentenced to death, making one think what might have been had Haggard -- he still had a restless streak at this point in his life -- come along. What ''did'' happen from this incident: one of his earliest best-known hits, the haunting "Sing Me Back Home."
Jimmy "Rabbit" Hendricks. As recounted in his 1981 autobiography Merle Haggard: Sing Me Back Home, Rabbit devised a brilliant escape and invited Haggard to join him, but they both agreed it would be best that he stay put. Rabbit was captured two weeks later and eventually executed for the murder of a state trooper.
13th Apr '16 3:10:30 AM 06tele
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* WordSaladLyrics: "We'll all be drinkin' that free Bubble Up and eatin' that rainbow stew" from "Rainbow Stew."

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* WordSaladLyrics: "We'll all be drinkin' that free Bubble Up and eatin' that rainbow stew" from "Rainbow Stew.""[[note]]In fact, Bubble Up is a lemon & lime soft drink that used to be distributed by Coca-Cola until they invented Sprite, and "rainbow stew" is a [[http://www.food.com/recipe/merle-haggards-rainbow-stew-29900 chilli-spiked stew]] made with chicken, sausage and three different colours of bell pepper.[[/note]]
10th Apr '16 11:20:53 AM MarkLungo
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Haggard was quite the badass early on in his life, including stints in PSI and San Quentin Prison. After working some time with Lefty Frizzell, he actively pursued a music career in the mid-fifties after cleaning up his life. A modest Top 20 hit, "Sing a Sad Song" on the Tally label, brought him to the mainstream for the first time, but it wasn't until he joined Capitol Records' roster in 1965 that the hits started coming. Working with his band, the Strangers, he would chart thirty-eight Number One hits and several more Top Tens throughout his career. Awards aplenty came from the Country Music Association and Grammys, as well as a Grammy ''lifetime achievement'' award in 2006 and induction into the country music Hall of Fame. He even got pardoned by then-California governor UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan in 1972. Starting in the late 1970s, he switched to MCA Records, and then to Creator/EpicRecords by 1981 and Curb in the early 1990s. Although he never hit the Top 10 again after 1989, he never gave up on recording.

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Haggard was quite the badass {{badass}} early on in his life, including stints in PSI and San Quentin Prison. After working some time with Lefty Frizzell, he actively pursued a music career in the mid-fifties after cleaning up his life. A modest Top 20 hit, "Sing a Sad Song" on the Tally label, brought him to the mainstream for the first time, but it wasn't until he joined Capitol Records' roster in 1965 that the hits started coming. Working with his band, the Strangers, he would chart thirty-eight Number One hits and several more Top Tens throughout his career. Awards aplenty came from the Country Music Association and Grammys, as well as a Grammy ''lifetime achievement'' award in 2006 and induction into the country music Hall of Fame. He even got pardoned by then-California governor UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan in 1972. Starting in the late 1970s, he switched to MCA Records, and then to Creator/EpicRecords by 1981 and Curb in the early 1990s. Although he never hit the Top 10 again after 1989, he never gave up on recording.



* ShoutOut: The song "No Show Jones" from his all duet album with George Jones is basically a series of these to (in order of appearance) Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Roger Miller, Haggard himself, Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash, Kenny Rogers, and Tammy Wynette.
* SomethingBlues: "Workin' Man Blues"
* SomewhereSong: "California Cottonfields"
* SonOfAWhore: "Son of Hickory Holler's Tramp"
* TheStoner: "It's All Going to Pot"

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* ShoutOut: The song "No Show Jones" from his all duet album with George Jones Music/GeorgeJones is basically a series of these to (in order of appearance) Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Music/WaylonJennings, Music/WillieNelson, Roger Miller, Haggard himself, Dolly Parton, Music/DollyParton, Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash, Kenny Rogers, Music/JohnnyCash, Music/KennyRogers, and Tammy Wynette.
* SomethingBlues: "Workin' Man Blues"
Blues".
* SomewhereSong: "California Cottonfields"
Cottonfields".
* SonOfAWhore: "Son of Hickory Holler's Tramp"
Tramp".
* TheStoner: "It's All Going to Pot"Pot".
10th Apr '16 11:18:39 AM MarkLungo
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/merle_haggard.jpg]]
7th Apr '16 1:53:12 PM CassandraLeo
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* ProtestSong: "Okie from Muskogee," wherein he laments the hippie generation. The song was frequently misinterpreted across the American political spectrum, as it is a satirical composition expressing the views of a segment of the populace with whom Haggard seems to have somewhat, but not completely, agreed; the song seems to have been more intended as a lament that such people were unilaterally dismissed as reactionaries and "squares" than a complete endorsement of their views. Haggard later strongly distanced himself from the song, saying he "must have been dumber than a rock when [he] wrote it" both in concerts and in interviews. Despite this, he continued performing it to the end of his life. Interestingly, the song also became popular enough among the counterculture that Arlo Guthrie, Music/PhilOchs, Music/TheBeachBoys, and Music/TheGratefulDead were known to perform it.

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* ProtestSong: "Okie from Muskogee," wherein he laments the hippie generation. The song was frequently misinterpreted across the American political spectrum, as it is a satirical composition expressing the views of a segment of the populace with whom Haggard seems to have somewhat, but not completely, agreed; the song seems to have been more intended as a lament that such people were unilaterally dismissed as reactionaries and "squares" than a complete endorsement of their views. (That said, Haggard gave [[FlipFlopOfGod conflicting statements]] about what he intended the song to mean, so it is difficult to know for sure how he intended it). Haggard later strongly distanced himself from the song, saying he "must have been dumber than a rock when [he] wrote it" both in concerts and in interviews. Despite this, he continued performing it to the end of his life. Interestingly, the song also became popular enough among the counterculture that Arlo Guthrie, Music/PhilOchs, Music/TheBeachBoys, and Music/TheGratefulDead were known to perform it.
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